Search Results for 'senior'

Dog Food Advisor Forums Search Search Results for 'senior'

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  • #156763
    K H
    Participant

    We’ve been feeding Wellness Senior Complete Health to our dogs for seven years on the advice of a trainer with canine nutrition education. Our newest dog is passing large amounts of smelly gas, so we consulted our veterinarian. (We don’t think it’s pathological. She’s missing some front teeth and so gulps extra air while eating.) They suggested we find a dog food with less than 21 percent crude protein. We were shocked to find out that our “low protein” senior dog food was packing 22 percent minimum crude protein!

    So we began looking for something new.

    We found the BalanceIT Guaranteed Analysis Converter, but it only lets you set a minimum instead of a maximum.

    How on earth do we find a dog food that actually has less protein than that?

    We are doing this on the advice of a veterinarian, so please don’t argue with us about the wisdom or otherwise of doing this.

    Thank you.

    #156754
    Joshua M
    Participant

    I just registered with this site because of this thread. That’s a huge deal for me. Primarily to express how grateful I am for the thoughtful, sincere contributions made by Cathy, Ryan, Laura and anonymous. In 30 years of forum diving, this thread is my Holy Grail.
    I know it’s been a while but hope all your pups are as well as can be. The past few years have been a ridiculous onslaught of healthcare issues for my girl Charlotte. She’s a fourteen(ish) year old Jack Russell mix that was displaced by hurricane Katrina. She was already a senior so her background is a genuine mystery.
    Initially I was fostering her and she was in perfectly typical health overall. She was adopted easily enough. So easily in fact that after the 3rd family returned her to me it became clear, I was the one being adopted.🥴
    Everything was fine for a couple of years then bam, a grape sized cyst right in the middle of her back. Biopsy confirmed it was benign so considering her age and the cost of surgery, we decided against removing it. Then she tested positive for Lyme disease, followed by kennel cough which was actually bronchitis and finally, collapsing trachea brought me here.
    Short story long, although I’ve been feeling terribly alone through it all, this thread has assured me I’m not unique.
    God bless you all!🙏

    #156744

    In reply to: Urinary Crystals

    Chipy
    Participant

    Hi Lauren,

    I’m so sorry to hear you are going through this with your senior pup. My favourite vet, Dr. Dobias has written some articles that I can share with you to learn more about these conditions. I absolutely love his natural approach and hope that it will be helpful for your beloved boy.

    URINARY BLADDER INFECTIONS IN DOGS – WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW:
    https://peterdobias.com/blogs/blog/57048581-urinary-bladder-infections-in-dogs-what-you-need-to-know

    5 STEPS TO PREVENT CALCIUM OXALATE CRYSTALS AND STONES IN DOGS – HOLISTIC APPROACH:
    https://peterdobias.com/blogs/blog/53667141-5-steps-to-prevent-calcium-oxalate-crystals-and-stones-in-dogs-holistic-approach

    WHY DO DOGS GET BLADDER AND KIDNEY STONES AND HOW TO TREAT THEM NATURALLY:
    https://peterdobias.com/blogs/blog/11014185-bladder-and-kidney-stones-and-urine-crystals-in-dogs-natural-approach

    Having veggies in the diet can help balance PH. Dr. Dobias discussed within the following article;

    WHAT VEGGIES ARE GOOD FOR DOGS?
    https://peterdobias.com/blogs/blog/11014993-what-veggies-are-good-for-dogs

    I hope this helps and wish you and your pup all the best for good health! 🙂
    Chipy

    #156614

    In reply to: Urinary Crystals

    Lauren S
    Participant

    Hi folks-
    Hoping someone can chime in here with some advice… I have a senior pup who went through the whole urinary crystals ordeal last year. He recently had a scope done because he kept getting UTIs, thankfully no stones. He has developed yet another infection but no crystals in the urine and pH is normal. Do I need to put him back on Royal Canin S/O? Does that do anything to prevent UTIs? I thought that was solely for crystals and stones. When I asked my vet, he didn’t seem to have an opinion one way or another. Any and all input is greatly appreciated. I want to do right by my dog, of course I’d rather keep him on his high-quality diet than the Royal Canin, but will do whatever I need to to prevent infection. Look forward to hearing from you. Thanks for reading. Be well 🙂

    #154578
    kelly C
    Participant

    First time here and thank you all for all your tips and advises. Really helpful. I have a little dog that is malipoo who will be turning 13 yrs this coming June. He is a really happy and playful dog full of love and joy always. He’s been on anti seizure med since he was 2 and was diagnosed diabetic Aug 2017 ( He was 10 ) I am planning on switching his food to a new food as recently switched food is not settling too well from stomach to his BG ( Blood Glucose ) fluctuations. Thinking of switching to Orijen Senior Dog Food.
    I need to look out for 2 things in his food 1) Diabetes ( low carb, high fiber )
    2) Seizures ( No rosemary and grain free which i have learnt )
    My question/request now is can you tell me if the ingredients listed below is good ( safe for seizures )

    ⬇️⬇️⬇️⬇️⬇️⬇️

    Orijen Senior Dog Food

    85% QUALITY ANIMAL INGREDIENTS| 15% VEGETABLES & FRUIT
    Fresh chicken meat (13%), fresh cage-free eggs (7%), fresh turkey meat (7%), fresh whole herring (7%), fresh chicken liver (6%), fresh whole flounder (4%), fresh turkey liver (4%), fresh chicken necks (4%), fresh chicken heart (4%), fresh turkey heart (4%), chicken (dehydrated, 4%), turkey (dehydrated, 4%), whole mackerel (dehydrated, 4%), whole sardine (dehydrated, 4%), whole herring (dehydrated, 4%), whole red lentils, whole green lentils, fresh whole green peas, lentil fibre, fresh whole chickpeas, fresh whole yellow peas, whole pinto beans, fresh chicken cartilage (1%), whole navy beans, herring oil (1%), chicken fat (1%), fresh turkey cartilage (1%), chicken liver (freeze-dried), turkey liver (freeze-dried), fresh whole pumpkin, fresh whole butternut squash, fresh whole zucchini, fresh whole parsnips, fresh carrots, fresh whole Red Delicious apples, fresh whole Bartlett pears, fresh kale, fresh spinach, fresh beet greens, fresh turnip greens, brown kelp, whole cranberries, whole blueberries, whole Saskatoon berries, chicory root, turmeric root, milk thistle, burdock root, lavender, marshmallow root, rosehips, Enterococcus faecium. ADDITIVES (per kg): Nutritional additives: Zinc chelate: 100 mg.

    Thank you all. 🙏🏼🐶❤️

    #154034
    Robbie M
    Member

    My dog is approximately 10.5 years of age (rescued from southern Cali in 2012 wasn’t sure of age brought him to Canada) he’s a boxer cross either staffordshire or pitbull likely pitbull. His hips have never really been in their sockets per se they are just held in place by muscle which he had lots of but now as he ages I worry. Also don’t want him to be sore or stiff or inflamed. Anyways I put him on Orijen Senior and he has shown good results, we also feed him a scoop or 2 of pumpkin every day, and his food is given 3 time’s a day with 2 scoops am 1/2 scoop afternoon and 2 in evening which equals to about 2.25 or 2.5 cups per day. Pumpkin usually goes in the AM and the afternoon he gets a tiny bit of tuna sometimes as well as a cracker with a bit of peanut butter n a couple small pieces of apple. And at night we top it with a bit diced apple/cucumber/carrot with an emphasis on the cucumber. His snacks are the orijen Six fish which he gets about 1-3 pieces a day. Oops and finally he gets CBD which I generally squirt 10mg onto a mini wheat and that’s twice a day. So with all this taken into account i bought him a bottle of grizzly joint aid with these ingredients:

    Active Ingredients, per ounce
    Glucosamine Sulfate (crustacean source) 1500 mg
    Chondroitin Sulfate (porcine source) 1250 mg
    Methyl Sulfonyl Methane (MSM) 1250 mg
    Krill Oil 560 mg
    Hyaluronic Acid (HA) 10 mg
    Inactive Ingredients
    Water, Xanthan Gum, Lecithin, Sodium Benzoate, Potassium Sorbate, Citric Acid. Each pump is 0.12 ounces and he gets 4 pumps per day.
    He seemed to do well on it but I wanted to make sure it was good.

    I’m considering switching it for alpha omega sinew which has:

    Ingredients (per 1 scoop [5 g]):

    Vitamins:
    beta-Carotene………………………………………………………………… 600 mcg (1000 IU)
    Vitamin B1 (Thiamine hydrochloride)……………………………………….. 2 mg
    Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin)…………………………………………………………. 2 mg
    Vitamin B3 (Niacinamide)…………………………………………………….. 20 mg
    Vitamin B5 (D-Pantothenic acid)…………………………………………….. 5 mg
    Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine hydrochloride)…………………………………….. 2 mg
    Vitamin B7 (Biotin)…………………………………………………………. 200 mcg
    Vitamin B9 (L-Methylfolate)………………………………………………. 300 mcg
    Vitamin B12 (Cyanocobalamin)…………………………………………… 100 mcg
    Vitamin C (L-Ascorbic acid)…………………………………………………. 100 mg
    Vitamin D3 (Cholecalciferol)……………………………………………… 12.5 mcg (500 IU)
    Vitamin E (d-alpha Tocopheryl acetate)………………………………… 16.8 mg AT (25 IU)
    Vitamin K2 (Menaquinones)………………………………………………. 10 mcg
    Choline (Choline bitartrate)…………………………………………………. 10 mg
    Inositol (Myo-inositol)…………………………………………………………. 10 mg
    Rutin………………………………………………………………………………. 10 mg

    Minerals:
    Boron (Sodium borate)……………………………………………………. 250 mcg
    Calcium (Calcium citrate)…………………………………………………… 50 mg
    Chromium (Chromium polynicotinate)……………………………….. 100 mcg
    Copper (Cupric gluconate)……………………………………………… 1000 mcg
    Magnesium (Magnesium citrate)………………………………………… 50 mg
    Manganese (Manganese sulphate)……………………………………….. 2 mg
    Molybdenum (Sodium molybdate)…………………………………….. 100 mcg
    Selenium (L-Selenomethionine)…………………………………………. 10 mcg

    Silicon (Sodium metasilicate)……………………………………………….. 1 mg
    Zinc (Zinc citrate)……………………………………………………………… 1 mg
    Minerals are in elemental quantities.

    Phytonutrients:
    Boswellia serrata (Frankincence Resin)…………………………………… 25 mg
    Curcuma longa (Turmeric Rhizome)………………………………………. 15 mg

    Harpagophytum procumbens (Devil’s Claw Root)……………………. 20 mg

    Accessory nutrients:
    Chlorella vulgaris (Chlorella Broken Cell)……………………………….. 100 mg
    D-Chondroitin sulphate……………………………………………………… 500 mg
    D-Glucosamine sulphate………………………………………………….. 1000 mg
    Hyaluronic acid……………………………………………………………….. 50 mg
    Hydrolyzed collagen……………………………………………………….. 1000 mg
    L-Glutamine…………………………………………………………………… 50 mg
    Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM)……………………………………………. 400 mg

    Enzymes**:

    alpha-Amylase……………………………………………………….. 15 mg (330 FCC DU)
    Cellulase………………………………………………………………… 10 mg (35 FCC CU)
    Lipase……………………………………………………………………… 35 mg (42 FCC LU)
    Protease…………………………………………………………………… 40 mg (720 FCC HUT)

    **Enzymatic Units
    FCC (Food Chemicals Codex)
    FCC CU (Cellulase Units)
    FCC DU (alpha-Amylase Dextrinizing Units)
    FCC HUT (Hemoglobin Unit on a Tyrosine Basis)
    FCC LU (Lipase Units)

    Additional ingredients:
    Apple fibre, Citrus bioflavonoids, Spirulina.

    The only issue with the sinew is I don’t feed him wet food but that actually leads to another question. Would it be a bad idea to say lower his dry food content a bit and use the Orijen Freeze Dried pucks as a topper instead of other stuff? Or is that too much for an old boy. I’m just trying my hardest to keep him as healthy and mobile as I can to keep his muscles as strong as possible around the hips. He’s always been fairly slow but never overweight I walk him about 2-3km a day at a relatively lax pace he likes to sniff a lot. We often break it up into two walks about 0.6 km early afternoon and about 2-3km at night. Hoping even with the slow pace this will keep his muscles from deteriorating too much. Really considering a water treadmill as I’ve been told that’s a good way to keep muscles without much strain. Sorry. I know that’s a lot to unpack and everything but I truly appreciate the feedback as I’ve been given very sound advice from this website before. Thanks again again my apologies I just love my guy so much he’s been like my best friend and helped me through some serious trauma and the ensuing insomnia and ptsd that goes with it.

    #153748
    Diane H
    Participant

    Can anyone recommend a dental chew that is safe for a senior dog with pancreatitis? He is on prescription food but I’ve learned recently that the brand name chews that he loves are not appropriate for pancreatitis. Thank you.

    dogsforever123
    Participant

    I don’t know much about senior specific dog foods so imho if all the dogs are happy and healthy with the current food you usually feed them then there’s no problem feeding them all the same thing. However, senior dogs do need extra care and that’s where supplements can come in. These days, there are so many types of oils like CBD and fish oils that have a variety of health benefits. There’s also flax seed oil which when combined with cottage cheese has actually helped dogs suffering from diseases like arthritis and even cancer. It can help keep senior dogs thriving and happy for longer. There’s a company in Florida that specializes in this wellness protocol. Switching to senior food is probably a good option, but you should also do some research into supplements to see if they might be a good idea to add to your dog’s diet.

    We have a seven pound Maltese mix and two almost 15 month old Chiweenies, 13 & 14 pounds. I’m having great difficulty trying to find healthiest, safest foods for them. We are currently feeding all three Click to open expanded view
    Blue Buffalo Wilderness Small Breed Chicken Recipe Grain-Free Dry Dog Food, Blue Buffalo Wilderness Small Breed Chicken Recipe Grain-Free Dry Dog Food By Blue Buffalo but I don’t think they should all be eating the same thing. What do you advise? It’s very difficult trying to figure it out on your web site. Thanks

    #152674

    In reply to: Ketona?

    Johnny R
    Participant

    @ Daniel,
    id like to discuss your product with you.
    we have a senior puggle with uncontrollable diabetes and a brain tumor.
    any reply is appreciated

    Johnny

    #152332
    Howard M
    Participant

    First many thanks for all your work on this site. As our beloved Luck (a King Charles mix) approaches 10 years old we wanted to find the very best Senior Dog Food using unbiased ratings. So thank you for helping us with this. However I noted that the first three or four senior foods were “Grain Free” and I was amazed to see many Grain Free foods recommended or given four or five stars. Our Vet has pretty much “outlawed” grain free (full disclosure she markets Hills SD foods). And in 2019 the FDA issued warnings about the risk of a grain free diet.
    Please see this article in the Atlantic- or google the FDA website regarding this. The Pet Food industry has worked hard to down play the risks- but they are there and real. Please reconsider recommending grain free. They should be avoided by breeds like out Lucy’s who are at risk of heart problems.

    https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2019/07/grain-free-dog-food-fda-warning/593167/

    • This topic was modified 9 months, 4 weeks ago by Mike Sagman.
    • This topic was modified 9 months, 4 weeks ago by Mike Sagman. Reason: Fix Duplicate Topic
    #151916

    In reply to: I need Help for my dog

    Susan
    Participant

    Hi,
    have you asked vet about “Cartrophen vet” weekly injection given for 1 month, Cartrophen vet is all natural, injection is given under thick section of dogs skin near neck & it finds the dogs pain.
    My boy suffers with IBD he cant take steroids, high omega oils, medications etc they cause diarrhea, acid reflux stomach ulcers so vet said NO to any meds, Patch is 11yrs old after his 2nd Cartrophen injection Patch was running around like a young pup, I have to tell him to slow down & stop jumping up your going to hurt your back, I couldn’t believe the results.
    Cartrophen vet caused no side effects, I’m feeding Royal Canine Intestinal Low fat vet diet at the moment with Canidae Pure Senior kibble, I feed 1/2 & 1/2 mixed together, in Australia our R/C comes from Europe, France they use dried meats, no meat meals & ingredients seem to be heaps better then the American R/C.
    I also feed Tin Salmon with boiled Sweet potato for lunch & his vet diet= Canidae is high omega 3 oils, he also eats Canidae Pure Senior, Wellness Core Senior or the Wellness Core Large breed its high in Glucosamine & Chondroitin, start adding Glucosamine & Chondroitin with diet it helps rebuild joints. If you’re going to give a fish oil buy Krill Oil Capsules instead, Krill Oil Capsules are better then Fish or Salmon oil, I also buy Freeze Dried Green Lipped Mussels & give 1-2 Mussels a day as a treat, Patch seems to handle foods that are high in Omega oils but not the supplements, just be careful as Supplements & Meds (NSAID) can cause acid reflux, diarrhea, stomach problems..
    http://www.cartrophen.com/for-vets/what-is-cartrophen-vet/

    #151911

    In reply to: I need Help for my dog

    Empire F
    Participant

    I had a cat that lived to 17 that died 3 years ago
    i have another cat that turned 19 years old this month. STill running around the house having fun
    I believe carefully selecting excellent cat food and spring water is the key

    My senior citizen dog, i need help what dog food to be giving him. I will look into the supplements but for right now, i need food that, even just a little bit, will help with his joints,cartridge.

    #151713

    In reply to: I need Help for my dog

    anonymous
    Member

    There are no veterinarians affiliated with this site.

    Find a vet nearby that you like and trust, make an appointment for a senior checkup, lab work , dental exam and all.
    The vet will then advise you regarding diet, and medication (if needed) to keep your senior healthy and comfortable.

    Never give OTC meds or supplements to a pet unless recommended by a veterinarian that has examined the animal.
    Many products are not intended for veterinary use and can cause harm.

    #151465
    Shelby L
    Participant

    So my dog began having these issues after his lipase levels spiked (causing severe vomiting, diarrhea, and loss of appetite) when he was about 1.5 years old. The vet said he was close to having pancreatitis and he was immediately put on low fat food. Then a few months later, the acid reflux arrived. Major gulping episodes where he just swallows frantically and runs to me for comfort would begin, and all he would want to do was be let outside to eat grass. The vet told me to let him eat the grass but not too much or it could cause a blockage. After a year of battling this, he’s a dry food that has 6% fat (currently Solid Gold Holistic food for seniors, but I am switching him to Diamond Care Weight Management), soaked in warm water, with 2 probiotics and some Hills Prescription I/D wet food mixed in. I usually only feed twice a day but I’m thinking I’ll start doing 3 as he is still having episodes once a week or so. I also always have Pepcid and omerprazole on hand (Pepcid 10mg with dinner if I think an episode might happen at night, omerprazole if an episode happens in the morning because it’s 24 hour and stronger. Goodluck everyone, it’s such a tricky condition and from my experience, vets always think it’s something else. I’ve had to do all the research and trial and error on my own.

    #150957
    Yianna S
    Participant

    Hello, my dog is a maltese, 10 years old and lately she has allergies. I’ve been feeding her from day 1 with Orijen (red, but now Senior). I am looking information for Acana Lamb & Apple, and if it is suitable for a 10 years old dog.
    Thank you!

    #148556
    Carmyn D
    Member

    I have fed this to my dog for about 6 months. But I give it to him as a topper essentially. My dog eats Victor senior formula or Iams Proactive. I mix 3 spoon fulls of pure being into the dry kibble and he likes it just fine. I only started doing this because back then I had to get my dog treated for heart worms and he had lost his appetite. My vet suggested giving him wet food. I chose Pure Being as it claims to not have artificial colors which can cause cancer.

    So far in almost 6 months he has had no diarrhea. The one time he did get diarrhea is when I gave him a cheaper brand of canned food.

    #148431
    Raymond L
    Member

    Hello, I would like some advice. I purchased 40 bags of wellness core senior dog food off an Amazon auction website. The best by date is Nov. 9th 2019. I went and checked the bags before bidding, all were sealed and in good condition. Upon getting them home and opening the bag after bag, I found bugs in them. Being an auction site all sales are final and a no return policy is enforced. So I emailed Wellness Core and explained the situation to them and got a reply that was more then discouraging. I was basically told that it was not their problem and that after it leaves their warehouse they have no control over the bags. I just asked if they might replace them seeing how it’s way before the best by date, and silence. Here is what the reply was (

     Dear Raymond,

    Thank you for taking the time to write WellPet regarding Wellness® CORE® Senior Formula Dry Dog Food.  At WellPet we are committed to providing the highest quality pet foods and treats available.  Our expert staff of engineers is continuously improving our products to ensure that they are tasty and nutritious for your pet.  We regret that the product you received did not meet our high standards.

    Our manufacturing facilities follow a very strict insect and pest control program that is constantly monitored. However, if pet food, treats and snacks are not stored properly at the distributor or retailer level, insects can be a problem. They can travel inside the packaging and can be seen in multiple stages including eggs, larvae, webbing, moths etc. Insect infestation can come from many places along the distribution channel and occurs prior to the consumer purchasing the product. While these insects are a nuisance and pet food industry does its best to store its food properly, they are non-toxic and non-parasitic.  

    In order to better address your concerns we would like to get some additional information about the product for our Quality Assurance Department. If possible, please provide us with the flavor and package size of the product in question, as well as the Best if Used By/Please Enjoy By date and any additional manufacturing information stamped on the package.

    We do recommend working with the Amazon auction vendor for a refund.

    Sincerely)

    Had they not had good dates I would understand. So basically I am out? Thank you for listening. Raymond

    GSDsForever
    Participant

    Hi Melissa.

    You do have some options among veterinary therapeutic/prescription diets for your dog’s medical needs. Hills, Purina, and Royal Canin all offer options for pancreatitis and digestive issues, and they differ from one another.

    When you mention Hills prescription diets, encountering all chicken based formulas, did you happen to try this one:

    https://www.chewy.com/hills-prescription-diet-id-digestive/dp/54523

    THIS lowfat formula for pancreatitis is primarily turkey and pork organ meat + egg, along with highly digestible (easy on the GI system) white rice. I can see that there is a bit of “chicken flavor”. . . but honestly, it’s pretty far down the ingredient list at #14, AFTER even the start of minerals & vitamins.

    The protein is about 22-23% dry matter minimum, but remember that it’s the overall amino acids complete profile, high quality ingredients, and high digestibility that’s important vs a crude protein minimum. Those ingredients genuinely do look high quality, and like they could really help your dog, and taste pretty good to him too!

    But if that doesn’t work for you, Royal Canin’s can formula does NOT contain chicken and is 25% protein, lower fat at 4% Min to 10% Max than Hill’s. (Purina’s is 32% Min protein dry matter in the canned, but has chicken.) See below, for therapeutic diet examples:

    https://www.petmd.com/dog/what-you-need-know-about-dog-food-pancreatitis-0

    As far as OTC diets go, when you start adding multiple specific medical condition needs — lowfat pancreatitis suitable, limited ingredient, good for colitis and sensitive GI system, no chicken — along with additional preferences such as high protein for senior life stage, or let’s say you want only a dry food (vs can), it becomes pretty difficult to impossible to find that “unicorn” OTC food. OTC foods are primarily made for healthy, average dogs without particular medical conditions, let alone multiple.

    But if you want to expand your options to OTC formulas, try asking your vet to give you the fat level he is recommending for pancreatitis, ask him whether he thinks you need to avoid chicken in formulas (and why or why not) and discuss what issues you believe your dog has with eating chicken, and review a product you pick with him.

    For example, the fat minimum and maximum of the Hill’s Lowfat I/D has a pretty big range listed, just under 8% Min. to about 16% Max. Ask about recommended fiber level too. Discuss what your vet thinks you should look for in protein level for your senior and why.

    For example, brands make lowfat foods including higher protein ones, and you may find some that don’t contain chicken. Solid Gold, just for one example, makes a “Fit & Fabulous” very lowfat formula (6%), with ~29% minimum protein on a dry matter basis. Fiber is 9% max. The formula may not be as digestible as the Hills & your vet’s recommendations, or have the right nutrient profile features. Then again, your vet may think it’s worth trying this one or another.

    #146470
    Robbie M
    Member

    Hello everyone and thank you ahead of time for taking the time to read through this. Again I know that nobody is a veterinary nutritionist but it seems to be a good pool of fairly knowledgeable people who love their dogs, but I have a question none the less. My dog is a rescue dog we believe (and Our vet also thinks so) to be a 9-10 year old boxer crossed with either sttafordshire or pit bull) we drove down from Vancouver, British Columbia to San Bernardino in Southern California once we saw he was going to be put down if he doesn’t get adopted in the next few days.😭😭😭☺️he is getting much much slower now and walks very slow, we know that he has bad hips and we were actually told that they are not even in a place where they should be but that it was held in place by muscle built around it. I’m getting concerned that I should be doing everything I can logically do to help him. He gets sore and I can tell. So with that in mind i was given a about 30 packets of Lickz it has fish oil and glucosamine. But I recently find out his food doesn’t have enough meat content. Since we Feed him veggies like carrots, brocolli, as treats veggies are not as important to be in his food. Also if you have any suggestions for treats and or supplements. Sorry for such a huge message but for those who took the time to read through this and give their feedback as my dog is very very important to me.

    #146426
    Sara M
    Member

    Your vet, almost any vet for that matter….is the absolute worst place to get advice on pet nutrition. Vets learn nutrition from the pet food manufacturer Hill’s. They are totally unfamiliar with concepts such as bioavailability or the difference quality protein makes on organs. My vevet actually told me a $5 bag of corn Kibbles N Bits is the same as my Easy Raw Or Farmina N & D. Unfortunately this is very untrue and wis what Hill’s is teaching. Corn, potato and pea protein is hard for dogs to digest and it is very hard on their organs. It is actually how low protein dog food for seniors got started. Old dogs actually need more protein. But if it is low quality protein, it is hard on their organs and they do actually need less of it. But if it is high quality protein from meat and organs, they need more of it. On to bioavailability. Cheap dog foods rely on synthetic vitamins and minerals, instead of high quality fruits and vegetables for nutrition. But these synthetic vitamins and minerals are not as bioavailable as real fruits and veggies. They cannot make use of it as well. Chelation helps, but it is still no substitute for the real thing. Bottom line, do not listen to your local Hill’s spokesperson, aka your vet.

    Melissa S
    Member

    I was wondering if anyone had suggestions for a high protein (because my baby is a senior dog), but is low in fat (because he has had pancreatitis), AND limited ingredient or for sensitive GI systems (because he gets colitis). I’ve been struggling with him for a few months now trying everything the vet recommends, which is just different Hill’s prescription diets that they sell. I do believe he has issues with chicken, which all the Hill’s diets seem to have- he did not do well with the i/d one- which is supposed to be for sensitive digestive systems. Any suggestions would be so appreciated. Bo’s belly will appreciate it too!

    anonymous
    Member

    “I’ve taken him to the vet because he doesn’t seem interested in his food although he will eat it when he gets hungry enough. I don’t think it is an appetite issue because he will gobble down chicken and rice I feed him after a vomit occurrence (which is not frequent). The vet recommends allergy testing.”.

    Yes, there is your answer. Continue to work closely with your vet. There is no magical food that will make your dog better.
    Regarding allergy testing, I would consult a veterinary dermatologist.

    PS: Did you have lab work done? CBC, Lytes, etc.
    That would be a good place to start. Seniors are vulnerable to all kinds of ailments. First step is to rule out medical issues.
    Instead of changing the food. After all the dog may have a medical condition that will respond to the appropriate treatment such as prescription meds. Please talk to the vet that examined your dog. There are no veterinary healthcare professionals here.

    #145311
    KENNETH O
    Member

    Joanne, I’m reserving those techniques for the future if I still cannot get him to eat as I transition to the next food. I agree in that I believe the food is the root of most of his problems. Boston terriers have a history of excessive allergies, so I’m sticking with limited ingredient. My other boston is incredibly healthy on Acana, and I’m slowly moving into feeding him that. He seems to like it more at least. I chose Nulo due to it having a senior blend.

    He is on bravecto now and flea free, and the vets all were quick to brush off all my concerns. Unfortunately, I am having a hard time trusting any available vets any longer. I’ve always had good ones before, but in my current location they dont seem to care.

    #145282
    anonymous
    Member

    Consider consulting a veterinary internal specialist that specializes in senior care. Ask your vet for a referral.

    https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/topic/itchy-doggo/#post-145196

    KENNETH O
    Member

    I’m here as I’m having a lot of trouble finding solutions to many problems I’m having with a recently acquired dog. I have went to 3 different vets, spent countless hours researching online and tried several different strategies and continue having trouble.

    Short backstory on the dog.. He is an 11 or 12 year old boston terrier who I gave to my father before I left for the Army. My father recently passed away and I was the only one willing or able to take him in. When I first saw him again in a long time, two months ago, he was in very bad shape. He was completely covered in hundreds of fleas, due to my father being unable to take care of him during his struggle with cancer in his final week or two. His skin was in bad shape and he was missing a lot of hair. He has, for at least several years, had an unusually bad time with allergies, inability to drink normal amounts of water without regurgitating it short after, and refuses to eat on a schedule. My 3 areas where I’m in need of help are those. I hope I’m not writing too much, but I want to be thorough, and it seems like most responses in here are very thought out and helpful in return.

    I know he has always had trouble keeping water down, but I don’t know why. We have it counted out to literally 30 licks of water about every 1-3 hours without him throwing up. However, he is extremely driven to continue drinking. He will literally drink a gallon of water if its sitting in front if him, throw up, and still want more. I’ve tried using a rabbit bottle that he very slowly can drink from, but he will stand there for 30 minutes until he has drank too much. It’s usually just a clear or foamy liquid that comes up, which from what I gather online is “regurgitating” not “vomit.” It may be an esophagus problem, but the vets have offered me nothing other than “dont let him drink too much,” which feels like a copout answer. I’ve recently changed his diet to a limited ingredient, grain free diet (Nulo Senior) in Hope’s that his whole health would be better. Not sure if that could help at all.

    His diet with my father was terrible. My dad would buy cheap dog food and mix it with some other cheap bag of treats and he would only pick the treats out and leave the rest, with the bowl left out all day. I’ve never seen him eat a whole bowl before. I’m trying to avoid doing wet food, due to his teeth not being great, however I spent the first month primarily putting water in his food to moisten it and motivate him to eat a whole serving since he really just wants the small amount if water. Since removing the water, he turns his nose up to the food usually once out of the two times hes fed daily. We tried picking up the bowl and just waiting until the next meal, which he will usually eat, but it isnt fixing the problem of not eating enough. Has clearly losing weight quickly as he went from 23-24 pounds a few months ago to about 20 pounds today. My only ideas now are to simply try a different food in Hope’s he likes it more, but I dont think he will.

    His skin is continuing to be an issue, although it is significantly better than before. My father was having him get steroid shots roughly every month for years, which I think was just a bandaid for the awful food he ate. I’ve included coconut oil n most of his meals for about 2 months which may or may not be helping, but he doesn’t mind it usually. I’ve also put a lot (probably too much) coconut oil on his skin and recently reduced that to once a week. He constantly is gnawing at his paws and scratching. Again, hes visibly improved, which i think is do to the food change, but he clearly has serious allergy issues or something.

    I’ve always been told to go the vet for these answers, but literally all of them seem to think my concerns are silly. I’m just looking for any help I can get to make his life better. Thanks!

    #144118
    snowtigga
    Member

    And, of course, my local WM doesn’t have the Health Extension.
    Pet Supplies plus didn’t have the Holistic Select that I was looking at so we went with a small bag of Victor senior and we’ll see where to go from there.

    I’d still welcome personal recommendations!

    #144090
    snowtigga
    Member

    Thanks, everyone!

    We don’t free freed. However, if we don’t remember to pick up their bowls when they’re done (3 areas, 3 separate bowls), *someone* who shall remain nameless but is formally called Reggie, will occasionally go over and finish it for them.

    I put these foods in my cart at chewy as possibilities. Didn’t Wellness have recalls?
    I’m taking into consideration that because it’s labeled “senior” doesn’t mean it’s the best choice. I’m trying to keep with a 23%/11%/5% guideline that DFA (or somewhere) deemed as being good for a senior ratio.

    I’ve also got my little dog to consider, too, and I’d rather not buy her different food than the boys if I can help it.

    Health Extension Lite Chicken & Brown Rice Recipe Dry Dog Food, 30-lb bag
    VICTOR Senior Healthy Weight Dry Dog Food, 40-lb bag
    Wellness Complete Health Senior Deboned Chicken & Barley Recipe Dry Dog Food, 30-lb bag
    Royal Canin Golden Retriever Adult Dry Dog Food, 30-lb bag
    Holistic Select Adult Health Chicken Meal & Brown Rice Recipe Dry Dog Food, 30-lb bag
    American Natural Premium Original Recipe Dry Dog Food, 40-lb bag
    Dr. Gary’s Best Breed Holistic Senior Reduced Calorie Dry Dog Food, 30-lb bag

    I think for today we’re going to get a small bag of the Health Extension (Vet’s Choice). I like that they don’t have any recalls and that they’re a small family business. There’s not a lot of fruit/veggies but I’ve got to compromise on something since I don’t think there’s a dog food out there that has it all.

    I also appreciate the personal recommendations as that goes a long way over the impersonal articles.

    #144069
    snowtigga
    Member

    I wish I could answer that but, frankly, I’m not sure. My oldest (lab/shar-pei) is 7 and I had one vet tell me he was overweight and the other said he was fine. He’s about 69 pounds at the moment but he’s been having some joint issues lately so he’s moved around even less than he normally does. To say he’s energetic would be an absolute lie.

    My middle dog is supposed to be around 4-5 (lab/aussie mostly) and he’s 85 lbs – he’s the one that could stand to lose weight and as gray as his face is, I often wonder if he’s not older than we were told.

    The youngest is 5 years old, about 17 lbs. (chi/spaniel) and has more energy than the boys. She doesn’t have a weight problem nor is she considered a senior. I’m not sure how to handle her food needs if I switch to a senior food for the oldest.

    None of my dogs go crazy for their food. They are accustomed to being fed three meals a day equal to the suggested servings on the food. The middle dog, Reggie, is the only one who will regularly eat his food but even lately he’s not been eating as he has in the past. The oldest dog, ShyGuy, and the youngest, Yoshi, will often leave meals and eat when they feel like it.

    This may be more information than needed, I know. Ideally, I need Reggie to lose about 15 pounds and ShyGuy to lose 5 at most, I think, but I’m concerned that what they’re getting in the Whole Earth Farms may be too much for their lazier days. The HS food I was referring to is called “Holistic Select Senior Health Chicken Meal & Lentils Recipe Dry Dog Food”

    The top senior dog foods listed on DFA all have the peas/potatoes listed and, yes, I’m trying to avoid those because of the most recent information about them.

    The information out there is just so overwhelming.

    I appreciate you taking the time to ask for clarification. Not sure if what I’ve provided helps or not.

    /K

    #144065
    GSDsForever
    Participant

    Hi Kimberley. It might be helpful in enabling others to respond better if you could tell us what about a formulation you are looking for, in terms of it being for seniors/reduced activity.

    Among senior dogs, there can be different needs between them for fat, protein, calories, etc. I never fed my last senior dog a specifically labelled “senior” or “reduced activity” formula; neither did my vets direct me to do so. I fed a variety of diets and supplemented based on my dog’s individual needs.

    Since you mentioned reduced activity, are you looking for a food with lower calories per cup so that you can provide more volume? Lowfat? What else?

    Also . . . some formulas that might be a good fit for your senior dogs, in whatever you’re looking for in nutrients, may not necessarily be labelled for senior dogs.

    Re HS, there are grain inclusive & no legumes/potatoes formulas. They make various formulas. Are you referring to one specifically labelled for seniors? For now, I think the most cautious approach does include avoiding GF & legume or potato heavy formulas.

    #144045

    In reply to: Fromm dog food

    Cathy F
    Member

    My problem with Fromm isn’t grain free vs with grain formula. It’s that THEY CHANGED THEIR FORMULAS WITHOUT TELLING CUSTOMERS. I fed Surf and Turf for a decade (die hard fan of Fromm) and all of a sudden my dogs didn’t want the new bag and both were barfing. I contacted Fromm and they told me they reformulated all the 4 star recipes. That info coming after the fact didn’t do a damn thing to help me as my senior dog couldn’t handle the issues the change caused and in 36 hours he was dead. 14 years and 5 months together ended in 36 horrible hours and with $1500 in vet bills. I’m still devastated 2 months later.

    I will never use Fromm again. They violated my trust. They ended my beloved Pip’s life prematurely and in an awful way. They made my Ollie sick. No second chances when this is how you do business. I have subsequently learned another dog in my circle also got sick and the owner talked to Fromm and was told this was the first they heard of any issue. That was a month after my dog died and my correspondence with Fromm about what happened. I have the entire email exchange to back up what I was told and what happened to me and my dogs.

    So, feed Fromm, but you’ve been warned.

    snowtigga
    Member

    Hi folks,

    I’ve surfed and read and surfed and read and I’m pretty sure if I look in the mirror, my face would be blue.

    My three dogs currently eat Whole Earth Farms grain-free food and I rotate between the flavors except for chicken. I had thought maybe my oldest Shar-Pei/Lab mix (7) would do better without it. There’s no real way for me to tell, though, so now I’m thinking of re-introducing chicken due to them.

    It’s just incredibly difficult, it seems, to find a dog food that’s affordable, made for seniors and/or reduced activity dogs, that doesn’t have peas/potatoes/legumes/fillers but does have a good selection of fruits/vegetables which also provides joint health (bonus since I can always continue with supplements).

    Maybe I’m being too selective. Holistic Select seems to come up a lot in various articles and reviews I’ve read – peas are the third ingredient. potatoes are the fifth.

    Fromm Gold reduced activity doesn’t have much for fruits/vegetables in it and potatoes are the 6th ingredient.

    Canidae Platinum Senior — potatoes/peas as well as Canidae Reduced Energy – same thing.

    Should I not be as concerned about these ingredients if my dogs are older? I would think it’d be the opposite. I’m so lost.
    I would welcome suggestions and information, please.

    Thanks.

    anonymous
    Member

    https://www.gofromm.com/fromm-family-small-breed-adult-gold-food-for-dogs
    Fromm has several grain inclusive formulas.

    Kibble does nothing to clean teeth. If the dog needs a professional dental cleaning I would get it done then just brush the teeth once a day, ask the vet tech to demonstrate if you don’t know how. Or check youtube.

    You can presoak dry food in water in the fridg for a few hours, or just add a generous amount of water to the kibble prior to serving the dog will lap up the water to get to the food.
    Don’t free feed (leave food down all day)
    Or you could mix the kibble with a little canned food and add water.
    Serve 2 or 3 small meals per day.
    I would not rotate foods, that may cause GI upset in a senior dog.

    Mia F
    Member

    We’re trying to balance a bunch of different concerns with my 14/15 year old shih tzu/jack russell’s food. We’re worried about her teeth and for this reason one vet recommended we stick with kibble. But we’re also concerned about the possibility that she could developed kidney issues, for this reason we want to make sure her food isn’t dehydrating her. (I’ve heard some troubling stuff about kibble, but I’m not an expert at all.) After the recent FDA report we switched from Earthborn to Hollistic Select’s chicken and rice kibble. That’s what she’s eating as of now.

    I’m wondering if we should consider rotating foods. If so, should we do wet or dry? Are there ways to supplement kibble to fix any dehydration issues?

    #143711
    Laura M
    Member

    My dogs both (cavaliers 5 and 14 years old) had negative effects with this product. After a very expensive and scary trip to the vet we have been advised to discontinue this. The coughing and vomiting is a frightening thing to watch in a senior dog. I called customer service and was also hung up on when I asked to cancel future shipments and return the unused product. (2 full jars one almost full jar!)
    Shayne I will be emailing you directly for resolution to this problem.

    • This reply was modified 3 years, 2 months ago by Laura M.
    #143586

    In reply to: Senior Supplements

    Robert B
    Member

    I own a 9-1/2 year old Australian Shepherd. I do not use “senior” dog food formulations mostly because many of them reduce their kcal/cup for older, more sedentary dogs by reducing the crude protein and fat content. I just use good all stage dog foods but consider a reduced kcal/day requirement. When my dog was younger an 1,100 kcal/day was required to maintain his weight. Today about 900 kcal/day is all that is required.

    Regarding supplements, I do use two types because while the foods that I use are balanced, I am uncertain of the amounts actually remaining based on his daily weight based feeding in his kibble post processing even though some are listed as ingredients.

    VetriScience Laboratories Glycoflex Everyday – My dog shows no symptoms yet of joint pain, but this is given as a joint pain preventative before joint degeneration occurs. It contains a combination of the active of green lipped mussels, glucosamine hci and N ,N-Dimethylglycine HCl.

    VetriScience Laboratories Derma Strength – this is a skin an coat supplement with omega 3, 6 and 9. These are also systemic anti inflammatories.

    Good Luck….

    #142611

    In reply to: FDA DCM notice

    Susan
    Participant

    Hi Sandy,
    Here’s Dog Food Adviser 20 Best Dry Dog Foods list, he emailed to all DFA people who have subscribe to get mail, I got this last week after FDA release the 16 brands that “MIGHT” be associated with DCM..
    https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/best-dog-foods/best-dry-dog-foods/?fbclid=IwAR1wJpUuDSSibm42V_A9GMalYW4_z1E91NFy1q01NAzf_GItd81nZBTwB1Q

    Have a look at “Canidae Pure Formula’s” the Pure formula’s have limited ingredients & DFA has the Canidae Pure Sea on his best 20 foods list…… I rotate & feed Pure Meadow Senior & Pure Wild Pork when on special, Canidae has jumped in price in Australia..
    https://www.canidae.com/dog-food/products

    #142487
    Susan
    Participant

    Hi,
    Is Nature’s Variety raw?? When raw diet is too high in bone this can cause constipation..
    My boy has IBD mainly stomach & he does really well on Wellness Core, Wellness Simple Turkey & Potato, Canidae Pure Meadow Senior & Canidae Pure Wild kibbles…
    Actually dogs need less fiber or no fiber, Patches vet told me, a dogs digestive tract is short made to digest a raw meat diet..

    If your looking for a kibble look at “Canidae Pure Meadow Senior” & “Wellness Core Senior” kibbles they both are high meat protein, low in carbs & the Canidae Pure Meadow formula is lower in fat 10.8% max & is very high in Omega oils for ageing joints & bones..

    #142206
    Robert B
    Member

    In light of the most recent update issued regarding FDA CVM’s Investigation between the relationship between diet and canine heart disease (DVM), I decided to review the 500+ case reports from the 5-year period studied. The published incidence rate including breeds with a genetic propensity for DCM is estimated to be between 0.1-0.2%.

    We own a 9-1/2 year old, neutered Australian Shepherd who we have been feeding Orijen dry foods all of his life. When I look at Orijen (we feed Adult, Regional Red & Senior) I see lugumes and pulses, but well down the ingredient list by weight. That said, there a dozen cases of DCM associated with the brand. I do realize that the incidence rate is influenced on how widely a food is selling.

    There were 10 case reports of Australian Shepherds (the summary shows n=13 but I could not find them) and DCM out of the 515 canine cases reported (or about 2%). The observed rate out of the dog’s within the cases is > 10x the general population rate for ALL dogs. This struck me as not happening by “chance”.

    I reviewed the listed dog foods fed to the Australian Shepherds and then looked into what their current top 10 ingredients for legumes, pulses and tubers:

    Case 1) Nature’s Recipe Easy to Digest Fish meal and Potato recipe dry dog food: Potatoes
    Case 2) Zignature Kangaroo and Lentil: Peas, Chickpeas, Pear Flower, Red Lentils, Green Lentils
    Case 3) Fromm Pork and Pea: Peas, Chickpeas, Pea Flower, Pea Protein, Sweet Potatoes
    Case 4) Blue Buffalo wilderness natures evolutionary diet with chicken and lifsource bits: Pea Protein, Peas, Pea Starch, Pea Fiber, Potatoes
    Case 5a) Farmina N&D Pumpkin Formula Medium and Maxi: Pea Starch, Dried Pumpkin, Pea Fiber
    Case 5b) Kirkland Natures Domain Salmon and Sweet Potato: Sweet Potatoes, Peas, Potatoes, Pea Protein, Potato Fibre
    Case 5c) Kirkland Organic Chicken and Pea: Organic Peas, Organic Lentils, Organic Garbanzo Beans, Organic Sweet Potatoes, Organic Potatoes
    Cases 6 & 7) Pine Forest Canine Recipe with Venison & Legumes – Taste of the Wild Pet Food: Garbanzo Beans, Peas, Lentils, Pea Protein, Pea Flour, Fava Beans
    Case 8) Earthborn grain free (specific variety not declared): Peas, Pea Protein, Pea Starch, Chickpeas
    Case 9) Hill’s Ideal Balance Grain Free Chicken and Potato: Potatoes, Yellow Peas, Pea Protein, Potato Starch
    Case 10) Acana (all flavors except Chicken or Lamb): Whole Red Lentils, Whole Pinto Beans, Whole Green Peas, Whole Green Lentils, Whole Chickpeas

    I see a consistent use of legumes or tubers as ingredients among these foods (including Hills!). I work in R&D and while I agree the root cause may not be fully understood and the rates shown in the pareto chart are biased by how widely used a food is I can see why the Agency sent out the notification. Given the > 90% rate in the reported cases of grain free, legume formulated foods, I have made the decision to move our Australian Shepherd to a new dry food. So I have been trying to identify high quality grain inclusive dry foods to replace Orijen. So far I have identified:

    Farmina:
    N&D Ancestral Grain Chicken & Pomegranate Senior Mini & Medium
    N&D Ancestral Grains Grains Chicken & Pomegranate Senior Medium & Maxi

    Fromm:
    Adult Gold
    Reduced Activity Senior Gold

    Nature’s Logic:
    Canine Beef Meal Feasts
    Canine Chicken Meal Feasts
    Canine Lamb Meal Feasts
    Canine Turkey Meal Feasts

    NutriSource
    Performance
    Adult
    Lamb Meal & Rice
    Beef & Rice

    We will begin to titrate him off Orijen onto some of these foods. We will first buy small bags to see how he a) likes them and b) his stool quality and general energy/health.

    Do any of you have any experience with these foods or have any other suggestions for me to consider?

    #142198

    In reply to: FDA DCM clarity

    Robert B
    Member

    In light of the most recent update issued regarding FDA CVM’s Investigation between the relationship between diet and canine heart disease (DVM), I decided to review the 500+ case reports from the 5-year period studied. The published incidence rate including breeds with a genetic propensity for DCM is estimated to be between 0.1-0.2%.

    We own a 9-1/2 year old, neutered Australian Shepherd who we have been feeding Orijen dry foods all of his life. When I look at Orijen (we feed Adult, Regional Red & Senior) I see lugumes and pulses, but well down the ingredient list by weight. That said, there a dozen cases of DCM associated with the brand. I do realize that the incidence rate is influenced on how widely a food is selling.

    There were 10 case reports of Australian Shepherds (the summary shows n=13 but I could not find them) and DCM out of the 515 canine cases reported (or about 2%). The observed rate out of the dog’s within the cases is > 10x the general population rate for ALL dogs. This struck me as not happening by “chance”.
    I reviewed the listed dog foods fed to the Australian Shepherds and then looked into what their current top 10 ingredients for legumes, pulses and tubers:

    Case 1) Nature’s Recipe Easy to Digest Fish meal and Potato recipe dry dog food: Potatoes
    Case 2) Zignature Kangaroo and Lentil: Peas, Chickpeas, Pear Flower, Red Lentils, Green Lentils
    Case 3) Fromm Pork and Pea: Peas, Chickpeas, Pea Flower, Pea Protein, Sweet Potatoes
    Case 4) Blue Buffalo wilderness natures evolutionary diet with chicken and lifsource bits: Pea Protein, Peas, Pea Starch, Pea Fiber, Potatoes
    Case 5a) Farmina N&D Pumpkin Formula Medium and Maxi: Pea Starch, Dried Pumpkin, Pea Fiber
    Case 5b) Kirkland Natures Domain Salmon and Sweet Potato: Sweet Potatoes, Peas, Potatoes, Pea Protein, Potato Fibre
    Case 5c) Kirkland Organic Chicken and Pea: Organic Peas, Organic Lentils, Organic Garbanzo Beans, Organic Sweet Potatoes, Organic Potatoes
    Cases 6 & 7) Pine Forest Canine Recipe with Venison & Legumes – Taste of the Wild Pet Food: Garbanzo Beans, Peas, Lentils, Pea Protein, Pea Flour, Fava Beans
    Case 8) Earthborn grain free (specific variety not declared): Peas, Pea Protein, Pea Starch, Chickpeas
    Case 9) Hill’s Ideal Balance Grain Free Chicken and Potato: Potatoes, Yellow Peas, Pea Protein, Potato Starch
    Case 10) Acana (all flavors except Chicken or Lamb): Whole Red Lentils, Whole Pinto Beans, Whole Green Peas, Whole Green Lentils, Whole Chickpeas

    I see a consistent use of legumes or tubers as ingredients among these foods (including Hills!). I work in R&D and while I agree the root cause may not be fully understood and the rates shown in the pareto chart are biased by how widely used a food is I can see why the Agency sent out the notification. Given the > 90% rate in the reported cases of grain free, legume formulated foods, I have made the decision to move our Australian Shepherd to a new dry food.

    So I have been trying to identify high quality grain inclusive dry foods to replace Orijen. So far I have identified:

    Farmina:
    N&D Ancestral Grain Chicken & Pomegranate Senior Mini & Medium
    N&D Ancestral Grains Grains Chicken & Pomegranate Senior Medium & Maxi

    Fromm:
    Adult Gold
    Reduced Activity Senior Gold

    Nature’s Logic:
    Canine Beef Meal Feasts
    Canine Chicken Meal Feasts
    Canine Lamb Meal Feasts
    Canine Turkey Meal Feasts

    NutriSource:
    Performance
    Adult
    Lamb Meal & Rice
    Beef & Rice

    We will begin to titrate him off Orijen onto some of these foods. We will first buy small bags to see how he a) likes them and b) his stool quality and general energy/health before settling on a new rotation of foods.

    Do any of you have any experience with these foods or have any other suggestions for me to consider?

    • This reply was modified 3 years, 2 months ago by Robert B.
    #141978
    Dennis M
    Member

    Hello. We are on our third Shih Tzu, Dory a female now 9 years old. None of our previous girls made it past 10 years old. We previously fed our dogs Nutro brand dog food. We’ve been feeding Dory Blue Buffalo Life Protection Formula since she was a puppy, and hoping she’ll be with us way past the age of ten. She’s now on Chicken & Brown Rice Recipe Senior for Small Breeds. She has always tolerated Blue Buffalo foods and treats very well. Our concern now is the FDA report on possible dangers of feeding grain-free diets. We realize the Blue Buffalo formula Dory is eating is NOT entirely grain-free, just doesn’t have any corn or wheat included. But the FDA warned of dog foods containing large amounts of legumes such as peas or lentils, other legume seeds, potatoes (including sweet potatoes), pea protein, pea starch, pea fiber, chickpeas, or beans. The ingredients of the Life Protection Formula Dory is now eating has several of these questionably high up in the ingredient list. We’re really at a quandary here. We’ve had great luck feeding Blue Buffalo products for nearly ten years, but concerned we might possibly be damaging our dog’s heart (DCM). Could you provide us a little guidance here? With the FDA concerns, is the Life Protection Formula we’re feeding the safest product line Blue Buffalo provides for this situation, or should we be considering another brand completely? I’m concerned and my wife is more than concerned. Please provide us with some sort of insight and direction to help us decide what may be best for Dory.

    #141368
    Scott M
    Member

    A new dog toe grip for senior dogs struggling on slippery floors worked wonders for our 16 year old German Shepard. She was at the point of struggling just to stand and lay down and her pain and inflammation were taking over. She was on all the Veterinarian prescribed medications and treatments but none addressed the problem of having little traction on the wood and tile floors. Dog Toe Treads worked wonders for our dog! The result was immediate and got better over time. She struggled far less to move around. She wanted to stay out longer and walked more at home. She actually grew stronger from increased activity. We were ready to put her down but gained another 2 years of quality time with her from the Dog Toe Treads. http://www.DogToeTreads.com

    #141234
    K K
    Participant

    Hi. Sorry this is a later post. But my sheltie had surgery last Thanksgiving for bladder stones – biopsy showed struvite – they said her bladder felt like a bean bag. But, no infection! They wanted me to switch her to one of Hill’s prescription diets but I don’t think much of the quality of their foods and they’ve had several recent recalls. The vet also suggested adding “wet food.” Since then, I’ve been soaking her kibble in water before feeding. Her last urinalysis did show crystal formation but again no infection.

    My problem now is that the food I’ve been feeding has changed. Ancestry (formerly Sammy Snacks) has been taken over — now “Ancestry Pet Food” and the food has changed. I had been feeding the grain-free Lamb and Sweet Potato which Dog Food Advisory gave 5 stars. I want to switch.

    In the past I used Acana when it was still made in Canada, which is no longer the case. I am also wondering if a higher protein diet in grain-free formulas like the Ancestry and in Acana and Orijen may be the cause of the increase in urinary crystals and the formation of struvite stones. Is anyone familiar with this issue.

    My pup is only 4 years old, so not a senior dog issue.

    Thanks.

    K

    #141232

    In reply to: Senior Supplements

    Sanne
    Member

    Hmm sorry if this double posts… my post disappeared after submitting

    Senior foods really do not have anything special about them compared to adult foods. In fact, the label will usually state something along the lines of “complete and balanced for maintenance of adult dogs” even on senior foods.

    Some differences in senior foods can include added glucosamine and chondroitin but you are already using a joint supplement anyway. Some lower the fat and calories because some dogs become less active as they age so may gain weight on higher fat/calorie foods. Some will also have lower phosphorus levels so the food is easier on their aging kidneys. None of Purina’s foods are particularly high in phosphorus though so you would not need to worry about an even lower amount unless your dog has current kidney issues. Some will also lower the sodium level for aging hearts, but again Purina’s foods typically are not that high anyway. If your dog had a heart or kidney issue due to old age that needed these nutrients lowered, you would be best off with a prescription food than a senior food. Because NONE of these things are actually a requirement to label a food as “Senior” so feeding a senior food would not even guarantee any of these benefits.

    Most healthy seniors can stay on their original adult food for the rest of their life

    The only supplements are personally use for my oldies are CBD oil for joint pain and CoQ10 for heart health. I do not bother with supplements much unless my dogs have a specific issue that needs to be addressed.

    #141228
    Christie B
    Member

    My 2 dogs: 4 year old 45 pound Catahoula Leopard Dog Mix (no food issues), 10 year old 120 pound American Bulldog mix (sensitivities to chicken, possibly lamb)

    After feeding both dogs for years on various grain free food and dealing with gastrointestinal issues with one of the dogs, I took my vets advice and tried Purina Pro Plan Sensitive Skin and Stomach. I’m actually surprised that my dogs stools are smaller and firmer and my one dog hasn’t had any stomach related incidents (there was one like the 2nd day of transitioning when both dogs literally picked out and only ate the PPP and left their old Merrick food in the bowl, but I chalked it up to a transitioning headache).

    I’m the first person who would cringe at just the thought of buying anything Purina related. But I told my vet I would at least try 2 bags of the food to see if my dog’s stomach issues resolved. So far so good, but I’m only halfway through first bag so we’ll see…

    My question though is related to what senior dogs require as far as nutrient profiles and supplements. He’s always had a bowed front leg and it doesn’t bother him when he stands or walks. But I know it can become arthritic, especially since he’s a large breed. So he’s been on Dasuquin for a while (both dogs are).

    Since the PPP is for Adults and there isn’t a PPP sensitive stomach formula for seniors, is there anything that I should be adding to his diet to meet his senior needs?

    #141133

    In reply to: Small Bites Dog Food

    anonymous
    Member

    http://vetnutrition.tufts.edu/2016/03/when-should-i-switch-my-pet-to-a-senior-diet/
    “Although it is a common belief, reduced dietary protein is not beneficial for the healthy older dog or cat. In fact, lower protein diets for older dogs and cats may have negative effects by contributing to muscle loss. Therefore, dogs and cats should not be fed a reduced protein diet just because they are aging. The “optimal” protein level for older dogs and cats, however, is still controversial. Some companies make senior diets with lower protein while others actually make their senior diets with increased protein. Just like there’s no evidence for benefits of a low protein diet, it also is not clear that high protein diets are beneficial or even optimal for seniors.”
    Cornell Vet. 1985 Apr;75(2):324-47.
    Nutrition and metabolism of the geriatric dog.
    Sheffy BE, Williams AJ, Zimmer JF, Ryan GD.
    Abstract
    Sixteen 10-12-year-old and eight 1-year-old dogs were studied over a two year period to determine comparative differences in physiological response to 4 diets varying in protein content and percentages of energy contributed by protein. The ability of old dogs to utilize nutrients as supplied by these foods was not significantly different from that of young adult dogs. Except for indices of mitogenic stimulation and serum urea nitrogen (SUN) other physiological parameters studied were not affected by the diet fed. Regardless of diet, old dogs had significantly higher serum levels of cholesterol, phosphorus and alkaline phosphatase and had lower indices of mitogenic stimulation than did young dogs.

    #140973
    Christie B
    Member

    Joanne – right now they eat Merrick Classic Beef Recipe Kibble with Merrick Big Texas Steak Tips Canned as a topper (I split the can between the two of them).

    I usually buy the biggest bag and then if there haven’t been any issues, then I buy another and then rotate afterwards.

    The previous rotation was Canidae Multi-Protein All Life Stages Kibble. Both dogs hated it…I had to sprinkle a bit of cheese on it just to get them to eat. It was a total waste.

    Before that it was Instinct by Nature’s Variety Be Natural Chicken & Brown Rice

    The rotation before that was Blue Buffalo Adult Lamb & Brown Rice Formula.

    The rotation before that was ProPlan Large Breed Senior Bright Mind (I had my 4 year old dog finishing the bag of Blue Buffalo Lamb). Surprisingly, my big guy wasn’t a fan of the Purina ProPlan formula, so I only used the 1 bag before switching.

    I started to keep a record of when his drooling episodes occurred, to see if there was a pattern.
    3/2- Purina (chicken) , 3/9 Purina (chicken) , 4/11 (turkey), 5/15 Canidae (multi protein)/Be Natural (Chicken) during transitioning

    I may have missed one or two in between, but they only seem to occur 1-2 times per month.

    I’m pretty sure he had an episode while on the current Merrick Beef and Green Peas w/ Ancient Grains

    I avoid chicken now (which is hard because it seems like so many formulas list chicken as a secondary protein ingredient).

    I try to stick to beef or fish since they don’t generally add chicken. I also try to limit potatoes because my vet told me that they can be hard to digest and lead to stomach upset. I’m not quite sold on Merrick using Peas as their 3rd ingredient. I’d prefer it to be lower on the list.

    I have a storage container with a lid to help keep the food fresh. I used to dump the food in directly, but I learned that it’s better to keep it in the original bag and put the bag inside the container in case any issues with recalls come up so you can check the bag for the manufacturing info. The only time I noticed ‘bad’ food was a bag of Purina Pro Plan from like 9 years ago when my dog was a pup. I didn’t notice until the container was almost empty, but it was infested with Pantry Moths and larvae/worms. Unsightly but harmless.

    • This reply was modified 3 years, 3 months ago by Christie B.
    • This reply was modified 3 years, 3 months ago by Christie B.
    #140787
    haleycookie
    Member

    Just an FYI, no over the counter food has enough glucosamine in it to make any difference. It’s just a marketing thing but when u break down the amounts per serving size they usually contain almost no glucosamine and chondroitin. I would recommend cosaquin for those issues. Or if it is severe a prescription supplement from the vet. Beyer also has a new joint line that are prescription strength that u can get over the counter.
    I would look at canidae senior formulas. They have two varieties that are excellent. They also have a vet on staff formulating their foods.
    Fromm is good as well, just keep in mind “Senior” is just a nice way of saying less meat, more carbs. Which for a dog that is getting older and having muscle wasting is not ideal. So I would recommend maybe finding a high meat all life stage food. Or look at natures variety raw boost senior. Merrick also has a great senior meat based formula.
    Higher meat foods will require less feedings so will be similar amount of money spent at the end of the day.

    #140752
    anonymous
    Member

    Consider Fromm https://www.gofromm.com/fromm-family-reduced-activity-senior-gold-food-for-dogs

    Never heard of the brand you mentioned. I avoid small companies. It’s not about the ingredients.

    #140750
    Amber J
    Member

    Hi, everyone! I have three senior dogs (two are 13 years old, one is 9 years old), so it’s a bit tough to find reasonably priced senior dog food that works for all of them. Everyone is healthy but it’s hard to find dog food that works well for each dog’s bowels. They don’t have any grain or protein sensitivities that I’m aware of. Two of them have arthritis , but they are otherwise healthy. I use 6-8 cups of dog food a day, so super expensive food is not feasible for our household.

    Since our two older dogs have arthritis, I like to see glocosamine, chondroitin, and omega’s in their food. I also like to see supplements that support muscle health, and plenty of fiber/digestive support ingredients. I was feeding them Victor Senior formula, but with Victor’s recent formula changes, all of the dogs are constipated and having a hard time pooping. I switched to Kirkland Senior formula, but their stools are a little too soft for my liking (especially as the person who has to scoop their poop out of the grass).

    We have a wonderful local company who sells a senior dog food that seems like it might be okay, and is reasonably priced. I bought a 5-lb bag to test, and even my one picky boy loves it; he’s picking that kibble out and leaving the rest. Does anyone have thoughts on whether this food looks like it would be highly rated by Dogfood Advisor, or whether there are ingredients to avoid? Any other recommendations on reasonably priced senior/mature dog food that might work? I was looking at Fromm but it seems like they have some questionable history with their food.

    Here’s the link to the local food: https://www.zamzows.store/products/grandma-zs-chicken-and-vegetable-senior-dog-food-35-lb

    Any help would be most appreciated.

    • This topic was modified 3 years, 3 months ago by Amber J.
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