Senior Supplements

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  • #141228 Report Abuse

    Christie B
    Member

    My 2 dogs: 4 year old 45 pound Catahoula Leopard Dog Mix (no food issues), 10 year old 120 pound American Bulldog mix (sensitivities to chicken, possibly lamb)

    After feeding both dogs for years on various grain free food and dealing with gastrointestinal issues with one of the dogs, I took my vets advice and tried Purina Pro Plan Sensitive Skin and Stomach. I’m actually surprised that my dogs stools are smaller and firmer and my one dog hasn’t had any stomach related incidents (there was one like the 2nd day of transitioning when both dogs literally picked out and only ate the PPP and left their old Merrick food in the bowl, but I chalked it up to a transitioning headache).

    I’m the first person who would cringe at just the thought of buying anything Purina related. But I told my vet I would at least try 2 bags of the food to see if my dog’s stomach issues resolved. So far so good, but I’m only halfway through first bag so we’ll see…

    My question though is related to what senior dogs require as far as nutrient profiles and supplements. He’s always had a bowed front leg and it doesn’t bother him when he stands or walks. But I know it can become arthritic, especially since he’s a large breed. So he’s been on Dasuquin for a while (both dogs are).

    Since the PPP is for Adults and there isn’t a PPP sensitive stomach formula for seniors, is there anything that I should be adding to his diet to meet his senior needs?

    #141232 Report Abuse

    Sanne
    Member

    Hmm sorry if this double posts… my post disappeared after submitting

    Senior foods really do not have anything special about them compared to adult foods. In fact, the label will usually state something along the lines of “complete and balanced for maintenance of adult dogs” even on senior foods.

    Some differences in senior foods can include added glucosamine and chondroitin but you are already using a joint supplement anyway. Some lower the fat and calories because some dogs become less active as they age so may gain weight on higher fat/calorie foods. Some will also have lower phosphorus levels so the food is easier on their aging kidneys. None of Purina’s foods are particularly high in phosphorus though so you would not need to worry about an even lower amount unless your dog has current kidney issues. Some will also lower the sodium level for aging hearts, but again Purina’s foods typically are not that high anyway. If your dog had a heart or kidney issue due to old age that needed these nutrients lowered, you would be best off with a prescription food than a senior food. Because NONE of these things are actually a requirement to label a food as “Senior” so feeding a senior food would not even guarantee any of these benefits.

    Most healthy seniors can stay on their original adult food for the rest of their life

    The only supplements are personally use for my oldies are CBD oil for joint pain and CoQ10 for heart health. I do not bother with supplements much unless my dogs have a specific issue that needs to be addressed.

    #142354 Report Abuse

    lynne l
    Member

    Can I give Dasuquin for hip joint to a dog being treated for kidney disease? Any interactions with these types of drugs? She’s on joint pain killers already, but at 15, she needs all the relief she can get. Thanks! \
    Lynne

    [email protected]

    #143586 Report Abuse

    Robert B
    Member

    I own a 9-1/2 year old Australian Shepherd. I do not use “senior” dog food formulations mostly because many of them reduce their kcal/cup for older, more sedentary dogs by reducing the crude protein and fat content. I just use good all stage dog foods but consider a reduced kcal/day requirement. When my dog was younger an 1,100 kcal/day was required to maintain his weight. Today about 900 kcal/day is all that is required.

    Regarding supplements, I do use two types because while the foods that I use are balanced, I am uncertain of the amounts actually remaining based on his daily weight based feeding in his kibble post processing even though some are listed as ingredients.

    VetriScience Laboratories Glycoflex Everyday – My dog shows no symptoms yet of joint pain, but this is given as a joint pain preventative before joint degeneration occurs. It contains a combination of the active of green lipped mussels, glucosamine hci and N ,N-Dimethylglycine HCl.

    VetriScience Laboratories Derma Strength – this is a skin an coat supplement with omega 3, 6 and 9. These are also systemic anti inflammatories.

    Good Luck….

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