Hypoallergenic Dog Foods

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Hypoallergenic dog foods typically share one of three basic dietary designs:
Dog with Allergies and Scratching

  • Limited ingredient diets
  • Novel ingredient diets
  • Prescription or veterinary diets

First, because they contain fewer components, limited ingredient dog foods can make it easier to pin down the specific allergen to which a pet may be allergic.

Next, novel ingredient dog foods contain components the animal might not have been previously exposed to — so, therefore, less less likely to be sensitive to.

These foods contain obscure ingredients — like buffalo, pheasant, kangaroo or millet.

And finally, prescription or veterinary dog foods are diets that have been designed to contain hypoallergenic ingredients.

And as the names suggest, these products are typically prescribed and sold by veterinarians.

Most Common Allergens

Most hypoallergenic dog foods are designed to avoid the use of ingredients most likely to provoke an allergic reaction.

According to online pet food retailer, Drs. Foster and Smith, the most common canine food allergens include:

  • Beef
  • Dairy
  • Chicken
  • Lamb
  • Fish
  • Corn
  • Wheat
  • Soy
  • Yeast

Surprisingly, dogs aren’t naturally allergic to many of these items. It’s just that these are the ingredients most commonly used in dog food recipes.

So, they’re simply the ones dogs are most frequently exposed to.

And many times, it’s not even the ingredients that are the problem. Dogs can also be allergic to what’s in the ingredients, too.

Why Food May Not Be the Cause
of Your Dog’s Allergies

Contrary to popular belief, food isn’t the primary cause of a canine allergies.

According to Drs. Foster and Smith, food allergies account for just 10% of all canine allergies. They’re only the third most common cause — ranked well behind fleas and atopic (non-contact) allergies.

Yet food is the first to be blamed whenever a dog shows any sign of an allergic reaction — like itchy skin.

And that begs the question: Is it really an allergy in the first place?

Food Allergy
or Food Intolerance?

Food allergies and food intolerances are considered two different issues.

A food allergy occurs when a dog’s immune system mistakenly identifies a particular food ingredient as harmful. And then creates defensive antibodies to fight the invading enemy (the food).

A food intolerance is a digestive problem rather than an immune response. An intolerance occurs when a dog’s digestive system is unable to digest a specific ingredient.

For example, lactose intolerance is a common condition in which a dog is unable to break down lactose (a sugar found in milk).

Different Conditions
with Different Symptoms

The symptoms of an allergy can include skin rash, hives, itching, paw biting, obsessive licking and sometimes nausea or vomiting.

The signs of food intolerance include (mainly) digestive distress, gas, bloating, nausea, vomiting or diarrhea.

Again, let’s use milk as an example…

A milk intolerance would look more like gastric distress. This can include symptoms like gas, bloating or diarrhea.

However, a true milk allergy would produce an immune reaction (for example, itching or a rash).

The Bottom Line

If you believe your pet is suffering from a food intolerance or a food allergy, you may wish to consider feeding a commercial dog food that’s been specifically designed to help manage these issues.

At the end of this article, you’ll find two lists — one includes a group of hypoallergenic dog foods prescribed by veterinarians and another using limited ingredient recipes.

These lists should not be considered a complete catalog of all hypoallergenic foods available.

In fact, if you know of a specific dog food you believe we should have included on these lists, please feel free to share your suggestions in the Comments section below.

Or if you’re looking for some suggestions yourself, be sure to look through our readers’ comments below to find some good ideas.

Veterinary Hypoallergenic Dog Foods

The following veterinary dog foods are marketed as hypoallergenic. However, readers are encouraged to consult a veterinarian before feeding these products.

Suggested Limited
Ingredient Dog Foods

The following limited ingredient dog foods may be helpful in tracking down specific allergens. However, these products are listed here only because of claims made by each manufacturer.

A Final Word

The descriptions and analyses expressed in this and every article on this website represent the views and opinions of the author.

The Dog Food Advisor does not test dog food products.

We rely entirely on the integrity of the information provided by each company. As such, the accuracy of every review is directly dependent upon the specific data a company chooses to share.

Although it's our goal to ensure all the information on this website is correct, we cannot guarantee its completeness or its accuracy; nor can we commit to ensuring all the material is kept up-to-date on a daily basis.

We rely on tips from readers. To report a product change or request an update of any review, please contact us using this form.

Each review is offered in good faith and has been designed to help you make a more informed decision when buying dog food.

However, due to the biological uniqueness of every animal, none of our ratings are intended to suggest feeding a particular product will result in a specific dietary response or health benefit for your pet.

For a better understanding of how we analyze each product, please read our article, "The Problem with Dog Food Reviews".

Remember, no dog food can possibly be appropriate for every life stage, lifestyle or health condition. So, choose wisely. And when in doubt, consult a qualified veterinary professional for help.

In closing, we do not accept money, gifts or samples from pet food companies in exchange for special consideration in the preparation of our reviews or ratings.

However, we do receive a fee from Chewy.com for each purchase made as a direct result of a referral from our website. This fee is a fixed dollar amount and has nothing to do with the size of an order or the brand selected for purchase.

Have an opinion about this dog food? Or maybe the review itself? Please know we welcome your comments.

  • Valerie Fryza

    If its good for your dog, don’t cheap out. Think of it this way…your dog eats x amount of dollars per month, compare it to what it costs you to eat for a month (not as.much as you think!)…He is a family member and deserves to be healthy and happy. I never understand people that want pets but ‘can’t afford to feed them’

  • Pitlove

    Hi Felicia-

    While I understand how daunting it can feel to have to spend so much money on pet food, I can assure you that if the dog is responding well to the therapeutic food, the cost will be off set by less trips to the vet.

    I caution you against using commercial foods to treat a food allergy, especially from a brand like American Journey, a brand who chewy.com will not disclose the manufacturer. The same cautious manufacturing steps taken in the production of the prescription foods is likely not being taken with this brand to prevent cross contamination of common proteins that could even in small amounts effect the dog.

  • anon101

    The testing done by a board certified veterinary dermatologist (intra-dermal skin testing) is accurate.
    Blood test not so much.
    The prednisone and antibiotics are necessary to stop the suffering temporarily and give the immune system a rest.
    However, long term, not a good idea.
    I would start with the prescription food.
    Ask your vet about about Cytopoint.
    If it is effective it would be less expensive than the veterinary dermatologist (although I still think that would be your best bet).
    Good luck
    PS: Beware of mail-in saliva and hair tests. No good.

  • Kim Thomas

    Thank you for your reply and time.
    Went to our vet. Usual doctor was not there and wasn’t fond of his replacement.
    We were prescribed antibiotics and steroids and shuffled off. They helped a bit.

    Our guy had told me a while back that testing was near-useless. I’m sure he could Rx a diet, but wanted to check here first.

  • anon101

    If you are having good results with the prescription food, I would not change. There is no comparison with commercial food, cross contamination of ingredients, for one thing.
    Also, the dog may have environmental allergies, for best results I would go to a board certified veterinary dermatologist for testing, accurate diagnosis and treatment.
    Especially if the symptoms have been going on for more than one year/4 seasons without any significant periods of relief.
    Allergies are complicated, often a multifaceted treatment approach is required, that includes a therapeutic diet (prescription food).

  • haleycookie

    Careful, make sure it’s a lid formula. The regular duck and sweet potatoes also has chicken and turkey. Common allergens. Also the food has been getting mixed reviews. And some ingredients are sourced out of China if that is something you wish to avoid.

  • Felicia Camardelle

    We have a 7 year old shepard mix. We have been treating him for ear & eye infections for 2 years. Vet said he believes it is a food allergy. We started him on Royal Canine duck & potatoes recipe. It seems to be helping. The problem is with the cost of that prescription dog food. It’s over $75 per 17lbs. We love our dog, but we cannot afford this food. I found another brand American Journey duck & sweet potatoes. We are giving it a try , the cost is much cheaper $39.99 for 24lbs. Plus Chewy.com had it as buy one get one free. Anyone have similar problem? Any advice would be welcome.

  • anon101

    See the vet. the first step is to get an accurate diagnosis.
    Her symptoms most likely have nothing to do with food.

    See my posts over here

    https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/environmental+allergies/

    PS: Nutrisca salmon or Zignature whitefish, if you refuse to consider prescription food

  • Liz Hungerford-Kuba

    I have a 13 year old Pekinese Shih who reacts to every commercial dog food we’ve tried. Currently I am making her food with ground beef or chicken, rice, eggs, fish, pumpkin, peas, carrots and/or spinach. She sneaks the other dog’s dry food if we’re not careful, and then has terrible itching issues( until she bleeds). Is there a dry food with limited ingredients and no preservatives?

  • Susan

    Hi Kim,
    I have a rescue dog who suffers with food sensitivities & gets red paws & itchy hot skin & body after he eats certain ingredients & he also has Seasonal Environment Allergies….
    Do you mean the “Natural Balance” LID formulas? I’ve never heard of Natural Science look for one of the Natural Balance formula’s with the least ingredients, some of the NB formulas have the Lentils & if your dog didn’t do well on the Zignature he may not do well on another brand that has Lentils or chickpeas, try the NB Sweet Potato & Fish formula fish is a cooling meat & higher in omega 3 oils, has he tried a fish kibblebefore? just read the ingredient list to the NB formula’s as some formulas have more ingredients some NB formula’s have less ingredients….
    You better off to start an elimination diet to work out what ingredients he’s sensitive too other wise you’ll be going around in circle trying all these dry kibbles or make sure the kibbles you try have very limited ingredients just 1 carb, 1 meat protein & an oil, there’s “California Natural” Lamb Meal & Rice it only has 3 ingredients or there’s “4Health” Special Care Sensitive Stomach formula it has just has Potato, Egg & an Oil very limited ingredients. I feed “Canidae” Pure Wild Boar Canidae’s Pure Sea is really good for skin problems, its high in Omega 3 Oils what is needed for skin problems…or can you afford to feed a Freeze Dried diet or a Pre-Made Raw diet would probably be the best diet to feed..
    Baths make sure your doing weekly or twice a week baths to wash off any allergens off his paws & skin baths relieve itchy paws/skin, I use “Malaseb” medicated shampoo, it’s an anti-bacterial, anti-fungal shampoo & kills any yeast or bacteria on paws & skin & washes off any allergens on their paws & skin, also makes their skin moist & fur really soft & stops my boy scratching, licking & red paws, in Spring & Summer he has to have a bath every 5-7 days, I also use baby wipes & wipe his paws body down after he’s been out doors when comes back inside real itchy rolling & rubbing his body on my rug…
    Keep a diary & you’ll start to see a pattern as the years go by if he has Environment Allergies as well, my vet said they normally suffer with both Food Sensitivities & Environment allergies, they normally come together, start buying tin Sardines or tin Salmon in spring water & start adding 2 spoons of the sardines or Salmon as a topper to 1 of his meals a day, Sardines & Salmon are high in omega oils excellent for his skin….
    There’s a really good group on facebook called “Dog issues, allergies & other information support group” a Dermatologist Dr Karen Helton Rhodes frequents the group & she has her f/b page called “Canine Skin Solutions” as a last resort you could ask Vet or Dermatologist can you try “Cytopoint Injection” given every 4-8 weeks depending on the dog, a few people in the Dog Issue Allergies f/b group ended up giving their dogs Cytopoint Injections it has brought relief to their once misable itchy dogs…..

  • anon101

    His skin condition probably has nothing to do with the food.
    He is at the age where environmental allergies show up, they get worse with age, not better.
    You need the expertise of a good vet, for best results consult a veterinary dermatologist for testing/diagnosis/treatment.
    But, I would start with your current vet, explore treatment options.
    Let’s hope that his allergies are seasonal/mild and will respond to treatment by the regular vet and go away (for a while) after the first hard frost.
    You could start with prescription food/therapeutic diet as an elimination diet. Commercial foods do not compare due to cross contamination and other factors.
    That is if you want to rule out food allergies (rare) and food sensitivities.
    Also, bathe as much as twice a week with a gentle puppy shampoo, wipe paw pads off when he comes in from the outside, see if this helps.
    Posters may recommend a more expensive shampoo, but until the dog is diagnosed, this is not necessary (imo).
    Please see my posts over here https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/environmental+allergies/
    PS: If he breaks out in a bright red rash especially on his chest and or has bloody scabs take him to the vet immediately, he may need a shot of prednisone and or a trial to stop the suffering and give his immune system a rest, maybe antibiotics…..
    Find a vet that you trust and can work with.
    Beware of miracle homeopathic cures and such and don’t trust Dr Google.

  • Kim Thomas

    Have a 100# (though not overweight), 3 year old Golden Retriever. He was an “owner surrendered” in a case of the owner doing the right thing – owner moved for a job and apartment was too small. He became part of our family at age 7 months.

    Owner has been feeding Fromm Beef Frittata so we continued a couple months until he settled. We then tried a couple times to go with different Fromm flavors (all in the same grain-free line) , but every time our pooch seemed to have a reaction. So we stuck with Beef Frittata.

    Around August dog started developing a hot spot on his paw. Changed his food to Regal Grain Free Lamb and Buffalo. Didn’t seem to get worse, but didn’t help either.

    About 2 weeks ago went to Signature Duck Formula. No good! He’s been scratching and hot spots are increasing.

    It’s been suggested we go with Natural Science Sweet Potato and Venison.

    Thoughts?

  • Susan

    Hi Lindsay,
    when you first got him what was the breeder feeding him, was he doing diarrhea when with old owner?
    Did the vet test his poos for parisite/Giardia?
    The antibiotic he was put on would have been Metronidazole (Flagyl) & he should of been on the Metronidazole a bit longer for 14-21 day course, 5 days isnt long enough….
    Have a look at “Canidae” All Life Stages, large breed dog Turkey Meal & Brown Rice or Canidae’s All Life Stages Large Breed Puppy formula, both formula’s are on page 5 https://www.canidae.com/dog-food/products, I do not give my boy any pig ears or Bully sticks, Bully sticks are very high in bacteria, it’s the Bulls penis yuk.

  • anon101

    Cut out the junk snacks (too rich for him). He obviously has a sensitive stomach.
    Use a bit of whatever kibble agrees with him for a snack, or a half of a raw carrot to chew on (no more than once a day)
    Consider Zignature a limited ingredient food or Purina Pro Plan Focus for sensitive skin and stomach
    Add a splash of water to meals and a bite of something like scrambled egg.
    See chewy dot com for reviews
    If the problem persists consider the prescription food that your vet probably recommended; at least till he is stable.
    Don’t free feed (leave food down) try 3 or 4 small meals a day for now.
    Don’t feed after 4 pm (or 6 hours prior to bedtime)
    Always have fresh water available.

  • Lindsay Dozier

    Hi I have a 4.5 month old golden retriever. We have been feeding him the Kirkland puppy chicken and sweet potato formula. He has had intermittent diarrhea, mostly at night since we got him. Any recommendations. I took him to the vet 2 weeks ago because he had bad diarrhea after eating a pig ear and bully stick. They gave him antibiotics and that helped for the 5 days he was on them.

  • Susan

    Hi Chara,
    I feed my senior boy who has environment allergies, food sensitivities & IBD, “Canidae” Pure Wild Pork & Pure Wild Land all life Stages formula’s they both have no Salmon Oil, no Chicken or Grains, here’s Canidae’s web page click on link then scroll down a bit look to your right & click on “View All” to see all Canidae’s formula’s also look for Pure Petite Small Breed Bison & Lamb formula’s they only has 5 ingredients, if you have any questions email Canidae & they will answer all your questions, Canidae grow all their own fresh fruit & vegetables…
    https://www.canidae.com/dog-food/products

  • Ellie

    I’m no scientist nor am I a veterinarian employed by a billion dollar a year pet food company, however, I am old enough to remember a time BEFORE, GMO foods were created and before huge food producing companies helped force independently owned farms into bankruptcy then bought up those farms to produce GMO grains, fruits, and vegetables. Pets and people were far more healthy back then. These corporate owned farms also have employed strong insecticides as well as depleted the soil of needed nutrients. They instead use strong chemicals as fertilizer. Pets did not suffer the same human diseases as people suffer years ago. Veterinarian science during the 50’s was mostly for farm animals. Vets had special hours for caring for smaller domestic pets. Today veterinary care for domestic pets is a huge industry that is promoted by huge tax deductible contributions by pet food companies.
    Pet foods, both canned and dry, are cooked at high temperatures at least 3 different times in order to obtain the texture desired by these companies. The high temps are also employed in order to destroy the harmful bacteria in the sub grade ingredients. Any nutrition that may have been present in those rotting meats and other organic materials that had been discarded by human food companies, is destroyed by those high temps. Then the long list of synthetic vitamins (processed in China) are added to the pet food in order to be able to make the claim that the “food” meets nutritional standards. The highly processed muck which these corporations produce is totally foreign to our pet’s digestive systems. Trying to assimilate nutrients from these highly processed man created “foods” puts a great deal of stress on the animal’s body which can result in a variety of harmful conditions.
    How do you know which of the toxic elements in these pet “food” products are causing allergies? Your vet usually does not even try to figure it out. There are so many possibilities that they are totally unprepared to investigate. As these “food” products are cooked down the toxins in them become more concentrated.
    We have a very small dog with allergies and put her on a food sourced from grass fed livestock which has not been continuously injected with antibiotics, steroids, and hormones as most of the meats in grocery stores and meats used for pet foods are. She has responded well to this diet which is also a freeze dried raw food.
    Much of the nation’s livestock used to feed the masses have also been fed GMO grains. GMO foods have been proven to produce cancerous tumors during testing. GMO foods are outlawed in the EU and other areas of the world. Americans, however, live in a country where the news media as well as “scientific” study is almost completely controlled by the huge corporations that now wield their influence throughout the county. Labeling of GMO foods was also rejected by our special interest owned politicians! Both major political parties are dominated by the so called “special interests!” That is why no matter which party is in power the corporations get richer while the rest of the country is being destroyed! The fact is that most of these huge corporations also manufacture other products In third world countries. The FDA is totally dominated by these big corporations. They are not looking out for the best interests of the people and certainly not for the best interests of your pets.
    I don’t know what we would do if we owned a couple of larger dogs since feeding two large dogs what we feed this one small dog would be outrageously expensive!
    One possible solution for people who truly want to feed themselves and their pets foods that are not toxic is to locate a farm near you that has grass fed free range livestock. There are still some privately owned small operations that do this. Their products are somewhat more expensive than the grocery store junk but much less toxic. If more people begin to refuse to support the corporate goons maybe they would start cleaning up their act. Speaking out and demanding that these corporate financed politicians start serving the people instead of their corporate bosses is also vital. It is time for another American revolution.

  • anon101

    Ask a acupuncturist or a chiropractor. They are into that stuff.
    Or pay for a consult with a homeopathic vet $$,
    If that’s your thing.
    Or you could just ask your regular vet his opinion as to what would be best, the next time you take your dog in for an annual checkup.

  • A Nonnie Mess

    Hi Molly, from what I understand Kangaroo falls onto the hot list but there’s a lot of discrepancies (depending on whom you ask) about certain foods being warming, cooling or neutral. Might be best to experiment!

  • anon101

    I don’t know. I learned a while back that homeopathic views, Chinese medicine, etc. often differ greatly from traditional medicine.
    So, you will get a lot of conflicting opinions.
    I choose to believe in science based veterinary medicine.

  • Molly Tuemler

    Would anyone know if kangaroo is warming or cooling based on Chinese holistic principles?

  • Christine McCarran

    I have a 7 yr old pit mix,she is a rescue dog so not exactly sure,but she has had no problems with her skin and stayed outside mostly, running in woods most her life, always going different states with me until two years ago. Started getting bald spots, dark rich brown brindle started turning orangeish in color. Vet said steroid,its always steroids! but they can do a lot of damage so he suggested an anti fungal shampoo to usr when the itching started and everytime it cars her right up and as long as i keep her from rubbin her backside raw,no acess to brick walls, her ‘hot spots’clear up and no kore itching, no more crying because she hurts. Benedryl just knocks her out and makes her disoriented. Vet in Birmingham said most lilely fungi in wet dewy grass especially and hardly ever a food allergy. Her coat is not as rich as it used to be (she grew up on Ole Roy for six years too) and she is still eating more expensive,limited ingredient food. I think I am going to try some Ole Roy again! Hope our story might help.

  • anon101

    Nutrisca Lamb is probably lower in calories than Zignature Kangaroo.
    Feed a little less? Increase exercise?
    Swimming is the best for arthritic seniors, don’t know if you have pet insurance or if it is within your means but aqua therapy/rehab (swimming in a heated pool) just 20 minutes 2 or 3 times a week can work wonders for pain management and weight control.

    You could always add a glucosamine supplement if your vet has advised you to do so.
    Just make sure it is approved for veterinary use, and go with the lowest dose, as not all supplements are benign, some are known to have side effects.

  • Crazy4cats

    Whole Earth Farms has their pork, beef and lamb formula that is poultry and grain free. It does have salmon oil in it, however. It is not labeled a senior food, but it only has 348 calories per cup.

    https://www.feedgoodness.com/products/recipe?title=Whole-Earth-Farms-Grain-Free-Recipe-with-Pork%2C-Beef-&-Lamb-(Poultry-Free)&id=8

    AAFCO does not have a specific profile for senior foods, so I find that they tend to vary a lot between companies.

    https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/frequently-asked-questions/aafco-nutrient-profiles/

    Good luck to you. I hope this helps!

  • haleycookie

    Find either an all life stages or weight loss food. Wholehearted has a weight management with lamb as only protein. Found at Petco. Senior foods are good for weight but unfortunetly no dog foods (other than prescription) will have enough glucosamine in them to actually make a difference In Hips or bones health.

  • Chara Caponigro

    Thank you. Was trying for weight management and hips.

  • anon101

    I would skip the senior formulas, otherwise, Nutrisca or Zignature will meet your criteria.
    Check chewy dot com for ingredients and reviews.

  • Chara Caponigro

    I have 3 11 year old dogs with numerous allergies. Our main allergies are Salmon, Chicken/ poultry and grains. I can’t find a dry food that fits all my needs. Am I missing something? I need a Senior food with limited ingredients with no salmon, chicken/ poultry. We do well with lamb but hard to find Senior limited with no chicken. HELP! Lol
    Thank you

  • alicat321

    Try Diamon Naturals. Very Cheap and they sell at Menards. They have several types but for food allergies, they have a grain free formula. No white rice, yeast or egg in it. My dog has major gas to egg and white carbs. Lol

  • Tat

    Thank you so much! This was extremely helpful

  • Susan

    Hi Tat,
    I would be adding 1 new ingredient to her Royal Canine Ultamino vet diet food, there’s no point trying all these different kibbles until you work out what ingredients she is sensitive too, buy tin salmon in spring water add 1-2 spoons of salmon to her R/C Ultimino kibble for 6 weeks, do not feed any treats nothing else except the salmon or ingredient you want to trial, it can take anywhere from 1 day up to 6 weeks for the dog to have a reaction & react to an ingredient….. Look at the ingredient list to the kibble your thinking of trying & add an ingredient from the kibble ingredient list, peas, chickpeas or sweet potato & see if she starts to itch, scratch smell yeasty, I know it takes a while doing an elimination diet but it’s the only real way you will know 100% what she can & cant eat & the best time to do elimination trial is Winter when all the pollens & allergens aren’t around yet before Spring & Summer comes back around.
    or try the “4Health” Special Care, Sensitive Skin formula, it has about 3-4 ingredients, Pea flour Peas, Hydrolzyed Salmon, flaxseed, tomato pomace…or look at “California Natural” Lamb Meal & Rice large Bites it just has 3 ingredients.

    You know she can eat corn starch & hydrolyzed chicken by product, Hills Z/d & Purina HA also use the Corn starch & a hydrolzed protein, are they cheaper to buy then the R/C Ultimino??

    Gee you’d need to feed alot of the R/C Ultamino it only has 313Kcals per cup. about 4-5 cups a day.

    “Canidae” have their “Under The Sun” formula’s with around 3-4 ingredients their UTS Chicken formula is 25lbs for $34, maybe start with trying chicken formula again, It may not be a meat protein she is reacting too, it might be the other ingredients…this is why it’s best to do elimination diet cause your just going in circles…

    Here’s the Canidae UTS link just scroll down a bit look to your right & click on “View All”
    https://www.canidae.com/dog-food/products

  • anon101

    I also had good results with Nutrisca (several years) for a sensitive dog.
    How about the lamb https://www.chewy.com/nutrisca-grain-free-lamb-chickpea/dp/35039

    Maybe buy a small bag of whatever new food you want to try first, just to be sure it agrees with her.
    Good luck

  • haleycookie

    Sure is. They’re are pretty similar.

  • anon101

    Zignature Kangaroo Limited Ingredient Formula Grain-Free Dry Dog Food
    Check the reviews
    https://www.chewy.com/zignature-kangaroo-limited-ingredient/dp/118059

    If you buy the big bag, you can freeze/refrigerate at least half of it, it will stay fresh longer and prove to be cost effective.

  • Tat

    I’ve talked to my vet and the recommendation was to try a protein source that was novel to her which the first we tried was pork as she already was exposed to chicken, beef, white fish and duck

  • Tat

    I do not but is this food similar to the 4Health sensative skin food available at tractor supply?

  • haleycookie

    Do you have a Petco near you? Their new brand (which is a rebranding of dr Foster and smith food) wholehearted has a skin formula with hydrolyzed salmon in it. The big 25 lbs bags are 50$ not terrible expensive. A lot of my customers have had good success with it when it came to switching from an expensive hydrolyzed prescription diet.

  • aimee

    Hi Tat,

    Talk to your vet. I’ve read that if a dog has a positive response to food elimination trial the next step is to feed the original food and see if the reaction returns. If it does go back to the elimination diet and then when all clear again test one food ingredient at a time to pinpoint what your dog ‘s reactions

  • anon101

    I would stay with the prescription/therapeutic diet.
    You are very fortunate to have found something that simple that works.
    Commercial products will not compare as there is a lot of cross-contamination of ingredients that occurs during manufacturing.
    This does not occur with prescription food, hence the increased price.

  • Tat

    Hi, I have a 3 year old Pit mix that we adopted from a shelter who started to experience allergies about a year ago as well as skin infections. We have been to the vet numerous times and have finally determined it is a food allergy. We have been feeding Royal Canin Ultamino which has hydrogenized protein and she cleared up within weeks. Unfortunately the food is very pricey for the quantity so we would like to find a limited ingredient novel protein food that we could switch to. She has been fed Health Extensions (chicken), Pro pak bayside select (white fish), Pro pak (beef),Wellness simple (duck) and Zignature (pork) all of which have caused a reaction. We were exploring venison next but haven’t decided on a brand to try. Do you have any suggestion for a dry food that has the least amount of ingredients?

  • Susan

    Hi Lisa,
    if he has been allergy free all his life then all of a sudden he’s itchying like mad sound like food sensitivities/intolerances to me, when a dog eats the same food 24/7 they can start to react to an ingredient, change his food to something with different meat protein NO beef & different ingredients to what in the Purina Beef formula he’s eating, have a look at “Canidae” Pure Meadow Senior formula, it’s high in Omega 3 for skin, coat, brain, joints etc, has all the supplements for an ageing dog & see how he goes, its cheaper then seeing a Dermatologist, then if there’s NO improvment you can say yes I did do a diet change, also start bathing him twice a week in a medicated anti-fungal anti-bacterial shampoo like “Malaseb” medicated shampoo, Chewy has other shampoos like the Malaseb… Bath & wash off any allergens on the skin, the MAlaseb medicated shampoo relieves the itchy red skin & put the moisture back into dry skin & baths makes the dog feel better…
    Pit Bulls/Staffys are prone to food sensitivities & environment allergies, Please change diet I see this all the time, diet is the main cause.. https://www.canidae.com/dog-food/products

  • anon101

    Yes, I did the same, back and forth to the vet times 1 year, steroids, etc.
    I did not have positive results until we went to a Board Certified Veterinary Dermatologist and had intra-dermal skin testing done.
    The treatment prescribed, allergen specific immunotherapy worked for my dog. Stable times 5 years.
    There are now other treatment options available that are not as costly, apoquel, cytopoint……
    There is no cheap way out of this. Food will not fix this.
    Sorry, but that has been my experience.

  • Lisa

    We’ve been to the vet three times now and I’ve spent a very large amount of money on the visits, blood work and medications to treat “environmental” allergies… they are not working.

  • anon101

    Yes. Make an appointment with a veterinary dermatologist and explore treatment options for environmental allergies. It’s not the food (imo)
    You need the expertise of a specialist, not the internet.
    See my posts https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/environmental+allergies/

  • Lisa

    Hello, I have an 11 year old Pit Lab mix. He has been allergy free until about 6 months ago. He started scratching, biting himself and licking uncontrollably. It got so bad he was chewing the fur from his tail and it was raw. Took him to the vet, they ran tests, blood work was normal. Said looks like hayfever. They put him on a steroid and antibiotic and everything seemed to clear up for about a month. Symptoms came back a month later. Took him again, they ran tests for Cushing’s disease since he is an older dog, but again blood work was normal. Sent me home with steroids and antibiotic once again. Here we are, yet again, with the same problem and after discussing with a friend I’m thinking he may have developed a food allergy. He has chewed his skin so raw, I even give him Benedryl and nothing is helping. I’m currently feeding him Purina Pro Plan Adult Beef flavor dry food. He has been eating that food for about 3 years now. Can anyone suggest something else or maybe has been through the same ordeal? Thanks!

  • Susan

    Hi Abbie,
    the best treatment for environment allergies & food sensitivities is baths & I use creams, like Hydrocortisone 1% cream at night before bed, I do the paw, mouth & skin check & look for any red skin & lightly apply the Hydrocortisone 1% cream, then in the morning thru the day I apply “Sudocrem” cream it acts as a barrierprotects the skin, ears & paws when out doors, did the the vet give a cream & an anti-bacterial Anti-fungal medicated Shampoo to see if theres an improvement?
    When you bath you wash off the all the bacteria, yeast & allergens on paws, ears, skin coat etc. As they get older allergies seem to get worse, with her food she’s eating now that she is scratching on, how long has she been eating this food do you rotate between different brands What is she eating?? wet dry? if fed te same food 24/7 this is when a dog can start reacting to a few ingredients… I would Bath weekly or twice a week when itch is real bad, I use baby wipes & wipe down Patch mouth, head, body & paws days I dont feel like bathing him & I’d change her food to an limited ingredient single different protein to what she is eating at teh moment & see is there an improvement or use the Hydrolzyed Vet Prescription diet, then you will need to start adding foods to her diet to see if she reacts to them an elimination diet, have a look at “4Health” Special Care Sensitive Skin, its Hydrolyzed Salmon its like a vet diet the protein has been broken down so the dog does NOT react to the meat protein or try the “4health” Special Care Sensitive Stomach formula it just is Potato & Egg or I had great results with “Canidae”Pure Meadow Senior formula, its high in Omega 3 & has all the supplments for aging dogs. https://www.canidae.com/dog-food/products its on page 3..

  • anon101

    Exactly, I would try the prescription food. But, I would also discuss treatments available for environmental allergies.

    Depending on the severity of the symptoms and to prevent
    the risk of skin infection and to temporarily stop the suffering, the vet may recommend a shot of prednisone (or a taper)
    This will give the dog relief and the skin a chance to heal.

    Please see my posts https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/environmental+allergies/

  • Abbie Rigby

    Hello I have Yorkshire terrier who’s approaching 8 this and has had symptoms pop up throughout the years. She has had a reaction to flea bites in the past. But now gets itchy ears, itchy paws, which can get very red and swollen, leinsons on her belly that scab, is like to cure this as naturally as possible and most cost effective. We’re not sure if it’s a food allergy but the vet says we need to start with hypoallergenic food diet to see if symptoms decrease. Any help would be wonderful.

  • mary-lee cote

    The Iams vet diets are discontinued since Mars bought the company… Damned shame; my gsd reacts to every food we’ve tried (over 30) and the Iams fish & potato vet formula had him completely med free, full coat, no sores, no ear infections or yeasty feet. Decision to discontinue was highly irresponsible Imo, I’d like to sue them for the pain they’re causing our pets!

  • Susan

    Hi Diane,
    start looking for a chicken free & look at the other ingredients in the Chicken Soup Adult shes eating as it might be another ingredient & not be the chicken I ended up doing an Elimination Food Diet & Carrots made Patches ears itch, smell & shake his head. Have a look at “Canidae” Pure formula’s or Pure Petite Small breed formulas kibble size is nice & small easy to digest & there’s a few chicken free formula’s, click on link below then scroll down a bit look to your right & click on “View All” https://www.canidae.com/dog-food/products

  • anon101

    Zignature whitefish, check Chewy dot com for reviews.
    PS: Keep in mind that if she continues to have ear infections, it may not have anything to do with the food.
    If your regular vet isn’t helpful consider seeing a veterinary dermatologist.

  • diane meier

    I have a 2 year old mini dachshund chihuahua mix who has developed a yeast infection in one ear. The clinic suggested she may be allergic to the dog food (Chicken Soup adult small bites) no other symptoms. Ca you suggest a brand to switch her to?

  • Susan

    Hi crb,
    she might be sensitive to an ingredient (Rice) in the Lamb & Rice formula your feeding or the kibble you’re feeding isn’t balanced properly & is low in Omega 3 & really high in Omega 6 this can cause skin problems, start bathing her weekly to wash off any allergens that might be causing her itchy skin, I have found “Malaseb”medicated shampoo is excellent for dogs with yeasty itchy skin paws, dry skin & enviroinment allergies, Malaseb puts the moisture back into the dry itchy skin & paws, it relieves itchy skin & leaves dog feeling beautiful & soft.. Have a look at “Canidae” Pure Sea or Pure Sky formula’s these formula’s are balanced properly & high in omega 3 what is needed for skin problems… if you can’t afford Canidae have a look at “4Health” Special Care Sensitive Skin formula then rotate with another grainfree formula to strenthen her immune system, I would also start adding healthy whole foods to her diet, tin sardines in spring water add a couple of sardines to 1 of her meal a day, foods high in Omega 3…
    Skin problems are hard to work out, weekly baths will help & a good diet. Anti-Histamines like Zyrtrc don’t really work on dogs look at adding dog high potency Vitamin C to her diet.. there’s really good group on F/B put “Dog Issues, Allergies & other Information Support” group in f/b search bar.. https://www.canidae.com/dog-/food/products

  • anon101

    Does the dog have bloody scabs all over her body?
    That’s what happens next.
    Go over to forums and use the search engine to look up “allergies” see my posts.
    Good luck

  • haleycookie

    If the food is lamb and rice it’s probably not high quality. Lamb is mostly fat and water and rice is a cheap filler. I would get her into a limited ingredient food. Try merricks limited ingredient foods. I’ve had several people with pits and shepherds transition to that and most skin problems resolve.

  • anon101

    The dog needs to be seen by a veterinary dermatologist, asap.
    It is probably environmental allergies, there is no cure, but there is effective treatment.
    Her diet may have nothing to do with her condition.
    Take up a collection, GoFundMe, whatever.
    The dog needs to be seen by a specialist, it’s not cheap, but that is probably why she was dumped.
    Have you contacted GSD rescue groups? Maybe they could help?
    PS: The dog sounds like it is suffering, don’t be foolish and waste time, get the dog to a specialist if the regular vet has not been helpful.

  • crb

    I am fostering a German shepard. She has no fleas, dandruff, gas, rashes or sores, bloating, hair falling out, hot spots, ect but she scratches a lot and nips like she has fleas. I am giving her zyrtec, no difference. She is eating a high quality lamb/rice food, and likes it moistened with watered down pure chicken broth. The poor thing itches so much, it is driving me crazy too. She has been to the vet, no fleas/dander and it was the vet that suggested the zyrtec. (If only dogs could talk, she was abandoned and who knows what her diet was while she was trying to survive). I don’t know what to do for her.

  • Dana Renee Fedman

    Well, dangit. I will discontinue recommending that immediately!

  • aimee

    Unfortunately Nutriscan, when tested by third party testing, wasn’t found to be accurate in identifying adverse food reactions

    http://veterinarymedicine.dvm360.com/veterinary-dermatologist-claps-back-shady-allergy-tests?eid=222793369&bid=1776897

  • Susan

    Hi are you taking about Vet Diet Eukanuba FP Fish & Potato? Do you live America or another country?? I live Australia & we have Eukanuba Vet Diets but in America they have Iams vet diets which hasnt been mentioned either…Maybe Iams/Eukanuba is not as big as Hills, Purina & Royal Canine..

  • Dana Renee Fedman

    Dr. Jean Dodds now (2017) has a saliva test for food sensitivities and intolerance. http://www.nutriscan.org.

  • anon101
  • anon101

    Nutriscan is not a allergy test, it is a food sensitivity test, food sensitivities fluctuate.
    Any test that does not require an examination by a veterinarian (saliva/hair) is phony baloney.
    For reliable testing go to a Veterinary Dermatologist to get an accurate diagnosis of your dog’s skin condition and effective treatment options.
    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/?s=nutriscan

  • anon101

    Nutriscan is not a allergy test, it is a food sensitivity test, food sensitivities fluctuate.
    Any test that does not require an examination by a veterinarian (saliva/hair) is phony baloney.

    For reliable testing and the best treatment options go to a Veterinary Dermatologist. to get an accurate diagnosis of your dog’s skin condition.
    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/?s=nutriscan

  • Dana Renee Fedman

    You can order a saliva test from nutriscan.org.

    My Golden cannot tolerate chicken. I use Wellness Simple Lamb & Oatmeal. Low salt and no chicken.

  • Pat_Creighton

    I don’t see Eukanuba on your list. It had the only truly non-poultry recipes we could find. Everything else had either chicken fat, or was created using utensils that also touched poultry. Why has Eukanuba not been mentioned?

  • anon101

    Intradermal skin testing done by a veterinary dermatologist is the only way to accurately identify environmental allergens.
    Sounds like you do not have a diagnosis?
    I am not familiar with the condition you mention and I stay away from homeopathic remedies.
    I have had excellent results by taking my dog to a veterinary dermatologist for the diagnosis of a skin condition and treatment.

    PS: By any chance if you are receptive to science based veterinary medicine go here, use the search engine to look up specific topics http://skeptvet.com/Blog/
    Zignature white is a quality kibble.

  • Pamela Breffitt

    Jasper sees his vet at least once a month for one reason or another and they do not seem too concerned about it, they prescribe things for the itching but have been unable to identify what is causing it. He has had all the allergy tests and they came back negative. The dandruff does not cause him to excessively itch so I was thinking along the lines of Dysbiosis. Which can cause skin allergies. This condition is caused by the gut not producing enough good bacteria which is why he is on Pro Fibre. I would like to try him on a good fish diet if there is such a thing.

  • anon101

    Zignature is a quality limited ingredient food.
    Without allergy testing such as intradermal skin testing done by a veterinary dermatologist, you don’t have an accurate diagnosis. Chances are the allergies are environmental and seasonal and have little if anything to do with the food.
    Hopefully the symptoms are mild and are being managed well by your vet, if not, ask for a referral to a veterinary dermatologist.

  • Becky Underwood Baldwin

    I have 3 Shih tzus. My oldest dog gets red, itchy skin and has hair loss. Usually only during the summer. They have had 1 ear infection each in 5 years. Our vet suggested Natural Balance LID. She said not to give them chicken or fish. One of the ingredients in Natural Balance is Salmon oil. I’m confused about what they need to eat.

  • anon101

    Make an appointment with a veterinary dermatologist, asap.
    That is what I would do. You are wasting time looking for help on the internet.
    Your dog is obviously very uncomfortable. Food won’t fix this.
    The first step is to get the dog properly diagnosed.
    Talk to your vet.
    Good luck

  • Pamela Breffitt

    I have a shih-tzu with dandruff. He’s had this for about a year and gradually it is getting worse and creeping up from the tail towards his neck. He often breaks out in hot spots. He has been on Eden dry kibble all his life and he is also on Pro fibre for his anal glands and yumove for his joints. He is 4 1/2 years old and had major spinal surgery to remove 2 prolapsed discs a year ago. I am at a loss as to what to do he is not scratching all the time. I have just bought some Aloe Vera dog shampoo and soothing gel but only tried this week. I have tried him on raw diet but he would not touch it. Jasper weighs about 7 kg. Dog food is minefield with everyone claiming this, that and the other – I do not know what to do for my poor little fella, can anyone offer me advice?

  • Mercedes Barrow

    Thank you Susan that was very helpful

  • Susan

    Hi Mercedes,
    I have a Staffy with IBD mainly stomach & food sensitivities & skin problems, I’d say the food has become TOO rich & he needs a lower fat, lower protein, limited ingredient formula…. My boy is the same he’ll start doing really well on a higher fat & higher protein food then all of a sudden the acid reflux starts, then eating & eating grass, then vomiting, he ended up being put on an acid reducer Losec in the end & is doing heaps better now, if you can cook & feed at least 1 of the meals a lean cook meal & try & reduce teh kibblein his diet…
    I have found when I stay around 15% & under for fat, 26% & under for protein & fiber has to be 4% & under in a dry kibble Patch doesreally well, also teh Kcals per cup stay under 360Kcals per cup,
    Have a look at “4Health” Special Care, Sensitive Stomach & the Sensitive skin formula, it has hydrolyzedd Salmon this means the protein has been broken down for him so easier to digest…
    It’s VERY hard for vets to know whats wrong when it comes to the stomach, without looking into the stomach, its easy for posters to post “See a vet” all the time, when they have never had a sick dog with somach/bowel problems, & how expensive it is to see a specialist vet that specializes in Intestinal Health, the only test that gives any answers is Endoscope + Biopsies = $700-$1000 then the vet will have some answers to what’s wrong…
    another good kibble to try is “Canidae” Pure Meadow or Canidae All Life Stages Platnium formula, always look at the Kcals per cup the higher the Kcals the richer the kibble & more dense the kibble is, so more harder to digest…Give the “4Health” a try & stay away from kibbles with Chickpeas (Garbanzo Beans) & Lentils as these ingredients are very hard to digest when a dog doesnt have a healthy stomach…
    My boy does really well on “Taste Of The Wild” Sierra Mountain Roasted Lamb, it helps his stomach & stops his skin problem… I rotate with a few different brands but I always have to come back to teh TOTW Roasted Lamb formula… keep me up dated, the Natural Balance is good for dogs with stomach problems just read ingredients & pick the formula’s that are chickpea & lentil free, I think it’s the NB Fish & Potatoes that has noChickpeas, why NB doesnt get as many stars is cause the protein % is low, that’s all, not all dogs can eat over 30% in protein & eat high fat diets..

  • Sarah Eldeib

    My dog has IBD, and the vets believe she has an allergy to chicken. Merrick Limited ingredient, grain free all flavours, especially Duck was worked well for my dog, and is very affordable. Hope your cutie feels better soon !

  • anon101

    Food won’t fix this. Find a veterinarian that you trust and can work with. You may need a referral to a specialist.
    At the least you will need diagnostic testing, bloodwork/labs, x-rays, etc.
    Eating grass and vomiting is not normal, the dog is sick, something is wrong.
    A healthy dog has a good appetite.
    From what you have described it could be anything from allergies to gastrointestinal disturbances to something more serious like cancer.
    Go to the vet and get it properly diagnosed while you may still have treatment options.
    Don’t be silly, do you really think someone on the internet who has not examined your dog can help you?
    If you are receptive to science based veterinary medicine go here: http://skeptvet.com/Blog/

  • Mercedes Barrow

    I have a rotti/ American bulldog cross and he was on proplan and he would get rashes under his belly and by his flanks. He would lick so much it would make him raw so I switched to Acana and went between the grasslands and Pacifica ( we have another dog thats a picky eater so we have to rotate or she won’t eat) he was doing really well on it (1-2yrs) on it. The last 2 bags one of each kind he has gone off of which is not like him at all. He’s been eating a lot of grass and even vomiting it up now. Does anyone have any suggestions as to what other feeds I should try. I just picked up a bag of natural balance sweet potato and venison but it didn’t have great reviews. It was only a 3 out of 5 compared to Acana which was 4 – 5 out of 5

  • Susan

    Hi yes it sounds like food sensitivities/food intolerances, you need to look back on all the foods she has eaten, look at the carbs not the meat proteins, is there chickpeas, garbanzo beans, lentils, rice, barley, oats, etc a few ingredients that has been in all the formula’s she has eaten? then get a limited formula that just has 1 meat protein & only 1-2 carbs, also what was the fiber % try & stay 4% & under for fiber, California Natural” Lamb Meal & Rice has just 3 ingredients, it’s a good formula to work out food sensitivities, then when she is doing well no gas start adding 1 new ingredient as a topper on her kibble & see does she react, I added ingredients that were in kibbles like boiled potato, boiled sweet potato, egg etc, also have you put her on a good dog probiotic?? start on 1/2 the dose then slowly increase to proper dose..& with her weight look what the Kcals per cup are?? & stay under 350 Kcals per cup to lose weight…

  • Misty

    I have a female Pitbull that is about 4. She has gained a lot of weight and always has gas. I have tried lamb, salmon and chicken based foods. I feel like something in her diet is a problem. Any suggestions?
    ( i found her as a stray 3 years ago very malnourished and abused)

  • Cheryl Ganley

    Recently I switched my Golden to Zignature Catfish as he was having reactions (itchy, dirty ears and foot sucking) to previous foods (e.g. Kirkland Chicken and Rice, Nature’s Domain Salmon and Sweet Potato). I switched him to Zignature Catfish. After the first bag the foot sucking has dramatically decreased and his ears are looking good. I would recommend this food to try if your dog has food allergies. It was one of the few that had zero chicken, potato and grain that I could find.

  • JudyandSam Simpson Norris

    yes, it does work. We are on Zignature Kangaroo, highly recommended was that we feed her a kangaroo diet per the lab that did the allergy testing. Have tried to find it at our local Hollywood Feed but all they kept getting was a large bag of it and Abbie doesn’t eat that much before I would be afraid it would get old. Found it a Whole Dog Food Market, Homewood, Al.- 4lb bag, $15.00, She loves it !!!! Also due to the yeast constantly, I did a lot of research this past weekend. Added her regular yogurt, but only more and plain instead of flavors, added cottage cheese, added unsweetened organic coconut flakes, which she begs for !!! All this to boost the probiotics up. Ordered colloidal silver for the sores and 100% aloe vera for the itching. Baths in 1/2 water, 1/2 white distilled vinegar and some baking soda in a big container I put in my tub. Then I can sat her down in it and it will cover her neck to toe and top of back to absorb into her skin, to help dry it up, damp dry, then air dry. Cut her hair back with a #10 blade on my grooming shears so everything could get air. Be sure to clean and disinfect grooming shears and blades when done. This is just one of the tricks, keep the hair short to combat this stuff !!!!

  • JudyandSam Simpson Norris

    I have abbie on Zignature Kangaroo kibble now. It’s good for allergic dogs. Wild Calling is another one, both are good. I am attacking this yeast infection head on as of this week. Tired of her going thru this all the time. Tried everything my vet can think of. Even the cytopoint injection which only lasted 2wks and was $90. Not that I mind spending the money, but it didn’t work. I did alot of research this past weekend and have added cottage cheese, more yogurt, which she was already getting and unsweetened organic coconut pieces. Have ordered colloidal silver and 100% aloe vera gel for sores and itching. Shaved her down with a 10 blade yesterday and will bathe her daily in 1/2 water and 1/2 distilled white vinegar with some baking soda. Time will tell…..

  • anon101

    These articles may help someone who has a dog with allergies.
    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2010/06/evidence-based-canine-allergy-treatment/
    PS: If you are not receptive to science based veterinary medicine, just ignore, maybe someone else will be interested.

  • anon101

    Check the latest comments. If you are not interested, maybe someone else that has a dog with allergies will find something helpful. http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2015/09/naet-a-cure-for-allergies-not/comment-page-1/#comment-121006

  • anon101

    Please consult your vet regarding any concerns you have about about Prednisone.
    Otherwise, do not stop the medication or alter the dosage in any way.
    Give only as prescribed.
    To do otherwise will disrupt the treatment and cause the symptoms to return prematurely, therefore not giving the dog’s system the rest it needs to regroup.
    Steroids are ordered specifically for each affected dog, based on it’s history and the length of time he has been on it, in conjunction with other treatments. Your veterinarian will instruct you as how to do a safe taper.
    I hope you will continue to work closely with your veterinarian.

  • Susan

    Here’s link “Myths & Facts about Yeast Dermatitis” scroll down & read myths:Carbohydrates or sugar in dogs diet. Karen Helton site is excellent…. Go up the top of page & hover over “Resources” then click on “Education Library” heaps of very good info.. elimation diets etc http://www.healthyskinfordogs.com.blog/2015/9/8/facts-myths-about-yeast-dermatitis-in-dogs

  • anon101

    Regarding the prednisone. Please do not stop the medication or change the dosage without consulting the prescribing vet.

  • anon101

    Please don’t stop or give any medication in any way other than it is prescribed by the veterinarian.
    Steroids are usually tapered off at the discretion of the prescribing veterinarian. There is a reason for this. Call your vet if you have any concerns.

  • Lisa Rinaldi

    Thank you so much. I don’t know why I didn’t think of cutting his prednisone in half. I personally have taken it off and on for years so I know about the side effects. The dose he has is the lowest I’ve had so thought he’d be ok but you are right, in half then every other day makes more sense. I’m going to get the shampoo and get him into the groomer right away. You’ve been a big help. Lisa

  • Susan

    Hi Lisa,
    Wellness Simple grain free is a good quality food, the Salmon is higher in Omega 3 what is needed for skin problems, Wellness Simple was one of the first brands Patch tried for his IBD & itchy skin problems but I tried the Simple Lamb & Oatmeal formula instead cause it was lower in fat% back then vet felt Patch needed a lower fat diet the Simple Lamb formula is lower in fat for his IBD but after trialing a few different foods I found he can eat around 14-16% fat as long as there’s no fish oils in them cause he gets bad acid reflux (IBD).. I think the vet you saw has recommended a really good food for a senior with skin problems, now the wait to see if he improves keep up the weekly baths to wash any allergens off skin..I find “Malaseb” Medicated shampoo to work the best for Patch & his skin allergies also reduce the Predisone slowely at first cut the 10mg tablet in 1/2 to make 5mg give daily, for 2 weeks then start giving the 5mg every 2nd day for 1-2 weeks then give the 5mg tablet every other day till the steriod is out of his sytem, if you just stop the Predisone it can cause bad side effects & you will not know if the new food is really working & helping his skin, my vet always says Only do ONE thing at a time” & if your going to add anything new food, meds, supplements, treats, add weekly so you know if a problem starts it was the new thing added that’s causing the problem if a problem arises…
    Instead of giving the carrot look at Chewys for “K-9 Natural” Green Lipped Mussels freeze dried treats, Mussels are excellent for his skin, coat, joints, brain, heart etc very high in Omega 3 & has Glucosmine + Chondritin willhelp his aging joints..

    Post below from Anon 101 earlier. she write’s
    “PS: Potato (white, sweet, whatever) is not recommended for allergy dogs, according to the vets I have consulted with”.
    This information is FALSE, myth NOT true, the only way Potato or Sweet potato can cause yeasty, itchy skin is when the dog is sensitivie or has an intoerance too potatoes or sweet potato.. all vet diet’s Royal Canine, Hills & Eukanuba all use potato in all their elimination skin vet diets, so if this was true, wouldn’t Hills, R/C & Eukanuba not use potatoes in their vet diet formulas, vet diets have been researched & made especially for certain health conditions, so if Potato caused itchy skin problems they wouldn’t use them, Anon 101 also post Potatoes are no good for the stomach/bowel, dogs with IBD do really well eating formula’s with sweet potatoes & potatoes…again vet diet use potato for stomach/bowel problems.
    I will find the link about Myths people say/post that Karen Becker started years ago, the link is written by Dermatologist, Karen Helton Rhodes, Karen Rhodes runs a really good F/B group called .. “Canine Skin Solutions” & helps dogs cats with skin problems https://www.facebook.com/groups/1563654607200747/

  • anon101

    Consider Zignature, a limited ingredient high quality food.
    Treatment of allergies are multi-faceted, it’s not just the food, frequent bathing, medication…….
    Best to consult a specialist.
    Ps: I went to the veterinary dermatologist, had the recommended testing and treatment, my dog has been stable times 5 years, we see the specialist once a year.
    I have no regrets. Sometimes it’s true, you get what you pay for.
    PS: Potato (white, sweet, whatever) is not recommended for allergy dogs, according to the vets I have consulted with.

  • Lisa Rinaldi

    Thank you so much. The SG he’s been on is the holistic blends oatmeal, pearls barely and ocean fish meal. I’m avoiding chicken so he hasn’t had it in over a year because I was told it’s usually something that dogs are allergic to. I did just get Wellness Simple L.I.G salmon and potato formula so I’ll see if that changes anything for him. It’s odd because he was just groomed about 8 weeks ago and I asked them to use an oatmeal shampoo for him but he got bad after he was groomed and I wonder if he was allergic now that I’m reading these replies. I think I’m going to get a shampoo that someone advised me to try and see if that helps. Thank you again, I appreciate your input. I’ll also check out the salmon pills for him. Lisa

  • Lisa Rinaldi

    Thank you. He’s been to the vet many times and they’ve done scratch type of testing to be sure there are no mites, fleas or things like that but the actual environmental allergy testing and food testing hasn’t been done. My vet expects all money at the visit. I’m looking for a new vet now but in the meantime I just changed his food to Wellness Simple L.I.G salmon and potato. We’ll see if that changes anything at all.

  • Lisa Rinaldi

    Hi Susan, thank you SO much. I did get a new food for him before seeing the replies here unfortunately and got a food recommended from the ER vet called Wellness Simple L.I.D salmon and potato formula. If after him eating this with food if there’s no change I’ll definitely follow your plan. The only treats I’ll be giving him will be fresh carrots for now. I’m going to stop the prednisone too. It’s only 10mg. so I think taking him off will be ok. Thank you again. I appreciate your input very much. Lisa

  • anon101

    The symptoms you describe sound more like environmental allergies. For the best results see a veterinary dermatologist, if you scan through the comments on this page you will see some of my posts on this topic.

  • Susan

    Hi, Ashford is a beautiful boy, what shampoo are you using? I use “Malaseb” Medicated Shampoo weekly, the Malaseb shampoo kills the yeast & bacteria on the skin, relieves their itchy smelly skin & makes them feel beautiful, soft & itch free….also baths wash off any allergens that may be on the skin… I also use creams, “Sudocrem” is a nappy rash thick white cream for Eczema, Dermetitis, Sore,s & Abrasions & acts as a barrier & protects the skin, paws & ears, I put the Sudocrem on of a morning be walks when I remember it also protect Patches pink skin from being sun burnt.. at night I chech Patches body paws head to see if they’re red sore etc & I apply Hydrocortisone 1% cream lightly when he wakes up in teh morning his red paws have gone away the sore he gets near his ears looks better, I have found creams help & vet has OK the creams… If you live America I think you can get the Sudocrem from Amazon or read ingredients & find another cream that’s similiar ingredients & look in the baby section at supermarket or Walmart, I forgot to write down the name of it..
    My boy gets yeasty itchy smelly skin if he eat’s chicken, wheat, barley, oats & carrots, when he eats carrots he gets real itchy ears, shakes his head none stop, chicken makes his paws red 20mins after eating it & smelly itchy yeasty skin, when I introduced raw chicken 1 of his back paws went red, hot & swollen, he was licking his paw I had to put a ice pack on it, then wash in teh Malaseb shampoo, I started an raw Elimination food diet, he has IBD as well. food intolerances & environment allergies so I went thru an animal nuturopath nutritionist that treats alot of cats & horses with skin & stomach problems I ended up changing & cooking the first elimination food diet, then I did another elimination diet a few years later & used a vet diet the second time cause he has IBD it makes it harder… nilly 5 yrs & I have a pretty good idea now what he can & can’t eat….

    “Canidae Pure” formula’s are pretty good they’re for skin & stomach problems with limited ingredients wet & dry, there’s “Canidae” Pure Wild Boar, Pure Land Bison & Lamb, Canidae Pure Sea Salmon is excellent for skin problems the omega 3 is higher being fish but once you have worked out what formula’s Ashford can eat rotate the fish formula after 3 months start another single meat protein formula so Ashford isn’t just eating fish or 1 meat protein all the time for months & years, I found when Patch stayed on 1 pet food his vet had recommend he stay on for 9-12months Patch started to react to the chicken & corn that was in the vet diet so now cause I have worked out what he can eat I rotate between a few different proteins & different brands of kibble monthly or he has 1 formula for breakfast Lamb & another formula for dinner Pork or Venison….
    Patch does real well on Lamb, Pork & Venison, I was feeding salmon but he kept on having a IBD flares both times when he ate 2 different American fish brands so I had to stop Salmon/fish kibbles then I read about all the toxins these fish formula’s can have & pet food companies buy the cheapest fish off cuts, look on “Clean Label Project” site I had a heart attack 2 of the fish brands I was feeding him made the top 10 worse pet foods out of 299 brands testeed they had the highest amount of toxins & contaminates thats when he had his both IBD flares…he didn’t when he ate the Australain Salmon fish brand http://www.cleanlabelproject.org/
    Canidae also made the best list for no toxins, CLP says the cleanest meats are Turkey & chicken that’s why you’ll see alot of brands with turkey & chicken get 5 stars.. another brand Patch does real well on is “Taste Of the Wild” Sierra Mountain, Roasted Lamb, it just has Lamb no other meat proteins watch out some formula’s there will be a few different meat proteins further down the ingredient list.. he does real well when the foods has sweet potato, potato, egg & peas…..
    Wetried vet diet Hills Venison & Potato, it’s grain free, gluten free, & soy protein free, high in Omega 3 what is needed when a dog has skin problems & cause its a vet diet you are getting what it says on the ingredient list there’s no cross contamination when kibbles are being cut the kibble cutter machine needs to be clean so the vet diets are not being cross contaminated, so thats probably why we have to pay more money for a vet diet but its worth it in the beginning when your dog is in a bad way & owner doesn’t know whats wrong especially when they have food sensitivities/intolerances & are having intestinal stress like Patch gets, then once you have worked out what health problem our dog has you can look for a premuim food with limited ingredients….
    America has a really big selections of pet foods, air dried, freeze dried, raw, kibble, wet tin, rolls…. last night a lady was telling me she found a new wet tin limited ingredient food called “Walk About” Australian & New Zealand made there’s Wild Kangaroo, Goat, Wild Boar & Bushtail & Duck but the fat is higher in the possum & duck formula but the other 3 proteins are lean, excellent if you have a dog with food sesnitivities & he gets a special treat for Sunday dinner, they also make the Jerky or freeze fried treats.
    there’s “Merrick” limited ingredient but if you want a bit cheaper brands then there’s ” American Journey” limited ingredient sold thru Chewy there’s “4Health” Sensitive Skin or look at the limited ingredient formula’s 4Health kibbles & their wet tin foods are cheap $1.19 4Health is sold at Tractor Supplys.
    Pick a formula that’s not too high in protein & fat, around 25% protein & around 16% fat or under, too much protein can cause skin & bowel reactions I have found,…

  • Crazy4cats

    Very cute pup! Did you have some sort of allergy test to determine what he is allergic to? What did the vet say? Was an elimination diet with a hydrolyzed food recommended?

  • Pamela Parks

    Yes! I believe it is the chemicals they use to “preserve” the longevity of the bagged dog food. My dog was eating the same brand and formula for 5 years but when the company changed to their new and improved formula he developed this crazy food allergy. So sad because now I spend $100 on a very small bag of prescription dog food. My yellow lab is 95 pounds and it’s getting REALLY expensive.

  • Pamela Parks

    My dog, Ashford, has a severe food allergy to proteins like chicken and beef and wheat. I’m looking for suggestions of affordable dog food brands that have worked well for other dogs. I have included a picture of the rash he had in the past before switching dog food. Before I brought him to the vet he https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/a79a5e845e15ad0b2b397bb9dfca645234171e9e112eb5629038d784243e7941.jpg https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/17fb10677fa0543dc4a79cde0746c8f56af5b186be77d0b4fef812ede03cee75.jpg lost round patches of fur that was crusty or scabbed at the skin, itchy, red, sore, obsessively licking himself and yeast infection in his ears.

    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/887803ac1766bb64deb2ec5625e4a51ff34b696e543c643210d6f286b4b34a56.jpg

    Any advice and suggestions would be greatly appreciated. 🙂

  • anon101

    Hope this helps:
    By Klaus Loft, DVM
    Angell Dermatology Service
    Anyone who suffers debilitating environmental allergies tied to changing seasons, pet dander or household dust mites knows first-hand the misery of a scratchy throat, itchy eyes or painful rashes.
    Not everyone knows, however, that our pets can experience similar allergic reactions — and other very bothersome dermatological issues. But our pets need not suffer in silence. Modern veterinary science has evolved such that advanced, comprehensive treatments are now available to treat a range of skin conditions.
    Top pet dermatological issues
    Our four-legged friends suffer from some of the same skin issues as we do — and several that we do not. The most common conditions we see at Angell include:
    •Parasites, such as mites, fleas and mange (scabies)
    •Infectious diseases, such as Staphylococcal pyoderma (“Staph”) skin infections, yeast and fungal infections and skin fold infections
    •Systemic diseases, such as autoimmune diseases
    •Skin cancer, such as Squamous cell carcinoma, cutaneous lymphoma, Mast cell tumors
    •Allergies, such as flea allergy dermatitis, adverse food reactions, environmental allergies, etc.
    All of these conditions can become serious and, if untreated, dramatically reduce quality of life. But the tremendous strides made in veterinary innovation, however, is very good news for our pets. Specifically, the testing and treatments for allergies now rivals human healthcare in its sophistication, quality of care and long-term health outcomes.
    Unlike humans, dogs and cats cannot tell us about their dermatological health issues. So we as pet owners must look for the signs. The most common indicators that a pet is suffering from some kind of allergy involve frequent episodes of ear infections, red raised or open sores on the skin, constant licking or biting of paws or groin — sometimes causing wounds that will not go away.
    Allergies present a particular challenge because there can be hundreds (even thousands) of potential allergens that impact pet health, from foods to pollen from grasses, weeds, trees, dust mites and more. Today’s specialty veterinary hospitals have access to the very latest diagnostic tests to get to the bottom of what’s ailing our pet. Among these tests is the Intra Dermal Test (IDT).
    IDT is generally considered the gold standard of testing for identifying allergens that cause pets to suffer from chronic skin and/or ear diseases. IDT involves injections of a series of concentrated allergens into the skin to determine which of them generate allergic reactions in a given animal. The use of fluorescein — a chemical that illuminates the inflammation caused by the injected allergens in order to visualize the strength of individual reactions — is key to accurately diagnosing pet allergies, and is just one of the many ways veterinarians use new technologies to improve care and diagnostics.
    The results of IDT (as well as a review of the pet’s medical history) can then inform comprehensive immunotherapy treatments to relieve suffering. Veterinary dermatologists rely on IDT to build customized treatment plans for patients called Allergen Specific Immuno Therapy or “ASIT” for short.
    ASIT involves a series of injections specifically created for the allergic animal’s skin. These injections, of diluted allergens, are designed to make a pet less sensitive to their allergens over time. In most cases these injections must be continued for life to reduce symptoms, but they are highly effective. Seventy to 90 percent of pets experience a reduction in symptoms as a result of ASIT treatment. These treatments can be delivered even more easily via droplets under the tongue, perfect for pet owners who are squeamish about giving injections to their pet.
    This treatment is very new to the North American field of medicine (both human and veterinary) and underscores just how far innovation in veterinary medicine has come.
    When it’s time to see the vet
    Many pet owners are understandably concerned about taking their animals to the veterinarian because the cost (to say nothing of the fear some animals experience when going do the doctor) may outweigh any perceived reduction in suffering. To help pet owners know when it’s time to bring Fido to the doctor I’ve compiled my “Top Ten” list of dermatological symptoms that should never be ignored:
    •Intense itching of the skin (head shaking, running the face into the carpet, furniture, etc.)
    •Biting at the skin that creates red, raw crusting areas of the skin
    •Multiple ear infections (head shaking, odor from ears, scratching at the ears with hind legs)
    •Paw licking or chewing and frequent infections of the skin in the webbed skin of the paws
    •Staining of the fur of the paws and nails on multiple feet
    •Reoccurring skin infections in the groin, under the shoulders, perianal areas (on or under the tail)
    •Greasy scaling skin and/or fur with odorous skin
    •Hair loss, or thinning of the fur
    •Dark pigmentation of the skin that is chronically infected
    •Sudden depigmentation of skin
    Allergies and other dermatological issues can be as frustrating for pet owners and their veterinarians as they can be for pets. I encourage any pet owner whose animal is experiencing any of these symptoms to consult with their veterinarian.
    https://www.mspca.org/angell_services/dermatology-allergies/

  • Susan

    Hi Lisa yes if you have not yet change his food that would be the first thing I’d be doing & it will be cheaper then having blood test for food allergies that will give false positives, the only true test for food sensitivities is an Elimination Food Diet, you feed 1 novel protein he hasn’t eating before & 1 carb he hasnt eatin or hasnt been eating recent since his skin has gone downhill…..Read the ingredients in the formula he’s eating at the moment & look for a limited ingredient food that has the least ingredients & the ingredients are not what he’s eating at the moment, “California Natural” Lamb Meal & Rice has only 3 ingredients, is he eating Lamb & rice at the moment?? it’s the only premium food I knowof that has only 3 ingredients & isn’t a vet diet & is used for elimination diets. he eats the California Natural for 2 months no treats nothing else is allowed to be feed use the kibble he’s eating for treats also make sure our bathing him weekly in a medicated shampoo like “Malaseb” medicated shampoo, the Malaseb kills any yeast & bacteria on the skin, it relieves any itchy dry skin & puts moisture back into his skin & coat & washes off any allergens that might be on his skin & coat teh Malaseb is excellent, its on Amazon or your vet sells it, Predisone is just a bandaid & can cause health poblems especially age 9, then when you see an improvement in his skin after 2 months eating the limited formula you start adding only 1 new ingredient to his food I’d add sarines in spring water the sardines are very healthy & high in omega 3 what he needs for skin, coat, joints, heart, brain, then after 6 weeks if you see no reaction no itchy skin gas, sloppy poos, you start adding another new ingredient this time add chicken a food you think might be the problem as soon as Patch my boy eats chicken 20mins later his paws go red & hot & he starts licking his hot paw then he starts scratching body & rubbing bum on carpet after eating the chicken for 2 days his skin starts to smell real yeasty, yeasty skin paws & ears is from food sensitivities fod intolerances, then you stop feeding whatever food is making him itch write all this in a diary.. a really good kibble is “Canidae” Pure formula’s but they have more then 3 ingredients, Canidae has about 6-8 ingredients depends with formula you pick it has single proteins, Canidae has limited ingredients high in omega 3 kibble & wet tin for skin & stomach problems, Canidae has their Pure Meadow Senior formula, its turkey meal & chicken meal if you think he can eat chicken & turkey & its not the protein he’s eating at the moment you could give the Canidae a go or teh Canidae Pure Wild its pork has he eatin Pork before? only if you can’t get the California Natural Lamb Meal & Rice.. you have to do something & changing his diet is probably what he needs,… Intradermal skin test is for Environment Allergies & even when you spend all that money $1000+ & find out what in the environment he’s allergic to there’s not much you can really do, start with diet first..

  • anon101

    Until you get him to the veterinary dermatologist for intradermal skin testing and treatment options, the food won’t make much difference (imo)
    Have you asked your vet about a payment plan?
    You may end up spending more in the long run by waiting to start treatment.
    There is no cure for environmental allergies, but there is effective treatment, lifelong.
    I would explore the options with your vet, allergen specific immunotherapy is the most natural treatment.
    However, depending on the severity of symptoms there are other choices.
    The prednisone and such is just to temporarily stop the suffering and decrease the risk of infection.
    Sometimes it is necessary for short periods of time till you start a treatment that is effective.
    (see my posts below)

  • haleycookie

    What sg formula is he on? I’d suggest moving to a limited ingredient diet that’s fish based with omega 3 and 6 in it. I like Canidae’s pure sea and wellness’ simple salmon formula. It’d also be wise to maybe start an elimination diet since you don’t have the money for the tests. Just eliminate as many proteins from his diet, you can start with something like zignature they have a kangaroo formula, proteins like chicken and beef are common allergens. You might try a venison formula or lamb formula. Natures variety has both protein options and it’s a very nice high quality food. Solid gold is pretty good too in my opinion. They have some foods that are better then others though. Also look into a salmon oil supplement. My cousin’s lab has been taking a salmon oil pill every day for a few months now and the improvements in his coat have been amazing. Also raw coconut oil is good as well. A table spoon a day can help the fur and skin. Get with your vet and see if they have any medicated shampoos you can bathe him in to help heal any chewed or dug at areas on his skin.
    I don’t really recommend sconce diet or any of those other brands. They’re full of cheap ingredients that can make issues much worse. I had someone come in that had her dog on the prescription digestion science diet and was paying butt loads of money for it and the dog continued to have worsening problems. She switched to natures variety limited ingredient and voila all issues were gone.

  • Lisa Rinaldi

    I have a 9 yr old male Akita that has been scratching and looking fur in clumps down to his bare skin off and on over the last few years. It clears up a bit but never fully with medications like prednisone and also has had a few ear infections so antibiotics too. I was just told he most likely has a protein allergy. I was told that testing at my vet starts at $1,000 which I can’t afford right now but want to try to help him by possibly changing his food. He’s been eating Solid Gold for years now. What is a better food for his dry skin and possible allergies besides Science Diet which I was also told wasn’t good for an Akita.

  • anon101

    Frequent ear infections are in the environmental allergy family.
    Therefore it is considered a dermatological (skin) issue/problem.
    I would stop wasting time on the internet listening to amateurs (myself included)
    Consult a specialist, a veterinary dermatologist for the best results.
    PS: My dog has not had an ear infection in over 5 years after starting treatment prescribed by a veterinary dermatologist.

  • haleycookie

    Theyre are plenty you could try. One off the top of my head is the canidae pure line. I believe all of them are free from those ingredients except pure sea which has salmon. It could be fed to all your dogs except the puppy or any senior dog. But they do have formulas for puppy’s and seniors if you decide to switch to canidae. But you’ll just have to look into any foods available to you in your price range and have a look at the ingredient lists on them. There’s a lot out there it just takes a bit of sniffing around to find them.

  • anon101

    I found intradermal skin testing done by a veterinary dermatologist to be extremely accurate along with the prescribed treatment that followed.
    As the above poster suggested you could try an elimination diet/prescription food to see if it helps…just in case her symptoms are being caused by food sensitivities. It depends on how serious the dog’s symptoms and how your vet advises you to proceed.

  • Pitlove

    Hi Tiffany-

    The golden standard and only real way to determine if a dog has a food allergy/sensitivity/intolerance is to do an elimination trial. Unfortunately all other food allergy “testing” is not accurate and notoriously yields false negatives and false positives.

    I would go ahead and cancel the blood test and tell your vet you would like to do an elimination diet.

  • anon101

    Probably the blood test. I skipped it and went right to the intradermal skin test on the advice of the veterinary dermatologist that was treating my dog.
    http://www.vetstreet.com/care/allergy-testing excerpt below, click on link for full article.
    Allergy testing is most commonly performed to determine if a pet has atopy. Allergy testing can also help diagnose flea allergy dermatitis. Most veterinarians do not use allergy testing to diagnose food allergies.
    The two most common types of allergy tests used in pets are intradermal skin testing and serum allergy testing:
    Intradermal skin testing. Intradermal skin testing can sometimes be performed at your veterinarian’s office. However, because the allergens used for this test are very specific (they vary depending on where you live), your veterinarian may refer you to a veterinary dermatologist for this test to be performed. Usually, an area of fur is shaved from your pet’s side or abdomen to expose enough skin to perform the test. Using very small needles, tiny amounts of each test allergen are injected just under your pet’s skin in different areas. After a brief waiting period, the injection sites are examined to measure the degree of local allergic response, such as redness or a small hive. Allergens that your pet is not allergic to will not cause a reaction, while allergens that your pet is allergic to will cause a reaction that corresponds to the severity of the allergy. Pets are monitored carefully during the procedure in case a serious reaction occurs and treatment is required.

    Serum allergy testing. Serum allergy testing is performed at a laboratory using a small blood sample taken from your pet. Your veterinarian does not need to shave your pet or have special allergens on hand to perform this test. As with intradermal skin testing, the results of serum allergy testing can reveal which allergens are not causing an allergic reaction in your pet, which ones are causing a mild reaction, and which ones are causing a more serious reaction.
    Depending on which type of allergy test is performed, you may need to discontinue your pet’s allergy medications for a period of time before the test. Otherwise, the test results may be affected. Your veterinarian will tell you which medications can be used and which ones may need to be discontinued.

  • Tiffany McCord

    Not sure what test Vet is going to do. We wanted to test before we start trial and error with food/diet. And yes, they have a couple brands of prescribed vet foods. Thanks for the info.

  • anon101

    Do you mean atopic dermatitis?
    If so, it usually doesn’t have anything to do with the food.
    I hope this article helps http://www.nevetdermatology.com/canine-atopic-dermatitis-treatment/
    For best results consult a veterinary dermatologist, especially if the symptoms have been going on for 1 year/4seasons without a significant response to treatment by the regular vet.

  • Jo-ann Labuschagne

    Ho there i have a dog with atopi which one of your foods will you recommend please.

  • Susan

    Hi Tiffany, you need to do an food elimination trial/diet, 1 novel meat protein & 1 carb to work out what foods are causing his yeasty ears, it’s best to start with a novel protein & carb he hasnt eaten before or has eaten it alot, this way he probably won’t be sensitive too these new ingredients. My boy can’t eat carrots, he starts shaking head/ears & scratching at his ears & when he eats chicken, oats, barley & corn he gets red itchy paws & yeasty skin… You can cooked or do raw elimination diet or start with a limited ingredient kibble/wet food, either a vet diet, there’s Hills D/D Venison & Potato, it’s grain free, gluten free, soy free, or there’s also Royal Canine select protein formula’s, PR, PD, PK wet/kibbles, then when dog is doing realiy well just eating 1 protein & 1 carb diet you start adding 1 new food/ingredient, do not feed any no treats while doing elimination diet & you add the new food to kibble or cooked elimination meal you add new ingredient for 6 weeks, stop if you see a reaction & go back to 1 protin & 1 carb….
    Food sensitivities can take anywhere from 1 day up to 6 weeks to show stomach, ear, paw, skin reaction, this is why you add the new food for for 6 weeks as soon as you see any reaction stop adding the new ingredient…
    another good kibble is “California Natural” Lamb meal & Rice large bites, it has just 3 ingredients like vet diets have but vet diets has no other food contaminates……Yeast has nothing to do with starchy carbs, like potatoes, rice, oats, barley etc it all depends on what foods the dog is sensitive too, also he needs omega 3 in his diet, the vet diets are very high in Omega 3 for the skin, you can givefish/krill oil capsule, give daily with meal or when you start your food elimination diet buy tin sardines in spring water & add 2-3 sardines to his kibble or give the sardines as a treat & make the sardines the first food to trial…
    Salvia or Hair testing can give false positives & aren’t 100% accurate, they can be used as a starting point but then you’ll need to do the elimination food diet & add these foods that were positive for food intolerances & see does his ears start to get yeast…. Good -Luck

  • anon101

    What do you mean by allergy testing? Please, please don’t say a mail-in saliva or hair test.
    For best results consult a veterinary dermatologist, if you have been working with your vet and you have not noticed significant relief of symptoms after 1 year/4 seasons.
    Those hair and saliva tests are scams. They are “food sensitivity” tests, they are not allergy tests, food sensitivities fluctuate and often do not cause the symptoms you have described.
    Go to forums and use the search engine to look up “environmental allergies” see my posts.

  • Tiffany McCord

    I have an English lab with ear infections for a year. Treated bacterial and yeast. Now doing allergy testing. Have her on fortiflora to help her gut immune to help. But need a dog food for this immune reaction. Not skin or gi problems. Anyone have thought on which food for something like this. (Until test kit comes in and results) looking at 4 weeks.

  • Kyla

    We have a french bulldog that is currently on Pro Plan Vet Diets HA due to allergies to egg, salmon, corn, soybean, beef, milk, wheat, and rice (based on allergy test). I understand from my research this isn’t the best food to continue on forever. Is there any recommended foods that we should try for her instead?

    We’d love to be able to put all our dogs on the same food if possible. An all stages food would be ideal since we just brought a puppy into the pack, but we’d keep her on her own if necessary.

  • anon101

    Food does not cause environmental allergies. The dogs are born with a genetic predisposition.

  • anon101

    Yep, that’s when the environmental allergies start, 1 year to 2 years old. They get worse with age, this is just the beginning.
    For best results consult a veterinary dermatologist. There is no quick solution.
    This is a serious condition (environmental allergies) such as diabetes.
    If I were you I would stop wasting time on the internet and get the dog to a specialist! ASAP
    Good Luck.

  • Rob

    Thank you Susan for the information that you gave. It is much appreciated.Hopefully I will get this all worked out for my dog,by the way she is 1 1/2 years old.

  • Susan

    Hi Rob, if your dog does well on the Royal Canie HP dry kibble then around 3 months of just being fed the R/C HP you start adding 1 new ingredient to his/her diet, you add this new ingredient for 6 weeks, stop adding if you see any reactions like gas rumbling noises thru the bowel, smelly farts, sloppy poo/diarrhea, itchy smelly yeasty skin, paws & ears, bum rubbing on ground etc, keep a diary & write down what foods did what, if after you have tried the R/C HP & your dog is still having gas, sloppy poo’s yeasty skin paws & ears then there’s other Hydrolzed vet diets you can try, Royal Canine has their PS,which has potato instead of the rice, Hills has their Z/d which uses corn starch & hydrolyzed chicken liver has the matching hydrolyzed treats or Hills have their D/D formula’s, free from soy protein, Salmon, Duck or Venison, the proteins are single intact proteins, not contaminated like normal pet foods can be while being made & cut….. Purina has their HA, Purina HA is more for dogs who suffer with Intestestinal stress from foods & dogs with sereve IBD, pancreatitis & skin problems, the HA has the lowest fat%…..
    I did my own elimination diet & just used 1 cooked protein & 1 cooked carb & added 1 new ingredient every month, I’ve done a few elimination diets cause of Patches IBD the last one I used Hills D/D venison vet diet but it was end Summer & I couldn’t tell with Patches skin, was he scratching after our walk or from the vet diet or environment alergies but we did it more for his IBD not skin, his poos firmed up so I know he can eat potato & venison. Patches vet said 4-6 weeks to add 1 new ingredient, food intolerance/sensitivities can take 1 day to have a reaction up to 6 weeks to show symptoms, it all depends on your dog, with Patch chicken & carrots he reacts within 20mins of eating them he starts shaking his head/ears from carrots & when he ate raw or cooked chicken he gets his red itchy paws & paws are hot & swollen then he starts his paw licking, then after 5-7days he gets his smelly yeasty skin ….
    There’s also “California Natural” Lamb Meal & Rice small or large bites, it has just 3 ingredients, some vets recommend “California Natural” when the vet diets haven’t helped dogs with IBD & skin problems….Your dog probably has environment allergies as well, so best to start ellimination diets in the cooler months Winter when pollens, flowers aren’t in bloom, when allergy season hasn’t started yet, as they get older they get worse with their allergies so best to work it all out now while your dog is younger, if you want to know what in the envrionment your dog is allergic to then the gold standard test is “Intradermal Skin test” watch this video humans also do have this test, my daughter had it done on her back. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TM3zb0q7pc4&feature=share

  • Debbie Dibble

    If you want to put blame where it belongs, put it on the food manufacturers who keep putting stuff in food that dogs are not suppose to eat. It’s a money scam just like everything else. Make it cheap as they can, whether it is harmful to your dog or not. Then get rich off it.

  • aimee

    My understanding is that Cytopoint was developed as therapy for environmental allergies but I don’t think it is known what effect if any it has on food reactions.

    I don’t think it can be said with any confidence that if injections given at the vet controlled symptoms that food isn’t involved.

  • anon101

    There is no cure for allergies. The veterinary dermatologist that we go to said this at the first visit. “I can’t cure your dog.”
    However, he was able to diagnose and offer effective treatment (lifelong).
    That is as good as it gets for this condition, environmental/seasonal allergies. There is a genetic component, if you want to blame someone, blame the puppy mills, backyard breeders and breeders that continue to breed dogs that have a hereditary condition.

  • anon101

    The cytopoint injections were not available 5+ years ago when I sought treatment for my dog.
    From what I understand cytopoint is promising as a treatment for environmental/seasonal allergies, but has no effect on food sensitivities.
    His dog probably got a shot of prednisone to temporarily stop the suffering (if I had to guess).

  • Rob

    Haha I have heard 4 weeks 6 weeks and 12 weeks to do the food elimination diet.i guess I should do it till symptoms clear up.if they don’t clear up within 12 weeks then I assume it’s environmental then do the skin test.

  • Rob

    Ok thanks

  • Rob

    Ok thanks for the information.

  • aimee

    Yes and she even put the other dog in her house on it too

  • aimee

    Elimination diets are done for 12 weeks. If successful then challenge the dog with the original diet and see if symptoms return, if they don’t then diet wasn’t the cause. If symptoms return then return to the test diets until symptoms are controlled again and then challenge one ingredient at a time, introducing one every 2 weeks or so.

  • Rob

    Your friend continues to just feed her dog the RC hydrolyzed food??

  • aimee

    I wonder what was being given… I’m not so sure you can say if the shots worked then food can be ruled out. I think if it was that cut and dry then food elimination trials wouldn’t need to be done as often as they are needed/recommended to be done by dermatologists.

    I know historically I’ve read adverse food reactions are steroid resistant but I think that statement has been backed off of and I have no idea about the cytopoint injections.

    I’m interested in learning more.

  • aimee

    Allergies are tough.. many dogs have both environmental and food problems making it more complicated.

    The place to start is a good food trial. They are tough to do as you have to make sure nothing crosses the dog’s lips except the trial diet: no flavored medications, no scavenging outside or snacking from the cat box, no dropped food that the dog gets etc.

    After food is ruled out then skin test for environmental allergies.

    I’ve used Royal Canin for my dog for years and been very pleased. The quality control really impressed me. It is a very high quality food.

    A friend of mine followed holistic advice and people’s recommendations from here and her dog continued to suffer for over a year. She then took her dog to a specialist who recommended RC hydrolyzed soy, the same diet her vet had recommended. After switching to it her dog did great and she was gobsmacked.

  • anon101

    http://veterinarymedicine.dvm360.com/allergen-specific-immunotherapy-canine-atopic-dermatitis-making-it-work
    It’s really not that complicated, we were in an out in a little over an hour with a diagnosis, treatment plan, a complete list of allergies and diet advice.
    Two initial visits, then once a year for follow up, the specialist returns calls if something comes up and will communicate with your regular vet should flare ups occur, no additional charge (in my experience).

  • Rob

    Ok thanks

  • anon101

    The blood test for allergies is sometimes recommended, but not as accurate.
    Environmental allergies is usually the culprit. The Veterinary Dermatologist is the best person to recommend what testing is indicated after they examine the dog.
    I never bothered with the blood test, the veterinary dermatologist said it wasn’t necessary.
    My dog has been stable times 5 years, we see the specialist once a year (allergen specific immunotherapy)
    The regular vets were not helpful, back and forth times one year without significant results. Bandaid solutions.
    If you have a serious issue see a specialist.
    See my posts over here: http://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/environmental+allergies/

  • Rob

    What exactly is allergen specific immunotherapy?Is that just monthly allergy shots??

  • Rob

    I have been to 2 veterinarians and both said they think she has a food allergy/sensitivity.If the food trial does not work then I will do the environmental test.So is the intradermal skin test only good for environmental allergies and not for food allergies??What about blood testing for environmental allergies?

  • Rob

    Yes the vet prescribed food is expensive.Im going to use the vet prescribed food to see if the symptoms disappear and if they do then I will try bringing other foods into her diet to see what she’s allergic to.Believe me I do not want her on this prescribed food for the rest of her life if I can help it.

  • anon101

    Monthly shots, an excellent remedy!
    Btw: If the shots work that means that the dog’s symptoms have absolutely nothing to do with food.
    Environmental allergies are a serious condition and require lifelong treatment.
    If you really want to get to the root of the problem, go to a veterinary dermatologist and get intradermal skin testing done, allergen specific immunotherapy is the best, most natural treatment.
    Good luck, whatever you decide.
    Oh, btw, most homeopathic vets are quacks.

  • Rob

    While feeding her a chicken and rice formulated dog food I noticed the allergies swapped to a salmon and pumpkin kibble and no changes for the better.Thats when I put her on the hydrolyzed kibble. I thought I was suppose to try the hydrolyzed kibble for 4 to 6 weeks and if the symptoms clear up I then start adding other foods into her diet to see what she is allergic to.
    Am I understanding this process or am I doing it incorrectly??Believe me I do not want to have to keep feeding her the prescription kibble forever.

  • haleycookie

    Vet prescribed foods can be a good tool but are insanely expensive for their low quality ingredients so until you try an elimination test with other brands and proteins I wouldn’t just call it quits and feed the hyrdolyzed for the rest of her life. That would be a last resort after trying other foods. Just buy small bags and attempt to slowly transition over. If you cannot find something else that works then the vet diet will most likely be your last option to keep your pup on.

  • Rob

    Thank you Aimee for the information.Im doing the food trial now by using the Royal Canin hydrolyzed protein kibble to see how that works.My dog has been on this kibble for the past 5 days. I was just hoping that there was a quicker solution to this problem.I read other articles from holistic veterinarians and they say do not use the veterinarian prescribed kibble.So I’m kind of in the middle of what I should do about this problem.I just want my pup to get better I hate seeing her suffer.The veterinarians that I have been to seem to just want to suppress the symptoms instead of getting to the root of the problem.If I did not mention the prescribed kibble to the veterinarian and asked questions about it I think she would of just wanted to do a monthly shots.Thats what I’m trying to avoid if at all possible.

  • aimee

    Hi Rob,
    On an individual basis you will find that there are people who strongly believe the test worked for them. Bloodletting used to be the standard of medical care because it “worked”. Everything seems to work sometimes which is why to really evaluate if something works testing with controls is done

    Recently immune IQ was tested in the manner and the results were published. The company closed their doors probably to prevent the FDA going after them.

    I sent in IV solution as my saliva sample and cotton from the cotton swabs as my hair sample and got a report back reporting the numerous sensitivities my “dog” had. The company withdrew the product and relaunched it under a new name and now requires a
    disclaimer be signed before they will run the sample.

    The really expensive California based saliva test also fared poorly when tested under controlled conditions. The DVM behind it likes to sue people and the DVM that tested it didn’t want have to deal with a lawsuit so didn’t publish. I heard a new group from one of the major vet schools tested it and also found it not accurate. We’ll have to see if they publish.

    Bottom line put your money towards a good food trial.

  • anon101

    All hair and saliva food sensitivity tests are scams.
    They are not allergy tests.
    Work with your vet regarding an elimination/prescription diet to rule out food sensitivities.
    For the most accurate and the best allergy testing and treatment options have your vet refer you to a veterinary dermatologist. Allergies are complicated and require lifelong treatment. There are effective treatments, your money would be better spent on a specialist rather than phony baloney stuff.
    Buyer beware!