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anon101

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  • in reply to: Small Bites Dog Food #141212 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    The oat groats in dog food are highly processed and pretty much the same thing as oatmeal. Same as the pearled barley, everything is broken down already.
    It’s been recently discussed here
    https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/topic/oat-groats/

    The Wellness turkey and oatmeal looks good too, I’d get a small bag of whatever food you choose and see how it goes.
    PS: It’s 28% protein (Wellness turkey and oatmeal) according to Chewy dot com

    in reply to: Small Bites Dog Food #141175 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Thanks for the feedback.
    I was surprised at how small some of the Fromm kibble are, the Salmon La Veg is our current favorite, I have a 9 pound dog with a sensitive stomach that really appreciates the small bites.
    Like you mentioned, I also add a topper, a bite of chopped boiled chicken, scrambled egg and such and always a splash of water.

    • This reply was modified 2 days, 10 hours ago by  anon101.
    in reply to: Small Bites Dog Food #141161 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    The original poster:
    “I have been looking for a easily commercially available, well rated (4-5 stars), small bites dog food made with poultry and grain and with protein 25% or less”.

    Yes, and that is what I gave my opinion on (previous posts) before I was sidetracked with comments that are not relevant to your question and I made the mistake of responding.

    I would narrow your selections down to about 3 choices and then consult with a veterinary healthcare professional as to which would be best for your dogs and their specific needs. It’s best if you have a vet that is familiar with your dogs.

    Keep in mind that what you read on forums are considered opinions and not necessarily facts.

    Best of luck

    in reply to: Small Bites Dog Food #141140 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    “Just correcting misinformation about Fromm’s staffing”
    Well, in that case.
    Bump: https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/topic/small-bites-dog-food/#post-141131

    in reply to: Small Bites Dog Food #141138 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    You forgot, they have a veterinarian (consultant employee) too 🙂
    Yes! That’s more than good enough for me.
    My dogs are thriving on Fromm. My vet approves and he’s seen and heard a lot of things over the years.

    There are many other good foods out there too.

    @bonnie F
    What were you feeding before (that went out of business)?
    My friend’s dog is doing well on Nutrisource. She switched from Zignature as I did due to the grain-free scare although neither of us had any issues with Zignature.

    I dog-sit for her once in a while and the Nutrisource kibble doesn’t look big to me.
    Here it is https://www.amazon.com/Nutrisource-Adult-Chicken-Rice-Food/dp/B07D5D9BNB/ref=sr_1_5?crid=27KISNSV3VE03&keywords=nutrisource+dog+food&qid=1561136201&s=pet-supplies&sprefix=ntrisource+dog+food%2Cpets%2C317&sr=1-5

    in reply to: Small Bites Dog Food #141136 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    http://www.differencebetween.info/difference-between-consultant-and-full-time-employee
    excerpts below (out of context)
    Key Difference: A full time employee is an employee of the company that works there full time. They have all the benefits of employment, including being on the payroll, vacations, benefits, overtime, etc
    A consultant is a specialized professional who provides expert advice in their field. Hence, they are often hired for a particular task or project on which they can apply their expertise or give advice.

    A consultant, on the other hand, is different.
    While they are also an employee of the company, their role can vary tremendously depending on the contract that they have with the company.
    At the core of the definition, a consultant is a specialized professional who provides expert advice in their field. Hence, they are often hired for a particular task or project on which they can apply their expertise or give advice. For example: a tax consultant may be brought on to handle the finances as required on a new project that the company is developing, or perhaps to go over the company’s books to put them in order.

    in reply to: Small Bites Dog Food #141134 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member
    in reply to: Small Bites Dog Food #141133 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    http://vetnutrition.tufts.edu/2016/03/when-should-i-switch-my-pet-to-a-senior-diet/
    “Although it is a common belief, reduced dietary protein is not beneficial for the healthy older dog or cat. In fact, lower protein diets for older dogs and cats may have negative effects by contributing to muscle loss. Therefore, dogs and cats should not be fed a reduced protein diet just because they are aging. The “optimal” protein level for older dogs and cats, however, is still controversial. Some companies make senior diets with lower protein while others actually make their senior diets with increased protein. Just like there’s no evidence for benefits of a low protein diet, it also is not clear that high protein diets are beneficial or even optimal for seniors.”
    Cornell Vet. 1985 Apr;75(2):324-47.
    Nutrition and metabolism of the geriatric dog.
    Sheffy BE, Williams AJ, Zimmer JF, Ryan GD.
    Abstract
    Sixteen 10-12-year-old and eight 1-year-old dogs were studied over a two year period to determine comparative differences in physiological response to 4 diets varying in protein content and percentages of energy contributed by protein. The ability of old dogs to utilize nutrients as supplied by these foods was not significantly different from that of young adult dogs. Except for indices of mitogenic stimulation and serum urea nitrogen (SUN) other physiological parameters studied were not affected by the diet fed. Regardless of diet, old dogs had significantly higher serum levels of cholesterol, phosphorus and alkaline phosphatase and had lower indices of mitogenic stimulation than did young dogs.

    in reply to: Small Bites Dog Food #141131 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Bump:

    You can call Fromm for more information and where you can purchase.
    https://frommfamily.com/ 1- 800-325-6331
    According to the person I spoke to at Fromm they have a veterinarian and a nutritionist on staff.

    You can draw your own conclusions after speaking to someone directly at Fromm.

    They won’t come here despite all the misinformation. The person I spoke to said to encourage people that have questions to feel free to contact them with any concerns, also their website is very informative.

    in reply to: Small Bites Dog Food #141129 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    https://www.gofromm.com/fromm-four-star-nutritionals-salmon-a-la-veg-food-for-dogs “small kibbles”

    You can call Fromm for more information and where you can purchase.
    https://frommfamily.com/ 1- 800-325-6331
    According to the person I spoke to at Fromm they have a veterinarian and a nutritionist on staff.

    in reply to: Farmers Dog..anyone feed this? #141027 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Well, that’s nice. Glad you found a food that you like.

    I don’t agree with your choice for obvious reasons.

    If you are so sure this is a wonderful food why are you looking for validation on forums?

    No veterinary health care professionals here. No veterinarians here. No veterinary nutritionists here.

    BTW: No veterinary healthcare professionals are mentioned via the dog food link you provided.

    Good luck!

    PS: Call them up and ask if it’s okay if you eat the product yourself, lol

    You went through a traumatic experience with a dog or two (according to your prior posts)

    Hence, you are vulnerable to scams . Homeopathic medicine is a business just as much as traditional medicine is.
    They have to make money to survive. They know how to play you…

    But at least traditional medicine is backed by science.

    in reply to: Farmers Dog..anyone feed this? #140992 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    https://rationalwiki.org/wiki/Appeal_to_nature. excerpts below

    Notably, the appeal to nature is often implicit in marketing, simply by using terms like “natural”, “all natural”, “natural goodness”, “organic”, “pesticide free”, or “no artificial ingredients”.
    Deconstruction
    Appeal to nature is a fallacious argument, because the mere “naturalness” of something is unrelated to its positive or negative qualities – natural things can be bad or harmful (such as infant death and the jellyfish above), and unnatural things can be good (such as clothes, especially when you are in Siberia). Another problem is the distinction of what is “natural” and what is not, which can be murky: crude oil occurs naturally, but it’s not something you’d like poured on seabirds or your garden. The word “natural” itself has no exact definition and can be used in multiple ways, thus allowing equivocation.

    in reply to: Farmers Dog..anyone feed this? #140957 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2012/01/misleading-advertising-for-raw-pet-food-again/
    excerpt below

    “Finally, the terms “human grade” and “restaurant grade” are frequently used for the ingredients despite the fact that these are not legally defined terms or part of the USDA meat grading system. Use of such meaningless terms cannot be anything but misleading and deceptive since they appear to indicate an official judgment on the quality of the food’s ingredients when the manufacturers must know that no such judgment has been made by anyone but them”.

    https://www.petfoodindustry.com/blogs/10-debunking-pet-food-myths-and-misconceptions/post/6917-are-human-grade-pet-foods-really-human-grade excerpt below

    AAFCO guidelines for human grade claims
    In its Official Publication (2018), AAFCO clearly outlines the guidelines for pet food companies wanting to make human grade claims. The guidelines are broken down into four parts on pages 151 to 152. For purposes of this blog, I will abbreviate these parts:
    The use of the term “human grade” is only acceptable to the product as a whole. Every ingredient and finished food must be stored, handled, processed and transported in a manner that is consistent with current good manufacturing processes (cGMPs).
    The definition “human grade” is false and misleading if the finished good as a whole is not human edible. Human grade claims cannot be made on individual ingredients if the finished good is not human grade.
    For substantiation of human grade claims, a manufacturer must have documentation for the following:
    a. That each ingredient is fit for human consumption
    b. Every ingredient and finished food is stored, handled, processed and transported in a manner consistent and compliant with cGMPs for human edible foods in 21 CFR part 117.
    c. The manufacturing facility is licensed to produce human food by the appropriate authority (local, county or state public health authorities).
    4. A pet food with human grade claims must be labeled for its intended use (e.g., dog food).

    in reply to: Farmers Dog..anyone feed this? #140956 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    No, most of us have been advised by our veterinarians to avoid small companies that have not been around a long time.

    Also “Plans start at $3/day and include free shipping” That comes to $90 a month, minimum.

    No Thanks!

    PS: Sounds like a scam.

    in reply to: Dog flight Cabin vs Cargo in a long flight #140941 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Definitely Cabin (business class with you as a service dog).

    Surely you have heard the horror stories of what can go wrong in Cargo.

    in reply to: Local Dogfood for Three Senior Dogs? #140752 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Consider Fromm https://www.gofromm.com/fromm-family-reduced-activity-senior-gold-food-for-dogs

    Never heard of the brand you mentioned. I avoid small companies. It’s not about the ingredients.

    in reply to: Purina dog food #140728 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    I guess we have a misunderstanding.
    Glad your dog is doing well.
    Peace.

    in reply to: Purina dog food #140682 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    You are listening to too many sources, some are VERY UNRELIABLE.

    I will no longer respond to any of your posts, except to correct information that I believe may cause harm to an animal.

    Best of luck.

    PS: You keep referring to medication as drugs, not cool. Stop spreading negative propaganda.

    Homeopathic vets are dangerous! Find out the hard way. Many of us have.

    in reply to: Purina dog food #140680 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2017/04/latest-integrative-nonsense-from-the-integrative-veterinary-care-journal-spring-2017/
    excerpt below, click on link for full article and comments.

    Alternative medicine practitioners have had a lot of success marketing their methods to the mainstream veterinary profession by obscuring or downplaying the most egregiously unscientific and ridiculous of their beliefs and practices when speaking outside of their own groups. They will often claim an acceptance of scientific evidence, though not to the extent that it overrides their personal experiences or anecdotes. And they will employ the term “integrative medicine” to suggest that they consider all therapies, conventional or alternative, equally and fairly before selecting the right method for each patient. The outwardly reasonable marketing of such integrative medicine can be very effective at convincing reasonable, mostly science-based animal owners and veterinarians to take seriously methods that, when understood fully, are deeply unreasonable and incompatible with science.

    in reply to: Purina dog food #140679 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    “Dog Journal is doesn’t sound like voodoo science to me”.

    Well it does to me.

    https://www.petcarerx.com/article/what-can-i-do-about-my-dogs-anxiety/703 excerpt below
    For some dogs, medication to reduce anxiety may be recommended. Dogs can be given anxiety medicine like tranquilizers to help reduce short term stress, such as an airplane flight or noisy construction project near the home that will only last for a certain time. Other pets may need long term medication, like Clomicalm. Anti-anxiety drugs must be prescribed by a veterinarian, and if you choose a homeopathic medicine, be sure to consult your vet beforehand.

    Though seeing your pet anxious can be stressful, it is important for pet owners to remain calm during a bout of anxiety. With the right care and treatment, anxiety can be reduced and sometimes treated completely.

    Also, some helpful articles here: http://skeptvet.com/Blog/?s=dog+anxiety

    in reply to: Purina dog food #140659 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    None of the information you provided in your prior comment is in the article you linked to.

    Whole Dog Journal is a homeopathic site, so many science based folks would disregard anything they have to say anyway.
    Thanks for your opinion.

    in reply to: Purina dog food #140656 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    https://petfood.aafco.org/ excerpt below, click on link for full article

    AAFCO does not regulate, test, approve or certify pet foods in any way.

    AAFCO establishes the nutritional standards for complete and balanced pet foods, and it is the pet food company’s responsibility to formulate their products according to the appropriate AAFCO standard.

    It is the state feed control official’s responsibility in regulating pet food to ensure that the laws and rules established for the protection of companion animals and their custodians are complied with so that only unadulterated, correctly and uniformly labeled pet food products are distributed in the marketplace and a structure for orderly commerce.

    in reply to: Purina dog food #140655 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Is this from Susan Thixton’s site again? She is not a veterinarian. She is not a veterinary nutritionist.
    A link to the source would be appreciated especially when you quote someone or copy & paste.

    The AAFCO https://www.aafco.org/
    Discuss your concerns with your vet. Best of luck.

    in reply to: Same Food, Loose Stools #140644 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    https://www.gofromm.com/fromm-four-star-nutritionals-salmon-a-la-veg-food-for-dogs

    Both are doing well on this as a base. The terrier was fine on Classic Adult but my other one with allergies does best on a fish based food. It is easier to have them on the same food. I don’t “rotate”.

    I do change up the toppers and add a splash of water to meals.

    in reply to: Same Food, Loose Stools #140641 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Well that’s nice, glad you have it all figured out.
    Best of luck.

    in reply to: Same Food, Loose Stools #140639 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    I tried Purina Pro Plan Focus Sensitive, meh, it’s okay. I prefer Fromm.

    I think the Purina Pro Plan is a bland food so it might work for your dog.

    I would continue to work closely with your vet. Best of luck.

    in reply to: Same Food, Loose Stools #140638 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Eating grass is a red flag that something is wrong with the dog!
    The only dog I ever had that did that (more than just once in a blue moon) died young of an aggressive form of cancer.
    I am talking about a span of dog ownership over 30 years.

    in reply to: Same Food, Loose Stools #140636 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Dogs eat grass because they are nauseous, they are trying to induce vomiting. It is not normal to eat grass. I would try to stop them.

    I would talk to your vet about prescription food/therapeutic diet. That is if the Purina Pro Plan Focus doesn’t do the trick.

    Also, more diagnostic testing may be indicated to get to the cause.

    Visit this site (link below), use the search engine to look up various topics, nothing is being sold at that site.

    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2016/07/more-nonsense-from-holistic-vets-about-commercial-therapeutic-diets/

    in reply to: find Good diet #140481 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    If your dog is going to weigh more than 40/50 pounds as an adult you may want to consider a large breed puppy formula.
    Example: https://www.gofromm.com/fromm-family-large-breed-puppy-gold-food-for-dogs

    Hope this helps
    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2010/01/nutrition-in-large-breed-puppies/

    in reply to: find Good diet #140480 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Fromm Classic Adult (as a base)
    https://www.gofromm.com/fromm-family-classic-adult-dog-food

    Assuming your dog is in good health, if not, listen to what the treating vet recommends.

    in reply to: Weight loss food that isn't grain free #140455 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Not true from what I understand!
    But, you are entitled to your opinion as am I.

    in reply to: Weight loss food that isn't grain free #140451 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    What’s True
    “Baby carrots are often treated with small amounts of chlorine as an antimicrobial measure to reduce contamination”.
    excerpt from https://www.snopes.com/fact-check/baby-carrots/

    Chlorine is bleach.
    And they are a choking hazard due to their size, not all dogs chew on them but instead will try to eat a bite size carrot with one gulp.

    On the other hand they will chew on a whole carrot as if it is a bone.
    But, know that too much veggies can cause loose stools.
    I find it works for 1 snack per day.

    in reply to: Large and Giant Breed Puppy Nutrition #140370 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    https://frommfamily.com/about/food-safety/

    Speak to your vet. Lot’s of erroneous information on the internet.

    in reply to: Large and Giant Breed Puppy Nutrition #140362 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member
    in reply to: Weight loss food that isn't grain free #140346 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    https://www.gofromm.com/dog?specs=f_Attributes:Weight+Control!!-10!!

    We switched from Zignature to Fromm due to the grain free scare, no problems with Zignature

    Happy with Fromm and my vet approves.

    All healthy dogs act like they are starving! Don’t let them fool you. Try a raw carrot once a day as a snack.

    Do not use baby carrots they are bleached with chemicals and are a choking hazard due to their size.

    in reply to: Inflammatory bowel disease #140341 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/topic/inflammatory-bowel-disease/#post-140295

    Antibiotics and steroids are often prescribed for environmental allergies and other ailments. It’s a band aid fix. You are not getting to the root of the problem.

    The first step would be to get an accurate diagnosis via an internal medicine specialist or a veterinary dermatologist, whatever your vet thinks might be the most helpful.

    PS: Hope this helps http://skeptvet.com/Blog/?s=food+allergies

    How long did you try the prescription food for? Did you contact the vet to let him know of your concerns?
    Maybe more diagnostic testing is indicated? See what the treating vet advises, not the internet.

    How old is the dog? Has she had annual checkups? How did her last lab values look? Blood work is a good diagnostic tool.

    in reply to: Nutrisource #140314 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    @ haleycookie
    Maybe this is someone under 18 or something? I will ignore from now on, hopefully the person will consult a veterinary healthcare professional with their concerns.

    in reply to: Nutrisource #140299 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    There is no bad list. There is no good list. Please discuss with your vet. All kinds of bogus information on the internet.

    The only good food is the food that agrees with your dog. It does not matter how other people’s dogs have done on it.

    And judging by the amount of various foods you have tried, if I was you I would get a referral for a internal medicine specialist if your dogs issues continue. Especially if you have tried prescription/therapeutic food through your regular vet without positive results.

    Also, 2 or 3 servings mean nothing, it takes at least a month to see if the food agrees with the dog.

    PS: Maybe your dog is sick? A healthy dog has a good appetite.

    Has he had a thorough workup? Labs? What did his last bloodwork look like?

    in reply to: Inflammatory bowel disease #140295 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    “My dog is itchy but vets have said she is just an itchy dog. It could be allergies”.

    Ask your vet for a referral to an internal medicine specialist or a veterinary dermatologist.

    Her issues may have nothing to do with the food.

    in reply to: Nutrisource #140292 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    The same folks on this site that will bash Zignature, will bash Nutrisource, it’s the same parent company “Tuffy’s”

    They have already told you the ONLY foods they approve of.

    But then again, no one on this site is a veterinary healthcare professional nor are any of them a veterinary nutritionist.

    • This reply was modified 2 weeks, 1 day ago by  anon101.

    anon101
    Member

    NVM means nevermind. (internet slang)

    I was going to comment but changed my mind.


    anon101
    Member

    NVM

    in reply to: CBD Oil as Treatment for IBS IBD #140262 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Re: “I understand you rather have a holistic vet”

    All veterinarians (traditional and homeopathic) consider themselves to practice holistic medicine

    Holistic (definition)
    “A practice of medicine that focuses on the whole patient, and addresses the social, emotional, and spiritual needs of a patient as well as their physical treatment”.

    Maybe you are confusing homeopathic with holistic?

    in reply to: CBD Oil as Treatment for IBS IBD #140251 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Hope this helps
    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2018/07/evidence-update-promising-clinical-trial-of-cbd-for-arthritis-treatment-in-dogs/
    Check the comments too.

    What does your vet advise? That’s who I would listen to.

    in reply to: oat groats?? #140245 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Yes, that’s correct.

    There is no comparison between raw oats and seeds that are in bird feed to cooked processed oat ingredients and such that are in dog food.

    in reply to: oat groats?? #140239 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Oat groats/oatmeal/oat fiber/whole oats are all pretty much the same thing. Especially when they are cooked and processed properly.

    It’s not rocket science!


    anon101
    Member

    This article is for humans but you get the idea.
    https://www.livestrong.com/article/153409-what-are-the-most-toxic-vitamins/ excerpt below
    Vitamin A
    Toxicity in vitamin A is known as hypervitaminosis A. Symptoms of vitamin A toxicity are mild headaches, nausea, hair loss and blurred vision. Major adverse effects of vitamin A toxicity include birth defects, liver abnormalities, reduced bone mineral density, and central nervous system disorders, according to the NIH. The UL for adults is 3,000 micrograms of vitamin A daily. The recommended daily intake, however, is just 700 micrograms for women and 900 micrograms for men.

    Vitamin D
    Excess vitamin D accumulates in the liver and can cause bone calcification, headaches, weakness, nausea, vomiting, constipation, kidney stones and frequent thirst and urination. Severe symptoms range from kidney damage and bone weakness to growth retardation in infants and children. The UL for vitamin D is 100 micrograms per day, and you need just 20 micrograms daily to maintain your health.


    anon101
    Member

    Yeah, vitamin D and vitamin A are obviously toxic in large amounts.
    Note recent dog food recalls

    PS: I would only use supplements recommended by the vet (if any) Most are not necessary.

    • This reply was modified 2 weeks, 4 days ago by  anon101.

    anon101
    Member

    “vitamins A, D and E”

    Just noticed this. Some vitamins can be toxic in high dosages. Did you contact a vet? I hope all is well.

    Update?


    anon101
    Member

    Another option https://www.aspca.org/pet-care/animal-poison-control
    There may be a charge

Viewing 50 posts - 1 through 50 (of 2,144 total)