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anon101

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  • in reply to: Grain-free diets linked to heart disease? #131168 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    The latest

    https://www.fda.gov/AnimalVeterinary/NewsEvents/CVMUpdates/ucm630991.htm?utm_campaign=2-19-2019-DCMUpdate&utm_medium=email&utm_source=Eloqua
    Excerpt:
    Based on the information gathered as part of our investigation to date, our advice to pet owners remains consistent. The agency has not identified specific recommendations about diet changes for dogs who are not displaying DCM symptoms, but encourages pet owners to consult directly with their veterinarians for their animal’s dietary advice. FDA-CVM investigative activities include:
    Analyzing cases statistically to search for correlations between diagnosed DCM cases and what those dogs did or did not eat.
    Working with the Veterinary Laboratory Investigation and Response Network (Vet-LIRN), a collaboration of government and veterinary diagnostic laboratories to test blood, serum and tissues from affected animals.
    Collaborating with Chesapeake Veterinary Cardiology Associates (CVCA) to collect case summaries and blood/serum/tissue of dogs diagnosed with DCM to see if there are unique factors that separate diet-associated DCM from genetic. The FDA is also reviewing echocardiograms of dogs who are not showing symptoms of DCM to evaluate the significance of early changes in heart function.
    Consulting with board certified veterinarians in animal nutrition to identify nutritional factors such as nutrient bioavailability and ingredient digestibility that may contribute to the development of heart disease.
    Examining ingredient sourcing/processing and product formulation with pet food manufacturers.

    in reply to: Trying to decide on Best food for “puppy” #131167 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Again, I defer to the veterinarian that has examined your pet, he can give you the best estimate of age and nutritional requirements for your dog.
    Did you read the article (link) I sent you?
    That’s the best advice you will get from a veterinarian that has NOT examined your dog.

    I for one don’t bother with “puppy food” and go straight to adult.
    The large breeds puppies needing this and that is a new thing. Discuss with your vet.
    Good luck

    PS: “The shelter told us that we could switch him to adult food after he finished the mix of adult and puppy that they sent him home with”.
    Sounds like sage advice.
    Fromm Classic Adult is a good food (my vet agrees) https://www.gofromm.com/fromm-family-classic-adult-dog-food
    Add a topper ( a tablespoon of canned food or cooked chicken or scrambled egg) and a splash of water and you’re good to go!
    Always have fresh water available 24/7

    Oh, and please do not free feed (leave food down all day) that would explain the rapid weight gain, not good. Two meals per day, measured amounts, and an occasional snack is enough.
    Exercise, start walking every day! Start brushing the teeth once a day, check YouTube for how to videos.

    in reply to: Trying to decide on Best food for “puppy” #131113 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    I hope that you find this site helpful
    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/?s=large+breed+puppy+food

    Also, find a vet that you like and trust go in for routine checkups, an initial evaluation.
    Go from there.


    anon101
    Member

    I hope you find this site helpful, it is run by a veterinarian. Nothing is being sold there.

    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/category/nutrition/

    in reply to: Sudden GERD in RF Chis #131059 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Get them to a veterinarian, ASAP for diagnosis and treatment.

    I would stop all raw food immediately. The veterinarian will probably advise a bland diet after GI blockages are ruled out.

    The veterinarian will advise what to feed once they are stable, assuming they respond to treatment.
    Good luck.

    You may find this site helpful.
    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/?s=raw+diet

    in reply to: Help! Puppy food #130894 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Both Fromm and Pro Plan have puppy formulas
    Anyway many of us pet owners don’t bother with puppy formulas and go right to adult.
    Check with your vet if you have any concerns.
    Good luck

    in reply to: Help! Puppy food #130824 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Consider Pro Plan Focus for sensitive skin and stomach or Fromm Classic Adult (1949 recipe) as a base. Add a bit of soft food and a splash of water.
    If he is not a water drinker add a bit more of water to the meal (1/4 cup)

    As a topper: https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/topic/grain-free-2/#post-109751
    Instead of canned food.

    PS: The symptoms you describe may not be related to his diet. Please consult with your vet. Find a vet that you like and trust, go for routine checkups. That’s the best way.

    • This reply was modified 1 week ago by  anon101.
    in reply to: How can I help my dog to gain weight? #130745 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    If that is too much work for you, boil or scramble an egg (no milk) and add to his kibble meal with a splash of water.

    Has he had a senior checkup? Lab work? Kind of important. He may have a medical condition that will respond to treatment.

    Find a vet that you like and trust, then listen to him.

    in reply to: How can I help my dog to gain weight? #130744 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Dogs love chicken, just add a little to his kibble with a splash of water

    I boil a small chicken once a month in a huge pot, nothing added, then let it simmer for 3 to 4 hours.
    Let it cool for a couple of hours. You may have to put it in the fridge for at least 2 hours.
    When cool enough to handle, remove the chicken and debone, be very careful and throw out small pieces and such as tiny bones could be in there. When in doubt, throw out.
    Put the pot of broth in the fridg on cold temp for 24 hours, the fat will rise to the top so that you can easily remove it.
    Separate the broth in individual containers or freezer baggies (3 or 4 day supply each) store in freezer.
    Do the same for the chicken meat.
    Its a bit of work and messy, but cost effective, and you know for sure that there are no added ingredients.
    The store bought has preservatives and salt. The more expensive brand in the organic section might be a little better.

    in reply to: lawsuits against Orjien/Acana #130737 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    We have had this discussion before:
    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2018/05/whos-behind-the-the-truth-about-pet-cancer/
    (excerpt from article below)
    Susan Thixton
    Ms. Thixton is a vehement activist at war with the pet food industry, government regulators, and anyone who doesn’t share her views about pet nutrition. She blames the death of one of her dogs on a preservative in pet food and identifies this experience as the genesis of her crusade.
    Unfortunately, her passion is not matched by a respect for science or evidence or a very sophisticated understanding of epidemiology, nor does she have any apparent willingness to consider she might be mistaken or others might know more than she does about such issues.
    Ms. Thixton is one of these “experts” whose expertise consists of all the information she can find that supports what she is determined to believe no matter what. She has served as a public member of AAFCO, the group that generates much animal feed regulation, but was dismissed in 2017 for personal attacks against other board members. She expresses deep contempt for science and for anyone who doesn’t see the industry/government conspiracy poisoning our pets that she warns about, and her participation in this series illustrates the degree to which it is ideologically driven.

    in reply to: lawsuits against Orjien/Acana #130733 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    I agree. But, that’s a different kettle of fish.

    Spoke to my vet the other day and his advice was to stay away from small companies, boutique, grain free. They are more inclined not to hire veterinary nutritionists or do feeding trials and testing as they should.

    I told him I was currently using Purina Pro Plan and Fromm. He approved of both, especially Fromm.
    Fromm has been around a long time, I like the Classic Adult (1949 recipe) as a base and add to it.

    That being said, your vet may have a different recommendation.

    in reply to: lawsuits against Orjien/Acana #130652 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member
    in reply to: Dressler Cancer Diet #130647 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Quote: “There is nothing that says you can’t do both.”

    That’s not always true. Supplements can interfere with the absorption and effectiveness of some prescription medications.

    Best to check with the vet that is treating your dog first before acting on stuff that you read on the internet.

    in reply to: Nylabone Nubs – Caution #130643 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Thanks for posting this warning.

    The same thing can happen with bones, any hard object really.
    Bowel obstruction.

    in reply to: Frantic gulping and swallowing #130580 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Trust your intuition. Find another groomer.
    Or better yet, buy the equipment, take a course, buy a book “Dog Grooming for Dummies”
    and do it yourself.
    That’s what I have been doing the last several years. The equipment pays for itself.

    PS: Stuff does happen no matter how careful the groomer is, maybe insist on observing, although a lot of groomers do not allow. They say the dog won’t calm down because you are there.

    in reply to: Digestion time #130522 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    @ Christie B

    Check out Fromm Classic Adult https://www.gofromm.com/fromm-family-classic-adult-dog-food
    as a base, most veterinarians approve.
    Pro Plan Sensitive Skin and Stomach is good too.

    PS: Forget about raw, forget about supplements, listen to your vet

    Suggestions for a topper:
    I boil a small chicken once a month in a huge pot, nothing added, then let it simmer for 3 to 4 hours.
    Let it cool for a couple of hours.
    When cool enough to handle, remove the chicken and debone, be very careful and throw out small pieces and such as tiny bones could be in there. When in doubt, throw out.
    Put the pot of broth in the fridg on cold temp for 24 hours, the fat will rise to the top so that you can easily remove it.
    Separate the broth in individual containers or freezer baggies (3 or 4 day supply each) store in freezer.
    Do the same for the chicken meat.
    Its a bit of work and messy, but cost effective, and you know for sure that there are no added ingredients.
    The store bought has preservatives and salt. The more expensive brand in the organic section might be a little better.

    in reply to: Royal Canid Urinary SO – a scam?? #130416 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Also, diet is just part of the treatment.

    https://bichonhealth.org/kidneysbladder/management-of-bichons-with-urinary-stones/

    excerpts below, click on link for full article

    It has long been recognized that some Bichons Frises have a predisposition to formation of urinary stones (uroliths). This condition is known as urolithiasis. There are several types of stones that can form in the bladder, with struvite (also called magnesium triple phosphate or “infection” stones) and calcium oxalate being the most common in Bichons. The most important preventative for stone formation is free access to fresh water. For a dog predisposed to stone formation, there are other considerations as well. This article is intended to provide the pet owner with a better understanding of the prevention and treatment of urinary stones. Good veterinary treatment is the most reliable resource for the ongoing care of your dog. You may wish to copy this article for your veterinarian.

    in reply to: Royal Canid Urinary SO – a scam?? #130415 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    It depends on the type of stones, you may want to consider consulting with a specialist for follow up care. There are prescription meds for stubborn cases, talk to your vet.

    Below copied from a previous post:

    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2016/07/more-nonsense-from-holistic-vets-about-commercial-therapeutic-diets/

    Also, if the dog is overweight, get the extra weight off, increase walks/exercise/activity.

    “Dogs that get urinary tract infections and bladder stones tend to have a genetic predisposition, combine that with not enough water intake, not enough opportunities to urinate and you have a problem”.

    “Whatever you decide to feed, add water to the kibble or canned food, even presoak and add water. Take out to urinate at least every 4 hours (every 2 hours is ideal) stagnant conditions in the bladder are conducive to bladder stone formation”.
    “Always have fresh water available for the dog 24/7”.
    “Regarding supplements, I would check with your vet first. He may recommend something specific for your dog”. Otherwise, I would be careful, not all supplements are benign.

    Good luck

    in reply to: Medicated Shampoo #130232 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    I buy it in the gallon size (cost effective) and use it as my veterinary dermatologist recommends in conjunction with other prescribed treatments.

    My veterinarian confirms the product mentioned from PetEdge (1st post) is comparable to Malaseb.

    Malaseb’s label has changed and it has been impossible to find it in the larger sizes.
    I have also noted a price increase.

    in reply to: Medicated Shampoo #130136 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Also:
    “For those of you that use Malaseb shampoo for your pets per recommendation of your vet, you may be finding that it is out of stock everywhere except for the small bottle (not cost effective for us)”

    “We have decided to try this shampoo, our vet says that it is a good alternative.
    The ingredients are different…..we will see”.
    Dechra Mal-A-Ket Shampoo

    in reply to: Possible diet changes for dog with seizures #130130 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Per the search engine. Hope this helps: http://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/idiopathic+seizures/
    Seizures in canines are often idiopathic (unknown cause) and genetic. It’s neurological. Like a brainstorm that will occur at certain intervals, of course sensitivities could trigger, things like thunderstorms can lower the seizure threshold.
    Probably best to avoid unnecessary additives and chemicals and make sure the dog is getting adequate exercise.
    If he has more than 1 seizure a month the vet will advise medication, this is necessary and will help him.
    Uncontrolled seizures can lead to brain damage, not to mention the suffering and confusion the dog experiences.
    I had a dog with seizures that lived to old age on a daily low dose of phenobarbital. Listen to your vet regarding diet recommendations, I didn’t avoid any particular foods. However, a simple ingredient food might make sense. I like Nutrisca Salmon and Chickpea
    Also, ask your vet about a rabies vaccine waiver, he may qualify, if he is diagnosed with a neurological disorder.

    in reply to: Heart Murmur in 4 month old puppy #129644 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Quote “I used to homecook for my past dog with cardiac issues with the go ahead from my vet.”
    But, this is a different dog with a very serious cardiac condition.

    Quote “Our puppy has a Grade V-VI continuous machinery heart murmur”.
    Sounds like you need a veterinary cardiology consult, stat.

    in reply to: Heart Murmur in 4 month old puppy #129642 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Chicken is naturally high in sodium.

    Check with your vet first, usually cardiac diets are low sodium.

    Adding anything other than water to a prescription food defeats the purpose.

    in reply to: Food for allergies AND vacuolar hepatopathy?! #129626 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    “My veterinarian has done done preliminary research and it seems there’s not really a treatment for this, and the theory is that it’s a secondary condition resulting from his horrible allergies”.

    There is your answer, treat the primary condition. Allergies.
    See what your vet recommends, maybe you need a referral to a veterinary dermatologist.

    Stop looking for natural miracle cures, there are none.

    PS: If your vet is homeopathic then consider getting another opinion from a science based traditional vet.

    in reply to: Heart Murmur in 4 month old puppy #129624 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    I forgot to mention, you probably know, it may be best to feed several small meals throughout the day instead of one or two big meals. Divide up the same total amount.

    in reply to: Heart Murmur in 4 month old puppy #129621 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    The food your veterinarian recommended is a prescription food and appears to be the best option for your dog.
    I notice that it comes in canned, maybe she would do better with soft food.
    https://www.hillspet.com/dog-food/ha-puppy-dry

    Lot’s of misinformation out there. I would continue work closely with your vet for the best possible outcome.
    Science based information here: http://skeptvet.com/Blog/category/nutrition/


    anon101
    Member

    No.
    Have you checked the internet for prices? As long as your vet okays it you don’t have to buy it from him.

    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2016/07/more-nonsense-from-holistic-vets-about-commercial-therapeutic-diets/
    Copied from a previous post:
    Also, if the dog is overweight, get the extra weight off, increase walks/exercise/activity.
    Work closely with your vet, when the dog has been stable 6 months to 1 year then you can talk about diet changes.
    “Dogs that get urinary tract infections and bladder stones tend to have a genetic predisposition, combine that with not enough water intake, not enough opportunities to urinate and you have a problem”.
    “Whatever you decide to feed, add water to the kibble or canned food, even presoak and add water. Take out to urinate at least every 4 hours (every 2 hours is ideal) stagnant conditions in the bladder are conducive to bladder stone formation”.
    “Always have fresh water available for the dog 24/7”.
    “Supplements are crap, don’t waste your money unless your vet recommends something specific for your dog”.
    Ps: You think the prescription food is expensive. Try emergency surgery for a blocked urethra.
    Been there, done that.
    Regarding cranberry: http://skeptvet.com/Blog/?s=cranberry
    Also there are prescription meds for stubborn cases, talk to your vet.
    Was an ultrasound done? Dogs can have more than one type of stone, such as calcium oxalate and struvite…that was the case with my dog that had reoccurring UTIs.
    This is not veterinary advice; consult your veterinarian.
    PS: Note recent question on struvite in comments: http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2016/09/science-based-veterinary-nutrition-success-stories/comment-page-1/#comment-121266
    Good luck

    in reply to: Crystals in Dog Urine #129524 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    https://bichonhealth.org/kidneysbladder/management-of-bichons-with-urinary-stones/

    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2016/07/more-nonsense-from-holistic-vets-about-commercial-therapeutic-diets/

    Copied from a previous post:
    Also, if the dog is overweight, get the extra weight off, increase walks/exercise/activity.
    Work closely with your vet, when the dog has been stable 6 months to 1 year then you can talk about diet changes.
    “Dogs that get urinary tract infections and bladder stones tend to have a genetic predisposition, combine that with not enough water intake, not enough opportunities to urinate and you have a problem”.
    “Whatever you decide to feed, add water to the kibble or canned food, even presoak and add water. Take out to urinate at least every 4 hours (every 2 hours is ideal) stagnant conditions in the bladder are conducive to bladder stone formation”.
    “Always have fresh water available for the dog 24/7”.
    “Supplements are crap, don’t waste your money unless your vet recommends something specific for your dog”.
    Ps: You think the prescription food is expensive. Try emergency surgery for a blocked urethra.
    Been there, done that.
    Regarding cranberry: http://skeptvet.com/Blog/?s=cranberry
    Also there are prescription meds for stubborn cases, talk to your vet.
    Was an ultrasound done? Dogs can have more than one type of stone, such as calcium oxalate and struvite…that was the case with my dog that had reoccurring UTIs.
    This is not veterinary advice; consult your veterinarian.
    PS: Note recent question on struvite in comments: http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2016/09/science-based-veterinary-nutrition-success-stories/comment-page-1/#comment-121266
    Good luck

    in reply to: Dog pancreatitis #129464 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Quote: “I don’t know if I should keep giving her Purina Smartblend Ground food, or change her diet to something low-fat. Vets haven’t been helpful with that and I am very anxious and sad about all this, I want her to get better again but I don’t know if it’s even possible. Any help would be greatly appreciated”.

    There are no veterinarians here. Even if there were, they have not examined your dog so it would be irresponsible for them to advise you.
    For the best possible outcome take your dog to the nearest vet immediately for an accurate diagnosis and treatment options.

    in reply to: Bloat Diet #129242 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Ask your vet if there is a prescription food/diet that he would recommend for your dog’s specific medical condition.

    Have you consulted with a veterinary nutritionist, maybe your vet could recommend one.

    in reply to: Bloat Diet #129241 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Regarding:
    “Second, do this test for allergic triggers in food and environment”: (glacierpeakholistics)
    https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/glacier+peaks/

    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2016/11/glacier-peak-holistics-pet-wellness-life-scan-stress-test-or-how-much-bs-can-fit-on-one-web-page/

    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2018/11/hair-and-saliva-test-for-allergies-are-worthless-pseudoscience/

    Regarding:
    “Look into the Zignature line of dry, limited ingredient kibble”.

    Ask your vet, most vets are recommending feeding a grain-inclusive food at least till the results of the investigation are in.
    http://vetnutrition.tufts.edu/2018/11/dcm-update/

    in reply to: Starting Homemade Please Help #128725 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    PS: Australian Shepherds are herding dogs (mini or not) they need to be active.

    Minimum 3 to 5 mile per day walks for best results. Discuss with your vet.

    in reply to: Starting Homemade Please Help #128724 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Dinovite is poison.

    Homemade diets are very difficult to balance, unless you hire a veterinary nutritionist.
    This is an expensive endeavor, assuming you plan to do it the right way.
    Dog food recipes on the internet and Facebook are not safe.
    Only a veterinarian that has examined your dog and knows it’s history can responsibly advise you.

    Have a talk with your mom. Have a plan.

    #1 Two measured meals per day. Quality kibble, grain inclusive or canned. Water added. A tablespoon of chopped boneless boiled chicken or another type of homemade food added. Nothing else.
    #2 NO SNACKS
    #3 Increased exercise. Several 10 minute walks around the block every day, rain or shine.
    #4 Weigh once a week. You will see results.

    in reply to: Grain Free Food vs. Blue Buffalo #128649 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member
    in reply to: Grain Free Food vs. Blue Buffalo #128648 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Fromm Adult Classic is grain inclusive and does not have a lot of ingredients.

    Blue Buffalo has grain inclusive formulas.

    Pro Plan Focus for Sensitive Skin and Stomach is grain inclusive.

    in reply to: Grain Free Food vs. Blue Buffalo #128643 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/category/nutrition/

    Bump, per the search engine

    science based information http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2018/08/grain-free-diets-and-heart-disease-in-dogs/
    (excerpt below, click on link for full article)
    Bottom Line
    Nutrition and metabolism are complicated, and the exact relationship between dietary composition, breed genetics, and other factors leading to DCM is not yet clear. It is too early to say with certainty whether the diets are the primary cause of DCM in these dogs or whether other breeds may also be at risk. However, it is clear that the idea behind the health claims for grain-free diets is speculative at best and very likely untrue. Extreme diet fads hardly ever turn out to be a good idea in people, and the same is probably true for pets.
    If you are feeding a grain-free diet, there is no need to panic. If you own a golden retriever or other breed that has been shown to be develop DCM in the past, it makes sense to talk to your vet and potentially have taurine levels tested or other diagnostics done depending on the circumstances. The diet you are feeding may be perfectly fine, but it is also probable not any better than any other diet with more conventional ingredients, and there is now some small indication that it may place some dogs at greater risk for this preventable disease.
    The links above to the FDA and UC Davis Vet School will provide more information.
    Also: https://www.mspca.org/angell_services/choosing-the-right-diet-for-your-pet/
    Animal by-products (excerpt below)
    In addition to grain, animal by-products have become “dirty words” on the ingredient list. Although not necessarily appealing to humans (particularly in the USA), the definition of a by-product in pet food is a part of the animal that is not skeletal muscle. This includes organ meats and intestines (not intestinal contents). AAFCO specifically excludes hair, hooves, horns, hide, manure, etc… as acceptable by-products. So in reality, by-products are perfectly healthy and full of nutrients. And you can be sure that a wild wolf or mountain lion is eating “by-products” in nature.


    anon101
    Member

    I would give your vet a call, the veterinary healthcare professional that has examined your dog, provided treatment and see what they recommend.

    in reply to: Doodle- Hx of Food Issues, Seeking Kibble Advice #128629 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    What were the results of his latest annual vet exam? How long ago? Labs within normal limits? Does the dog have a diagnosis regarding gastrointestinal problems?
    What did the vet advise?

    “but I’m certainly not opposed to another medical check-up. We have a bag of Science Diet Gastro that the vet gave us when we have issues and he does well on it, but I doubt that’s a long-term food”

    Some dogs do stay on a prescription food for the rest of their lives.
    I would defer to your vet, after all, no one here has examined your dog.

    At age 5 a large breed is close to being a senior. Please go see your vet. Further diagnostic testing may be indicated.

    in reply to: Grain Free Diets and Heart Disease #128605 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    @ Inked Marie

    Didn’t see your thank you post, but I appreciate it 🙂

    in reply to: Grain Free Diets and Heart Disease #128603 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Labs are perfect. Physical exams reveal no cardiac issues.
    An echo would be recommended only if anomalies have been detected via routine exam and lab work.

    It’s all good!

    PS: Taurine levels are an expensive lab to have done and not indicated in most cases.
    Again, listen to the vet that has examined your dog, see what has been recommended.

    in reply to: Grain Free Diets and Heart Disease #128600 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    “I would be uncomfortable and disappointed with my Vets if their advice were, “…to feed whatever brand of dog food that she likes as long as it includes grains.” Or, “The vet said don’t throw out the Zignature, just mix it in with the new food.”

    Quite the contrary. I am satisfied with that advice. My dogs are doing very well.

    Some of us are on fixed incomes and cannot afford to throw out any food, especially if it has not caused an adverse reaction.

    in reply to: Grain Free Diets and Heart Disease #128598 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2018/12/evidence-update-grain-free-and-other-beg-diets-associated-with-heart-disease-in-dogs/comment-page-1/#comment-123037

    We would like a listing of dry kibble that is acceptable for our taurine deficient dog. Obviously the listing must be longer than just Royal Canine and Purina

    skeptvet says:
    December 18, 2018 at 9:05 am
    There is no such list. If you have read my articles on the subject, you know that the relationship between diet, taurine, and DCM is complex and evolving, so there is no way to make a simple “good food/bad food” distinction. I would suggest looking at the resources on the subject available the Tufts University Veterinary Nutrition Service or arranging a personal consult with a veterinary nutrition specialist.

    in reply to: Grain Free Diets and Heart Disease #128596 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Fromm Classic Adult (1949 recipe), Pro Plan Focus sensitive skin and stomach, Blue Buffalo (grain inclusive).

    PS: My friend decided on Nutrisource (grain inclusive) as per the pet shop’s recommendation.
    We’ll see…..

    I have to add that the dog has been doing great on Zignature for a few years, as have my dogs.

    The vet said don’t throw out the Zignature, just mix it in with the new food.

    in reply to: Grain Free Diets and Heart Disease #128594 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    My friend just asked her vet what to now feed her dog?
    The vet told her that they no longer recommend any grain free dog foods.
    BTW: Her dog has a minor cardiac condition (not diet related)

    He told her to feed whatever brand of dog food that she likes as long as it includes grains.

    In other words, until we know more, don’t overthink it.

    in reply to: Grain Free Diets and Heart Disease #128591 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Bump

    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2018/08/grain-free-diets-and-heart-disease-in-dogs/ excerpt below, click on link for full article and comments:
    Dr. Jennifer Larsen, a nutritionist at UC Davis, has written an excellent summary of the nuances of this issue, and she has agreed to let me share some of it here:
    Taurine is not required to be present in dog foods. Taurine is an amino acid that is not nutritionally essential for dogs; however, there are dietary factors (such as protein source, fiber type and concentration, and cooking or processing methods) and individual dog characteristics (such as breed and calorie needs) that impact how efficiently taurine may be made and used by the body. The sulfur amino acid content and bioavailability in food is important though. The problem with dietary deficiency-related cardiac disease is multifactorial and is not just seen in goldens.
    1- in many grain free diets, legumes are used to provide the carb (starch) but also protein and fiber – you cannot tell which ingredients are providing various proportions of nutrients from an ingredient list
    2- legume protein is low in sulfur amino acids (methionine and cystine- the precursors for taurine synthesis)
    3- some fiber types/concentrations increase fecal taurine content and promotes bacterial degradation of taurine (dogs and cats must use taurine to conjugate bile acids) so taurine recycling is not as efficient and more is lost
    4- dogs need an adequate supply of precursors and to be able to make taurine fast enough to replace obligatory as well as excessive losses. When Newfoundlands and beagles were compared (during the Investigation into the lamb and rice issue with DCM in the 90s), it was found that Newfoundlands made taurine more slowly, so there are differences among breeds and probably individuals
    5- dogs with lower than predicted calorie needs (“easy keepers”) also might not eat enough food and therefore enough protein to supply adequate precursors
    6- some grain free diets (and other types of diets), are not high in protein (and therefore sulfur amino acids) since they use more expensive exotic or uncommon sources.
    Any of these or a combination may impact taurine status in the dog.
    There have been recent cases seen in our hospital and elsewhere of dilated cardiomyopathy secondary to taurine deficiency in dogs that have been associated with commercial diets containing certain ingredients (such as legumes – beans, lentils, and peas – and root vegetables – white and sweet potatoes). Data collection and interpretation is ongoing for these recent cases.
    In the past we have also seen cases of dilated cardiomyopathy and taurine deficiency in dogs eating home-prepared diets (with either cooked and raw ingredients and those with and without meat), and other commercial diets with various ingredients and nutritional profiles. Some of those cases and investigations have been published (others can be found on PubMed):

    in reply to: Grain Free Diets and Heart Disease #128590 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    It is usually not necessary to add taurine to dog food.

    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2018/12/evidence-update-grain-free-and-other-beg-diets-associated-with-heart-disease-in-dogs/ (excerpt from article below)

    In some cases, the diets and disease has also been associated with a deficiency in the amino acid taurine. This is an amino acid that dogs do not normally require in the diet since they can make as much as they need. However, in some breeds there appear to be genetic factors that make individuals more susceptible to taurine deficiency, and associated heart disease. These may include reduced production of taurine, increased loss of taurine, or increased need for taurine. Certain diets that have low levels of the ingredients from which taurine is made or that contain substances, such as legumes and some types of. Fiber that make reduce absorption or synthesis of taurine and its precursors or that encourage taurine loss make act in con cert with these genetic factors to lead to deficiency and disease in some dogs. Many of the details in this hypothetical series of steps remain to be understood.

    in reply to: Open Farms #128469 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Glad you have found some sites on the internet helpful.

    BTW:: Dr Mike is a dentist. (for humans). Susan Thixton? Can’t find her credentials anywhere.

    in reply to: Open Farms #128464 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    I hope you don’t mind another opinion regarding Susan Thixton.

    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2018/05/whos-behind-the-the-truth-about-pet-cancer/
    (excerpt from article below)

    Susan Thixton
    Ms. Thixton is a vehement activist at war with the pet food industry, government regulators, and anyone who doesn’t share her views about pet nutrition. She blames the death of one of her dogs on a preservative in pet food and identifies this experience as the genesis of her crusade.
    Unfortunately, her passion is not matched by a respect for science or evidence or a very sophisticated understanding of epidemiology, nor does she have any apparent willingness to consider she might be mistaken or others might know more than she does about such issues.
    Ms. Thixton is one of these “experts” whose expertise consists of all the information she can find that supports what she is determined to believe no matter what. She has served as a public member of AAFCO, the group that generates much animal feed regulation, but was dismissed in 2017 for personal attacks against other board members. She expresses deep contempt for science and for anyone who doesn’t see the industry/government conspiracy poisoning our pets that she warns about, and her participation in this series illustrates the degree to which it is ideologically driven.

    in reply to: Grain Free Diets and Heart Disease #128460 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Evidence Update: Grain-free and other “BEG” Diets Associated with Heart Disease in Dogs
    Posted on December 14, 2018 by skeptvet http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2018/12/evidence-update-grain-free-and-other-beg-diets-associated-with-heart-disease-in-dogs/ (excerpt from article below)

    Bottom Line
    We cannot say with certainty that BEG diets cause heart disease. We can only say that they have been associated with DCM in both golden retrievers with taurine deficiency and in other breeds without taurine deficiency. We can also say that changing diets appears to have benefitted some of these dogs, though many other treatments were employed at the same time, which limits out ability to know how important a factor this diet change was in the dogs’ recovery.
    We can also say that none of the claims for health risks from grains in pet foods, or for health benefits from grain-free or other BEG diets, are supported by any reasonable scientific evidence. Certainly, the evidence for such diets is weaker than even the very limited evidence against them.
    As pet owners and veterinarians, we need to proportion our confidence in any conclusions to the strength of the available evidence and be willing to change our minds as new evidence emerges. We also need to make our decisions now, even before we have perfect evidence. Right now, there is no solid reason to think grain-free diets have any health advantages, and there is weak evidence to suggest they might have health risks for some dogs. If you have a golden retriever, it seems reasonable to avoid the diets that have been associated with taurine deficiency and DCM in this breed. Even if you don’t have a golden, you should at least give some thought to why you might want to feed or avoid BEG diets. The evidence can’t make the decision for you, but it should certainly be considered.

    in reply to: non grain free dog food #128441 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Interesting. For some reason I thought that was grain free. I may give it another look at some point.
    So far the Fromm Classic Adult and the Pro Plan Focus Salmon are working out well.

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