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  • in reply to: My dog is *ALWAYS* hungry #151012 Report Abuse
    anonymous
    Member

    Start walking him for at least an hour a day. He sounds bored.
    Btw: All healthy dogs act like they are starving all the time.
    Keep the trash where he cannot get at it. Don’t leave him unattended outside.

    Didn’t you learn your lesson about raw? http://skeptvet.com/Blog/?s=raw+diet

    Sounds like your dog did best when you went by what the veterinarian that examined your vet advised.
    Good luck

    PS: there are no veterinary healthcare professionals affiliated with this site.

    in reply to: Pancreatitis & Salmon Oil #150967 Report Abuse
    anonymous
    Member

    No veterinarians are affiliated with this site. Ask over here https://www.reddit.com/r/AskVet/

    Salmon oil is high in fat. Fat triggers pancreatitis. I would trust the vet that told you to stop it.

    in reply to: Sensitive stomach #150634 Report Abuse
    anonymous
    Member

    PS: Are they drinking enough water? I always add at least a little water to dry kibble to be sure.

    Dogs LOVE toast, but toast is not a good idea. It will be hard to break them from wanting it, but at least cut down the amount of toast to only a bite or two.

    in reply to: Sensitive stomach #150632 Report Abuse
    anonymous
    Member

    @ Glenn G

    At age 7 dogs are considered seniors, seniors are vulnerable to a multitude of things, so if they have not had a recent checkup at the vet, now is the time to make that appointment, lab work, dental check, etc.

    Always rule out medical issues when you see a sudden change in behavior or appetite.

    A healthy animal has a good appetite. Avoid raw and boutique foods. See what your vet recommends after examining the dogs.

    Go here for science based veterinary medicine http://skeptvet.com/Blog/

    in reply to: Starting Raw #150581 Report Abuse
    anonymous
    Member

    Hope this article helps someone.

    From SkeptVet TV- Raw Diets for Pets
    Posted on December 6, 2019 by skeptvet

    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2019/12/from-skeptvet-tv-raw-diets-for-pets/

    in reply to: Eating Raw Meaty Bones #150470 Report Abuse
    anonymous
    Member

    Hope this article helps some of the readers
    https://www.petmd.com/blogs/nutritionnuggets/jcoates/2012/mar/dogs_bones_dangerous_combination-13528

    Dogs and Bones: A Dangerous Combination

    Dogs have been chewing on bones for thousands of years. This is what nature intended, right? Well maybe, but it’s an activity that is not without its risks.

    As a veterinarian, I’ve seen the ill-effects of feeding dogs bones more times than I can count. The risks are significant enough that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has even gotten involved by posting the following “10 reasons why it’s a bad idea to give your dog a bone” on their Consumer Updates website.

    Broken teeth. This may call for expensive veterinary dentistry.

    Mouth or tongue injuries. These can be very bloody and messy and may require a trip to see your veterinarian.

    Bone gets looped around your dog’s lower jaw. This can be frightening or painful for your dog and potentially costly to you, as it usually means a trip to see your veterinarian.

    Bone gets stuck in esophagus, the tube that food travels through to reach the stomach. Your dog may gag, trying to bring the bone back up, and will need to see your veterinarian.

    Bone gets stuck in windpipe. This may happen if your dog accidentally inhales a small enough piece of bone. This is an emergency because your dog will have trouble breathing. Get your pet to your veterinarian immediately!

    Bone gets stuck in stomach. It went down just fine, but the bone may be too big to pass out of the stomach and into the intestines. Depending on the bone’s size, your dog may need surgery or upper gastrointestinal endoscopy — a procedure in which your veterinarian uses a long tube with a built-in camera and grabbing tools — to try to remove the bone from the stomach.

    Bone gets stuck in intestines. This will cause a blockage and it may be time for surgery.

    Constipation due to bone fragments. Your dog may have a hard time passing the bone fragments because they’re very sharp and they scrape the inside of the large intestine or rectum as they move along. This causes severe pain and may require a visit to your veterinarian.

    Severe bleeding from the rectum. This is very messy and can be dangerous. It’s time for a trip to see your veterinarian.

    Peritonitis. This nasty, difficult-to-treat bacterial infection of the abdomen is caused when bone fragments poke holes in your dog’s stomach or intestines. Your dog needs an emergency visit to your veterinarian as peritonitis can kill your dog.

    I look at feeding bones in the same way I do letting dogs run loose. Is it natural? Yes. Do dogs like it? Yes. Are there some potential benefits? Yes … until misfortune strikes. There are many ways to safely satisfy your dog’s desire to chew (e.g., toys made out of twisted rope fibers or dense rubber), to promote dental hygiene (e.g., daily tooth brushing or dental diets), and to provide your dog with the high-quality foods and balanced nutrition he needs to stay healthy.
    Dr. Jennifer Coates

    in reply to: Rescue dog won't eat kibble, need help #150467 Report Abuse
    anonymous
    Member

    https://www.amazon.com/Placebos-Pets-Alternative-Medicine-Animals/dp/1912701367/
    Placebos for Pets?: The Truth About Alternative Medicine in Animals. Paperback – November 1, 2019
    by Brennen McKenzie (Author)
    Whether online or in the local pet store, there is a bewildering variety of pet healthcare products and services to choose from. Diets and supplements, ancient herbs and folk remedies, and even high-tech treatments like hyperbaric oxygen tanks and laser therapy. Everything promises to give your pet better health and a longer life, and isn’t that what every pet owner wants?
    But how do you know if all of these products do what they claim? Are they safe? If they really are miraculous cures, why are so many offered only on the Internet or by a few veterinarians specializing in “alternative medicine?”
    McKenzie, a vet with twenty years of experience and the former president of the Evidence-based Veterinary Medicine Association, helps pet owners and veterinary professionals understand the claims and the evidence, allowing them to make better choices for their companions and patients

    in reply to: Starting Raw #150466 Report Abuse
    anonymous
    Member

    I hope this article is helpful to readers. It’s a few years old but still just as accurate, there are more recent Nutrition articles at this site, just use the search engine
    Click on link to read comments
    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2012/07/what-do-veterinarians-know-about-nutrition/

    What do Veterinarians Know About Nutrition?
    Posted on July 8, 2012 by skeptvet
    It is not unusual for people promoting unconventional, approaches to pet nutrition, such as raw diets, grain free foods, homemade diets, a preference for organic ingredients, and so on, to dismiss objections to these approaches made by veterinarians. These people will often claim that veterinarians know little about nutrition and that what they do know is mostly propaganda fed to them by commercial pet food manufacturers. Like most bad arguments, this one contains a few bits of truth mixed in with lots of unproven assumptions and fallacies.
    Most veterinarians do have at least a semester course on nutrition in general. And a lot more information on the subject is scattered throughout other courses in vet school. So the idea that we know nothing about the subject is simply ridiculous. However, it is fair to acknowledge that most veterinarians are not “experts” in nutrition, if by this one means they have extensive specialized training in the subject. The real “experts” in this area are board-certified veterinary nutritionists, individuals who have advanced residency training in nutrition and have passed the board certification exam of the American College of Veterinary Nutrition.
    Of course, as I always take great care to point out, expertise is no guarantee of never falling into error, particularly expertise based primarily on experience and a familiarity with the opinions of other experts rather than solid scientific research. Given the limited research data available on many important questions in small animal nutrition, even the real experts are often forced to rely on extrapolation from basic science or research in humans and their own clinical experience, which are important sources of information but always less reliable than studies specifically designed to answer these questions. Nevertheless, boarded nutritionists have a legitimate claim to expert status in this area. And as a group, they generally are skeptical of many of the alternative approaches to nutrition, as they should be give the paucity of data to support them As for the question of the role of the pet food industry in veterinary nutrition education, there is some truth to the claim that much of that education is sponsored by companies who make pet foods. Obviously, most veterinary nutritionists put their training to work researching and evaluating food for veterinary species, so the money and expertise in this area tends to concentrate in industry. And it is not entirely unreasonable to ask the question whether or not this influences the information veterinarians get about nutrition. It quite likely does.
    This is not the same thing as saying that veterinarians are all lackeys or dupes of industry and unable to think critically for themselves, however. I am generally as skeptical and critical of pharmaceutical companies and mainstream pet food companies as I am of herb and supplement manufacturers and producers of alternative diets. All of them have both a genuine belief (most of the time) in their products, a genuine interest in the welfare of the animals they serve, and a high risk of bias and cognitive dissonance that impedes their ability to see and accept the flaws in their own reasoning or the data that contradicts their beliefs.
    One should always be aware of bias, but that awareness does not justify ignoring the arguments or evidence coming from a source with potential bias, only evaluating it carefully and critically. The reason science is so much more successful than unaided reasoning is precisely because it is a method for compensating for human biases and other cognitive limitations that interfere with our seeing the truth. Mainstream pet food companies undoubtedly have biases, but often they also have good scientific data, which is rarely available for the alternative products and approaches. Ignoring this data in favor of opinion, theory, or personal experience is not a recipe for improving the state of veterinary nutrition.
    The real issue is not so much what do general practice veterinarians know about nutrition as what is the evidence supporting the alternative theories and products being promoted? The accusation that vets know little about nutrition, even if it were true, doesn’t invalidate their criticisms. The classis ad hominem fallacy is the strategy of attacking a person and imaging that somehow this attack says anything about that person’s argument. It is the mirror image, in many ways, of the appeal to authority fallacy, which involves claiming some special wisdom or expertise on the part of a person making an argument and then imaging that claim somehow proves the argument. If proponents of raw diets or other unconventional nutritional approaches wish to make a case for their ideas, they have to do it based on logic and facts, not on the presumed expertise of supporters or the supposed ignorance of critics. As always, it is the ideas and the data that matter, not the people involved.
    That said, there is a certain hypocrisy to many of these criticisms in that they come from sources with no particular right to claim expertise in nutrition anyway. Proponents of alternative nutritional practices are almost never boarded veterinary nutritionists. Often they are lay people who have labeled themselves as experts without even the training general practice veterinarians have in nutritional science. And while they may not be influenced by the mainstream pet food industry, this only means they are less subject to that particular bias, not that they don’t have other biases. People selling pet food or books on veterinary nutrition are all too often blind to the hypocrisy of claiming their opponents are under the influence of pet food companies while ignoring the fact that they make money selling their own ideas or products.
    Others who frequently claim most veterinarians know little about nutrition are themselves general practice veterinarians or specialists in some aspect of veterinary medicine other than nutrition. It may very well be true that they are well-informed about nutrition because they have an interest in it, but this is not evidence that their arguments are true and those of their opponents are false. It is not even evidence that they know more about nutrition than their detractors, who may themselves have studied independently in the area. If you’re not a boarded nutritionist, you can’t claim to be an expert. And whether or not you are an expert, your ideas must stand or fall on their merits and the evidence, not on any presumed superiority in your knowledge over that of your critics.
    So I think it is fair to say that most general practice veterinarians have only a fairly general knowledge of veterinary nutrition. And it is fair to acknowledge that much of this information comes from a source with a significant risk of bias, that is the pet food industry. However, I see no evidence that proponents of alternative approaches to nutrition have a reason to claim they know more about nutrition than most veterinarians, or that they are free from biases of their own. Only boarded veterinary nutritionists can legitimately claim to be “experts,” and even this is no guarantee of perfect objectivity or the truth of everything they believe. Claims about who is or is not smart or informed enough to have an opinion on a subject are mostly a superficial distraction from the important elements of any debate, what are the arguments and data behind each position. Awareness of potential bias only serves to make one more careful and cautious in examining someone’s arguments and data, it doesn’t get one a free pass to ignore what they have to say.

    in reply to: Rescue dog won't eat kibble, need help #150465 Report Abuse
    anonymous
    Member

    @ YorkiLover4

    Per the product link you provided”

    Disclaimer
    Ask Ariel is committed to providing education, information and the free exchange of ideas regarding pet health and wellness issues. When you use the information or products on this website, you consent to the terms stated in this disclaimer. If you do not agree with the terms set forth herein, then please do not use this site. The material on this website is intended to provide you with education and information so that you can make an informed decision about the care and health of your pet or yourself. It is not intended as veterinary or medical advice. The statements made on this website are the sole opinions of Susan Davis, CCN based on her research and should not replace the advice and treatment by a doctor or veterinarian. Susan Davis is NOT a veterinarian or a doctor and is not providing veterinary or medical services. Further, she is not prescribing supplements, making diagnoses or attempting to treat, cure or prevent any diseases.
    When you choose to use the information presented on this website, you understand that the decision to do this is your own responsibility and you agree to hold Susan Davis and Ask Ariel harmless for any outcome from the information provided. If you use the information or products contained on this website, you are “prescribing” supplements for yourself or your pet and Susan Davis assumes no responsibility. You affirm your right to self-health and that of your pet.
    The Ask Ariel website strongly encourages you to seek the advice of a veterinarian for regular preventive care, dental care and the treatment of any symptoms or diseases. Every pet is unique and supplements may not have the same effect for every person or animal. If you have questions or concerns, please feel free to contact Susan Davis for a professional consultation or seek the advice of a doctor or veterinarian.

    in reply to: Starting Raw #150443 Report Abuse
    anonymous
    Member

    Please speak to a veterinary healthcare professional (not on the internet) preferably a vet that has examined your dog and knows it’s history before going down this dangerous path.
    I hope these articles help you or someone else.
    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/?s=raw+diet

    in reply to: Eating Raw Meaty Bones #150348 Report Abuse
    anonymous
    Member

    Yes, they (wolves) die young and suffer greatly from broken teeth, infection, bowel obstruction, ,etc.
    They also suffer and die from malnutrition and parasitic diseases. Alone, deep in the woods.

    Bones are dangerous for dogs, anyone who is educated in veterinary medicine knows that.

    in reply to: Water Additives? #150347 Report Abuse
    anonymous
    Member

    Dental Disease in Dogs and Cats: Does Treatment Improve Health?
    Posted on June 6, 2013 by skeptvet
    A reader recently asked me about the evidence supporting recommended therapy for dental disease in dogs. This is has become a common question given the increasing awareness among pet owners that dental disease is a real and important health problem, … Continue reading →
    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2013/06/dental-disease-in-dogs-and-cats-does-treatment-improve-health/
    Posted in Science-Based Veterinary Medicine | 37 Comments

    Dry Pet Food and Dental Disease in Dogs and Cats
    Posted on October 17, 2011 by skeptvet
    One of the most common diseases in cats and dogs that I see in practice is dental disease. According to the American Veterinary Dental Society, by three years of age 70-80% of dogs and cats will have signs of oral … Continue reading →
    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2011/10/dry-pet-food-and-dental-disease-in-dogs-and-cats/
    Posted in Nutrition | 19 Comments

    Healthy Mouth Water Additive: Does It Help Prevent Dental Disease?
    Posted on January 13, 2011 by skeptvet
    I am often asked by clients or readers about specific products, and while I certainly can only investigate a small proportion of all the stuff marketed to pet owners, I try to look at as many of these things as … Continue reading →
    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2011/01/healthymouth-water-additive-does-it-help-prevent-dental-disease/
    Posted in Herbs and Supplements | 103 Comments

    in reply to: Eating Raw Meaty Bones #150339 Report Abuse
    anonymous
    Member

    Make sure you have the phone number and directions to the nearest emergency veterinary clinic handy for you or anyone else that wishes to engage in this risky practice “raw meaty bones”.
    I speak from experience.
    Best of luck!

    in reply to: Updated: Grain & White Potato Free dog foods #150337 Report Abuse
    anonymous
    Member

    Here you go!
    Just add a little bit of chopped up boiled egg (no shell) and a splash of water

    https://www.gofromm.com/fromm-family-classic-adult-dog-food

    INGREDIENTS: Chicken, chicken meal, brown rice, pearled barley, oatmeal, white rice, chicken fat (preserved with mixed tocopherols), menhaden fish meal, dried whole egg, beet pulp, cheese, flaxseed, brewers dried yeast, potassium chloride, salt, calcium sulfate, dl-methionine, l-tryptophan, taurine, chicory root extract, yucca schidigera extract, sodium selenite, sorbic acid (preservative), Vitamins [vitamin A acetate, Vitamin D3 supplement, Vitamin E supplement, Vitamin B12 supplement, choline bitartrate, niacin supplement, d-calcium pantothenate, l-ascorbyl-2-polyphosphate, riboflavin supplement, thiamine mononitrate, pyridoxine hydrochloride, folic acid, biotin], Minerals [zinc sulfate, ferrous sulfate, manganese sulfate, magnesium sulfate, copper sulfate, cobalt carbonate, calcium iodate, iron proteinate, zinc proteinate, copper proteinate, manganese proteinate, magnesium proteinate, cobalt proteinate], dried Lactobacillus acidophilus fermentation product, dried Bifidobacterium longum fermentation product, dried Lactobacillus plantarum fermentation product, dried Pediococcus acidilactici fermentation product.

    PS: I just reread your post. I would stay awy from grain-free unless a veterinarian that has examined your dog specifically recommends it.

    in reply to: Dog gulping hard swallowing #150310 Report Abuse
    anonymous
    Member

    https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/gulping/

    Multiple threads here on the subject that are not closed.
    That being said, some of the advice being given is bogus and could cause harm.

    Your best bet is to work closely with a veterinarian that you trust.

    in reply to: Rescue dog won't eat kibble, need help #150307 Report Abuse
    anonymous
    Member

    @ Helen S

    Have you tried adding a little warm water to the kibble? Your pup may prefer soft food, I would try a can version of the same Science Diet food you are feeding now and see if that makes a difference.
    Next time you take him to the vet make sure they take a good look at his teeth.
    Small breeds tend to have lousy teeth. Maybe he needs a dental cleaning.
    Just saying to rule out issues that may cause him discomfort when he eats hard food.

    in reply to: Flea & tick prevention #150287 Report Abuse
    anonymous
    Member

    Those things don’t work.

    That stuff is crap and a waste of money.

    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/?s=heartworm

    in reply to: Rescue dog won't eat kibble, need help #150284 Report Abuse
    anonymous
    Member

    Another thing, don’t leave food out all day. Offer the dog a meal twice a day, if he is not interested pick it up after 10 minutes and put it in the fridg, offer at the next mealtime.
    As long as he is drinking water I would not worry unless he goes 72 hours without eating solid food, then I would call the vet and speak to the vet (have him call you back when he has a minute)
    I would not hand feed. Let the dog rest and adjust to his new surroundings.

    in reply to: Rescue dog won't eat kibble, need help #150283 Report Abuse
    anonymous
    Member

    @ Helen S

    Please listen to the folks that you adopted the dog from.
    The worst thing you could do right now is make any change to his diet. never mind a drastic change.
    Raw sucks and will most likely cause more problems. No reason for it.

    Please go here http://skeptvet.com/Blog/ for science based veterinary information, use the search engine there to look up nutrition .
    Find a vet that you like and trust and work closely with him if the dog’s symptoms continue.
    But, honestly it takes an adult at least a month to adjust to a new home.
    Patience.

    There are no veterinarians or veterinary nutritionists affiliated with this site.
    But I suspect there are vet haters.
    (I am not a vet)
    Other sites you may find helpful: Reddit Ask a Vet, or Reddit Dogs.
    Good Luck

    in reply to: Beagle Anal Glands #150184 Report Abuse
    anonymous
    Member

    It may not be all about the diet

    https://www.merckvetmanual.com/dog-owners/digestive-disorders-of-dogs/disorders-of-the-rectum-and-anus-in-dogs

    Your veterinarian can often squeeze out impacted anal sacs by hand. If the material in the sacs is too hard or dry, the veterinarian may inject a softening agent into the sac. If infection is present, antibiotics might be prescribed. Your veterinarian might recommend applying hot compresses if an abscess (infection) is present. Supplemental fiber may be recommended to increase fecal bulk, which facilitates anal sac compression and emptying. If treatment is ineffective, the condition keeps coming back, or a tumor is present, the anal sac can be surgically removed. A common complication from this surgery is fecal incontinence.

    Anal sacs may become clogged (impacted), infected, abscessed, or cancerous. There are several common causes of clogged anal sacs, including failure of the sacs to be squeezed out during defecation, poor muscle tone in obese dogs, and excessive secretion of the gland. When the clogged gland contents are not periodically squeezed out, this can make the glands susceptible to bacterial overgrowth, infection, and inflammation.

    in reply to: Beagle Anal Glands #150183 Report Abuse
    anonymous
    Member

    “Most dogs never have problems with their anal glands, but some unlucky dogs have to have their anal glands emptied several times a year. In these cases, your veterinarian may recommend removing your dog’s anal glands. This is a simple procedure that will prevent future problems with these glands”.

    https://pets.webmd.com/dogs/anal-sac-disease-dogs

    f your dog repeatedly has impactions, you vet may suggest adding more fiber to his diet. This increases the size of his poop, which puts more pressure on the sacs to empty naturally.
    If your dog doesn’t have a problem, there is no need for you to empty his sacs.
    Left untreated, the impaction will turn into an infection. Look for yellow or bloody pus oozing from his sacs. This painful condition can cause your dog to act fearful or angry. Your vet will wash out the sacs and give your dog antibiotics.

    An untreated infection will develop into an abscess (a swollen, tender mass of puss) and could break open. Your vet will open and drain the abscess and usually prescribe antibiotics and anti-inflammatory drugs. Daily warm compresses can help, too.
    If your dog keeps having problems, your vet may want to remove his anal sacs with surgery. It’s a simple procedure, but can result in complications like fecal incontinence (when his poop leaks uncontrollably).
    Prevention
    Put your dog on a healthy diet and make sure he gets plenty of exercise. Small, obese dogs are at the highest risk of anal sac disease. Also, if you dog has problems with his anal sacs, have your vet check them at every checkup.

    in reply to: Dr. Marty dog foods #149409 Report Abuse
    anonymous
    Member

    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2019/11/dr-marty-goldsteins-natures-feast-raw-diet-a-look-at-the-infomercial/

    excerpt below

    Dr. Goldstein is another celebrity participant, a veterinarian to the stars. He is also a strong advocate of the bait-and-switch known as “integrative medicine.” This means he will sometimes use science-based treatments, but then often gives the credit for any improvement to homeopathy, acupuncture, raw diets, herbs, and other alternative treatments he also employs.

    anonymous
    Member
    in reply to: Dr. Harvey’s Kidney Support #149311 Report Abuse
    anonymous
    Member

    Just wanted people to be aware.
    Because, this this information may influence your decision.
    Maybe it doesn’t matter to you. But it may matter to some.
    Dr Harvey is a chiropractor. He is not a veterinarian. He is not a veterinary nutritionist.

    in reply to: Coconut Flour/Coconut in Commercial Dog Foods #148620 Report Abuse
    anonymous
    Member

    “Coconut flour is often compared to other gluten-free flours, such as almond, hazelnut, amaranth, and chickpea flours”

    I would consider it an exotic ingredient .

    PS I previously thought you were talking about oil.

    in reply to: Coconut Flour/Coconut in Commercial Dog Foods #148619 Report Abuse
    anonymous
    Member
    in reply to: Dog Food #148592 Report Abuse
    anonymous
    Member
    in reply to: Wellness core senior dog food #148433 Report Abuse
    anonymous
    Member

    I don’t buy dog food kibble from Amazon. Not sure how it’s stored. I don’t buy dog food kibble unless the expiration date is at least a year out. ” Amazon auction website” not a good idea. Don’t get me wrong, I love Amazon but not for dog food.

    Don’t buy anything that will leave an opened bag not used up within 2 months at the most. Store in an airtight container, cool pantry or even better the fridg.

    Better luck next time.

    in reply to: Senior dog whining at night #148382 Report Abuse
    anonymous
    Member

    Please talk to your vet about medication options. I would not rule out canine cognitive dysfunction (dementia).
    Has he had a checkup recently? Lab work, etc.? That’s where I would start.

    This article/blog and comments may help you:
    https://dogdementia.com/canine-cognitive-dysfunction-guide/#How_Common_Is_Canine_Cognitive_Dysfunction
    (excerpt below)

    “The most important thing to know about determining whether your dog has CCD is that you can’t diagnose your dog yourself. Even though there are handy lists of symptoms all over the Internet, including one on this page, every symptom on those lists could also be a symptom of another disease or condition. Brain tumors, certain liver conditions, tickborne diseases, and other conditions can cause similar symptoms. Diagnosing canine cognitive dysfunction means ruling those other things out. It’s called a diagnosis of exclusion, and it takes a vet to do the appropriate tests to do that”.

    in reply to: CBD for dogs. Yes? No? #148381 Report Abuse
    anonymous
    Member

    Talk to your vet about this. Maybe this article written by a vet will help http://skeptvet.com/Blog/?s=CBD

    PS: It’s very expensive.

    anonymous
    Member

    Fromm Customer Service Team
    Fromm FAMILY FOODS | Mequon Office
    13145 Green Bay Road
    Mequon, WI 53097
    Phone 800-325-6331
    Below is NOT TRUE. Contact Fromm if you don’t believe me.

    “Could you please tell me “Who” manufactures this product, I know it’s in one of the oldest manufactures in the Midwest, but Who manufactures this”??
    “American Natural Premium pet foods are co-packed for the company by Fromm which has several USDA-inspected pet food manufacturing plants in Wisconsin”.
    By on Aug 22, 2019 https://www.chewy.com/american-natural-premium-turkey/dp/204685

    in reply to: American Natural Premium #148290 Report Abuse
    anonymous
    Member

    Fromm Customer Service Team
    Fromm FAMILY FOODS | Mequon Office
    13145 Green Bay Road
    Mequon, WI 53097
    Phone 800-325-6331

    Below is NOT TRUE. Contact Fromm if you don’t believe me.

    Could you please tell me “Who” manufactures this product, I know it’s in one of the oldest manufactures in the Midwest, but Who manufactures this??
    American Natural Premium pet foods are co-packed for the company by Fromm which has several USDA-inspected pet food manufacturing plants in Wisconsin.
    By on Aug 22, 2019 https://www.chewy.com/american-natural-premium-turkey/dp/204685

    anonymous
    Member

    Some false information about that product. I contacted Fromm myself.
    Please see my post.

    https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/topic/american-natural-premium/

    in reply to: Favourite Dog Food #148145 Report Abuse
    anonymous
    Member

    I also add a topper, boiled chopped up chicken meat and a splash of water. Been doing this for several years. So far, good results.
    PS: Chopped up boiled egg is another one.

    in reply to: Hopelessly confused about dog nutrition #148144 Report Abuse
    anonymous
    Member

    You’re welcome! I have found the site very helpful. Make sure to use the search engine to look up specific topics 🙂

    in reply to: Hopelessly confused about dog nutrition #148141 Report Abuse
    anonymous
    Member

    Go here for science-based information: http://skeptvet.com/Blog/category/nutrition/

    anonymous
    Member

    A good vet can determine what diagnostic tests are indicated, IF DCM IS SUSPECTED.
    Average cost of a canine echo $300. Average cost to have a taurine level done $200.

    How is this disease diagnosed? https://www.vetmed.wsu.edu/outreach/Pet-Health-Topics/categories/diseases/dilated-cardiomyopathy-in-dogs (excerpt below)
    “A cardiac exam by a veterinarian can detect abnormal heart sounds (when present) and many signs of heart failure. Usually chest radiographs (x-rays), an electrocardiogram (ECG), and echocardiogram are performed to confirm a suspected diagnosis and to assess severity. Echocardiography also can be used to screen for early DCM in breeds with a higher incidence of the disease. Resting and 24-hour (Holter) ECGs are sometimes used as screening tests for the frequent arrhythmias that usually accompany DCM in some breeds, especially boxers and Doberman pinchers”.

    Updated June 27, 2019 https://www.fda.gov/animal-veterinary/news-events/fda-investigation-potential-link-between-certain-diets-and-canine-dilated-cardiomyopathy (excerpt below)
    “In July 2018, the FDA announced that it had begun investigating reports of canine dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) in dogs eating certain pet foods, many labeled as “grain-free,” which contained a high proportion of peas, lentils, other legume seeds (pulses), and/or potatoes in various forms (whole, flour, protein, etc.) as main ingredients (listed within the first 10 ingredients in the ingredient list, before vitamins and minerals)”.

    anonymous
    Member
    anonymous
    Member

    @ Joann H

    A echocardiogram is not always necessary to detest signs of DCM (dilated cardiomyopathy) I think your vet would have suggested it if he thought it or additional testing was warranted.

    Regarding dog food, ask your vet about this one. The ingredients that you are concerned about are not in the first 10.
    https://www.gofromm.com/fromm-four-star-nutritionals-salmon-a-la-veg-food-for-dogs
    I have a sensitive dog that does well on this formula.

    Yes, I would trust your vet, he is the veterinary healthcare professional that has examined your dog.

    in reply to: Gulping Disorder in Dogs #147985 Report Abuse
    anonymous
    Member
    in reply to: Gulping Disorder in Dogs #147983 Report Abuse
    anonymous
    Member

    See a specialist, either Internal Medicine or Neurology. Your dog has not responded to the treatment from the regular vet.
    He will probably need diagnostic testing to be accurately diagnosed.
    Have not watched your video. There are no veterinary healthcare professionals here and even if there were, they have not examined your dog so they would not be able to give you specific advice.
    I would make an appointment with a specialist, asap.

    Several gulping threads are here/not closed. Just use the search engine, example
    https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/topic/frantic-lapping-gulping-licking-whining/

    PS: Just watched the video. Impossible to speculate on what it could be. There are a multitude of disorders that can cause these symptoms. I would not give over the counter meds, supplements or any other remedies unless prescribed by a veterinarian that has examined the dog.

    in reply to: Favourite Dog Food #147901 Report Abuse
    anonymous
    Member

    I would go by the recommendations of a veterinarian that has examined your dog suggests.

    There is no perfect dog food, it all depends on what is best for your dog.

    That being said, we like Fromm 🙂

    Go here for science based information http://skeptvet.com/Blog/

    in reply to: Large puppy breed best food, Acana? #147816 Report Abuse
    anonymous
    Member

    @ Alberto A

    What dog foods do you have available in Italy?

    Also, when you get the pup, do not change the food! Continue to feed what the breeder has been using.

    See the vet for an initial puppy exam within 2 weeks of bringing the pup home. See what he recommends.

    This is the brand I like, I don’t know if you can get it where you are https://www.gofromm.com/fromm-family-large-breed-puppy-gold-food-for-dogs

    in reply to: GreenMin for Detox? #147617 Report Abuse
    anonymous
    Member

    It’s a scam. Most supplements are. Beware of homeopathic vets, also known as quacks.

    in reply to: hydrolyzed dog food #147518 Report Abuse
    anonymous
    Member

    “Are there any non prescription hydrolyzed protein dog foods on the market”?

    NO, there are not, and mixing in another food defeats the purpose. Stop adding stuff to the prescription food.
    Offer a meal 2 times per day, your dog will eat when he is hungry. He will be fine as long as he is drinking water (have fresh water available 24/7)
    If he goes 72 hours without eating solid food then call your vet and discuss diet options.

    https://www.petmd.com/dog/what-hydrolyzed-protein-dog-food excerpt below
    Veterinary prescription hydrolyzed protein dog foods are an excellent choice for both food allergies and IBD. These diets are manufactured under the strictest quality control measures, which ensures that they aren’t contaminated by ingredients that are not included in the label. Eating prohibited foods is a major reason that diagnostic food trials and treatment for food allergies and IBD fail.

    in reply to: Redford Naturals #147308 Report Abuse
    anonymous
    Member

    Chronic ear infections are indicative of allergies , also there are other disorders that can cause this.

    For the best testing, diagnostics and treatment options, I would consult a veterinary dermatologist.

    http://www.mspca.org/angell_services/dermatology-allergies/Ear Diseases. excerpt below
    Otitis externa is the medical term for ear inflammation. Most cases of otitis externa also have an infection that is causing the ear inflammation.
    The structure of the ear in dogs and cats can make them more prone to ear infections. The ear canal in dogs and cats is longer than the ear canal in people. The ear canal is also “L-shaped” with vertical and horizontal parts.
    Because only some dogs and cats develop ear infections, other conditions often contribute to the development of otitis externa and ear infections in your pet. Allergies, parasites, and masses or tumors can all cause ear irritation and infection. Allergies are the most common cause of ear infections in dogs and cats. Since an ear infection can be secondary to an underlying problem, it is often important to diagnose and treat the cause of the ear infection while treating the ear infection.
    An ear infection can develop into a severe health problem for a dog or cat. Left untreated, ear infections can spread deeper into a pet’s ear (middle ear infection) and cause permanent damage to the ear canal (ear canal mineralization). Some chronic ear infections can develop resistance to antibiotics and become untreatable with medications.

    in reply to: New to raw feeding #147205 Report Abuse
    anonymous
    Member

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is cautioning pet owners not to feed their pets Performance Dog frozen raw pet food purchased after July 22, 2019 because a sample tested positive for Salmonella and L. mono.

    https://www.fda.gov/animal-veterinary/news-events/fda-cautions-pet-owners-not-feed-performance-dog-raw-pet-food-due-salmonella-listeria-monocytogenes?utm_campaign=9-26-2019-PerformanceDog&utm_medium=email&utm_source=Eloqua

    anonymous
    Member

    Make an appointment with a veterinary dermatologist. Allergies are complicated. There is no cure, however there is effective treatment but it is lifelong.
    Sorry, no miracle cures. Often the expertise of a specialist is required. There is no cheap way out of this.
    Hope this helps http://skeptvet.com/Blog/?s=allergies

    in reply to: Need Grain Free/LOW Fiber/LOW Carbohydrate Food #146871 Report Abuse
    anonymous
    Member

    Make an appointment with a veterinary dermatologist. Allergies are complicated. There is no cure, however there is effective treatment but it is lifelong.
    Sorry, no miracle cures. Often the expertise of a specialist is required. There is no cheap way out of this.
    Hope this helps http://skeptvet.com/Blog/?s=allergies

    in reply to: Dog turning pink #146664 Report Abuse
    anonymous
    Member

    Are you talking about the skin turning pink as in inflamed, irritated? If so please consult a vet (in real life) one that actually examines your dogs, asap. Your dogs may be having an allergic reaction and may need medical attention right away.
    Impossible for any vet wannabe to advise you over the internet.
    Stop consulting Dr Google. You are wasting time. CALL THE VET!
    Good luck.

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