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anon101

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  • in reply to: Blood in stool while transitioning… advice? #134914 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    ” Before rushing to the vet, I’d prefer to ask other people if they know anything that could have caused it, or what I can do that might possibly help it. I never said I wasn’t going to take her to the vet, I intend to. I came here because I wanted helpful advice presented in a kind, respectful manner”

    Yes. That is what I responded to, my advice was “Go to the vet” asap. I provided information to support my opinion.
    I guess that is not what you want to hear.
    Don’t get angry at me. Don’t ask for advice if you don’t want to hear it.
    Anyone can tell you not to worry, everything will be alright. I guess that is what you would prefer.

    in reply to: Blood in stool while transitioning… advice? #134875 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Please be advised that we not veterinarians. For this reason, this website was never meant to be used as a substitute for sound professional advice.
    Because the health of your dog can be directly affected by what you read here, you should always consult with a licensed veterinary professional before taking any specific action.

    Above is an excerpt from https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/disclaimer-and-disclosure/

    in reply to: Blood in stool while transitioning… advice? #134865 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    “She isn’t a senior, she’s only four”

    That is even more concerning. I am sorry but you just don’t get it. Blood in the stool is not normal.

    GO TO THE VET. What did her last annual exam reveal?

    Peace out

    PS: An 8 pound dog is not a wolf, they are delicate animals, please discuss with your vet, prescription food may be the way to go at least till she is stable.

    “There are many people that have been doing it for decades and their dogs have never been healthier”
    BS Where is the research? You are talking ragtime.

    in reply to: Blood in stool while transitioning… advice? #134857 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    “dehydrated bones”

    That is bone, it can calcify in the gut and turn into a cement like substance and cause a blockage, GI upset at the least.

    Obviously you have been listening to the homeopathic crowd. Your info about raw food is wrong.
    ” Dogs aren’t built like us and are designed to be able to handle it. As long as your dog is healthy and doesn’t have any underlying problems they should be just fine.”

    Good luck with that.

    BTW: Your dog is a senior, has she had labs done recently? My advice still stands. Take her to the vet. I would have an x-ray/ultrasound done to rule out.

    If you think I am blowing smoke, I am not. I have experience and knowledge in these matters. Find out the hard way, I did.

    Please provide an update after your dog sees a real vet (not the internet).

    in reply to: Blood in stool while transitioning… advice? #134837 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    “Blood in the stools that is red, is undigested blood. This is a sign of the colon lining being irritated. This can be from something like pieces of bone in the stool, from diarrhea”.
    “If the stools are soft, there may be colitis, inflammation of the colon lining”.

    “It might be better on its own in a few days. If is not better, I would start with a microscopic exam of a stool sample to check for parasites. Not all parasites are worms, and most are too small to see without a microscope”.

    Above are excerpts in response to a specific question about a dog and answered by a veterinarian from https://www.justanswer.com/dog-health/bvnrf-wrong-beagle-blood-stools.html

    Hope this helps!

    in reply to: Blood in stool while transitioning… advice? #134819 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2011/06/salmonella-and-other-risks-of-raw-pet-diets/ excerpt below

    C. Health Risks:
    As I have pointed out before, raw diets are more likely than cooked diets to be contaminated with infectious organisms, including Salmonella. Such organisms have been found in raw diets (1, 8-12) and have been found shed in the feces of pets eating these diets (13), they can be passed from pets to humans (13-16), and they have caused illness in both pets and humans (16-18).
    Another recent paper in the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, written by Dr. Kate KuKanich (19), specifically addresses the subject of Salmonella contamination in pet foods and treats. Her analysis of the literature shows that uncooked foods and treats are far more likely to be contaminated with Salmonella, and that up to 69% of sled dogs and 61% of racing greyhounds fed raw meat shed this organism in their feces even when they have no diarrhea or other clinical symptoms. This is compared to a rate of shedding of less than 5% up to 15% in studies of other healthy dogs. While Salmonella contamination after cooking has been found in dry diets, the risks for uncooked foods and treats are substantially higher, and Dr. KuKanich concludes, as I would,
    Ample evidence exists for the risk of Salmonella contamination in raw food diets; thus, it is advised that pet owners avoid feeding raw food diets to pets.

    in reply to: Blood in stool while transitioning… advice? #134818 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Stop the raw immediately and take the dog to the vet, TODAY. This has been going on for more than a week. She needs treatment by a veterinarian, not the internet. BE HONEST ABOUT THE RAW WITH THE VET.

    Give us an update so others will learn from your unfortunate experience.

    Whatever you are feeding her does not agree with her and is causing her harm. She may have an obstruction especially if you have been feeding bones and such.
    Or not, but something is wrong.
    Even cooked chicken has a lot of small sharp bones in it, especially if you haven’t carefully chopped it up.

    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2018/02/actually-raw-chicken-likely-does-lead-to-paralysis-in-dogs/ excerpt below

    “Dr. Brady can call me a dupe or lackey of Big Pet Food if he wants (and I suspect he will). The truth is, I am open to the idea that fresh food, even raw food, might have health benefits. However, the evidence is clear that raw has risks, and it is up to the proponents of raw diets to prove there are benefits that make these risks worth taking. Not with anecdotes, faulty logic about what is “natural,” rhetorical assaults on the pet food industry, or mere passion. They should prove it with data, with reliable evidence derived from appropriate scientific research. Until they do so, there is no reason for pet owners to take the risks they deny exist for ourselves, our pets, or our families.”

    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2018/02/yet-another-study-shows-the-real-dangers-of-raw-diets-for-dogs/
    Read article and comments, use the search engine there to look up topics for more articles.
    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/category/nutrition/

    Nothing is being sold at that site, no dog food, no supplements, no books, no membership fees.


    anon101
    Member

    Another thought, keep a harness and leash on him at mealtimes and when you have guests over so you can lead him away from where food is being served without having to put your hands on him. Then put him behind a gate or in a crate.
    Dogs tend to behave better in general when on leash.


    anon101
    Member

    PS: Ignore the whining, barking, begging, and the sad eyes. HE IS NOT STARVING.

    However, do not ignore anxiety and panic, some dogs that have never been crated cannot tolerate it and may hurt themselves trying to get out. That’s why I suggested a doggy gate, so he can still see and hear others. Don’t put him behind a closed door, he’ll go nuts :-/

    How about a raw carrot to chew on? Some dogs like them and they are low calorie. No more than 1 a day.

    Not baby carrots, they are bleached and can be a choking hazard due to their size.

    Take him on long walks as tolerated, a game of fetch? He may be eating out of boredom.


    anon101
    Member

    He needs to be removed from the area where you are eating meals before you sit down to eat, at least by a doggie gate or put him in the car as long as you can see him from the window, but not in extreme weather, during your mealtime.
    Or crate him (if he can tolerate it) during meals.
    Same thing when you have guests over. If he bites someone you will have serious problems.
    Consider getting a basket style muzzle, he won’t like it and you will have to be with him when it’s on.
    Maybe give him one bite of kibble afterwards as a reward, and praise him for being good.

    Also he must be removed from the kitchen when food is being prepared, at least by a gate.

    I have never used a trainer, I suspect they will just tell you what I did plus they are expensive.

    • This reply was modified 1 day, 15 hours ago by  anon101.
    in reply to: Dehydrated and Freeze Dried Dog Foods #134635 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Who are you quoting?
    A homeopathic propaganda site?

    @dawne
    Listen to your vet, he is the one that has examined your pets and knows them best.
    More info here (science based) http://skeptvet.com/Blog/?s=raw+food

    Nothing is being sold at the above site, no dog food, no supplements, no books, no membership fees, etc.

    You can use the search engine there to look up topics, the comments are often informative and helpful too.

    in reply to: Dr. Marty Pets Dog Food #134382 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Regarding “Dr Marty”

    https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/topic/how-much-do-you-trust-dog-food-sold-by-veterinarians/#post-134035

    Check out Fromm’s grain inclusive formulas https://www.gofromm.com/fromm-family-classic-adult-dog-food

    Add a little something to it (chopped up cooked chicken or scrambled egg, a bit of canned tuna) and a splash of water.

    If your dog does better on a fish based food https://www.gofromm.com/fromm-four-star-nutritionals-salmon-a-la-veg-food-for-dogs

    My vet approves of Fromm, that’s good enough for me 🙂


    anon101
    Member

    Clear as day to me. My vet advised avoiding small companies, new companies, stay with large dog food companies that have been around a long time, grain-inclusive food. The larger well known companies are more likely to employ a veterinary nutritionist and do feeding trials.

    https://www.mspca.org/angell_services/linking-diet-to-dilated-cardiomyopathy-dcm/

    excerpt below, click on link for full article

    Your Pet’s Diet
    “Cooperation between veterinary cardiologists, nutritionists, and the USFDA has confirmed that the increase in canine and feline DCM is linked to grain-free diets. The dogs and cats affected are often being fed boutique diets that contain exotic meats and are grain-free. On the ingredient list, the first 5 items listed are often non-traditional proteins (anything other than chicken or beef), potatoes or sweet potatoes, and legumes such as lentils or peas. Over twenty food brands have been identified, including home-cooked meals. While a small number of patients may require grain-free diets for management of chronic illness, most dogs and cats are being fed these diets as the result of heavy marketing and the misconception that grains cause illness”.
    “While the link between DCM and grain-free diets has been confirmed, the exact cause is still under investigation. These diets may be deficient in an amino acid called taurine, or the components of the diet may not allow for appropriate taurine metabolism. This is of concern, as taurine is necessary not only for cardiac health, but also normal eye and brain function. Taurine levels in many patients are very low; however, only some patients improve with taurine supplementation. Other theories include a thus far unidentified toxin or lack of other essential nutrients”.

    PS: I would avoid homeopathic vets, they can be dangerous to the health of your pet.


    anon101
    Member

    I don’t trust homeopathic vets, I believe that they can cause harm.
    Example:
    Marty Goldstein–
    Dr. Goldstein is another celebrity participant, a veterinarian to the stars. He is also a strong advocate of the bait-and-switch known as “integrative medicine.” This means he will sometimes use science-based treatments, but then often gives the credit for any improvement to homeopathy, acupuncture, raw diets, herbs, and other alternative treatments he also employs.
    Dr. Goldstein, much like Jean Dodds, is one of those alternative practitioners who is so nice and caring and respected (at least by celebrity clients and alternative medicine advocates) that it is considered almost taboo to point out that much of what he sells is unproven at best and, as in the case of homeopathy, completely useless nonsense.
    I’ve talked frequently about the problem with the concept of alternative medicine experts. Being learned and experienced in the use of unproven or quack therapies makes one an expert only in a narrow, and fundamentally misleading sense. An “expert” on homeopathy is like an expert on astrology or a long-dead religion: they know a great deal about something fictional, but this knowledge is only useful to believers, and there is no reason for those who don’t share the faith to take their proclamations seriously. For all his good intentions, Dr. Goldstein charges people lots of money to provide unscientific advice and fake medicine, along with the real medicine and, presumably, sound advice he “integrates” with the snake oil. This does not make him an expert but mistaken and, thanks to his prominence and PR skills, a bit dangerous.

    Above is an excerpt from http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2018/05/whos-behind-the-the-truth-about-pet-cancer/
    Click on link for full article and comments, also you can use the search engine there to look up nutrition for more science-based informative articles such as http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2016/07/more-nonsense-from-holistic-vets-about-commercial-therapeutic-diets/

    in reply to: chronic vomiting and esophagus issues #133897 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    At age 3 your dog is young, have x-rays been done? Bloodwork? More diagnostic testing may be indicated to get to the root of the problem. It may cost a few bucks.
    Over the counter meds (intended for humans) are not a good idea unless advised by the examining vet.
    Just bandaid stuff anyway, talk to your vet.
    Good luck

    in reply to: chronic vomiting and esophagus issues #133875 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Please wait for your vet to call you back when he has a minute to advise you. Ask if the prescription food comes in canned (soft).
    You are asking for medical advice from folks that may or may not have any experience in veterinary medicine.

    Not a good idea.

    in reply to: Mossy Oak Nature's Menu dry dog food? #133815 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Quote ” He’s been eating it for about a week now with no problems”.

    The results of feeding a low quality diet often don’t show up till a year or two later.

    I a not familiar with the food you mentioned (never heard of it in my neck of the woods) so I have no opinion as to whether it’s a good food or not.

    PS: Orange stools? Food coloring in the kibble?

    Glad it is working out for your dogs but I would not be jumping up and down for joy yet.

    • This reply was modified 1 week, 5 days ago by  anon101.
    in reply to: Anal Glands & Diet Recommendations #133744 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    “Pet Fooled” Is propaganda from the homeopathic crowd.

    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/?s=pet+fooled


    anon101
    Member

    Just see what your vet recommends.

    A prescription or bland diet, soft food instead of kibble may be a good idea.
    Always have fresh water available 24/7.

    You said you feed 30 minutes before you leave in the am, in my experience most dogs have a bowel movement about 1 to 3 hours after a meal.
    If you could feed smaller meals and have someone come in mid day to let her out for a bathroom break it might help.

    Those plastic automatic feeders are useless, most dogs are able to destroy them within 20 minutes.

    in reply to: questions , questions please #133730 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Quote “Didn’t you hear the latest that they’re using road kill squirrels in their food.” lol

    It has nothing to do with dead squirrels, some of Wellness formulas are heavily laden with potatoes.

    No thanks.


    anon101
    Member

    anon101
    Member

    I would ask the vet for a prescription dog food, at least till the dog is stable.

    Vomiting and diarrhea for more than 72 hours are a BIG concern.

    All the foods you mentioned are good. Put a call into your vet, ask him to call you back when he has a minute and see what he recommends. More diagnostic testing may be indicated.


    anon101
    Member

    If your dog is doing well on a particular food I would stay with it.

    No one can guarantee that the foods have the exact same ingredients as cross contamination occurs at the manufacturing sites.
    I don’t think it is worth trying to save a few bucks, just my opinion.

    in reply to: Natural Remedies for IBD and Lymphangeictasia #133674 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    This article was written in 2015 I’m sure the numbers are even higher now.

    http://time.com/4072487/supplements-cause-more-than-23000-er-visits-a-year/ (excerpt below)

    “Dietary supplements in the United States require no safety testing or FDA approval before being sold and marketed. Providing reasons for the use of the ingredients—citing historical use, for instance—is considered enough. If supplements are found to be unsafe, the FDA can remove them from market”.

    BTW: Supplements are not medication.

    in reply to: Natural Remedies for IBD and Lymphangeictasia #133672 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Quote: “it’s hard to find vets that will attest to the efficacy of non-conventional meds!”

    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/category/herbs-and-supplements/

    I am sure you can find a homeopathic vet that will sell you supplements without even examining your dog!

    They are in business just like traditional vets and need to make a profit too 🙂

    Before you go down this road know that some supplements can interfere with the absorption and the effectiveness of prescription meds. Not all supplements are benign and with humans they have caused harm. There is no way of knowing exactly what is in the supplement. Most are just purified water and such.

    I’d stick with the regular vet, maybe he can lighten up on the dosages of prescribed meds as your dog becomes stable.

    Good luck


    anon101
    Member

    Re: Skin scraping, I think it would have showed if there was infection, it looks like you caught it in time and antibiotics were not indicated.


    anon101
    Member

    See if the vet will give you 1 can of the prescription canned food to try, maybe mix it with the kibble?

    Pour a splash of warm water on the kibble?

    Has the Apoquel kicked in yet? Or is that his brother?

    in reply to: Bad teeth #133501 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Don’t be silly! Small breeds are notorious for having lousy teeth, no matter what you feed them.

    I like Fromm https://www.gofromm.com/fromm-family-small-breed-adult-gold-food-for-dogs

    I would add water, if your dogs are doing well on soft food I would continue that. Check out Fromm’s grain inclusive formulas, dry and canned, maybe a combo of both would work?

    You can presoak dry food overnight in the fridge and it has the consistency of wet food.

    Have you tried brushing their teeth once a day?
    Check YouTube for how to videos, it’s never to late to start.


    anon101
    Member

    Did the vet prescribe an antibiotic? Do a skin scraping? If not, I would call him and ask why not? My dog is on a low dose broad spectrum antibiotic times 21 days along with the Apoquel.


    anon101
    Member

    The dermatologist can do intradermal skin testing , the regular vet can’t. This would lead to immunotherapy ($)

    I would wait and see how the dog responds to treatment by the regular vet.

    Sometimes the allergies are seasonal, working with your regular vet you may be able to decrease the meds in late fall/ winter.

    If the symptoms go on for 1 year/4seasons without significant periods of relief then yes I would consult a dermatologist.

    Some dogs respond to immunotherapy (desensitization shots) its expensive.

    Give it ( Apoquel) some time.


    anon101
    Member

    My dog weighs 9 pounds so the dermatologist prescribed Apoquel 5.4mg tab, give 1/2 tab once per day. A 30 day supply costs about $30-$40.

    Believe me this is reasonable compared to immunotherapy, if it doesn’t work they will suggest cytopoint which is a little more expensive and tedious because only a veterinary healthcare professional (licensed) can administer the shot.

    I noticed a decrease in pruritus (itching ) on day 3 or 4. On day 6 she definitely felt better/no itching.
    Day 7, even better.
    For now I am a happy camper.

    Do frequent bathing, every day if needed.
    https://www.petedge.com/zpetedgemain/catalog/productDetail.jsf?area=&sort=RD&wec-appid=PEDM_WEBSHOP_TR&page=C35456610F7C42BFA1CA25328F1F0BBB&itemKey=005056A64D261EE788EDFBC0B87C86C5&show=12&view=grid&simpleSearchString=Nootie&wec-locale=en_US

    I buy it in the gallon jug, it has the same ingredients as Malaseb which is more expensive.
    It’ s hard to do but leave it on for at least 10 minutes if you can.

    PS: You have to wait for the skin infection to clear up to see dramatic results, that may take a couple of weeks.

    in reply to: Top Recommended Dry Foods #133479 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Fromm Classic Adult is our current favorite https://www.gofromm.com/fromm-family-classic-adult-dog-food

    They have other grain-inclusive formulas too.


    anon101
    Member

    Well, it certainly sounds like atopic dermatitis (environmental allergies) or some other skin condition. It sounds like the dog is in extreme discomfort and at risk for bacterial skin infection.

    Anything anyone tells you on these forums is just speculation and opinion (myself included)

    If your veterinarian has not been helpful I would ask for a referral to a veterinary dermatologist for testing to come up with an accurate diagnosis and treatment options.

    There is no miracle cure or magical supplement or food that will fix this.

    In fact the dog may have to go on steroids and antibiotics again to temporarily stop the suffering.
    Consult your vet, asap.


    anon101
    Member

    The diet helps but it can only do so much.

    A multifaceted approach is often needed for environmental allergies. There is no cure.

    But there are effective treatments/management.

    PS: Bacterial skin infections that require antibiotics are common with atopic dermatitis. It is painful. Itchiness and burning….

    Next, ear infections.

    in reply to: Dog won't eat – ongoing for almost 2 months #133439 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    I have no words of wisdom. I am so sorry for what you are going through.


    anon101
    Member

    Oh, no.

    Ask the vet about Apoquel if the symptoms continue, it works within a few days. It is reasonable (cost) in comparison to going to specialist.

    I am optimistic about it. It is not a steroid, side effects are minimal if any.

    PS: I hate cones….
    Don’t wait till he has a skin infection and needs antibiotics.
    It is what it is. You have 2 high maintenance dogs at the moment 🙁


    anon101
    Member

    The Apoquel is working! My allergy dog is stable again and may not need the immunotherapy much longer.

    I recently switched her back to a fish kibble as a base . Might be a coincidence but I’m staying with it. She still gets a variety of toppers including cooked chicken.

    Honestly, every dog is different, some of it is just trial and error.


    anon101
    Member

    My allergy dog has fresh cooked chicken almost every day, no problem. It seems that the processed chicken in kibble affects her but not fresh cooked. So I still give her cooked chicken meat without issue.

    Not sure about a better forum, I like SkeptVet for science based information.


    anon101
    Member

    I might go with the prescription food at least till he is stable.

    Most vets like Fromm, take a look at the different foods, see if the vet will approve?
    https://www.gofromm.com/dog
    https://www.gofromm.com/fromm-four-star-nutritionals-salmon-a-la-veg-food-for-dogs

    My dog’s dermatologist says try a novel protein like kangaroo. I just can’t do it, baby kangaroos are just too cute.

    I have noticed that my allergy dog does best on fish based kibble, Purina Pro Plan Focus Salmon for sensitive skin and stomach seemed to work…

    It might be worth a try.

    PS: I think IBD/IBS is good news. This can be managed and may even go into remission for extended periods of time.

    You got this!


    anon101
    Member

    Excerpt from link provided in above post.

    Why is the FDA issuing this alert?
    The FDA is issuing this alert because these three lots of Darwin’s Natural Pet Products raw dog food represent a serious threat to human and animal health and are adulterated under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act because they contain Salmonella. Because these products are sold and stored frozen, and the FDA is concerned that people may still have them in their possession.
    The FDA considers the actions taken by Arrow Reliance to remove violative product from the marketplace to meet the regulatory definition of a recall. However, the firm has not issued public notification, and the FDA is not confident that the firm’s customer notifications are effective for this ongoing recall. The FDA continues to work with Arrow Reliance, doing business as Darwin’s Natural Pet Products, on recalling the remaining products from these lots.


    anon101
    Member

    Yes I saw your comments. I didn’t see anything offensive about the comments (yours or mine).
    Forums, this stuff happens, no big deal.


    anon101
    Member

    Oops! I guess someone didn’t appreciate my opinion on supplements.

    I do use fish oil for my allergy dog but I use the brand my vet approves of, also I initially will buy it from the vet clinic but then look around online for a better price.

    Always check expiration dates. It’s always a bit of a risk because you don’t know if the product has been stored properly plus I have heard that counterfeit meds and supplements are a big business.

    in reply to: How to decide to use Large Breed or not? #133222 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member
    in reply to: How to decide to use Large Breed or not? #133120 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Hope this helps. If she is going to be over 40-50 pounds I would consider her a large breed.

    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2010/01/nutrition-in-large-breed-puppies/

    How about: https://www.gofromm.com/classic-puppy-dog-food


    anon101
    Member

    Please consult a veterinarian that has examined your dog and knows it’s history.
    There is no blanket rule as to what is right or wrong for any dog.
    I always add water to dry kibble, that being said it may not be right for your dog, depending on breed, age, etc.
    Some dogs do best on canned food only.


    anon101
    Member

    Chewy is now owned by Petco.
    I no longer use them if I can avoid it.
    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2019/03/a-detailed-evidence-based-response-to-petcos-ban-on-artificial-food-ingredients/

    Fromm cut ties with them.

    in reply to: dried/powdered veg and fruit vs fresh? #133057 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Quote: “I just wondered if there was any degradation of their nutrients by dehydrating them first and adding to the mix”.

    Of course fresh is best but how many of us can afford that everyday? A lot of folks on fixed incomes can only afford frozen fruits/veggies (for themselves). I am sure they are getting some benefit…but it’s not the same thing :-/

    I consider dog food kibble the base, not the entire meal. So by adding some fresh cooked ingredients (plus water) to it, I feel I am covering all bases.

    So far I have had positive results. I don’t expect any kibble or canned food to cover all nutritional needs (ideally) for pets.

    in reply to: dried/powdered veg and fruit vs fresh? #132967 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    If you have questions call Fromm

    This one has blueberries https://www.frommfamily.com/products/dog/four-star/dry/#chicken-a-la-veg-recipe

    I think they have to process fruits and veggies otherwise they would spoil in the bag very quickly. Just my thoughts…

    in reply to: dried/powdered veg and fruit vs fresh? #132966 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Wysong is a small company, not sure I would trust it.

    Have you checked out Fromm? https://www.gofromm.com/dog

    As far as fruit and veggies go, I think anything in a kibble would be dried/powdered.
    Not sure about canned.

    You can always go with something like Fromm Classic Adult or another basic kibble of your choice and add a little steamed veggies as a topper, a bit of scrambled egg, boiled chopped chicken meat, tuna. A splash of water.
    I would go light on the fruit and veggies, in some dogs it can cause loose stoole.


    anon101
    Member

    Keep him on bland diet and make sure he is drinking water, add it to his food.

    I hope he has a peaceful weekend and you all get some rest.

    I keep wondering if he got into something. Swallowed something sharp, like a bone? Maybe he passed it but it caused a lot of irritation?
    Increase in bile, gallbladder inflammation? I guess IBD could cause these things.

    The fact that his labs are normal is a good sign.

    • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 6 days ago by  anon101.
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