Dog Food Advisor Forums crazy4cats

crazy4cats

Forum Replies Created

Viewing 50 posts - 101 through 150 (of 2,068 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • in reply to: Dog food (Duplicate Topic #4) #137349 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    Joanne-
    You could always purchase a ProPlan Beef canned food to feed as a topper. I buy the ProPlan Large Breed Beef and Rice canned and put a couple of TBS mixed in their food. They love it. Bad thing is, you may get the stink eye if it’s not on the food when they get used to it.

    in reply to: Taurine-Deficient Cardiomyopathy Podcast #137347 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    JRS-
    They actually have a chart that lists the brands that have been submitted to them from dogs that have diet-related DCM. They do not list the actual formula because they said it’s tough to include them on their chart. For example, many of Acana’s Formulas have been implicated. It’s hard to fit them all in. Therefore, they just list the brand. They have to submit the actual results of their echo and then they have to wait and see if they recover with a food change before they are entered on the chart. I believe Fromm has had a few reported that may not have been grain free.

    They might delete your question because it’s been asked before, but I doubt they would ban you. Remember, this chart is only a group community “project”. It is not what is reported to the FDA and only a small percentage of all the dogs. I hope they are being reported to the FDA by the owners.

    in reply to: Dog food (Duplicate Topic #4) #137341 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    I’ve been having a hard time finding a beef recipe to. I have fed one of the Beneful recipes, but I think it might have chicken or poultry By-Product in it.

    Not sure why the other brands do not make many or any beef formulas?

    in reply to: Taurine-Deficient Cardiomyopathy Podcast #137318 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    That is just plain not true. They have an article by Lisa Freeman, Veterinary Nutritionist, that states it’s not just grain free.

    in reply to: Dog food (Duplicate Topic #4) #137317 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    Hi Joanne,
    Just wanted to let you know that I am now a fan of Purina ProPlan. I used to feed my two large dogs a rotation of mostly grain free along with some with grain. I never really understood why grain free could be better with all the peas and potatoes. Especially when the recommendation is to feed your dogs boiled chicken breast with over cooked rice when they have bad bellies. Why is it now all the sudden best to stay away from rice? I followed the trend and marketing anyway. You can still give in to peer pressure when you’re a grown adult and know better!

    When the FDA warning came out and our very own Aimee showed concern over it, I switched. My dogs are part Golden and it made me nervous. Anyway after feeding Purina for 8 months I had an echocardiogram done for peace of mind. Thankfully, they are both fine.

    They do best on the Purina ProPlan Focus Lg Breed Weight Management formula. I tried the Purina One Weight Mgt with turkey and they had a ton of gas. Too bad as Purina One is a little cheaper. Lol,

    My dogs stools are the smallest and firmest they have ever been. Which is saying a lot! Their coats and skin are good too. Although they have never had issue with that. I may give Iams and/or Eukanuba a try sometime in the future as well. Good luck!

    in reply to: Grain Free Diets and Heart Disease #137118 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    Yes, Joanne, I hope the investigation into the sudden increase of cases of DCM in dogs would come up with some more concrete answers soon also. However, it seems like it is complicated. Too bad some of the companies whose names keep coming up as having been fed to the dogs being diagnosed would step up and help support the research. They instead are turning their backs and continue to formulate dog food without employing people with the expertise to do so. Also using new untested ingredients without doing any type of feed trials.

    So many people roll their eyes at the “big 3” donating money to the researchers. How would the research get done if they didn’t. I’m sure they would accept money from some of the other pet food companies as well. I’m guessing that Champion, Fromm, Global Pets, and Diamond have enough profits to contribute. They charge enough for their food! Where are their profits going? Not on veterinarian nutritionists, testing, research or feeding trials!

    Not sure if the FDA ever came to a conclusion on what was causing dogs to die from jerky treats. I won’t ever feed those again either. Just like I will only feed foods that meet all the WSAVA criteria from now on.

    You’re right about dogs being able to synthesize their own taurine if the proper precursors are available in their diet. There are several articles to be found on the internet with this information. I’ve resigned myself to the fact that I am not an expert at analyzing dog food ingredient panels! You just can’t get the whole story from them.

    Btw, Dr. Stern’s peer-reviewed study at UCDavis was privately funded. There was no money taken from any pet food companies.

    My dogs are doing great on Purina ProPlan. Sounds like yours are/is as well, joanne. Best wishes!

    in reply to: Grain Free (Topic 3) #136439 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    Haley cookie-
    Most of the dogs that are being diagnosed currently with diet-mediated DCM are NOT low in taurine. The issue isn’t quite as simple as adding taurine-rich supplements. Your recommendations are dangerous. There is something going on with how the BEG diets are being formulated. I can’t think of anything more heartless than to tell someone who has a dog diagnosed with DCM that it is due to feeding a subpar food.

    So many people are feeling guilty as it is. And they should not! The companies making these foods are at fault! They are using untested ingredients being formulated by people who do not have the expertise to do so. Then marketing them like they are the best without doing any feeding trials. Our dogs are their guinea pigs and it’s not going well. They are not taking any responsibility. Shame on them!

    in reply to: Grain Free (Topic 3) #136389 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    I’m sure the vets on that site cannot make formula recommendations without actually examining your dog or consulting with a vet who has.

    I switched my dogs to Purina ProPlan Focus Large Breed Adult Weight Management. Whew! Say that real fast. Lol!

    What are you feeding now? I tried to find a kibble that had a similar analysis as what I was feeding. For example, calories, fat, and fiber. You could call or email whichever brand you choose for help choosing a formula.

    I’m glad people are finding out about this and switching foods at least until the exact cause is found out. Good luck!

    in reply to: Grain Free (Topic 3) #136366 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    Check out this FB group:

    Taurine-Deficient (Nutritional) Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    It is a science-based group that is keeping up with the latest research on the increasing number of dogs being diagnosed with DCM due to their diets. They also have a support group for owners with dogs who have been diagnosed with it.

    I’m sorry about your dog’s diagnosis. What food did you switch to?

    crazy4cats
    Participant

    Exactly Marie and BDog! Thank goodness owners are being proactive and having their dogs tested. DCM is typically asymptomatic until they are in heart failure and it’s too late to fix. Once diagnosed, they can change their diet, take their meds and be on the road to recovery if it is diet mediated.

    crazy4cats
    Participant

    In the beginning, yes, not so much anymore that people are becoming aware of the issue. There have been several different breeds diagnosed and have been improving with food changes. Golden Retrievers do not have a genetic link to DCM.

    crazy4cats
    Participant

    Hmmmm??? Other than the fact that Zignature is a grain free boutique brand that has the highest number of dogs diagnosed with DCM after eating it, is a good food. Just Hmmmm????

    crazy4cats
    Participant

    Actually, no, I have called Fromm myself! And am following the advice of our vet and a board-certified veterinarian cardiologist who is researching this issue.

    I’ve read most everything the SkepVet has written. Funny, I actually follow him on his FB page! I guess not all FB sites are bogus. I value his information and opinions.

    crazy4cats
    Participant

    It is not opinion, it is fact. Go ahead and give them a call and ask. Is this the same vet that you said approved of Zignature and said that “legumes rock?”

    Never ever have I implied I am a veterinarian. I was feeding Fromm myself when I saw the results of Dr. Stern of UC Davis peer-reviewed DCM study results. I quickly switched to Purina.

    crazy4cats
    Participant

    Hi DanniB –
    It certainly wouldn’t hurt to feed large breed puppy food just to be safe. It is formulated correctly to keep growing joints of large breed pups healthy.

    Lots of large breed pups are raised on Purina Pro Plan large breed puppy food with excellent results.

    I wouldn’t feed Fromm. It is considered a boutique food company. They do not have a vetrinary nutritionist on staff and have not done any testing, research or feed trials since the 90’s. I don’t know much about the Wellness brand. I’d stick to Purina, Royal Canin, Hill’s, Iams or Eukanuba. They have all been around for a long time and do much testing on their food. Good luck and have fun with your new puppy!

    in reply to: Grain Free (Topic 3) #136123 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    Lol!, I’ve been a member of the Taurine-Deficient (Nutritional) Dilated Cardiomyopathy since early August. You probably found out about it from me!

    It’s hard to keep us all straight.

    I read your comments the other day on the site about how well one of your dogs is doing on Bright Mind. I gave you an upvote!

    I like to keep spreading the word about this increasing concern with DCM and “boutique” type foods.

    in reply to: Grain Free (Topic 3) #136064 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant
    in reply to: Dehydrated and Freeze Dried Dog Foods #134581 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant
    in reply to: questions , questions please #133681 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    You should probably contact him and ask if he has changed his ratings criteria.

    I personally do not believe you can successfully rate a food by its ingredient label. There is no way to tell the quality of the ingredients . It’s best to choose a manufacturer that employs experts in the field and test their products with feeding trials.

    in reply to: questions , questions please #133665 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    Patricia A-
    The latest research has shown that not all dogs that are being diagnosed with DCM are taurine deficient and it’s not only grain free foods that are causing it.

    Check out this article:
    http://vetnutrition.tufts.edu/2018/11/dcm-update/

    Why can’t you bring yourself to feed a food that meets all the WSAVA guidelines?

    in reply to: Diet for renal failure #131121 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    There is not going to be an OTC food that is appropriate for your dog. I agree with the others, either feed a prescription food or work with a certified-board nutritionist to formulate a homemade diet for your poor pup. BalanceIt has a team of nutritionists that will work with your vet to formulate a diet for you. Good luck!

    in reply to: Grain-free diets linked to heart disease? #131117 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    Here is the latest from the FDA on the ongoing investigation into the ever increasing number of dogs and cats being diagnosed with Dilated Cardiomyopathy due to their diet:
    https://www.petfoodindustry.com/articles/7887-fda-asks-pet-food-industry-for-dcm-related-information?fbclid=IwAR009PEbLG3fX4AIBKgKh0jEAkbr5_rUHdz6O2D8-75f2NKwKA05fU4VUe8#.XGgfFjOgs88.facebook
    PetfoodIndustry.com
    Home » FDA asks pet food industry for DCM-related information
    PET FOOD NEWS / PET FOOD INGREDIENTS / PET FOOD SAFETY
    DCM-dog-foods-FDA
    Debbie Phillips-Donaldson
    BY DEBBIE PHILLIPS-DONALDSON ON FEBRUARY 14, 2019
    FDA asks pet food industry for DCM-related information
    FDA needs pet food producers to report on any changes in ingredients, processing or formulation.
    3K
    In its ongoing investigation into atypical cases of canine dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) possibly related to grain-free pet food ingredients, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is asking the industry for information related to changes in ingredients, processing or formulation.

    David Edwards, Ph.D., an officer with FDA’s Center for Veterinary Medicine (CVM)’s Office of Surveillance and Compliance, presented an updated on the agency’s DCM investigation during the American Feed Industry Association’s 12th Annual Pet Food Conference, held February 12 in conjunction with the International Production and Processing Expo in Atlanta, Georgia, USA.

    What FDA needs from pet food industry
    Specifically, Edwards said, CVM needs information from pet food producers relative to the timeframe when most of the new cases of DCM were reported over the past few years, but mainly during 2018. He asked for input on changes in ingredients used, sourcing of ingredients, processing or formulation.

    He also asked that pet food companies, academic programs and organizations such as the Pet Food Institute continue their own investigations on any potential issues with formulas and ingredients possibly related to this DCM situation.

    Wide range of dogs reported among DCM cases
    Through November 30, 2018, CVM had recorded 290 cases of DCM involving 325 dogs (plus a few cats) and 74 pet deaths, Edwards reported. The cases occurred from 2014 through 2018, but most were in 2018. He also presented demographic information showing a wide range of affected pets. For example, the most frequently reported dog breed was Golden Retrievers, with 61 dogs affected, while another 27 were mixed-breed and 25 were Labrador Retrievers. Other breeds with numbers in the double digits included Great Danes at 16 and Australian Shepherds at 11; Edwards listed 15 other breeds with three to nine dogs affected each.

    Related to the variety of breeds affected, the dogs’ weight ranged from 8 to 212 pounds, with a mean of 68 pounds. They ranged in age from 0.42 to 16 years, with a mean of 6.5 years; 59 percent were male, 41 percent female.

    Among the cats affected, ages ranged from 0.4 to 12 years; the mean was 5.5 years old. Their weight ranged from 7 to 13 pounds, with a mean of 11 pounds. The cats were 60 percent male, 40 percent female.

    Dog foods and ingredients in DCM reports
    Edwards also presented data on the types of dog foods and their ingredients in the reported DCM cases. The foods were predominantly dry (269 of the reports), with four raw and one each of wet and semi-moist. In 14 reports, multiple formulations were named; in five others, the foods were unknown.

    Then Edwards provided a deeper dive into the formulations and ingredients for 196 of the reports, in which the affected dogs were fed a single, primary dog food:

    About 90 percent of the diets were labeled grain free;
    Of the other 10 percent of the foods, some were labeled vegan or vegetarian, while some contained brown rice;
    A large proportion of the foods contained peas or lentils high on the ingredients list. In fact, peas appeared in 180 of the dog foods named in these 196 reports and lentils in 104 of the foods. Other ingredients presented by Edwards included potatoes, in 63 of the diets, plus sweet potatoes and chickpeas, each in 55 of the diets.
    Edwards said that, before FDA issued its alert about these cases of DCM in July 2018, the agency had investigated for contaminants such as metals or improper levels of minerals and other nutrients in the cases reported to date. After the alert came out, FDA then bought some of the products named in the reports and tested them specifically for those same factors, among other things. All the tests before and after the alert were negative.

    FDA is continuing its investigation, working with scientists and nutritionists in the Veterinary Laboratory and Investigation Response Network (Vet-LIRN), and also with veterinary cardiologists. The investigation has included nutritional and amino acid analyses of the foods reported and complete health histories of many of the dogs, Edwards said.

    crazy4cats
    Participant

    Hi Midama-
    Congratulations on your new pup. Definitely make sure that you choose a puppy food formulated especially for a large breed puppy. They need certain calcium percentages. It’s very important for their joints. Keep the puppy as lean as possible and limit the exercise. I would get rid of the Taste of the Wild and feed either Purina, Royal Canin, Hill’s, Eukanuba, or Iams. They all meet the WSAVA guidelines for choosing a good dog food.

    Currently, I feed my dogs Purina kibble with mostly Purina canned. But also mix in either eggs, fresh chicken or sardines a few days a week as well. The unbalanced toppers and treats should be no more than 10 to 15 percent of their total diet. I feed mostly weight management kibble that is 350 calories or less per cup. My dogs are also chubby lab mixes!

    My cats get Royal Canin because they are the royalty of the house! 😊❤️

    Hope this helps. Good luck!

    in reply to: dog food questions #130248 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    Hi Joanne-
    Which Purina formula were you feeding? How long did you give it before switching? Do you know what the fiber percentage was? I was thinking that maybe choosing a Purina formula with a different fiber level may help. My two do better with a little higher fiber around 5 or 6 percent.

    Also, you need to give a food a good six to eight weeks before you know how your dog is doing on it. Unless, of course it is causing serious vomiting or diarrhea.

    Have you talked to your veterinarian? Some recommend feeding a gastrointestinal RX food until their tummy gets settled down and then slowly switching to an over the counter food. I hope you find something that works. Sounds stressful.

    Good luck!

    in reply to: Grain-free diets linked to heart disease? #130114 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    Hi Patti S-
    Did you join the FB group? There are over 21,000 members now. Wow! Might be tough to take in all the info. Let me know if you have any questions. I joined it early on when it was easier to navigate!

    in reply to: Grain-free diets linked to heart disease? #130058 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    Hi Patti S-
    Here is a link that may be of interest to you. It includes the article that you shared along with others. You may also consider joining their FB page. There are many knowledgeable vets as admins, including Joshua Stern, the cardiologist from U Davis who recently released study results on the subject.

    https://taurinedcm.org/

    I’m glad you are changing food. I also took mine off grain free and am now feeding Purina kibble with various toppers. Good luck!

    in reply to: Happy Birthday to Boone! #130044 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    Happy Birthday Boone! Looking good. 13 is suite an accomplishment!

    in reply to: TASTE OF THE WILD complaints #129981 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    I’m so sorry to hear about your dog. Are you thinking of having the food tested or a necropsy done? I’m not sure if you realize that TOTW is made by Diamond. As huge as they are, I do not think they have veterinary nutritionists on staff or do feeding trials. Did she have any other symptoms besides not eating? Was she a senior?

    Again, I’m sorry for your loss and I hope your other dogs make a full recovery. Best wishes. 💔

    crazy4cats
    Participant

    Thank you.

    crazy4cats
    Participant

    It’s a raw brand of raw food that uses fermentation on their products. Last I checked they had no pathogen quality control testing and could not provide nutrient analysis.

    in reply to: read before switching back to grain inclusive #129629 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    Again, it’s not just about taurine. I’ve read issues about this company before. Do they have a full time veterinary nutritionist on staff? Do they do testing or feeding trials? I would keep it to no more than 10 to 15 percent of total calories if you really want to feed. Do a search up top on this company. It’s been discussed before. Pay close attention to Aimee’s posts. She is the most informed and educated poster on this site by far!

    Best wishes. I know you are trying to do what you think is best! I’ve done a 180 on my way of thinking when it comes to dog food. I realize I cannot rate a food by it’s ingredients. I’m sticking to the brands that employ the experts who can. 😊

    in reply to: No Hide Chews #129625 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    You could try filling a Kong and freezing it for him to chew on in the evening. Wet some kibble and mix a little pumpkin or no sugar added applesauce in, stuff it in the Kong and stick it in the freezer. There are probably other ideas on the internet as well. Just don’t get too fancy if he has digestive problems.

    Bully sticks are high in fat and may cause digestive issues also. My dogs do get one of them a week. They are seven year old lab mix brothers and still love to chew!

    Hope this helps!

    in reply to: Heart Murmur in 4 month old puppy #129623 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    Hi Tami-
    I agree with Anon. A prescription diet from Royal Canin, Hills or Purina is the absolute best way to go! They have years of research and testing behind them. Do not listen to the internet grain free boutique hype. Those foods are having very negative effects on our dogs!

    Good luck with your puppy. In hope he grows out of it.

    in reply to: read before switching back to grain inclusive #129619 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    Hi Patricia-
    Did you know that dogs being fed homemade and raw diets are also turning up with DCM? And that many of the dogs with diet related cases are not taurine deficient?

    The two recent major peer-reviewed studies from UCDavis and North Carolina State University Colleges of Veterinary Medicine findings are implicating diets that are from boutique companies that do not have much research, contain exotic ingredients and/or contain legumes and/or potatoes. They also do not employ full time veterinary nutritionists. It’s not just about taurine. They know it is about the diet though because when taken off this type of diet and fed a WSAVA approved food, the dogs DCM was cured.

    Check out this link for more info:
    https://taurinedcm.org/

    • This reply was modified 3 years, 4 months ago by crazy4cats.
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    Hi Patrocle-
    I’m glad you figured out the thyroid problem with your dog. Once you get it back on track with meds, they will make a big difference with his weight and hair loss. My sister’s dog was hypothyroid and his meds turned him into a new dog!

    I agree with Sanne. Listen to your vet and also stay far away from Champion Foods. Purina ProPlan Salmon Sensitive Skin is also a good one along with the food Sanne recommended. Stay away from grain free small boutique type foods. Good luck!

    • This reply was modified 3 years, 4 months ago by crazy4cats.
    in reply to: 2019 reviews #129481 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    Dr. Sagman is a retired dentist. My guess is he is waiting until the FDA makes another statement about BEG (Boutique, Exotic and Grain Free) dog food causing DCM before he reinstates the Editor’s Choice section.

    In my opinion, there should have already been a few recalls! Do your own research people!!

    in reply to: Vetmedin Shortage? #129477 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    Hi Michelle-
    I do not think they are the same, but here is a link that may help you. If you join the FB group, there are a few veterinarians that are admins and moderators that are educated on the subject. When I first joined the FB group, there were only a couple hundred members. Now, there are over 17,000. So, I feel that it is a little more difficult to know who knows what, but I’ve learned a lot! Check out their info page:

    https://taurinedcm.org/

    Good luck!

    in reply to: Vetmedin Shortage? #129472 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    Martha M-

    I’m very sorry to hear about your dog’s diagnosis and your difficulty obtaining the necessary medicine for him/her. Do you suspect the DCM is diet related? This is a scary time with dogs being diagnosed with diet-related DCM at an alarming rate these days. Did your dog have any symptoms leading up to the scary news?

    Thank you for the information. Hopefully, it can help some people out. Best wishes to you and your pup!

    in reply to: 2019 reviews #129158 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    I got that same message clear back in August.

    Find a company that employs at least one full time veterinary nutritionist and does some feeding trials.

    My dogs are doing well on Purina and my cats are doing great on Royal Canin. Good luck!

    in reply to: 2019 reviews #129143 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    Hi Patricia-
    The Editor’s Choice list has been shut down for new members and/or renewals for months. My subscription ran out months ago. I hope it’s revamped. Right now, one of the top brands on the list is Champion who makes Orijen and Acana. I would never buy either of these foods. Acana is responsible for DCM in many dogs. They use too many non-traditional ingredients that have not gone through any testing or feeding trials.

    Do your own research and call the companies who make the food you are interested in feeding. Good luck!

    in reply to: Rest In Peace, Louie and Bocce #128723 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    Hi mah4angel-
    That is so sad. My heart is breaking for you. 💔

    Best wishes for you and Bolo. Btw, I think the name is cute.

    in reply to: Grain Free Diets and Heart Disease #128589 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    I think they know how to formulate their food correctly. They’ve had years of testing and research behind them. They have board certified veteranarian nutritionists with PhDs on their staff. They use ingredients with the correct amino acids that allow dogs to synthesize their own taurine as needed. That’s why!

    I’m sorry it took me so long to realize this. The marketing and Internet world sucked me in too. Quit looking at the ingredient panel. They know what you’re looking for and can split ingredients and weigh ingredients in different forms (wet vs dry) to make that label look just like what you want to see. Plus, you can’t tell the quality of ingredients by the label. Is that chicken meal mostly bone or muscle meat? Btw, by-products can be very good and more digestible than muscle meat. Just trust the big companies that follow the WSAVA guidelines.

    My dogs are doing just fine on Purina ProPlan. Good luck!

    in reply to: Open Farms #128586 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    Hi Joanne-
    Why would you want to feed a brand that produces suspect food? If they can’t get their grain free recipes right, what makes you think their foods with grain are formulated correctly. Both Zignature and Nutrisource are manufactured by Tuffy’s. It’s not just grain free foods causing heart issues. Feed Purina, Hills, Royal Canin, Eukanuba, Iams or Farmina! Good luck!

    in reply to: Open Farms #128568 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    Hi Patricia- Yes, science is ever changing. However, the sources you are choosing to follow as far as I know, have no background or education in the science of veterinary nutrition. Susan Thixton is an activist and has done some good work as far as safety in the pet food industry. Which, lord knows we need! However, she has no credentials to rate dog food.

    There are brands that employ many PhD’s in veterinary nutrition and do research and testing on their foods to make sure they are digestible and providing all the nutrition our dogs need. Their ingredients just may not look as appealing as some of these new boutique foods that are all the rage now.

    Like it or not, the big companies are employing experts, do research, testing, and own their own manufacturing facilities. And, most importantly, do not have any dogs so far with diet related cardiomyopathy.

    Check out this article by Dr. Lisa Weeth, a board certified veterinary nutritionist:

    https://weethnutrition.wordpress.com/2015/01/11/the-importance-of-peer-review-or-how-to-spot-a-huckster/

    in reply to: Grain Free Diets and Heart Disease #128564 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    It’s not just grain free. It’s also boutique foods that use non traditional ingredients that have not been tested formulated by people who are not experts in the field:

    http://vetnutrition.tufts.edu/2018/11/dcm-update/

    in reply to: Open Farms #128473 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    Patricia A-
    Not one of either Susan Thixton’s or Dr. Mike’s requirements for rating dog food involves who actually formulates the recipes or if there are any feeding trials done. Not having a full time expert who has a Ph.D. In animal nutrition formulating the recipes is a real problem for me.

    Having the best safest ingredients does no good if they are not working together properly to provide all the nutrition our dogs need to be healthy. Such as in the case of the recent findings by Dr. Stern.

    in reply to: Taurine-Deficient Cardiomyopathy Podcast #128443 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    Here is the latest update from the diet-related DCM FB group I belong to. There is a lot of information on this link. Check it out!

    http://www.taurinedcm.org

    in reply to: dog recipes and supplements #128371 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    Hi Carol C-
    Did you see my post above? You really need to consult with a veterinary nutritionist to help you prepare a homemade diet. Most recipes on the Internet, are not balanced and can cause your pup damage over time. The two links above are a good place to start. Good luck!

    in reply to: Looking for a legumes free diet #128306 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    How about Purina ProPlan Beef and Rice or their Sensitive Skin Salmon formula? Neither have chicken and are made by a company with years of research and testing. They also have veterinary nutritionists on staff and own their own manufacturing facilities.

    Until a definite answer is found to the recent rise in DCM cases, I will only feed my pets a food made by a company that meets all those qualifications. Many dog owners who said they would never feed one of these brands have switched and their dogs are doing great. Including, my own!

    It’s not worth the risk!

    Have you done an elimination diet with a prescription food to find out exactly what your dog is sensitive to? Often it is discovered that the dog actually has environmental allergies. It would probably be beneficial for you to do one. Instead of switching food after food. I know that can be stressful. Good luck!

    in reply to: non grain free dog food #127768 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    There is no comparison between Fromm and Royal Canin. Fromm doesnt even come close to doing the same amount of research and testing that RC does. They also do not employ certified veterinary nutritionists. Yes, they are a feel good family owned type business that does a good job of marketing. They also have had mixed results with their taurine testing on the diet induced DCM FB table.

    I’m with you guys, I used to feed it too. This is not an emotional decision. It’s a scientific one! A lot of the professionals in that FB group feed RC. I feed it to my cats. It’s just real expensive for my dogs. My kitties coats are all soft as silk though. The dogs are doing great on Purina ProPlan. Never thought I’d be feeding that either. Not, really sure why? Other than peer pressure, I guess. Lol!

    Again, golden retrievers are getting hit hard by this new found issue. Joshua Stern, UCDavis Cardiologist and golden Retriver owner feeds RC. His findings are going to be released in a few weeks.

    Have you found either of the FB groups that he supports? One is for mixed breeds and the other for golden retrievers. They provide a lot of info in their “files” section. There are thousands of members now on them, so it’s a bit harder to muddle through all the posts. They are legit groups with professionals as admins and moderators that mostly know their stuff. Good luck!

Viewing 50 posts - 101 through 150 (of 2,068 total)