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crazy4cats

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  • in reply to: non grain free dog food #127768 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    There is no comparison between Fromm and Royal Canin. Fromm doesnt even come close to doing the same amount of research and testing that RC does. They also do not employ certified veterinary nutritionists. Yes, they are a feel good family owned type business that does a good job of marketing. They also have had mixed results with their taurine testing on the diet induced DCM FB table.

    I’m with you guys, I used to feed it too. This is not an emotional decision. It’s a scientific one! A lot of the professionals in that FB group feed RC. I feed it to my cats. It’s just real expensive for my dogs. My kitties coats are all soft as silk though. The dogs are doing great on Purina ProPlan. Never thought I’d be feeding that either. Not, really sure why? Other than peer pressure, I guess. Lol!

    Again, golden retrievers are getting hit hard by this new found issue. Joshua Stern, UCDavis Cardiologist and golden Retriver owner feeds RC. His findings are going to be released in a few weeks.

    Have you found either of the FB groups that he supports? One is for mixed breeds and the other for golden retrievers. They provide a lot of info in their “files” section. There are thousands of members now on them, so it’s a bit harder to muddle through all the posts. They are legit groups with professionals as admins and moderators that mostly know their stuff. Good luck!

    in reply to: Taurine-Deficient Cardiomyopathy Podcast #127743 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    That is the same link that I posted above. I’m not sure how you came to the conclusion that potatoes are safe. They are still on the list of suspect ingredients. No, they haven’t proved they are causing harm, but they haven’t quite been been able to prove anything yet other than that there is a correlation. Still not worth the risk as far as I’m concerned.

    My dogs were doing well with potatoes as well, but I’m still not comfortable feeding them. The veterinary diets that include them have a lot of research and testing behind them. I’m not sure that is true with the OTC foods made by companies that do not employ certified veterinary nutritionists, do research and hold feeding trials.

    I know this is a frustrating situation. I hope they come up with some facts soon. There are many different theories rolling around.

    in reply to: non grain free dog food #127742 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    Hi Jill B-
    I’m glad you are taking the advice to avoid grain free foods. Golden Retrievers seem to be more prone to heart issues. You don’t have to be a scientist. You just need to trust brands that are formulated by scientists with degrees in veterinary nutrition. Believe it or not, most aren’t. I switched my dogs to a Purina ProPlan large breed recipe. Other brands that fit this category are: Royal Canin, Eukanuba, Iams, and Hills. The cardiologist from UCDavis that is leading a research team feeds his Golden Royal Canin. It’s a bit expensive for me as I have multiple pets. Best wishes!

    in reply to: Taurine-Deficient Cardiomyopathy Podcast #127531 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    Hey, I’m right there with you. I think the ingredients look good as well. But, I’ve come to realize that I am not a good judge of an ingredient panel. I am now leaving it to the experts. Which, in my opinion are companies that meet the WSAVA guidelines. And, unfortunately, Fromm does not.
    I’m really glad you’re not feeding Zignature anymore though!

    in reply to: Taurine-Deficient Cardiomyopathy Podcast #127527 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    Yet, you participate on this site? Lol! Talk about misinformation!

    I believe sites like this are one of the reasons we got into this situation to begin with. High ratings for boutique foods with ingredients that are appealing to humans. Foods that have not been tested and have no veterinarian nutritionists on staff are starting to show very ill effects in our dogs.

    Yes, this is an opinion!

    in reply to: Taurine-Deficient Cardiomyopathy Podcast #127525 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    Hi Lisa A-
    I belong to that FB group. As a matter of fact, that is where I got this article from! There are so many members on it now that, sometimes it’s hard to pull out the facts.

    Good luck with your pup! I hope you get the peace of mind you are looking for.

    in reply to: Taurine-Deficient Cardiomyopathy Podcast #127521 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    You’re welcome. I also originally switched to Fromm, but now have made the switch to Purina ProPlan. I have recently learned that Fromm does not meet WSAVA guidelines and falls more under the Boutique category. Having large golden retriever/lab mix dogs, I am not taking any chances at all. Their breed seems to be more at risk.

    The brands that I know of that meet the guidelines are: Royal Canin, Purina, Hills, and Eukanuba. Also, have learned that you absolutely cannot judge a food by its ingredient label.

    in reply to: Taurine-Deficient Cardiomyopathy Podcast #127514 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    Here is an update from Lisa Freeman who is considered to be the ultimate authority on nutritional aspects of cardiac disease in dogs. She is a board certified Veterinary Nutritionist that largely focuses on heart disease. I find this to be very interesting. Seems they are finding the latest rise in DCM in dogs and cats is not only related to taurine deficiency. Check it out!

    http://vetnutrition.tufts.edu/2018/11/dcm-update/?fbclid=IwAR1WIq3hIvVSF43bAI0ztNoslRgkzi9GokG2PntZZv5Lag-C0f6NQsWQoNc

    in reply to: Taurine-Deficient Cardiomyopathy Podcast #126680 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    Thanks, Joanne, interesting stuff. It basically confirms a lot of the other stuff I’ve read. I do try to keep an eye on the amount of fat and calories in the kibble I feed both my dogs and cats. My dogs are neutered male labs that tend to get chubby and my cats are indoor only.

    I’ve never really thought that grain free food could be better, but did rotate it along with grain in food to my dogs anyway. NO MORE!!!

    in reply to: Taurine-Deficient Cardiomyopathy Podcast #126382 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    Good luck, Lisa. I switched to Purina ProPlan large breed weight management and my dogs are doing just fine.

    I noticed the salmon recipe is quite a bit higher in calories than my dogs are used to. I’m not sure how it compares to what you’ve been feeding though. You may have to feed a little less.

    in reply to: Taurine-Deficient Cardiomyopathy Podcast #126195 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    Hi Lisa A-
    I’m glad your vet notified you about diet related DCM. There is a FB group dedicated to this issue called Taurine-Deficient cardiomyopathy. The cardiologist that is leading one of the research groups from UCDavis belongs and pops in every now and then to give advice. There is also a team of mostly knowledgable admins that run the site. Check it out!

    Many of the members whose dogs cannot tolerate chicken have transitioned their dogs off of suspect diets to the Purina ProPlan Sensitive Stomach Salmon recipe.

    As I think Susan mentioned, Acana and Zignature have been mentioned quite often when people have reported their dogs either have either low taurine or actual DCM. Remember, it’s tough to rate an ingredient label. So, I have officially given it up and leave it to the experts to know which ingredients work well together to deliver an appropriate nutrient package to my dogs. Surprisingly, a number of raw and homemade fed dogs are also turning up taurine deficient.

    At this point in time, I’d stay totally away from the suspect ingredients (legumes and potatoes) and stick with a brand that has been around for a while that has proven to be safe. I switched to Purina and will stick with either them or Royal Canin, Eukanuba, Hill’s or Iams. They all have veterinary nutritionists on staff, do research, feeding trials and own their own facilities.

    Btw, I think the ingredients of Natural Balance look fine. It doesn’t contain any of the suspect ones. It contains some of the building blocks for dogs to synthesize their own taurine. I’m not sure about that brand though but if your vet is good with it, give it a go! Or, try out the PPP salmon formula. Good luck!

    in reply to: Taurine-Deficient Cardiomyopathy Podcast #125737 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    Hi Katie R-
    I am going to venture to guess that Pitlove was not referring to any Rx grain free kibble. I don’t know her, but have been seeing her posts for the last few years. She is a vet tech and supports Rx diets when needed. I’m sorry if you were offended. I am confident that she did not mean to.
    On the taurine-deficient DCM FB site, this question has come up several times. The Admins in the group state that grain free Rx diets are safe. They are very well researched and tested. The dogs are in the care of a veterinarian and there is no concern with them causing DCM. I believe there are a couple on the taurine data chart.

    There is so much information on that page. Unfortunately, it’s getting tougher to wade through all the posts because there are over 9,000 members now! The admins are in touch with Joshua Stern from UC Davis, who is also in touch with the FDA regarding this research. Today there was a post about a 3 year old German Short Haired Pointer that was just diagnosed with severe DCM who had been eating Acana Lamb. He lives in Canada. I hope it can be reversed with a different diet. So sad.

    They have already proved that many cases are food related as the DCM can be reversed when fed a new diet. They just don’t know what it is about the food that is causing it yet. Fingers crossed it will be figured out soon!

    in reply to: Taurine-Deficient Cardiomyopathy Podcast #125700 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    Actually many grains contain the amino acids necessary for dogs to synthesize their own taurine. There are a surprising number of raw fed dogs showing up as taurine deficient in the ongoing study. (Both the official and the unofficial FB)

    Carbs are a great source of energy for dogs.

    in reply to: Taurine-Deficient Cardiomyopathy Podcast #125695 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    Honestly, I didn’t pay much attention to the links. I enjoyed listening to the podcast. She was discussing some of her experiences with patients and her theories about the issue. Ive read a lot about it. It was nice to hear a discussion.

    It’s true, not all dogs are reacting the same. Some are metabolizing the food better than others. But it is not known why yet. It does appear that goldens are more sensitive than other breeds. But it has been established it is not genetic with them. And, other breeds have indeed been affected as well.

    I have not had my dogs’ taurine levels checked as I switched foods before I knew about testing. It is recommended to be on the same food for three months before you test. I will be having echoes done in a couple of weeks at a nearby dog show that is having a clinic offering them at a reduced rate.

    My dogs are a lab/golden mix and I’ve been rotating grain free along with grain friendly for about 4 or 5 years. Their stools seemed better on gf. Most likely due to being higher in fiber. But, no more gf for us! Not worth the risk. I’d rather have loose stools than broken hearts. Some of the heart breaking stores on the FB page, the owners say that their dogs showed no symptoms before their hearts were too damaged to repair.

    I think it’s sad people think it’s a conspiracy. I don’t know how anyone could get so many different organizations on board with the “lie”. I hope someone finds this info helpful. 🐶

    in reply to: Nulo Limited Ingredients #125646 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    Hi Christie B-
    How about Purina ProPlan salmon sensitive stomach? Many people on the FB page I’m following regarding DCM who have dogs with chicken allergies and are switching off of grain free foods are feeding it with good results.

    in reply to: Taurine-Deficient Cardiomyopathy Podcast #125626 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    Bumping up my post!

    in reply to: New York Times Article #125459 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    Hee Hee! I’m such a terrifying fear monger!!!!!

    in reply to: New York Times Article #125420 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    Hi David A-
    I am probably one of the posters that HC is referring to and I’m not afraid to admit it! Here is a link that I think will be helpful to you:
    http://taurinedcm.org/taurine-dcm-faq/?fbclid=IwAR0_Dg1_8xYsghSeOXLYeDgIN_YMU_0w8eAHxQXUs4JSTlQ7f4rDdvnd1ck
    I believe it is something to take seriously at least until they find out what the actual issue is. I’d certainly rather be safe than sorry. You could always switch back later if whatever your feeding is found out to be safe.

    I have been feeding mostly grain free for the last four years and have now switched to Purina Pro Plan. My dogs are doing great. I have joined the taurine-deficient DCM FB group and there are some very informative vets, including one of the cardiologists from UCDavis that is performing the investigation, moderating the group. However, there are over 9,000 members in the group now and the site is getting more messy. But, there is a files section with some good info and a taurine data table where people are volunteering the results of their dogs taurine and echo cardiogram results. If I remember correctly, Honest Kitchen is not one that is doing very well on the table. I personally wouldn’t feed it. There is a very informative poster on this site who has debated that THK does not provide complete and balanced diets.

    If you want to feed a balanced homemade diet, check out http://www.balanceit.com.

    I have learned a lot in the last couple of months about dog nutrition. It is much more complicated than I realized. Ingredients that look good to humans are not necessarily good for dogs. You can’t look at the ingredients separately. They all need to work together for a complete nutrient package for your dog. DCM is labeled the silent killer. There usually are not any symptoms until it’s too late to be reversed.

    I was never one to feed any of the “Big Three or Four” brands, but now will not feed anything but. They all employ veterinarian nutritionists with Phd’s, do research, feeding trials and own their own manufacturing factories.

    I hope this helps and I wish you well!

    (Please check out the link!)

    Edit: I just realized all the documents form the FB page are on this link as well! Good luck!

    • This reply was modified 3 years, 7 months ago by crazy4cats.
    in reply to: What’s your take on this from the FDA #125395 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    Hi Patricia A-

    Maybe this link will help answer some of your questions:

    http://taurinedcm.org/taurine-dcm-faq/?fbclid=IwAR0_Dg1_8xYsghSeOXLYeDgIN_YMU_0w8eAHxQXUs4JSTlQ7f4rDdvnd1ck

    BTW, brown rice and corn gluten are excellent precursors for taurine. They contain the amino acids necessary for dogs bodies to synthesize taurine on their own. I guess formulating a balanced pet food is rocket science after all. I’ve learned so much in the last few months since this warning came out. I hope others are open to it as well.

    Also, I think it would be great if some of the smaller companies would conduct research themselves or donate to universities for research as well. Most of them don’t pay for full time veterinarian nutritionists either. Many people think that the big companies are greedy. But, some of the smaller companies are charging just as much more for their foods and are not donating any or employing experts!

    Hope this helps!

    in reply to: food for dog with silica stones #125220 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    It is not known what is causing the increase in diet related DCM yet, but yes, peas is one of the suspected ingredients along with other factors under consideration. Again, Purina does not have any DCM cases so far and Champion has several.

    It’s best to listen to your Vet!

    in reply to: food for dog with silica stones #125213 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    Hi Cathy-
    I do not have dogs with this issue, but I did have a cat that had a urinary blockage a few years back. They were Struvite crystals though. They are much more common than silica. Scary stuff. You definitely want to stop them from forming. As far as ratings go on this site, I wouldn’t worry about them. It’s tough to rate food by the ingredient label, especially for a dog with a medical condition.
    Listen to your vet! ProPlan is a great food. Purina is a large company that has been around for a long time. They do a lot of ongoing research, they employ full time board certified veterinary nutritionists, and they own their own manufacturing plant.

    I have been following the “DCM thing”. So far, there have been no dogs diagnosed with it that have been fed Purina PP. Their food contains all the amino acids that enable dogs to synthesize their own taurine in addition to the taurine that is in the food. There are also no known ingredients that will block it from being absorbed. I recently switched back to Purina and my dogs are doing great. We all need to listen to our vets more. They know more about nutrition than we give them credit for. Good luck to you.

    in reply to: Ketona? #124887 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    You can’t tell how much of what is in the food by the ingredient label. Manufacturers are allowed to weigh ingredients at different stages of processing making it impossible to tell. They know that consumers are now checking out ingredient labels and know exactly what we want to see and can manipulate them to our liking.

    Many of the dogs that have been recently diagnosed with Dilated Cardiomyopathy coincidentally have been eating Acana. Cardiologists are researching right now if there is a connection. I’d steer clear.

    in reply to: What’s your take on this from the FDA #124886 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    Yep! Scary, scary stuff. Looks like 9 cases of DCM from a very small sampling of Zignature’s taurine and echo results. Not good. Would not touch any of theirs or Champions’ formulas. That google sheet isn’t supposed to be reproduced. We need to get people to check out the FB group to see it and get the correct information along with it.

    People- Buy food that is manufactured by companies with full time board certified veterinary nutritionists on staff, that do research and feeding trials! Companies are using new untested ingredients in our dogs’ food that look good to human eyes, but are not good for dogs’ hearts!

    • This reply was modified 3 years, 8 months ago by crazy4cats.
    in reply to: Finding a more affordable dog food #124597 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    The FDA cannot recommend a diet switch at this time for a couple of reasons: 1.) They have not examined or know your dog. 2.) Also, there has not been a specific causation yet only a very strong correlation. They are not sure yet if it is due to ingredient interactions or some sort of contamination in the ingredients.

    It is too bad the word seems to be getting out slowly. This new grain free fad is sacrificing nutritional value for better “looking” ingredients. Many of us are falling for it, including myself. I’m sticking to the bigger established companies that do research and feeding trials from now on. I do not want my dogs in a sense to be the ones doing the feeding trials.

    Here is a current interview with Dr. Martine Hartogensis, the Deputy Director at the US Food & Drug Associations Center for Veterinary Medicine’s Office of Surveillance & Compliance. She says there have now been about 200 dogs diagnosed with DCM do to the food they are eating. I can imagine there will only be more as the word gets out.

    https://stevedalepetworld.com/blog/fda-on-grain-free-diet-alert/?fbclid=IwAR1ixTfKSusHU_IxdOTuWXdFTztYrm2R_zy_VmBiSmDn7zAZkEbnWIlsT7k

    I’m certainly not taking the risk. If they find in the end there is no causation after all, there is no harm done. Just a diet switch. But, if they turn out to be right, your dog could have a “broken” heart.

    If concerned about transitioning to a new food, a very helpful vet has recommended feeding a prescription diet to aid in the transition to a new diet. The type of fiber between a food with legumes and potatoes is different than one without and sometimes can be rough. Hope this is helpful!

    in reply to: Finding a more affordable dog food #124564 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    Hi Atlas-
    In my opinion, your instincts are correct. You should be avoiding legumes and potatoes at least until the research is over. Here is the FDA’s second bulletin:
    https://www.fda.gov/AnimalVeterinary/ResourcesforYou/AnimalHealthLiteracy/ucm616279.htm

    The link that Susan provided is not by a veterinarian nutritionist and is also the founder of a bogus $300 allergy test. I wouldn’t pay attention to it.

    Join the Taurine-Deficient Cardiomyopathy FB group for more information. It is supported by 4 or 5 vets, including Joshua Stern. He is the UCDavis cardiologist who is leading the investigation.

    They are recommending to feed food from a large company who employs full time veterinary nutritionists, who regularly tests their food, does research and feeding trials. Some of the companies that fit most of the criteria that Ive found so far are: Royal Canin, Eukanuba, Iams, Purina, Hills, Annamaet, and Farmina.

    I have switched my dogs to Purina Pro Plan. Their stools were soft at first, but are getting better and better. I’d rather have soft stools than an enlarged heart. However, my dogs are Golden and Lab mix, two breeds that seem to be more affected by this issue. But, other breeds are starting to show up too.

    There are supplements that you can buy that may help with the anal gland issue. They usually contain probiotics and fiber. You may want to talk to your vet about using one until your dog’s system gets used to the different type of fiber in food with grain. We use Forti Flora probiotic. It is awesome! Hope this helps. Good luck!

    in reply to: Sprout Grain Free?? #123354 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    Hi Lyndsey D-
    This food is loaded with suspect ingredients that the FDA and several cardiologist teams are investigating as causing Dilated Cardiomyopathy in dogs. I wouldn’t feed it at least until the investigation is over and the cause increased amounts of DCM lately is figured out.

    https://www.fda.gov/AnimalVeterinary/ResourcesforYou/AnimalHealthLiteracy/ucm616279.htm

    Good luck to you!

    in reply to: question about reviews and ratings? #122759 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    Hi Patricia-
    You are absolutely right! It’s impossible to tell how much of each ingredient is actually in the food by the ingredient label. In addition, you can’t tell the quality of the ingredients. You can’t tell which cut of the meat they used, or if they weighed it when it was wet or dry.

    You need to go with a company you trust that uses solid ingredients, has safety procedures in place, does research, has a veterinary nutritionist on staff and tests their food!

    Good luck!

    in reply to: dog recipes and supplements #122755 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    I only know of petdiets.com and balanceit.com that are supported by vets with PhDs in animal nutrition.

    I have formulated a few recipes using balanceit’s program supplemented by their own supplement. The dogs love when I actually make them one!

    in reply to: Grain Free Diets and Heart Disease #122539 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    Here is an article found on the Taurine-Deficient Cardiomyopathy Face Book Page:

    In addition to the below, corn gluten meal is an excellent precursor for taurine.

    Debunking Myths around Corn Gluten Meal
    Avi Deshmukh, DVM, MS, Ph.D.

    Why add CGM in petfoods?

    Most of the available CGM contains about 70% protein. It is an excellent source of
    methionine & cysteine, which are beneficial while acidifying the urine to prevent
    and/or manage urinary caliculi. Because of this, CGM is typically combined with
    another animal or plant protein source.

    Additionally, when compared to other proteins, CGM has a low level of ash (<
    2.0%) and a full complement of vitamins and xanthophylls such as zeaxanthin and
    lutein.1

    Zeaxanthin and lutein are antioxidants and protect the vision.

    Facts, myths and misconceptions about corn:

    Misinformation about corn & CGM Facts about corn & CGM
    (1) Corn is not digested by dogs and
    cats
    No mammal can digest the intact corn
    kernel.
    **However, when corn kernels are ground
    and cooked, corn is >90% digestible.

    (2) Corn & CGM are cheap ingredients
    and added to cheapen the food
    ***High quality of corn and CGM are
    expensive ingredients.

    (3) Corn and CGM are fillers
    The term “filler” means that it has no
    nutritional or beneficial value to the pet.
    ***Both, corn and CGM, provide a number
    of beneficial nutrients to improve the
    animal health
    (4) Corn & CGM cause allergies in
    pets
    ***The incidence of “True food allergies”
    is very low. In fact, animal proteins are
    potentially more allergic than plant
    proteins. Studies show an incidence rate
    of 1.5% of adverse reactions to food
    may be caused by corn or CGM.

    (5) The cob is added along with corn
    kernels
    ***Cob is never added in the pet foods.

    From what I can tell, corn gluten meal is a much better addition to dog kibble than legumes and/or potatoes.

    in reply to: drinking alot of water #122123 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    Hi Joanne-
    How long have you been feeding it? Sometimes you have to give them time to adjust. I’ve learned this the hard way. 😳

    Also, I just took a look at the recipe you are feeding. It is extremely high in calories at 498. A lot of the foods I feed are around 350 to 400. Maybe the higher calories and fat are not agreeing with your dog.

    Another thing I’ve learned lately is that lamb is not the most digestible protein for dogs. Vets mostly recommend it if the dog needs a novel protein due to allergies or IBD. Can your dog eat chicken, turkey or beef? I think Purina is a good brand. I’d either give it a little more time or switch to a different protein with a little less fat. Good luck!

    • This reply was modified 3 years, 9 months ago by crazy4cats.
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    Yes, I do feel lucky. For the FDA to out out a warning, there must have been too many dogs with side effects. Our vet felt it was safe, but I did have some concerns. I’ll prob use the Seresto collar for the dogs next year too. At least you can take it off if there are side effects.

    I hope your dog is ok.

    crazy4cats
    Participant

    I gave my two dogs Bravecto for the first time this year. Luckily, no side effects for mine either. I’m trying the Seresto collar on my one cat that goes outside. So far no issues with him either. I hate the messy topical stuff. Thought I’d try something different this summer/fall.

    in reply to: Hello! I have 1 dog and cat! introducing myself #122113 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    Hi Dennis!
    Welcome to the forum. I have both cats and dogs too. I mostly feed kibble with canned or fresh to my crew.

    in reply to: Really at a loss about allergies #121729 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    Congrats on the rescue of your pup. It sounds like a beautiful mix. And probably a handful! The best way to figure out an allergy is through an elimination diet with an Rx hypoallergenic food.

    Just a word of warning, there has been a FDA warning on dog food that contain a significant amount of legumes and/or potatoes. There have been many cases of dogs eating these types of diets that have been diagnosed with Dilated Cardiomyapathy due to low taurine. It is suspected that these ingredients may be blocking the absorption or inhibiting the synthesis of taurine.

    There is a data table on a FB page that is gathering taurine test results. Acana and Zignature are both consistently showing very low results. I wouldn’t feed either! Kangaroo is very low in taurine. I’m glad it is not available.

    in reply to: Giant Breed Puppy having Stool Issues #121448 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    I do not see any mention of a fecal test. Has his poop been tested for parasites! Specifically Giardia? My dogs had that same issue when I got them. I kept changing foods thinking that was the problem. Turns out they had giardia which can cause intermittent loose stools and diarrhea.

    It took several rounds of metronidazole and panacur c to get rid of it.

    in reply to: Large Breed Puppy Foods #121430 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    Then go with your gut and find a different food. You’ll be mad at yourself if your dog has any joint issues. My dogs are 7 years old. I didn’t know about this issues when they were pups. Luckily, their joints are fine so far.

    I’d stay away from grain free and buy a well known brand that has been fed successfully to a lot of large breed pups. Hope you find one you are more comfortable with.

    in reply to: Large Breed Puppy Foods #121407 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant
    in reply to: Malable and Moist Dog treats as soft as Play doh?? #121386 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    You’re talking about marshmallows, Anon. The poster asked about soft treats to use as pill pockets.

    I’ve used banana for small pills with perhaps a dab of PB on it before. I can’t be trusted with a can of spray cheese! LOL! Yum! 🙂

    • This reply was modified 3 years, 9 months ago by crazy4cats.
    • This reply was modified 3 years, 9 months ago by crazy4cats.
    in reply to: Grain free food. Bad or good. #121363 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    Hi dendad-
    This is a blow to most of us who have been feeding “fancy” grain free food. It is tough thinking that we are doing the best for our dogs and find out something like this!

    You should really think about joining the Face Book Group Taurine-Deficiency Dilated Cardiomyopathy group. If you don’t have a FB account, you can set one up using your dog’s name or something besides your own name if you are concerned about privacy. It does not have to be a public account. The FB group is closed and private as well. It has a lot of information posted and vets actively participating. Including the cardiologist who is heading up the research.

    Basically try to choose a brand that has been established for a long time and continues to do testing and research on their foods. They should also employ at least one veterinary nutritionist.

    There was no mention of recommending the rotation of foods to be valuable by any of the vets or admins in the group. There are some people who like to do this and their dogs do well with it. If you are rotating between brands and foods that have suspect ingredients or are not truly complete and balanced, then there still could be issues.

    Pick a food that does not have any legumes or potatoes in the first five ingredients is what either the FDA or UC Davis is recommending.

    If you can’t stand the thought of feeding a food made by Mars, Purina or Hills, then Annamaet might be a good option for you. They’ve had good results on the data chart. Also, I see Farmina is doing well on the data table as well. But, I’m not sure they fulfill the other requirements suggested by the group. (I’m switching to Purina) Good luck!

    in reply to: What’s your take on this from the FDA #121339 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    Fair enough. I just want to make sure as many dog owners are aware as possible. Best of luck to you and your pup.

    in reply to: Grain free food. Bad or good. #121328 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    Foods specifically with legumes and/or potatoes in the first five ingredients should be avoided according to Josh Stern, the cardiologist that is heading the research at UC Davis.

    I guess there are a few grain foods that don’t fit this description. But, I can’t think there could be very many.

    I switched to Purina Large Breed Weight Management after feeding grain free off and in for about five years. Hoping my boys have not suffered any damage!

    in reply to: What’s your take on this from the FDA #121327 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    Hi Susan k-
    I’m not sure that the data table is a great representation of all dogs and all foods yet. So far, they are mostly getting goldens reporting their taurine levels because the original study started out with that breed. There are not a lot of entries for Wellness yet. Don’t know if that means there are not a lot of people feeding it, or just not a lot of people who feed it have submitted test results.

    However, it does show trends of foods that are heavy with legumes and potatoes that are being manufactured without the guide of veterinary nutritionists on staff are consistently testing low in dogs of all breeds who have eaten then over a period of time.

    I have two lab/golden mix dogs which both breeds seem to be showing up with DCM. I won’t be feeding grain free ever again unless absolutely necessary and then would be one made by Purina. I don’t think Royal Canin ever followed the band wagon with the grain free foods?

    As Pitlove stated, “why take the risk”?

    in reply to: What’s your take on this from the FDA #121305 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    It says in big letters for us not to share or reproduce it. Unfortunately, you’d have to join. It is a closed private group at least. It’s actually not a list, but a data table with real people and dogs’ names listed on it.

    Which food are you curious about?

    The worst offender is Acana by far, followed by Zignature. Both are full of legumes!

    in reply to: What’s your take on this from the FDA #121296 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    Hi Marie-
    Did you just order them? Do they have grain? If yes, best of luck to your transition! It’s going to be harder on you than the dogs. Lol!😍

    in reply to: FYI Fromm Gold new recipe #121293 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    Grain fee foods for the most part are using lentils and potatoes because they are cheap and contain protein. They can up their protein percentage by using these cheap proteins. I don’t think quality grains are any cheaper than lentils and potatoes.

    Fromm is dropping duck or lowering it in the ingredient list due to availability issues. So, that is what they told me anyway. I wouldn’t think that should up the price! (Hopefully not)

    in reply to: Malable and Moist Dog treats as soft as Play doh?? #121287 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    The vet recommended it.

    in reply to: What’s your take on this from the FDA #121286 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    I’m a little confused about fish as well. You could join the group and ask. I do know that ProPlan has a salmon recipe that has been recommended by the experts on that forum. I’m certainly no expert, but have learned a lot on that FB site.
    There is not much bickering on the site, but just enough to keep it entertaining!

    in reply to: Malable and Moist Dog treats as soft as Play doh?? #121278 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    I had not heard of using a marsh mallow before. Love it!

    in reply to: Large Breed Puppy Foods #121277 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    Look for a label that specifically says that it is formulated to meet the needs of a large breed puppy. Try Purina Pro Plan large breed puppy food. It has been around for a long time, has a lot of successful history behind it.

    in reply to: quality of ingredients #121275 Report Abuse
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    Yes, Pro Plan has the AAFCO label.

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