C4D

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  • in reply to: At my wits end! weight loss food. #88172 Report Abuse
    C4D
    Member

    LOL Kathlleen C! I totally understand. I actually feed my dogs less than any of the calculators or feeding guidelines and they go on long, fast walks daily.

    Christine W, I have the opposite problem with brutal winter months. Exercise does help. Do you have a pool for her to swim? Or maybe a long walk at a big box pet store?

    in reply to: At my wits end! weight loss food. #88147 Report Abuse
    C4D
    Member

    I’m including the DFA link for the feeding calculator. According to the numbers I put in:
    Ideal weight: 19 lbs/20 lbs
    Activity Level: overweight
    Calories per cup: 360
    Your should be feeding .98/1.02 cups per day depending on which weight you want. This total would be including ALL treat calories, so you have to add them in, or reduce the food. Treats should never account for more than 10% of their daily food intake. If you overtreat and underfeed, you would be undernourishing the dog. Since the calories of the food are 360 and she should be getting 10% max in treats, those high calorie treats would put her over on just 2 treats! If she seems hungry, wetting her food with warm water will make her feel fuller. Also, adding cooked frozen green beans is another trick that often works. I almost forgot this. Make sure you are using a real measuring cup that has all of the increments. Many private dog stores have them for free. Good Luck!

    Link:

    https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/dog-feeding-tips/dog-food-calculator/

    in reply to: At my wits end! weight loss food. #88143 Report Abuse
    C4D
    Member

    Are you feeding your dog’s per the feeding guidelines based on what the dog’s ideal weight should be? Also (like people) dogs really don’t need and shouldn’t have treats all day long. I only use them for training or working with a new foster.

    Christine W, 19 calories per treat is a high calorie treat, even for my 80 lb labs.

    • This reply was modified 4 years, 3 months ago by C4D.
    in reply to: Can Merricks Dry Food Substitute Joint Pills? #88136 Report Abuse
    C4D
    Member

    Hi Kyle E,

    That seems to be Merricks new marketing tool. Your dog would have to eat roughly 1 kg or 2.2 pounds of food to get a 1200mg dose of glucosamin and chondroitin on the Backcountry Game Bird and Great Plains recipe. The other 2 formulas have 800 mg/kg(2.2 lbs). Most joint supplements have a higher dosage than that and when you have a dog that already has joint or hip issues you definitely need separate supplementation. It doesn’t necessarily have to be from the vet. Some of the supplements Susan mentioned could be a good possibility. I use a supplement that has Green Lipped Mussel. I haven’t used the Turmeric Golden paste yet as my dog hasn’t showed any symptoms of pain. Anonymously is right about the senior blood panels and feeding a lower calorie food if your dog is getting on the heavy side. I do yearly blood panels on my dogs. It gives you a heads up on possible issues before the symptoms appear or have progressed too far.

    I also have an almost 12 year old Lab that has bad knees due to torn CCL’s several years ago. I have been supplementing with fish oil (human) and joint supplements for years now. She does well, even though she has diagnosed arthritis in both knees. She goes for a brisk 1-2 mile walk daily, with her choosing to jog most of the way. The other most important thing you can do is to keep your dog on the lean side and daily walks to keep the joints from getting stiff. If you haven’t been walking or exercising your Lab on a daily basis, start very slow.

    Edit: I don’t know how much 1 cup of Merrick weighs (I couldn’t find it on their website) and all dog foods are different, but as an example, I use Earthborn in my rotation and it states on it’s website that an 8oz cup of Great Plains holds 4.8 oz of food. So, if Merrick’s weight is comparable and if I did the math right, that would be feeding over 10 cups of food to get the 1200 mg dose of supplement. That’s a LOT of food.

    • This reply was modified 4 years, 3 months ago by C4D.
    in reply to: Diet options to reduce lawn burn from urine? #88088 Report Abuse
    C4D
    Member

    Hi RobbW,

    Have you thought about rotating between the foods? I do rotate my foods as I mentioned in my earlier post. That way there is less of a transition issue if you have to change for whatever reason. Many of us feel it also gives the dog a healthier gut flora.

    In regard to the weight, C4C is correct. You are probably feeding too much and exercising too little. If you add water to the food it will also help them to feel fuller and eat less. I actually feed less than the calculator. Unless your dogs are REALLY active (like jogging with you daily) use the “typical” activitely level. Also, on the calculator and on the dog food bag’s feeding guidelines, you should use the dogs’ ideal weight for how much to feed. A lot of people miss that point and put in the dog’s current weight. So, if they’re already overweight, it’s adding to the weight problem.

    in reply to: Need help with pre mixes #88087 Report Abuse
    C4D
    Member

    I heartily AGREE! I like using fresh meat and premixes, but they’re never rated. I wonder if it’s possible with a disclaimer about the meat not being in there?

    in reply to: Diet options to reduce lawn burn from urine? #88072 Report Abuse
    C4D
    Member

    Hi RobbW,

    I have several dogs of my own and foster dogs, and they are mostly large dogs, so there is a lot of urine going in my grass! What you read about giving the dogs more water (think adding fresher, higher moisture food to their diet) and watering the lawn more often is the way to go. Urine is essentially fertilizer in liquid form and is a free, all natural one at that. But too much and too strong will burn the lawn in a heartbeat. I’ve done that in the past when the spreader fell over. 🙁

    In spite of having a lot of dogs in a relatively small area, I have very few, if any “burn spots” and I don’t feed any “grass saver” type additives. I also don’t fertilize the dog area of the yard. I do feed all of the dogs canned food when I feed kibble and add a good amount of warm water to the mix, so it’s pretty wet to begin with. I also have fresh water on hand throughout the day. I feed a fresh dinner to most of the dogs, all of my own. All this moisture means a more diluted urine. The results are healthier dogs that aren’t slightly chronically dehydrated and a lawn that doesn’t have many, if any, burn spots. I will spray the lawn area down on a fairly regular basis, maybe every few days, or run the sprinkler if it’s been very hot and dry. I do have a REALLY GREEN lawn in the dog area. LOL! 😉

    Here’s a university link that you might find interesting:

    http://www.ext.colostate.edu/mg/gardennotes/553.html

    • This reply was modified 4 years, 3 months ago by C4D.
    in reply to: dark solid poop #87721 Report Abuse
    C4D
    Member

    My dogs’ poop will also change in color based on what protein they’re eating. I recall rabbit and venison as being the darkest in color and chicken being the lightest in color. I haven’t fed lamb in a while since one of the dogs reacts to lamb. Susan is right. You can rotate to another brand or protein to see if the color changes. Dark tarry stools are the ones that you need to watch out for.

    Here is a link on the subject

    http://www.epi4dogs.com/poopchart.htm

    in reply to: Best grain free dry food for nine yr old lab #87383 Report Abuse
    C4D
    Member

    There is no 1 best food. What are you currently feeding?

    Many of the regular posters, myself included, feed a rotational diet. My current senior lab is over 11 years old, jogs on our long daily walks and is very spunky.

    in reply to: dog food and kibels #87382 Report Abuse
    C4D
    Member

    InkedMarie is right. Gravy Train isn’t a very good food. Try to find a 3-4 star rated food to begin with since your dogs are eating such a low quality food. There are a lot of foods that cost about the same and are much more nutritious with better ingredients. You will have to do a slow transition, but it will be better for your dogs in the long run.

    Salmon oil is much better than vegetable oil. I would add some fresh cooked meat or adding some canned, as IM suggested. If you are feeding only oatmeal and egg daily, that’s not nutritionally complete, even for a senior dog.

    in reply to: Lost our beloved 11 year old Zoey. #87257 Report Abuse
    C4D
    Member

    I am so sorry for th loss of your dog. No matter how long we have them, it’s never enough. Keep the memories you have close to your heart and he will always be with you! :'(

    in reply to: Bravecto (chewable flea and tick) #86958 Report Abuse
    C4D
    Member

    I am so sorry for your loss. :'(

    in reply to: Bravecto (chewable flea and tick) #86932 Report Abuse
    C4D
    Member

    HI Dr. Mike! Does this mean we can directly reply to comments like on the other section of DFA?

    in reply to: My Standard Poodle has only one kidney #86929 Report Abuse
    C4D
    Member

    Did her blood panel come back with abnormal kidney values? A dog can function with one kidney, as long as it’s working properly. If her numbers are off, she will need an adjusted diet.

    You could look into the balanceit website. They work with the dog’s condition to give you a properly balanced home cooked diet.

    C4D
    Member

    I agree with InkedMarie. At this point in their lives, if they are doing well, I would let sleeping dogs lie. 😉

    in reply to: Looking for grain free single protein food #85676 Report Abuse
    C4D
    Member

    In addition to the other’s there is Nature’s Variety Limited Ingredient Diets. I’ve had good luck with these.

    in reply to: 6 month old Beagle scratching! #84822 Report Abuse
    C4D
    Member

    Hi Jennifer,

    If he’s already been checked out by a vet to make sure there are no parasite issues like fleas or mange, you might consider switching the protein first. If you don’t see improvement, you could try a grain free food.

    in reply to: Dry Food for Hip and Joing #84787 Report Abuse
    C4D
    Member

    Hi Michael,

    There is no food that provides enough glucosamine and chondroitin. I’ve had several dogs with joint issues for many years. I feed grain and potato free (potatoes exacerbate inflammation) and supplement with human grade fish oil and joint supplements. You have to be careful if using human joint supplements that there aren’t added vitamins. Your vet might be willing to give you suggestions. You also have to adjust the dosage. My current senior dog is doing well and still extremely active.

    • This reply was modified 4 years, 6 months ago by C4D.
    in reply to: Confused! Frustrated! Help! #84782 Report Abuse
    C4D
    Member

    Hi Erin,

    I am so sorry for you and your pup. The others have offered you some good advice. There are also bacterial infections that can cause enlarged lymph nodes. You could take her to another vet and have them run a complete blood panel and have a sample from the lymph node sent to a pathologist. The result might still be lymphoma. A close family member’s dog had lymphoma, did chemo and it bought him some extra months with his wonderful dog. Unfortunately, the dog had the more aggressive lymphoma, but the other forms respond very well to chemotherapy. It may not cure, but it will buy you a lot more time.

    In regard to the food, if the canned is giving diarrhea, you might want to cut back and instead give a combination of the kibble that the dog has done well on with some canned and add warm water. You can let it sit long enough to soften the food so eating won’t be a problem. The steroids are making her hungry. Whatever you decide to do, the best thing you can do is make the dog comfortable and feed something that won’t cause diarrhea. She doesn’t need digestive issues along with a life threatening disease. Best wishes to you and your pup!

    Here’s a link regarding lymphoma that might help answer your questions:

    http://www.caninelymphoma.com/canine-lymphoma-types/

    in reply to: 6 month old Beagle scratching! #84735 Report Abuse
    C4D
    Member

    Are you using the Lamb & Rice or the Chicken and Duck formula? If you are using a chicken base, it could be the chicken causing the problem, since that’s the common protein in both formulas you’ve used. Has he had a vet check for fleas or a skin scrape for demodex?

    in reply to: High Protein Kibble without fish or fish oil #84733 Report Abuse
    C4D
    Member

    Hi Dog Pack Mom,

    I know the Earthborn Great Plains and Meadow Feast have no fish or fish oil, Zignature Turkey, Duck and Lamb formulas, and Nature’s Variety Instinct Limited Ingredient formulas. I know these don’t since I use them in my rotation.

    in reply to: 6 month old Beagle scratching! #84702 Report Abuse
    C4D
    Member

    Hi Jennifer C,

    What formula of Natural Balance are you feeding him?

    C4D
    Member

    Just anothere one to throw into the mix might be Propac Ultimates. They have a large breed puppy formula and are very reasonably priced.

    in reply to: Whole Prey Style Treats for Raw Feeders #84258 Report Abuse
    C4D
    Member

    Hi Coonhound Mama,

    I use dried tracheas for my dogs, but as an occaisonal after dinner chew. I have labs so they get the bigger trancheas. I have seen them in some pet stores cut up as “chips”. It is a good source of glucosamine.

    I’m not sure, and still researching, if it applies to dried trachea, but you have to be careful when feeding fresh or raw trachea. Apparently the thyroid tissue is somethimes still attached to the raw tracheas and some trace amounts can be found within the entire trachea. If it’s fed in rotation or on a limited quantity, it appears to be ok. If fed too often there seems to be some research regarding hyperthyroidism resulting in dogs that have been fed gullet.

    Here are a couple of links regarding the issue:

    https://thesciencedog.wordpress.com/2015/10/29/got-gullet/

    http://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2014/11/04/hyperthyroidism-dogs.aspx

    I did look up the Hare today website and it seems the thyroid might still be attached. I’d love to hear others thoughts and experiences on this.

    • This reply was modified 4 years, 7 months ago by C4D.
    in reply to: Merrick #84180 Report Abuse
    C4D
    Member

    Pitlove, I’m not sure where you got your figures from, and from what I read on the NRC, THK only came in slightly low from those guidelines you mentioned, and from the AAFCO guidelines, they were in compliance and exceeded the minimum standards. I did not check every formula. I rotate my foods among many good brands that have good reputations, so I’m more concerned with feeding quality foods that have more natural ingredients and the nutrients would often be obtained from the food itself as opposed to a manufactured vitamin pack.

    From a news clip, the Nulo food is manufactured by a Kansas manufacturer, but I couldn’t find any details.

    http://reportingtexas.com/austin-natural-pet-food-company-moves-to-become-a-national-brand/

    Jenn H, keep us posted on what you find out. If they won’t reveal their manufacturer, it would be a no for me regardless of how good the ingredient panel reads. 😉

    in reply to: Mast Cell Tumor #84164 Report Abuse
    C4D
    Member

    I’m so sorry for your loss. Dogs have a special place in our hearts. It seems we lose them too soon no matter what the cause. It is a terrible pain when they are gone. It sounds like he was a very lucky boy to have you. You did the very best you could and I’m sure he knows he was loved by you for his entire life.

    in reply to: Merrick #84149 Report Abuse
    C4D
    Member

    Hi Jenn H,

    Unfortunately, I think Pitlove has gone to the “Aimee” side. Everything she’s said sounds like comments Aimee has made in previous posts. I believe the foods were evaluated by Aimee. Unfortunately Aimee is also a blatant fan of Purina, including Dog Chow.

    I do use and have used this brand for several years now. I also use Grandma Lucy’s and Sojos when I use dehydrated foods. I feed them in my rotation along with quality kibble, canned and raw. My dogs have had no problems with them in any way. I have also seen many comments from other posters who have had very good luck with the brand. Anyway, that’s my $.02 worth. 😉

    in reply to: Low phosphorous quality dog food #84026 Report Abuse
    C4D
    Member

    Hi Diane S,

    The only food I’m aware of is Dave’s restricted diet can. It’s phosphorus level is .17% as fed and has a G/A minimum/maximum of .02%-.22%. Almost every other commercial food adds phosphorus to meet daily requirements.

    Here’s a link to Dave’s:

    http://davespetfood.com/product/%EF%BB%BFrestricted-diet-protein-phosphorus-chicken-dinner-dogs-13-oz-can/

    When you’re dealing with kidney issues, you should feed a wet diet (as opposed to any kibble) to help keep the dog hydrated properly. Home cooked diets are often the best option. The balanceit website will work with you vet and your dog’s particular numbers to provide homemade recipes. Another helpful resource is dogaware:

    http://dogaware.com/health/kidneydiet.html

    Good luck with your pup. I’m not sure what type of kidney disease you’re dealing with, but I wish you the best.

    in reply to: Feces are small rocks or firm liquid..? #84010 Report Abuse
    C4D
    Member

    Until you get a balanced raw diet, I would probably use a commercial kibble, mixed with canned food. If you’re dog can’t tolerate it, a bland diet of boiled chicken and rice is good to calm the digestive system down for a day or so. That’s what my vet, and I believe, most vets would recommend. Good Luck with your pup!

    C4D
    Member

    I don’t think supplementing with vitamins, especially if you are feeding a food that’s complete and balanced, is a good idea. If you must supplement for a specific condition, that would be different. An example is, in a dog with arthritis, fish oils may be beneficial to reduce inflammation. Here’s a link which shows that several studies have found that humans taking multivitamins has actually caused a shortened lifespan and some medical issues in others:

    http://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2013/07/the-vitamin-myth-why-we-think-we-need-supplements/277947/

    in reply to: Feces are small rocks or firm liquid..? #83994 Report Abuse
    C4D
    Member

    Hi Kevin K,

    Are you feeding a balanced commercial raw diet? If not, unless you are very knowledgable on feeding a balanced raw diet and are following a recipe that has been put together by a vet nutritionist, or at the very least, by a qualified professional, you need to rethink feeding raw. Too much liver, which is very rich and nutrient dense, can cause loose stools. Too much bone, which is very high in calcium, and lack of correct fiber can cause a very small dry stool.

    Raw food can be fed to a healthy animal, as long as there has been the proper adjustment period and that the diet is correctly formulated and nutritionally balanced. I do feed raw in my rotation of foods, but I use commercial raw food that’s complete and balanced. When feeding fresh cooked food, I use a commercial premix added to the meat. I have no problems with stools or any health issues with my dogs.

    You might want to either put him back on a traditional diet to see if that corrects the issues and transition to the correct raw diet gradually. If the sypmtoms persist or worsen, you do need to see a vet soon.

    • This reply was modified 4 years, 7 months ago by C4D.
    in reply to: Misleading Dog Food Packaging #83980 Report Abuse
    C4D
    Member

    Hi Dr. Mike,

    Pedigree’s “Targeted Nutrition” and “Complete Nutrition” would be good examples of what you’re talking about. It shows a lot of pictures of fresh meat and vegetables on the front of the packages. The steak and vegetables formula shows a fresh grilled steak and vegetables on the front, when the ingredients are poultry by-product meal, meat and bone meal along with corn as the first ingredient. The dried (not fresh) peas come in the middle of the vitamin pack and the dried (not fresh) carrots come in after the vitamin pack, before the artificial colors and BHA.

    Here’s the link to the whole line:

    http://www.pedigree.com/really-good-food/dry/

    in reply to: Misleading Dog Food Packaging #83929 Report Abuse
    C4D
    Member

    Sorry about my earlier post with the misspelling of food. Darn cell phones! 🙁

    I don’t know if I agree with you on the Orijen, Pitlove. It is certainly better and less misleading than many others. It lists most of the proteins used right on the front of the bags along with the percentages of meat/vegetables, etc. and most people are conditioned to feeding kibble.

    I do hate the foods, like Alpo that have captions like “T-Bone Steak & Ribeye Flavor” when the actual ingredients are chicken, unnamed liver and unnamed meat byproducts along with soy flour and rice flour as the actual ingredients. Even though it says “flavor”, most people don’t understand that. It’s a marketing scam, IMHO.

    Among the better foods, I personally dislike when foods call it a particular meat in the label when, in fact, the majority is not. A good example of this is Merrick Grain Free Bison & Sweet Potato. Granted, there is Bison, but it’s followed by chicken, turkey and salmon meal, which by weight would be the actual main ingredients. I and many other posters here, have dogs with sensitivities to certain protein sources and this makes it seem deceptive.

    in reply to: One-year-old puppy won't eat #83927 Report Abuse
    C4D
    Member

    Hi Hailey L,

    Ahhh, small dogs. My family and I’ve had many dogs over the years, mostly big, but a few small ones. They are, for sure, the nippers of the group. The only times my kids have been bitten was by small dogs.

    The others have given you some good suggestions. I tend to think no records were given because there are no records. Giving the name of the vet used to verify is extremely easy and they have the records. You could go 1 of 2 routes. You can either titer to see if vaccinations were given (it is expensive, but considered a very safe route) or you could revaccinate. It’s a tough decision. I foster a lot of dogs, many with no prior history, including some of my own personal dogs. Rescues tend to vaccinate if no prior history is known. But, the choice is up to you. I’ve taken it on a case by case decision with my dogs. Rabies are required in my state, so I do 3 year rabies shot.

    In regard to food, she may be missing her family and trying to adjust. The homemade broth is a good idea. Anonymously is right. Stay away from sausage since it’s loaded in nitrates and preservatives. People shouldn’t even be eating them! Putting the treats into the food isn’t a good idea, since they are not a balanced diet. You could also try adding some well rated canned food to the kibble and adding warmed water to make it more attractive. I mix them all together so everything is well coated and almost like a stew. My fosters, as well as my own dogs just love it. You might go to the pet store and see if they have samples of food so you could try before you buy. Some dogs can be picky. I have Labs and kill shelter rescues, so, fortunately, I haven’t had the problem. Good luck with your new pup!

    in reply to: Misleading Dog Food Packaging #83922 Report Abuse
    C4D
    Member

    So many fodds, so little time. Caesars canine cuisine, any of them, but filet mignon flavor really makes me laugh!

    Are they interested in deceptive commercials/advertising as well?

    in reply to: Eating poop, passing gas. #83903 Report Abuse
    C4D
    Member

    Changing their diet to a better rated food should help with the gas. Take a look at some of the 3-4 star foods on DFA. I do like the foods suggested by InkedMarie, but if they are older dogs and have been on low quality food their whole life, you will need to do a very slow transition, no matter what better quality food you switch to. I never feed my older dogs senior food. If your dogs are overweight, choose one that is lower in fat and make sure you are not overfeeding them. If this doesn’t help with the gas, you might try to switch to a different protein.

    Sorry I can’t help with the poop eating. None of my dogs have ever done this.

    in reply to: Dry Food for Senior Dogs #83813 Report Abuse
    C4D
    Member

    InkedMarie is right, but transition slowly if you’ve never rotated your dogs’ food before. A good idea for all dogs, including seniors is to add some fresh or wet food. It will keep them more hydrated, which is important for all the organs body functions. It’s helpful for seniors as their sense of smell tends to diminish as they age.

    in reply to: PORK? YES or NO? #83663 Report Abuse
    C4D
    Member

    Hi mark f,

    There is no perfect food for all dogs. As you can see by the discussion, some dogs do the best, some have extreme problems, some do just fine. It also depends on the cut of pork. If it’s too fatty, it can cause problems, especially if the portion is too large for the size of the dog. While many people say chicken is the big offender in dog foods, I haven’t had any problems with chicken in any form and the current dogs in my household. I’ve actually had a couple of dogs that had problems with proteins that should be easily digested.

    My point, and the discussion shows that you have to find the food that works for your dog. The only way you’ll know is if you try it.

    in reply to: Taste Of The Wild Dry Dog Food? Grain free? #83656 Report Abuse
    C4D
    Member

    Hi jenne e,

    jakes mom is right. If your vet did a needle aspiration and said it was a lipoma, I would just leave it alone. Lipomas are not cancerous, some vets don’t even like to call them “fatty tumors” because it gives people the impression of being a cancerous or dangerous condition. My dogs have had them and my current older lab has a couple of small ones. My vet also recommends leaving them unless it becomes a comfort or mobility issue.

    There are various theories as to what actually causes them. Some breeds, like Labs, seem to be more genetically prone to them. Middle age and overweight are often other contributing factors. Some of the more natural, holistic vets think it might be linked to toxins in the body. I have no scientific proof, but after my first Lab mix had several lipomas as he aged, and my current senior Lab started developing a couple of small lipomas (definitively diagnosed) I have started feeding fresher foods, including fresh meat and premix and/or commercial raw as a part of the daily meals. Her lipomas have stayed very small. I’m not sure what you’re feeding now, but better, fresher food is better for the dog’s health overall. It may not help prevent lipomas, but it will improve the dog’s general health.

    C4D
    Member

    Hi Bill K,

    First of all thank you for taking care of those pups. Your story brought me to tears.

    The others have given you some very good suggestions for other food choices. I’m not sure where you are located, but there are many foods that could fill the bill at a much lower price. Whole Earth Farms, even though it was purchased by Purina, has a 25 lb bag for $39.98. ProPac has grain free chicken, fish, beef and lamb for around $45/28 lbs. These are chewy dot com prices. I have seen them form cheaper in local stores. My point is there are many options if you look in the 4-5 star dog food reviews and check out the prices online or at your local stores. The cost of Now is way too expensive for the rating and G/A it has. I would choose another food.

    Good luck to you and your pups! Thanks for taking care of them! 🙂

    in reply to: My dog will not eat meat anymore #83629 Report Abuse
    C4D
    Member

    Are you feeding a commercial raw diet that’s complete and balanced or a homemade raw diet? Have you tried the dehydrated raw diets that you add water, like Grandma Lucy’s or The Honest Kitchen?

    in reply to: Need food advice for 13 month old labrador #83621 Report Abuse
    C4D
    Member

    Hi Lorelee,

    I have Labs, gotta love ’em! If you do choose another food, make sure you do a slow transition. The slow feed bowls and adding some warmed water will slow down the eating time. I actually add some canned too and let it sit for a few minutes to allow the kibble to absorb some of the water. That way it won’t expand in their stomach as much. I also never exercise them for @ least 45 minutes before or after feeding and have never had bloat in any of my dogs.

    In regard to the acid reflux, have you tried feeding small snacks prior to bed? This worked for a foster I have that would vomit bile in the early morning. I also give a midday snack when I can.

    in reply to: Dog Unenthusiastic About Eating #82996 Report Abuse
    C4D
    Member

    Hi Sadie’s Mom,

    The others have all given you good advice. I am a firm believer in yearly checkups and complete blood panels on a regular basis. In regard to the calulator, you must use the dog’s healthy weight, not the current weight. Also, I have Labs, but even though they get regular, brisk walks, I still feed them less total calories than what the calculator shows, and I use the “typical” level. Doxies have long backs which makes it crutial that you keep them lean. Dentals are another critical issue to keep your dog in good health. There are so many issues that can include liver and ultimately kidney problems if you don’t keep up with a healthy dental program including chews, brushing and checkups!

    Good Luck and keep us posted! 🙂

    in reply to: Heartworms, need advice. #82937 Report Abuse
    C4D
    Member

    Hi losul,

    Glad to hear that you and Turbo are doing well! It’s nice to see you on the forum again. I always like to hear other people’s thoughts, experiences and opinions. I don’t always agree with all, but it makes for great discussion. I appreciate the backing I’ve gotten from you in the past. 😉

    in reply to: Freshpet fowl smell and finding Nutritionists? #82836 Report Abuse
    C4D
    Member

    Hi Huskypup,

    Pitlove is right. If it smells funky, especially like vomit, either your refrigerator or the store refrigerator is not keeping it cold enough. I don’t feed this brand often, I use the grain free versions, but when I do, the smell almost reminds me of lunch meat, but never foul smelling. I use to buy the bag versions of this for an old dog that was getting picky and had good luck overall. One time, however, it went bad in a matter of being open for only one day. I remember a very sour smell when I opened it. Anyway, I would try buying it from another store to see if that helps with the problem.

    in reply to: Reviews of dog foods for senior dogs #82797 Report Abuse
    C4D
    Member

    Hi IM,

    Did you use the green lipped mussels on arthritic dogs? If so, did it help and if so, did you see a significant difference? I’ve been reading up on it and am thinking of adding it.

    in reply to: Life's Abundance #82760 Report Abuse
    C4D
    Member

    Hi Jim G,

    It sounds like the food is not working for your dog. You’re breeder probably recommended Life’s Abundance because she get’s a percentage of sales. It’s sad, but true.

    If her stools are normal on plain cooked chicken and rice, I would try another grain free food and slowly intoduce it to her. If that one doesn’t work, try another until you are getting the perfect stools again. Look through this forum for large breed puppy food. Since she’s a Lab, you need to feed her a Large Breed Puppy food so it has the correct calcium/phosphorus ratio.

    in reply to: Reviews of dog foods for senior dogs #82759 Report Abuse
    C4D
    Member

    Hi September D,

    I’ve owned a lot of dogs over the years. I’ve never fed a senior dog food to them. Senior dog food is really just a marketing ploy. My large breed dogs live well over their expiration date. The most important thing is to watch that they don’t gain too much weight, get exercise on a daily basis, and address any health issues they might have as they age or due to injuries they have sustained. I also get yearly checkups and do blood panels on a regular basis. That let’s you know if there are any issues that might need addressing. My vet once said to walk my dogs for as long as they could walk. I’ve always done that. I’m not saying this is a miracle cure, but dogs need exercise and they need a job. That’s their job and they love it. I have a senior right now, 11 yo Lab along with other older adult dogs, but if you didn’t know her age, you wouldn’t think she was that old. She has bad knees too, but she walks briskly almost 2 miles daily and runs the yard after everything she sees. She does get supplements (fish oil, joint care) and I am very careful about her diet to keep her lean. I also feed her a combination of kibble, canned and fresh/raw food daily. So, I’ll get off my soap box now. Best of luck with your pup!

    in reply to: Unhealthy Obsession with Pet Food #82636 Report Abuse
    C4D
    Member

    Hi Alex Woodward, I mean Ed W.

    So you’ve made your way on to the forum side. It seems really inappropriate to tear down people on this site, particularly the regulars. I’ve seen many of their posts and I see them regularly suggest, to people that are asking for suggestions, food that is compatible with their price point. I do the same. They generally preface it with the fact that these foods have worked for them and that it might or might not work for their dog(s).

    You said: “The vast majority of problems are dreamed up by pet owners in order to try the next latest and greatest product, or just overfeeding or excessive treats. Yes, this is in fact true.” Could you please provide links to back this comment up?

    There are many people who have genuine issues with their dogs, myself included in the past, that would like a bit of advice, particularly when whatever they are doing is not working. I wouldn’t consider it an obsession when someone’s dog has ear or skin infections, vomitting, diarrhea, etc. and are going back to the vet several times for the same problem and they start on a merry go round of antibiotics, steroids, etc. In many cases, a change in diet worked wonders and completely cleared the dog(s) issues.

    I have many personal friends that work and have worked in the dog world, including myself. They have trained, showed in AKC agility, conformation and field trials. They have finished dogs, dogs with Regional and National Championships. They feed a variety of food, including some who feed raw. None, that I know, are feeding proplan.

    If you want to talk about expensive dog food, Royal Canin, which you suggest, is probably the most expensive dog food on the market, making Orijen, which is an expensive dog food, seem cheap by comparison.

    • This reply was modified 4 years, 8 months ago by C4D.
    in reply to: Dry dog food for overweight dogs #82519 Report Abuse
    C4D
    Member

    Hi Becky A,

    The others have given you some good suggestions. I’ve used the Wellness before and haven’t had any issues with it. The other one I use, generally in the brutal cold of winter, when my dogs aren’t getting exercised enough, is Nature’s Variety Instinct Healthy Weight. It’s only 347 kcal/cup and only 5.5% fiber so I don’t see any difference in poop quantity. I don’t use it for weight loss, but just to keep them slim when they aren’t able to burn the extra calories. Another trick is to add some frozen (thawed or lightly cooked) green beans. Just don’t use canned unless they are “No Salt”. That’s what a rehab vet recommended to me years ago when I did need to get weight off my lab. It worked well.

    Another thing to do is increase those walk times and/or distances. A fifteen minute walk could work, but it has to be at a decent pace. A pedometer can help you stay on track. I use them all the time and walk my dogs about 2 miles a day. Good luck with it! 🙂

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