Search Results for 'orijen'

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  • #153019
    Carolyn B
    Member

    I can’t believe how old this post is, really hope you found a solution for Timber!

    I’ve had two huskies and both were intolerant to chicken, beef, AND lamb. Even boiled chicken and rice would give them diarrhea. I found that unique proteins like venison, bison, quail, etc do not bother their digestive system. And they thrive on fish-based kibble. I wonder if you have tried something without chicken, beef or lamb? It’s not as easy to find kibble without it, since those are the cheapest and therefore most common in dog foods. I fed both of my dogs orijen six fish.. very pricey for kibble but huskies don’t eat as much as most dogs for their weight, so it was $90 a month for two dogs. Not that bad.

    Also, 50 lbs is not small for a well bred Siberian husky. People breed them bigger.. but breed standard is 45 to 65 lbs for a male. My male had champion lines and he was just over 50 lbs at a healthy weight. My female was around 40 (breed standard for females is 35 to 55).

    #151488

    Topic: Lymphoma

    in forum Diet and Health
    CM86
    Participant

    My dog has a high suspicion of Lymphoma. Secondary testing at the end of the week will either deny or confirm.

    I am already trying to be proactive in the even it is in fact bad news. Yesterday I grabbed the lowest carb food I could find at my local non-chain pet store. I ended up with Orijen Regional Red which contains 15% fruits and vegetables which is the only part which would contain any carbs….the rest of the food was 30-40% fruits and veggies.

    I need to do more research, but for the mean time I at least wanted to make some progress which the food change over. I am currently blending the Orijen Regional Red into his current food which contains sweet potatoes (carbs grrr).

    Was this a waist of money or was getting him on regional red until I figure out a better game plan a helpful decision ?

    #150968
    haleycookie
    Member

    Every dog food has horror stories. Heck most have recalls at this point. The most important thing to me is rotational feeding meat based foods along with adding in as much fresh foods as possible. Frozen raw, freeze dried raw, bone broths, canned food are all less processed than kibble. Some good kibbles as a base I like to use are Nature’s variety raw boost, orijen, and canidae ancestral.

    #150957
    Yianna S
    Participant

    Hello, my dog is a maltese, 10 years old and lately she has allergies. I’ve been feeding her from day 1 with Orijen (red, but now Senior). I am looking information for Acana Lamb & Apple, and if it is suitable for a 10 years old dog.
    Thank you!

    #150371
    Donna H
    Member

    I have Australian Shepherds. They have been on Fromm Acana, Orijen, and are now on Farmina Ancestral Grain. One of my boys was diagnosed last year with very mild DCM. I switched all of the dogs off of grain free in light of this. On the Ancestral Grain, a couple of them are having G.I. issues (specifically gas). I want my dogs to be on a high quality dog food that is not grain free. At this point I am not interested in getting into the discussion regarding DCM and grain free foods. Veterinarians will recommend science diet which I am not necessarily in favor of. I’m looking for a healthy grain kibble that does not produce G.I. issues.

    #147923
    haleycookie
    Member

    So your dog is about 31 lbs at 5 months. First do you know if she’ll be over 50 lbs at full size? Is you think she will be I would switch to the large breed puppy food. If you think she’ll stay under 50 lbs follow the medium sized puppy guide on orijens bag. So for a 33 lbs dog it says 2 and 1/3 cup of food a day. Feeding guidelines will normally give u per day feedings not per meal. Some ppl only feed one meal a day so that wouldn’t help some ppl. So 2 and 1/3 cup is 266 g of food a day.
    As for adult, let’s say he taps out at 20 kg or 44 lbs. for the original orijen you would feed him between 1 and 1/2 to 2 and 1/4 cups depending on his activity levels. Or somewhere between 171 g and 257g.

    • This reply was modified 4 months, 2 weeks ago by haleycookie.
    #147038

    In reply to: Ketona?

    Daniel S
    Member

    Hi there, I’m the founder of KetoNatural Pet Foods.

    On the issue of ingredient commonality, chicken is BY FAR the most prevalent ingredient in our chicken recipe (and salmon is by far the most prevalent ingredient in our salmon recipe). In both cases, the meat products make up 75% or more of the formula. And, unlike most pet food companies (including at least one of the two you’ve mentioned here) when I make that claim I’m making it on a post-dehydration basis. We add our chicken to our formula AFTER it has been dehydrated, so the percentage of the formula that is chicken is not skewed by the presence of water. Even after dehydration, it’s still the case that more than 75% of our formula is chicken. Your statement that chicken is the “fifth of sixth ingredient” is completely false, I assure you. It’s BY FAR the most common ingredient and I’m not aware of another kibble on the planet that has a higher ratio of animal products to starch than Ketona (and I’ve actually written a book about this subject, so I’m quite familiar with the marketplace!).

    (If you want to see this “dehydration issue” for yourself, go check out the website for Orijen by Champion Pet Foods. The company claims that most of its Orijen formulas are at least 90% meat products. But the formulas are also typically at least 25% carbohydrate. Animal products don’t contain carbohydrates. So something doesn’t add up. That “something” is the presence of water in the animal ingredients.)

    On this issue of price, it is indeed the case that our food is more expensive than many (but not all) kibbles. But it’s nutritional composition is different too. We have by far the lowest carbohydrate content of any dry pet food on the market today. Carb-heavy ingredients (corn, rice, potatoes, etc.) are the cheapest ingredients. And that’s why most kibbles are insanely cheap (far cheaper than the trashiest fast food on a per-calorie basis). Because our formulas feature more animal-based ingredients and fewer carb-heavy ingredients, they’re more expensive to produce. So we have to charge a bit more. But I’ll note that (1) our prices are only about 20-25% of nutritionally-similar raw diets (the only other types of pet food products that have a nutritional content remotely similar to ours) and (2) on a quantitative basis, switching a 50-pound dog from Acana to Ketona is only likely to add $0.50 to $1.00 per day to your dog food budget. Hardly a massive change.

    Regards,

    Daniel Schulof
    KetoNatural Pet Foods

    #146137
    Lewis F
    Member

    Linda,

    Our Cavapoo has been on Orijen Original for three years. We have b;lood work done every year and everything is fine! Our Vet says the same thing”there is no reason tio change food”

    #146135
    Linda R
    Member

    My dog is a 5 year old German Shepherd. She has had bad food allergies all her life. I have had her on Orijen dog food when she was young. She has been on Acana Singles for about 4 years now. Had her at the Vet he said she is doing fine and he see no reason to change her food.

    #146062
    Alice B
    Member

    I was talking with a lady on our walk, about her dogs & dog food
    Her last dog was fed Orijen, Wellness, Acana, all very high protein foods, & died of cancer at age 5 years old!

    Now with her new pup, she is feeding Pro plan as her Vet has suggested & hopes the pup has a much longer lifespan

    #145968
    haleycookie
    Member

    It’s unlikely your pup will be large breed. Try to stick with meat based foods, some of my favorites are, merrick back country, canidae ancestral, orijen, instinct raw boost, and essence dog food. All of these foods are going to be made up of mostly meat. They all (to my knowledge) employ vet nutritionalist to formulate their foods as well.
    I’d also recommend adding canned foods, dehydrated raw, frozen raw, and other topper type foods.
    Fresh pet is actually pretty good quality. It is much more fresh and meat based than kibbled foods. Kibble should ideally be a base and other types of less processed foods should make up the rest.
    Nature’s variety makes quality canned foods, frozen raw, and freeze dried toppers in a multitude of flavors, I would check those out, merrick has a wide variety of canned options for picky dogs. Tiki dog food also have very popular canned foods for picky dogs. Also the brand weruva has great canned foods too. You can add bone broths as well. Solid gold has a variety of those as well as other brands, you can also just boiling chicken (or bones) and use the broth off that. Cooked egg, plain kefir, and raw goats milk are nutritionally dense as well.
    Consider rotational feeding, this helps prevent allergies, pickiness in dogs, and it also helps in case the food u feed is recalled or discontinued. Rotational feeding just helps expand their diet and if u ever have to change for an emergency you will be prepared to do so. If u do decide to try rotational feeding try to start slow. Get the pup on one food for awhile then slowly switch over the course of a couple weeks. Eventually u will have no issues switching with no transitional period at all.

    #144900
    Jennifer M
    Member

    I used to feed my dogs Purina Proplan 20 yrs ago and when I noticed my Cocker Spaniel started to itch around the time that grain-free food b/c popular, I switched her over to them. In 2013, she was 11 and we had a new lab puppy and I did research and fed them them, the best food I thought at the time which was Orijen and Acana. Because it was so high protein, I then switched my Cocker over to Fromm. My Cocker did develop a heart murmur in the last 2 yrs of her life, so not sure if it was from having been fed grain free or of her age, but I have read the studies and there definitely is something going on. For me, having had a Dane with DCM, I don’t wish that on any dog, so I switched my lab and new Cocker puppy off grain free completely. Ironically, thinking of going back to Purina Proplan. What I do notice is that chicken usually causes itchiness, while fish based does not in many dog foods. Lamb i usually a good choice as well, but many dogs don’t always like it.

    #144579
    GSDsForever
    Participant

    Jeff,

    Glad to hear your dogs are off the Acana and doing better with regard to the symptoms you mentioned (vomiting).

    If you are concerned about the DCM-diet connection, I would still caution to avoid other grain-free/high legumes especially or potatoes formulas in other brands, along with other unusual/more exotic ingredients. It wasn’t just Acana, but many brands implicated including Health Extension’s grain-free formula.

    I agree that Orijen & Acana (Champion Pet Foods) have been heavily over promoted as the most wonderful & perfect foods on the planet — for many recent years. They have great advertising.

    Whatever brand(s) you choose, ask a lot of questions and do your research on the company, manufacturing, and formula — just to be on the safe side.

    #143538
    Robert B
    Member

    Four companies who make legume (e.g. peas, lentils, chickpeas etc.) and tuber (e.g. potatoes, cassava root, sweet potatoes etc.) free canine formulations that are grain inclusive but avoid corn, wheat and soybeans are:

    – Annamaet
    – Dr. Gary’s Best Breed
    – Dr. Tim’s
    – Farmina N&D Ancestral Grains

    You may want to research them a bit and add them to your “list” for consideration.

    I am currently in the process of moving my 9-1/2 year old Australian Shepherd off Orijen and I am piloting a rotation among different foods by these companies. I have an older dog so what specific foods that I chose might not be right for your dog, so look at the different foods that each make carefully.

    What I like is the companies all have some grounding in veterinary nutrition, all disclose ash content and looking at their ingredient lists > 1% by weight, they look pretty good among their peer companies. I am starting off with smaller 5lb. Bags to see how he does.

    Good Luck

    #142404
    sonha n
    Member

    We had an 8 year old akc Doberman … the breeder told us to keep her on orijen/acana which we have done for the past 8 years with no problems. She was a beautiful and healthy Doberman. She started having problems … wet diarrhea poop, weakness a month or so ago. It took her a week to bounce back. she is an indoor pet and only would go outside for a walk or to use the bathroom. Then, two weeks ago, she started vomiting and would not touch her Acana food at all. We switched to a different type of Acana and still she refused to eat. We then gave her boiled chicken, rice and boiled potatoes mashed up and she ate this for a day or two but then she gave up eating entirely. Now, Eva, our Doberman, never has been sick for this long in her life. We tried some wet puppy formula and hunger stimulant through a syringe. She suddenly passed away last night. We took too long to investigate all the trouble Acana has been going through lately and if we had known earlier, we would have switched her food. What we have been reading lately with Acana food has really gotten us upset … the last 2 bags of Acana food did come from Kentucky plant

    she passed away last night

    #142235
    Robert B
    Member

    Thanks for the comments. I am familiar with best practice switching protocols and we’ll go slowly. He rotates regularly within the Orijen line with no transition without event. With these switches we’ll transition gradually (1/4, 1/2, 3/4 across a week or so). We’ll try Farmina first, Fromm second, Nature’s Logic third.

    #142206
    Robert B
    Member

    In light of the most recent update issued regarding FDA CVM’s Investigation between the relationship between diet and canine heart disease (DVM), I decided to review the 500+ case reports from the 5-year period studied. The published incidence rate including breeds with a genetic propensity for DCM is estimated to be between 0.1-0.2%.

    We own a 9-1/2 year old, neutered Australian Shepherd who we have been feeding Orijen dry foods all of his life. When I look at Orijen (we feed Adult, Regional Red & Senior) I see lugumes and pulses, but well down the ingredient list by weight. That said, there a dozen cases of DCM associated with the brand. I do realize that the incidence rate is influenced on how widely a food is selling.

    There were 10 case reports of Australian Shepherds (the summary shows n=13 but I could not find them) and DCM out of the 515 canine cases reported (or about 2%). The observed rate out of the dog’s within the cases is > 10x the general population rate for ALL dogs. This struck me as not happening by “chance”.

    I reviewed the listed dog foods fed to the Australian Shepherds and then looked into what their current top 10 ingredients for legumes, pulses and tubers:

    Case 1) Nature’s Recipe Easy to Digest Fish meal and Potato recipe dry dog food: Potatoes
    Case 2) Zignature Kangaroo and Lentil: Peas, Chickpeas, Pear Flower, Red Lentils, Green Lentils
    Case 3) Fromm Pork and Pea: Peas, Chickpeas, Pea Flower, Pea Protein, Sweet Potatoes
    Case 4) Blue Buffalo wilderness natures evolutionary diet with chicken and lifsource bits: Pea Protein, Peas, Pea Starch, Pea Fiber, Potatoes
    Case 5a) Farmina N&D Pumpkin Formula Medium and Maxi: Pea Starch, Dried Pumpkin, Pea Fiber
    Case 5b) Kirkland Natures Domain Salmon and Sweet Potato: Sweet Potatoes, Peas, Potatoes, Pea Protein, Potato Fibre
    Case 5c) Kirkland Organic Chicken and Pea: Organic Peas, Organic Lentils, Organic Garbanzo Beans, Organic Sweet Potatoes, Organic Potatoes
    Cases 6 & 7) Pine Forest Canine Recipe with Venison & Legumes – Taste of the Wild Pet Food: Garbanzo Beans, Peas, Lentils, Pea Protein, Pea Flour, Fava Beans
    Case 8) Earthborn grain free (specific variety not declared): Peas, Pea Protein, Pea Starch, Chickpeas
    Case 9) Hill’s Ideal Balance Grain Free Chicken and Potato: Potatoes, Yellow Peas, Pea Protein, Potato Starch
    Case 10) Acana (all flavors except Chicken or Lamb): Whole Red Lentils, Whole Pinto Beans, Whole Green Peas, Whole Green Lentils, Whole Chickpeas

    I see a consistent use of legumes or tubers as ingredients among these foods (including Hills!). I work in R&D and while I agree the root cause may not be fully understood and the rates shown in the pareto chart are biased by how widely used a food is I can see why the Agency sent out the notification. Given the > 90% rate in the reported cases of grain free, legume formulated foods, I have made the decision to move our Australian Shepherd to a new dry food. So I have been trying to identify high quality grain inclusive dry foods to replace Orijen. So far I have identified:

    Farmina:
    N&D Ancestral Grain Chicken & Pomegranate Senior Mini & Medium
    N&D Ancestral Grains Grains Chicken & Pomegranate Senior Medium & Maxi

    Fromm:
    Adult Gold
    Reduced Activity Senior Gold

    Nature’s Logic:
    Canine Beef Meal Feasts
    Canine Chicken Meal Feasts
    Canine Lamb Meal Feasts
    Canine Turkey Meal Feasts

    NutriSource
    Performance
    Adult
    Lamb Meal & Rice
    Beef & Rice

    We will begin to titrate him off Orijen onto some of these foods. We will first buy small bags to see how he a) likes them and b) his stool quality and general energy/health.

    Do any of you have any experience with these foods or have any other suggestions for me to consider?

    #142198

    In reply to: FDA DCM clarity

    Robert B
    Member

    In light of the most recent update issued regarding FDA CVM’s Investigation between the relationship between diet and canine heart disease (DVM), I decided to review the 500+ case reports from the 5-year period studied. The published incidence rate including breeds with a genetic propensity for DCM is estimated to be between 0.1-0.2%.

    We own a 9-1/2 year old, neutered Australian Shepherd who we have been feeding Orijen dry foods all of his life. When I look at Orijen (we feed Adult, Regional Red & Senior) I see lugumes and pulses, but well down the ingredient list by weight. That said, there a dozen cases of DCM associated with the brand. I do realize that the incidence rate is influenced on how widely a food is selling.

    There were 10 case reports of Australian Shepherds (the summary shows n=13 but I could not find them) and DCM out of the 515 canine cases reported (or about 2%). The observed rate out of the dog’s within the cases is > 10x the general population rate for ALL dogs. This struck me as not happening by “chance”.
    I reviewed the listed dog foods fed to the Australian Shepherds and then looked into what their current top 10 ingredients for legumes, pulses and tubers:

    Case 1) Nature’s Recipe Easy to Digest Fish meal and Potato recipe dry dog food: Potatoes
    Case 2) Zignature Kangaroo and Lentil: Peas, Chickpeas, Pear Flower, Red Lentils, Green Lentils
    Case 3) Fromm Pork and Pea: Peas, Chickpeas, Pea Flower, Pea Protein, Sweet Potatoes
    Case 4) Blue Buffalo wilderness natures evolutionary diet with chicken and lifsource bits: Pea Protein, Peas, Pea Starch, Pea Fiber, Potatoes
    Case 5a) Farmina N&D Pumpkin Formula Medium and Maxi: Pea Starch, Dried Pumpkin, Pea Fiber
    Case 5b) Kirkland Natures Domain Salmon and Sweet Potato: Sweet Potatoes, Peas, Potatoes, Pea Protein, Potato Fibre
    Case 5c) Kirkland Organic Chicken and Pea: Organic Peas, Organic Lentils, Organic Garbanzo Beans, Organic Sweet Potatoes, Organic Potatoes
    Cases 6 & 7) Pine Forest Canine Recipe with Venison & Legumes – Taste of the Wild Pet Food: Garbanzo Beans, Peas, Lentils, Pea Protein, Pea Flour, Fava Beans
    Case 8) Earthborn grain free (specific variety not declared): Peas, Pea Protein, Pea Starch, Chickpeas
    Case 9) Hill’s Ideal Balance Grain Free Chicken and Potato: Potatoes, Yellow Peas, Pea Protein, Potato Starch
    Case 10) Acana (all flavors except Chicken or Lamb): Whole Red Lentils, Whole Pinto Beans, Whole Green Peas, Whole Green Lentils, Whole Chickpeas

    I see a consistent use of legumes or tubers as ingredients among these foods (including Hills!). I work in R&D and while I agree the root cause may not be fully understood and the rates shown in the pareto chart are biased by how widely used a food is I can see why the Agency sent out the notification. Given the > 90% rate in the reported cases of grain free, legume formulated foods, I have made the decision to move our Australian Shepherd to a new dry food.

    So I have been trying to identify high quality grain inclusive dry foods to replace Orijen. So far I have identified:

    Farmina:
    N&D Ancestral Grain Chicken & Pomegranate Senior Mini & Medium
    N&D Ancestral Grains Grains Chicken & Pomegranate Senior Medium & Maxi

    Fromm:
    Adult Gold
    Reduced Activity Senior Gold

    Nature’s Logic:
    Canine Beef Meal Feasts
    Canine Chicken Meal Feasts
    Canine Lamb Meal Feasts
    Canine Turkey Meal Feasts

    NutriSource:
    Performance
    Adult
    Lamb Meal & Rice
    Beef & Rice

    We will begin to titrate him off Orijen onto some of these foods. We will first buy small bags to see how he a) likes them and b) his stool quality and general energy/health before settling on a new rotation of foods.

    Do any of you have any experience with these foods or have any other suggestions for me to consider?

    • This reply was modified 7 months, 3 weeks ago by Robert B.
    #142104

    In reply to: FDA DCM clarity

    haleycookie
    Member

    Acana and orijen both break down amounts of meat vs protein. So does natures variety instinct. Says right on the back what’s from veggies and what’s from meat. You can also get the carb vs carb %s with just the info on the nutritional analysis.

    #141908
    haleycookie
    Member

    @joanne l orijen is a meat based food. Far more meat than anything Hill’s, purina, or rc will ever offer. They are some of the lowest carb dog foods around. So not sure where you all are getting your into it’s mostly peas. Acana is more but still under 40% of the food is vegetables and fruit.
    They’ve been doing feed trials the past year on labs and beagles and have found no instances of heart problems so far. Not to mention most of those on this forum were incorrect on them not working with vets to formulate their foods. They seem to actually fit most of wsava guidelines, which I find comical.
    If anyone would actually read the FDA’s article they’ll notice how they recommend to not change foods yet as this is still not a common issue at all. Not only that, the testing they’ve done on the foods have shown nothing conclusive and all foods are showing up balanced and appropriate. I suppose after they start testing the dogs and how the different breeds synthesize taurine in foods with peas we’ll know more, but is suspect it will be a genetic breed issue more than anything else. But til then it’s not a wide spread issue that I’m concerned about. Nor should anyone else be, this mass hysteria going on in this forum is almost comical. To think feeding a carnivore a mostly carb diet is healthy. hahahah. Whatever floats ur boat. I’m done arguing about it. I’ll just be reminding folk whom are concerned that it is a very small unproven issue at this moment and to not feed into the hysteria some of you push so hard.

    #141561
    Patricia A
    Member

    I believe this is the latest on brands at top of list with most DCM cases.

    https://whdh.com/news/fda-announces-dog-food-brands-that-could-cause-heart-failure/?fbclid=IwAR1IauGHrj8kUtOTRAyccRpKqvCNRL_rX6Qbx4zZAeMIE5QlFHE_TCdRrgo

    Please someone explain how a brand for instance such as Arcana being the top one fed with most DCM cases was for years touted as the BEST of the BEST you could feed in a kibble. My dogs never took to it and I was disappointed . Also are All recipes implemented as a whole? The regional recipe doesn’t have the legumes that far up on the list even as other grain free brands do that are not on the list . Also the recipes I just looked at are not exotic proteins.
    Plus their statement checks all the boxes that this food should NOT be a problem.

    Q. DOES CHAMPION PETFOODS HAVE A VETERINARY NUTRITIONIST OR OTHER QUALIFIED EMPLOYEES ON STAFF? ARE THEY AVAILABLE FOR CONSULTATION OR QUESTIONS?

    Yes, our highly educated and talented team of 20 Research & Innovation scientists lead the development and research of our ACANA and ORIJEN pet foods. These individuals cover a wide variety of education and experience including, but not limited, to: 1 Doctor of Veterinary Medicine, 1 PhD in Animal Nutrition, 2 PhD’s in Food Science, 3 Masters of Science in Animal Nutrition (2 in companion animal nutrition), 2 Masters of Science in Food Science, 1 Masters of Science in Meat Hygiene and Food Microbiology, and 17 Bachelors of Science areas such as Animal Science, Biochemistry, and Veterinary Medicine.

    Q. WHO FORMULATES YOUR DIETS AND WHAT ARE THEIR CREDENTIALS?

    Champion Petfoods’ Research and Innovation team works with a group of animal nutritionists, and consults with Veterinarians who specialize in nutrition, toxicology, and holistic medicine when developing our ACANA and ORIJEN diets.

    • This reply was modified 7 months, 3 weeks ago by Patricia A.
    #141519
    Sarah B
    Member

    I feed my mixed breed dog Zignature Kangaroo. I’m concerned after reading the recent FDA investigation into the correlation between diet and Canine Dilated Cardiomyopathy. https://www.fda.gov/animal-veterinary/news-events/fda-investigation-potential-link-between-certain-diets-and-canine-dilated-cardiomyopathy#diet
    The study indicates a link between grain-free diets and DCM. The brands listed are many of the brands recommended on Dog Food Advisor for quality. What suggestions do you have in light of this study? Is it worth reevaluating our dog’s diet? The blogs I’ve read so far on the subject are calling Zignature/Orijen/etc “fad diets” and telling readers to return to Purina. Are those literally the only options for those who feed their pets dry food?

    #141505
    Joseph G
    Member

    The FDA has released an update, detailing for the first time the brands with the most problems associated with them. The brands with at least 10 reported cases follow, but many other smaller brands are named in the full report:
    1. Acana
    2. Zignature
    3. Taste of the Wild
    4. 4 Health
    5. Earthborn Holistic
    6. Blue Buffalo
    7. Nature’s Domain
    8. Fromm
    9. Merrick
    10. California Natural
    11. Natural Balance
    12. Orijen
    13. Nature’s Variety
    14. NatruSource
    15. Nutro
    16. Rachel Ray Nutrish

    91% of cases involved Grain-Free foods. 93% used pulses in their formulation. Most were dry food. More cases were observed in males than females. Animal protein source was from many different sources.

    Golden retrievers tens to be prone to taurine deficiency and were the breed most affected, but amino acid profiles in the food were all normal. No other nutrient abnormalities have been found so far.

    More information is here, but the cause is still unknown: https://www.fda.gov/animal-veterinary/news-events/fda-investigation-potential-link-between-certain-diets-and-canine-dilated-cardiomyopathy

    • This reply was modified 7 months, 3 weeks ago by Joseph G.
    • This reply was modified 7 months, 3 weeks ago by Joseph G.
    • This reply was modified 7 months, 3 weeks ago by Joseph G.
    #141234
    K K
    Member

    Hi. Sorry this is a later post. But my sheltie had surgery last Thanksgiving for bladder stones – biopsy showed struvite – they said her bladder felt like a bean bag. But, no infection! They wanted me to switch her to one of Hill’s prescription diets but I don’t think much of the quality of their foods and they’ve had several recent recalls. The vet also suggested adding “wet food.” Since then, I’ve been soaking her kibble in water before feeding. Her last urinalysis did show crystal formation but again no infection.

    My problem now is that the food I’ve been feeding has changed. Ancestry (formerly Sammy Snacks) has been taken over — now “Ancestry Pet Food” and the food has changed. I had been feeding the grain-free Lamb and Sweet Potato which Dog Food Advisory gave 5 stars. I want to switch.

    In the past I used Acana when it was still made in Canada, which is no longer the case. I am also wondering if a higher protein diet in grain-free formulas like the Ancestry and in Acana and Orijen may be the cause of the increase in urinary crystals and the formation of struvite stones. Is anyone familiar with this issue.

    My pup is only 4 years old, so not a senior dog issue.

    Thanks.

    K

    #139678

    Topic: help

    in forum Canine Nutrition
    Stefanie F
    Member

    Dr Martys NATURE’S BLEND

    Any one know of it and have any good or bad thoughts about it?

    I have a small dog a bichon weight of around 14/15 pound he is about 8 now.

    I have been feeding for morning a tablespoon of fruit yogurt with probiotic powder mixed in. (He was getting 1/2 cup of cheerios but am no longer doing that due to the pesticides in them)

    Then at night 1/2 cup of mixed ORIJEN Dry Dog Food, Six Fish, and Acana Meadowlands Dry Dog .

    He also gets a lot of table veggies and fruits. He eats what ever I am having for fruit and veggies. So if I have bruss sprouts he gets them that night, If I have salad he will get tomato and cucumber. If I am eating an apple he will have some a well.

    He is a good begger.

    I have seen the lawsuit info on champion pet foods. I have read about the grain free is bad now. I also know neither ORIJEN or Acana have ever had a recall and it seems like every other brand has. (He eats this out of a a tug-a-jug to slow him down and keep him busy for a half hour)

    I am at a total loss of if I am doing good or bad by my dog.

    I can not go raw, and I do not have the time to cook for him daily. So I have to have either a freeze dried, kibble, or can I can take with me.

    I care for 3 elderly people all in different places and the dog comes with me so I have to have something I can easily toss in a bag and go as I never know where I am going to be.

    I did post something a few weeks back and got jumped on about giving him his tablespoon of fruit yogurt because of sugar. I always read fruit was good for dogs and he will not eat plain yogurt. So it seems even when I think I am doing good by him I am not.

    So I really need some advice.

    #139127
    Stefanie F
    Member

    Joanna l and PR Lover
    Thank you for answering but oatmeal has the same GLYPHOSATE that cheerios has and the Non-GMO are just as high. They use it to dry the oats with so anything with OAT is bad right now even the non-GMO or organic (unless you grow it yourself) Anything with whole grains especially oats has the GLYPHOSATE in it. Cheerios seems to have one of the highest amounts but oatmeal is right behind it.

    Crazy4cats
    Thank you for answering.
    First my dog dose not have a tendency to have pancreatitis. He had it the one time due to the turkey skin and ANY dog will get pancreatitis if they eat turkey skin that is just a fact of life. Turkey skin is deadly and kills dogs. I am lucky I caught him and got him treatment in time. Also Orijen is not a grain free boutique food. It is grain free and a top food. Most dog food are 90% grain and fillers and I learned my lesson well with feeding a cheap grain filled food and lost a dog very young to it who had problem after problem. That is why I chose a good quality grain free food for this dog.

    One last thing you need to know about Tuffs they are funded by Colaget who owns Hill Science Diet so they recommend it and say everything else is junk. My cousin went to Vet school there before she switch field and they spend very little time on nutrition.

    Oh and if you read more from the FDA they state.
    “It’s Not Just Grain-Free Diet-Associated With Dilated Cardiomyopathy”

    After addressing the most common misconceptions, Dr. Freeman concludes, “for the vast majority of dogs, we do not yet know what is causing this disease.”

    So until they do I am not going to not go with a good grain free diet.

    • This reply was modified 8 months, 4 weeks ago by Stefanie F.
    #138868
    Mike S
    Member

    I feed my dog a scoop of Orijen “Regional Red” with a soft boiled egg and a handful of frozen vegetables (corn, peas, green beans, and carrots) for breakfast.

    For dinner, he gets another scoop of the same, with some kind of meat like chicken, ground turkey, ground beef, etc. and vegetables. Sometimes I add in cottage cheese, yogurt, or chai seeds.

    I feel like he’s getting a great mix of a high quality food with a good kibble, a variety of protiens, and “fresh” (frozen) veggies for vitamins and fiber.

    He loves his food and has picture perfect bowl movements. What could I do better?

    • This topic was modified 9 months ago by Mike S. Reason: spelling / typos
    #138737
    crazy4cats
    Member

    If you think it is the fiber in the Cheerios that is helping, you could try adding a little plain canned pumpkin. But, you want to be careful not to add too many unbalanced things to your dog’s diet. Only 10 to 15% of calories should be unbalanced toppers and treats. You could be feeding a little too much too. That will sometimes cause loose stools.

    Also, I believe Orijen is a very rich grain free diet. I’m surprised you would feed it to a dog with a tendency to have pancreatitis. In addition, have you seen the FDA warning about grain free boutique foods?

    https://vetnutrition.tufts.edu/2018/11/dcm-update/

    Best wishes!

    #138688
    Stefanie F
    Member

    I feed a grain free Orijen dry dog food for the past 8 years and give table food bites here and there. (My bichon will go nuts for a cherry tomato, cucumber, brussels sprouts, egg, or cooked spinach. )

    For breakfast he has 1/4 of a chobani fruit yogurt with a canine pro biotic powder mixed in. (He will not eat the plain)

    Everything was fine until last Thanksgiving when he got into the trash and ate his fill of Turkey skin. He develops pancreatitis and for weeks was on meds and boiled hamburger and white rice. Along with IV’s daily to keep him hydrated.
    (No more Turkey on holidays at my house.)

    After I got him well and back on his regular food (and that took well over a month transitioning back) he started to have 1 good normal poop in the morning and then a second gelatinous poop in the late afternoon. (he was always a 2 poop a day boy)

    Told the vet she suggested adding some cheerios to his breakfast. I did and the problem was fixed.

    Now my dilemma I just saw all the news and articles about the oat drying process and how they use RoundUp for it so most oat cereals and breakfast products have high amounts GLYPHOSATE in them and we know that causing cancer. The biggest offender on the list with very high amounts of GLYPHOSATE in it is cheerios.

    Needless to say my baby will not be getting them any more with his yogurt.

    Dose anyone have a suggestion what I can give him as a cheerio alternative that will be safe, and I do not mind cooking it myself as long as I can make it in bulk and freeze.

    I take care of 3 elderly parents with a lot of health problems so I have to be able to through in a dish and run a lot of times.

    Thank you for reading and any help any one can suggest.

    • This topic was modified 9 months ago by Stefanie F.
    #137794
    hamish
    Participant

    @crazy4cats

    But the big 3 have grain free SKUs with the exact same ingredients everyone is worried about in them. Purina has no less than 14 SKUs loaded with legumes and potatoes in place of grains. Even some of their prescription vet formulated kibble does and they’re still being sold. This is before you branch out to the other brands they own outside of the Purina name. A lot of good the years of canine nutrition and PHD veterinarian nutritionists did. By your logic the fact that Purina puts out those products should be a green light for everyone to purchase grain free dog food. The truth is no company saw this coming or even knows what the exact problem is.

    You’re also not considering any other factors. Here’s one. Grain free foods, especially of the boutique variety, cost a hell of a lot more than a bag of kibbles and bits. Who’s more likely to have pet insurance for their dog? Who’s more likely to spare no expense going down the rabbit hole of their dogs illness when the pup is on death’s door. Who’s more likely to say do whatever you need to do to save my dogs life? Who’s more likely to take their dog to a specialist when a problem arises instead of the town vet? Who’s more likely to say keep going than putting their dog down when the vet says what the problem is and the costs are? Who’s more likely to do each of those things between a person who spends $20 on a 50 pound bag of Kibbles n Bits or someone who spends $130 on a bag of Orijen Tundra half the size.

    We just don’t know yet. Years ago no one had autism now 1 in 60 kids in the USA is on the spectrum. You know why? Not vaccines. It’s because we test for it now and are much more sophisticated in our awareness of it. This could be peas. This could be potatoes. Or it could be that people that buy boutique foods are more likely to have more disposable income resulting in them more likely to have pet insurance or more likely to spend any amount necessary to save their dog. Which would result in bringing the dog to a place that’s going to go down the rabbit hole and ultimately report the issue. How many dogs do you think die of DCM but we don’t know because the owner takes them to the vet, vet has a listen, and says, “I know it’s heart failure but if you wanna find out exactly what’s wrong it’s gonna cost a lot of money. Best to just put the dog down.”

    This is all before we look at who the owner’s got the dog from. Did they get it from a responsible breeder or did they get it from a puppy mill breeder that put on a good show and is pumping out dogs whose parents showed signs of heart failure or was over-breeding dogs from the same line? What else do these people feed their dogs? Are the dogs exercised and taken care of? That’s why this is going to take so long to figure out. There are so many other factors to isolate before we get to the food.

    We just don’t know.

    • This reply was modified 9 months, 1 week ago by hamish.
    #137242

    In reply to: Dog food

    Sanne
    Member

    Hi Joanne, I do not feed Purina as much as I feed Roycal Canin, but I do have excellent results with it! I dabbled in the “high end” grain free stuff for a while and cannot say I was ever pleased with it. Dry skin, huge loose stools, gas. I have nothing to complain about with RC or Purina (when I feed Purina it is typically Pro Plan). One of my dogs is dark and used to be coated in flakes back when she was on Orijen. Have not had that problem return since switching over a year ago.

    Both RC and PP are the most popular foods in my country, with just regular people and breeders and working dogs. They have a LONG history of good health and longevity. The way I see it, breeders and people who need their dogs for work would not continue to use these foods if they did not have generations of long living healthy dogs on these food. They would not continue to use them for years if their dogs were regularly dropping dead early from cancer and other diseases. The results of millions is what made me open my eyes, majority of people here feed these foods and their dogs are incredibly healthy.

    #136374

    In reply to: Hydrolyzed Diet

    Candace P
    Member

    I really good dry dog food is Orijen, and it is one of the lower carb, grain free kibbles around, made in Canada and if your dog does not have any food sensitivities, they have several flavors to rotate feedings . . . it just didn’t work for the dog I have now, but her poops were almost like a dog’s that is eating a raw diet . . . not to be graphic but they came out in nuggets instead of being all compressed together into a squishy turd (sorry).

    Right now I am feeding Nom Nom Now, it is a cooked dog food that is shipped to your door. It runs me about $130/mo for my 50lb pit bull mix and she has all kind of issues such as crusty skin bumps, yeasty feet (why I need a low carb dog food), and cannot tolerate chicken or beef. She is fed the Nom Nom Now pork with Nulo salmon kibble. Her bumps are completely gone for the first time in about two years, but I think the kibble may be a little too high in carbs as her feet aren’t doing well. I am thinking of trying Ketona Natural kibble because it a a new very low carb, high protein salmon kibble (they make a chicken as well).

    #135825
    anonymous
    Member

    I fell for the marketing ploys a few years ago too.
    Both my dogs vomited after one serving of Orijen (similar to Acana)
    Too much oily crap in it (imo) No thanks!

    My dog with a sensitive stomach does well on this one https://www.gofromm.com/fromm-four-star-nutritionals-salmon-a-la-veg-food-for-dogs small kibbles

    I use kibble as a base I always add a splash of water and a bit of chicken or scrambled egg…

    #135589
    christine v
    Member

    I feed my adult Orijen puppy and Holistic select small mini breed puppy, he’s a small dog and prefers smaller kibble. The ingredients are exactly the same in the puppy vs adult, except with Orijen, 20% fat in the puppy instead of 18%, and there’s a 1% difference in the holistic select.

    #133664
    haleycookie
    Member

    I like natures variety raw boost, Merrick Backcountry, orijen, canidae ancestry, wellness core raw boosted food, and only natural dog food. These are all going to have more meat. You could even rotate if you think your dog is up for it. I don’t think any kibble is perfect. Add meat based toppers, freeze dried raw bits, bone broths, etc and you’ll be just fine.

    Cody D
    Member

    Thanks Anon. I’ll look at all of that. Only fear with the fish based is he (and my other dog who I say is his brother, but not) was on Orijen six fish before this all started. So fish has been his main staple. It was great! Everything up to this point was so healthy with him, and he is a picky little **** head though the strong fish odor really helped in the beginning. This appeared to be the best kibble on the market IMO at the time of starting it. Maybe the protein/fat content was too much for him? Or maybe this is just a chicken allergy (has had chicken breast with most of his meals for a couple years. Cut into pieces, mixed in. Spoiled rotten, has his mom wrapped around his paw). Anyway, I guess we can only wait and see!

    SIDE NOTE: Is there a better forum to now post this too? Maybe one with people who have had dogs with IBD that might have some suggestions. I’m being lazy honestly and haven’t looked yet. I’m sure there is.

    #132867
    Kathryn P
    Member

    That’s interesting it’s in Petco now. When both my dogs became ill from a bag of Acana (when this all started) I switched to Zignature and have had zero problems. The whole thing with Acana/Orijen seemed shady and now they’re at petco makes it even more suspicious.

    #132551
    Ana C
    Member

    Hello to all!

    Here I am reading up on lawsuits on Acana/Orijens. I’ve been feeding my boys this food for the past 6 years. I trusted this brand whole heartedly like most folk out there and now I’m at a loss. Like most people I don’t feel comfortable feeding them this food until something is know whether it is safe or not. So, now I’m not sure what to feed my boys(dogs, just to clarify). Should I get them Fromm’s, Stella & Chewie, other? Which one? Unfortunately I just purchased a bag of Acana and I’, hesitant to feed them but they have to eat!
    Any recommendations? No food allergies that I know of at this time. Both are cocker spaniels in good health and both roughly around 8-9 years of age.

    Thank you so much for your time and suggestions,

    Ana

    #131983
    Ayat S
    Member

    Well, I bought her from a breeder who seems to be knowing what she is doing. The dog has been checked by a vet and has a health card and everything. I could take her to the vet right now if it is really needed. But so far there does not seem to be anything specifically wrong with her.
    And no, I am not listening to homeopathic vets or anything :D. Since this is my first time having a dog, I started reading up on stuff on the net, and since there were so many brands of dog food, I thought I do a overview of what is out there. I did not even know there were brands that were supposedly even harmful to the dog in the long run. Here are the brands I have easily access from two shops in my hometown:
    Acana, Barking Heads, British Care, British Premium, Canagan, Carnilove, Edgard and cooper, Eukanaba, Golden Eagle, Hills , Lilys Kitchen, Nutrima, Nutro, Orijen, Piccolo, Planet Pet, Profine, Sams field, True instict, Wonderboo, Pronature holistic, Riverwood, Ziwipeak, 1st choice, Primadog, Welldog, Champion, Platinum, Proplan, Booster, probooster.

    Again since I saw RC on a few brands to be avoided, I thought about changing the brand. I guess we can stay on it if that is what she wants…Also, since you said small breeds at 6 months are practically adults, should I buy normal adult food or stick to puppy until she is 1 years old?

    #131884
    anonymous
    Member

    The only kibble I like at this time are Fromm Adult Classic or Fromm Small Breed Adult Gold

    https://www.gofromm.com/fromm-family-small-breed-adult-gold-food-for-dogs

    PS: Royal Canine is a good food, lots of misinformation on the internet.
    Just add a tablespoon of soft food like boiled chopped chicken meat or canned food.
    Also, add a little water, 1/4 cup to meals.

    Small breeds love Purina Mighty Dog and it comes in small cans.

    If she does not eat within 10 minutes pick up the dish, cover and store in the fridg offer at the next meal time. Offer her a meal twice a day like at 7a and 4p.

    Do not leave food down. She will eat when she’s hungry. It’s okay if she skips a meal or two as long as she is drinking water. If she eats no solid food times 24 hours take her to the vet.

    My dogs won’t eat Acana or Orijen either, they are too rich. Both my dogs vomited after eating Orijen.

    Go here and search nutrition http://skeptvet.com/Blog/

    #130826

    In reply to: Help! Puppy food

    Sanne
    Member

    Just my personal opinions of these brands.. I would not bother with Blue Buffalo. So many people seem to have digestive issues on that brand. I also do not like the company as a whole, seems shady. Orijen and Acana are imo very overpriced for what they are. So much beans/lentils/peas which in my experience are not very easy to digest. My dogs get gas and huge loose stools on foods that use beans/lentils as the starch source. I have had much better digestion results with foods that use rice/barely/potato/sweet potato, that is just my personal experience though. With all the odd cases of DCM/low taurine with dogs on Acana, I would hold off on that food anyway until more is found on that.

    I am not too familiar with Innova or Solid Gold. Wellness seems pretty decent. My go to puppy formulas are Farmina Puppy and Annamaet Original Puppy or Ultra. It really is trial and error though, what works for mine may not work for yours. You will only know what works for him by experience.

    As for mixing add ins, my dogs starting since they were pups get raw meat, boiled eggs, and tinned sardines added to their dry food. They are very used to this though as like I said this started very early on. I would not add in a bunch of stuff too quickly with your pup though. You could start with just some egg or chicken added in a few times a week and go from there.

    #130821
    Dereck B
    Member

    Hello all! well Tofuu is officially 3 months now and is growing so fast. but I DO NOT like the food that my bf family has been feeding him. (done some research). cause i’ve noticed that he has been scratching alot and biting at his fur. so i am switching his food as soon as i can and as soon i get some opinions as well! (for reassurance. ).

    Well these are the brands that i am looking to buy, Orijen Puppy, Solid Gold, Wellness for Puppies, Blue Buffalo Puppy, Innova Puppy, or Acana. and another question i really want to ask you fellow shiba parents. Do you feed you puppy straight up dry food (high quality kibbles) or do you mix the kibbles with some wet food? and if so what combinations did you feed your shiba pup this early in puppyhood?

    sorry to sounds so antsy!, but i just HATE the food he’s been eating this past week . Tofuu’s health and growth is what’s important. THANKSSSS for all your help and advice in advance.

    #130787
    christine v
    Member

    Susan, just an update on Orijen. It will be available for purchase on or around the 25th of February. Still not 100% on who exactly will be stocking it.

    #130652
    anonymous
    Member
    #130424
    Patricia A
    Member

    Sounds like a good plan to me Amir. I agree with staying away from Orijen/Acana. I know about the lawsuit but it’s really because Acana was mentioned so many times as being fed when their dogs were diagnosed with low taurine or DCM. Lamb and rice frequently.
    Mine get home cooked also. Just some boiled chicken, lean steak if they’re and I’m lucky that day. lol
    I do like to switch around the freeze dried though. Primal turkey/sardine and duck. They get Bixbi Rawbble as treats only. Really expensive.
    Don’t think kibble will ever be the perfect food for dogs . Grain free or not. Just man made for convenience for pet owners. Not natural for our pets to be eating day in and day out for life.
    You have about the same feeding regime as me. I wish us luck. Geesh..I didn’t worry so much about what I was feeding my kids when growing as much I do about these two fur babies. lol

    • This reply was modified 1 year ago by Patricia A.
    #130390
    Amir H
    Member

    Thanks for the reply.

    I do know about the DCM issue and grain-free. That’s why i chose Fromm large breed puppy (it has 4 stars on dogfood advisor). I am worried about switching to a grain-free diet a bit as well but most high quality kibbles are grain free these days (Fromm is really an exception). Here are some other thoughts I had:

    1- Orijen is great in terms of ingredients but their last lawsuit is keeping me away from Orijen and Acana. I totally know that the lawsuit could be baseless but I want to be safe.

    2- I’m adding Primal nuggets and stella & chewy freeze dried to Fromm kibble as topper every day. So that’s a route I can continue. My dog eats 3 cups of Fromm food and the toppers I put are about 0.4 cups. So, at least I know I’m getting some freeze dried food and some other nutritions to her.

    3- I’ve also considered going completely freeze dried (buy Stella & Chewy). It’d be expensive but it still fits my budget. I just don’t want to make the transition while she’s still a puppy. I’ll do that when I’m transitioning her to adult food.

    It’s kind of sad that all good quality foods are grain-free these days.

    #129772
    Sanne
    Member

    I would think the toxins could be a big part of it more than “exotic” meats. I live in the Netherlands and as Susan pointed out, this just isn’t an issue here in Europe either. Some very common meats for dogs in my country are venison, rabbit and goat. Very often fed raw too. I would think if meats like that were a cause for all of this we would be seeing quite a few cases here in NL!

    Orijen and Acana are sold here in Europe but we only get the stuff from the Canadian plant. Also, even if a food is not made in the EU, if it is sold here it must pass the same regulations that food made here does. I still don’t touch Champion foods though and it is not that common in the Netherlands. Most of us stick to foods made in Europe because the rules on pet food are much more strict.

    It is definitely an interesting theory! Interestingly, dog foods full of legumes are not very popular here either. We do have some with peas but foods like that just have not gotten very widespread here.

    #129745
    Susan
    Member

    Hi Joanne,
    You might be onto something cause America is the only country where these dogs are suffering with low taurine causing health problems…
    Canada, Australia, UK & Europe aren’t having these problems like the dogs in US??

    We dont get Orijen, Zignature or Acana in Australia maybe this is why we dont have any of these problems.
    Every time I see Patches vet which has been monthly lately cause of his lower back, I ask my vet has any vets here had any dogs come in suffering with heart problems caused by low taurine & she say’s “no” I asked her again last week & she laughed & said
    “Susan I think you need to stay off the internet’ lol….
    I’m not asking her no more cause I know now if she does start having dogs come in suffering with low taurine she will tell me, its stuck in her head lol…

    Sanne
    Member

    I would listen to your vet. They know more about your dog than a store owner. I personally would not touch anything from Champion (Orijen/Acana). They are currently in quite the lawsuit and have more cases than I am comfortable with of dogs having DCM and/or low taurine while on their foods.

    There is nothing wrong with grain inclusive food. Using peas/lentils/chickpeas etc in place of rice/oats/barely has no benefits unless your dog is specifically allergic to those ingredients. Peas and beans just up the overall protein content of the food with plant protein.

    patrocle
    Member

    I have a 4 year / 3 months old Siberian Husky and he started to gain little weight and he slowed down as he does not have energy anymore, plus he started to get few hot spots. So i went to the Vet and done some blood work on him. Tests came good , but the Thyroid test the Vet say is way to low and that’s why he has the spots, getting weight and probably all this causing from allergies.
    So the Vet put him on three different medications, witch he is done with two of them and just left with one ,for another week and then will have to do the blood test for Thyroid again to see the levels.
    I also asked if the food maybe a problem too, in what i was giving him. At that time witch was till some where half way in Dec 2018 , i had the kirkland brand from costco “Kirkland Signature Nature’s Domain Beef Meal & Sweet Potato” and before that , about 1.5 month ago i was giving him “Kirkland Signature Nature’s Domain Salmon Meal & Sweet Potato Dog Food”
    So the Vet told me to give him dry food “with Grains” , so today i was looking for some dry food with grains at a local store witch the owner was the dog trainer & food for 25,30 with Law Enforcement , and he owns the store now, i told him my story about my dog health and what the vet recommended and he said , he will go with dry food like:
    Orijen Six Fish or the FirstMate Pacific Ocean Fish Meal – Original Formula
    Also he mention to give him 2 cups a day for now.

    So i need some clarification what to buy and what to choose between “with grains or grain free” ? Done a lot of reading and looks like i am more confuse than to know exactly what to buy,

    Any advice will appreciate!
    P.

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