Curious, what exactly constitutes "Large Breed Puppy"

Dog Food Advisor Forums Canine Nutrition Curious, what exactly constitutes "Large Breed Puppy"

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    Alisha T
    Member

    We are going to be adopting another furry member to our family today and I am a little confused about the Large Breed issue. I have had dogs in my life all of my life and I never realized until coming to this site that getting specific food for a puppy that will be large is so important. Lola, our five year old Goldendoodle is only 10 pounds and so luckily this doesn’t apply to her. The one we will be adopting has a mother is who 35 lbs and father 25 lbs. My question is does this qualify as “Large Breed”? Lola has been so hard to feed due to her being picky and I have tried all of the high end foods and after five years of expensive dog food that had to be tossed in the end we have landed with the Fresh Pet Select that you get in the fridge. Not ideal but it is healthy and she eats. Any advice on what new puppy should be eating?

    #145957 Report Abuse

    crazy4cats
    Member

    Congratulations on your new furry family member! Large breed pups are dogs that will be over 50 or 60 pounds when they are full grown. It doesn’t look like the new puppy will be that big. But, you could always feed a large breed puppy food if you are not sure.

    I only feed my pets food that are WSAVA compliant. They are Royal Canin, Eukanuba, Iams, Purina, and Hill’s. They all sell puppy food that would be great for your new addition. I feed my dogs mostly Purina ProPlan. They are doing great! Good luck!

    #145968 Report Abuse

    haleycookie
    Member

    It’s unlikely your pup will be large breed. Try to stick with meat based foods, some of my favorites are, merrick back country, canidae ancestral, orijen, instinct raw boost, and essence dog food. All of these foods are going to be made up of mostly meat. They all (to my knowledge) employ vet nutritionalist to formulate their foods as well.
    I’d also recommend adding canned foods, dehydrated raw, frozen raw, and other topper type foods.
    Fresh pet is actually pretty good quality. It is much more fresh and meat based than kibbled foods. Kibble should ideally be a base and other types of less processed foods should make up the rest.
    Nature’s variety makes quality canned foods, frozen raw, and freeze dried toppers in a multitude of flavors, I would check those out, merrick has a wide variety of canned options for picky dogs. Tiki dog food also have very popular canned foods for picky dogs. Also the brand weruva has great canned foods too. You can add bone broths as well. Solid gold has a variety of those as well as other brands, you can also just boiling chicken (or bones) and use the broth off that. Cooked egg, plain kefir, and raw goats milk are nutritionally dense as well.
    Consider rotational feeding, this helps prevent allergies, pickiness in dogs, and it also helps in case the food u feed is recalled or discontinued. Rotational feeding just helps expand their diet and if u ever have to change for an emergency you will be prepared to do so. If u do decide to try rotational feeding try to start slow. Get the pup on one food for awhile then slowly switch over the course of a couple weeks. Eventually u will have no issues switching with no transitional period at all.

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