Search Results for 'allergies'

Dog Food Advisor Forums Search Search Results for 'allergies'

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  • #144646

    In reply to: New to raw feeding

    anonymous
    Member

    “Back then you would hardly ever hear of a dog having cancer, seizures, allergies, or the multitude of skin problems you see today”

    Back then? Back then no one took their dogs to the vet unless they had to. No one did any diagnostic testing, they just had the dog put down if it was suffering. It’s a fact, dogs did not live very long “back then”.

    There are more puppy mills now, breeding dogs with genetic flaws that should not be bred, just to make money.

    By the way, read the ingredients on the last loaf of bread that you bought, lol

    #144644

    In reply to: New to raw feeding

    D
    Member

    That does not mean you shouldn’t do your own educated research.
    Go ahead and ask your vet a simple request to go over all of the ingredients they put into your dog kibble and have them explain to you each and every ingredient and its purpose and benefits. Since they are so much wiser than you it shouldn’t be a difficult request to ask. You must love the Yellow 6, Yellow 5, Red 40, Blue 2, genetically modified organisms, pesticides and all the other artificial flavorings and preservatives they add into it. It’s not like dog food has ever been recalled before…Nor have vets ever been wrong on anything before…

    Up here in Alaska our sled dogs don’t seem to mind eating raw, something of which they have been down for hundred plus years. And our family and friends pets all seem to live a long healthy life.
    It wasn’t until the early 1950’s that dogs started to eat kibble. I wonder what they were eating before that?? Back then you would hardly ever hear of a dog having cancer, seizures, allergies, or the multitude of skin problems you see today.

    There is a plethora of great articles and books out there regarding the history of dogs and their diets, especially feeding raw.

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 1 month ago by D.
    #144505
    Emma L
    Member

    Hi everyone!

    New to the forum here. After scouring the site for hours, I still am at a loss at where to start with picking a new dog food.

    I have one VERY picky dog. Changes his tastes at the tip of a hat. He’s healthy, nothing wrong according to the vet (I did start there as he used to gobble his food and I had to use a slow feeder bowl)

    When I first got him from the shelter, he was on raw nuggets because he was severely underweight and needed a lot of protein. Once he got to a healthy weight, I switched him over to Fromm. My two dogs were on that for a very long time (GF formula) and the only reason I stopped buying it was because it was incredibly hard to get in my area. I switched over to Acana for a few years, and then not only did he completely detest the stuff after a while, they had the lawsuit. I’m a worrier, and I didn’t want my dogs anywhere near the stuff if there’s was even a small chance of an issue.

    We went to Stella and Chewys Raw Coated Kibble, which I thought he’d love because those were the raw nuggets he had, but no. Ate it once, wouldn’t eat it again. I decided to go back to Fromm since we never had an issues, and a store opened near me where I could get it. Ate it for a few days, and now both of my dogs turn their nose up at it, which is strange because my other dog could will eat legitimately anything. Which leads me here. Absolutely confused and in information overload with the amount of best dog food lists, articles, and google searches.

    For reference, my dog is a chihuahua/corgi/mix of some sort. He’s around 13 pounds, and has no allergies. He’s been on grain free, but I’m not opposed to not grain free at this point because I just want him to eat without having to mix yucky wet food in there. Anyone have any top/tried and true brands they can suggest?

    #143998
    GSDsForever
    Participant

    Uhhhh . . . where does it purportedly claim to treat “allergies” and “inflammation”?

    Ruth K’s original post (from several month ago) states this supplement is marketed for allergies, but I see nothing about that on the website. That’s actually a good thing (read below).

    Without getting into discussion of efficacy & value of this supplement . . . this product contains multiple food proteins including 1 of the top 2 most common food allergens: beef. This product would not be appropriate for dogs with food allergies and could cause an allergic reaction. Just FYI.

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 2 months ago by GSDsForever.
    #143878
    GSDsForever
    Participant

    I’m receiving an error message that does not correspond with what I see on my screen here. I don’t *think* this is a duplicate post, but a technical malfunction. (Please pardon me if it is.)

    Nadia,

    The only guidance I’ve ever received or read from trustworthy experts in diagnosing and treating dog food allergies is a food trial:

    *Novel protein diet for up to 12 weeks (or other hypoallergenic test diet, like hydrolyzed) to evaluate for relief
    *Followed by challenging testing the dog with one single food at a time, a former/suspected ingredient allergen

    I’ve been there, with a very itchy dog with food and other allergies. And the above is the route I’ve followed, with a primary care vet and boarded specialist. We also did things to exclude other diagnoses. That’s what I would recommend.

    I’ve heard (and read here) of others referencing blood tests, saliva tests, hair tests, etc. But to the best of my knowledge, there is not medical evidence to support their efficacy and they are not the standard of care in the medical community.

    I worry that such tests not only scam well-meaning pet owners out of money (which they could use otherwise to help their pets), but also lead people to come up with long lists of ingredients that their dogs are supposedly allergic to such that diet choices become severely limited. (IMO, it is very unlikely that these dogs are allergic to numerous and very uncommon things, things that the dog has never been exposed to.)

    Re fleas, allergy or standard reactions to them are more common than are food allergies. (Inhalant and environmental allergies also are common culprits for itching.)

    Vacuum, vacuum, vacuum. It will eliminate a lot of flea problems. Flea dirt is more likely to be discovered than fleas and fleas spend more of their life cycle off the dog in its environment than on. Vacuuming will also help keep pollen, irritants lower inside (as will removing shoes, etc.)

    #143875
    GSDsForever
    Participant

    Nadia,

    The only guidance I’ve ever received or read from trustworthy experts in diagnosing and treating dog food allergies is a food trial:

    *Novel protein diet for up to 12 weeks (or other hypoallergenic test diet, like hydrolyzed) to evaluate for relief
    *Followed by challenging testing the dog with one single food at a time, a former/suspected ingredient allergen

    I’ve been there, with a very itchy dog with food and other allergies. And the above is the route I’ve followed, with a primary care vet and boarded specialist. We also did things to exclude other diagnoses. That’s what I would recommend.

    I’ve heard (and read here) of others referencing blood tests, saliva tests, hair tests, etc. But to the best of my knowledge, there is not medical evidence to support their efficacy and they are not the standard of care in the medical community.

    I worry that such tests not only scam well-meaning pet owners out of money (which they could use otherwise to help their pets), but also lead people to come up with long lists of ingredients that their dogs are supposedly allergic to such that diet choices become severely limited. (IMO, it is very unlikely that these dogs are allergic to numerous and very uncommon things, things that the dog has never been exposed to.)

    Re fleas, allergy or standard reactions to them are more common than are food allergies. (Inhalant and environmental allergies also are common culprits for itching.)

    Vacuum, vacuum, vacuum. It will eliminate a lot of flea problems. Flea dirt is more likely to be discovered than fleas and fleas spend more of their life cycle off the dog in its environment than on. Vacuuming will also help keep pollen, irritants lower inside (as will removing shoes, etc.)

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 2 months ago by GSDsForever.
    #143872
    anonymous
    Member

    I knew it (carpeting)! If the dog has a flea allergy, you may not see any signs of fleas. Again one flea bite can wreak havoc.
    Work closely with your vet, however…
    If the dog’s symptoms continue, please consider consulting a veterinary dermatologist, that was the only thing that helped my dog. Intradermal allergy testing
    https://www.preventivevet.com/dogs/canine-atopic-dermatitis-environmental-allergies-in-dogs
    Final words about atopic dermatitis in dogs
    “It is also very important for any dog with atopic dermatitis to be on a year-round, comprehensive flea control program. Atopic dogs tend to be more sensitive to the bites of fleas, so even occasional fleabites should be prevented. Speak with your veterinarian about a safe and effective flea prevention program for all the pets in your home, and learn more about fleas here”.

    “Managing this lifelong condition takes some patience. By using various combinations of therapy, and altering the treatment when needed, your veterinarian can help your atopic dog feel and look their best. And for cases that prove difficult to manage, there are board-certified veterinary dermatology specialists that are available to help. You can search for a specialist in your area on the website for the American College of Veterinary Dermatology”.

    The only accurate way to do a food elimination trial is with prescription/therapeutic diet food.

    Otherwise, it’s a waste of time.

    #143869
    aimee
    Member

    Hi Nadia,

    The only accurate test for food reactions including allergies is with a food trial. Blood tests, saliva tests, hair tests etc are not helpful as your dog can test positive for food they are not reacting to and negative for the food that is causing the problem.

    #143866
    anonymous
    Member

    Have fleas been ruled out? Let me guess, you have carpeting? Flea allergy is common and can wreak havoc even after just one flea bite.
    Talk to your vet.
    https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/environmental+allergies/

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 2 months ago by anonymous.
    #143769

    I have been fighting allergies with my bulldog for 3 years. He is allergic to chicken, peas,potatoes etc. I just found a food American natural premium Turkey and pumpkin has no legumes no chicken corn etc. It is 56 dollars for a 33lb bag. My dog has been on it two weeks and I am already seeing a difference.

    #143507

    In reply to: Anal Gland Problems

    anonymous
    Member

    Yeah, tried all that.

    The only thing that helped was having the anal glands expressed at least once a week by a vet tech.
    You can ask your vet to have the vet tech show you how to do it yourself.

    My dog with environmental allergies had anal gland issues, once she started treatment for atopic dermatitis by a veterinary dermatologist all anal gland issues went away.

    She does well on a variety of foods. The dog food did not appear to have anything to do with it.

    PS: GSDs have specific anal gland problems related to the breed.

    #142116
    AdinaFay
    Member

    Hey all,
    Has anyone ever tried or looked into free-feeding supplements to their pooch that’s on a homemade or raw diet? I’m interested in if this has been done before or if there is a specific reason that it is /not/ done. It’s (at least as far as I am aware) standard practice for livestock and horses, and most dogs/cats will already self-regulate to a certain extent with behaviors such as grass-eating.

    Background:
    After struggling for two years with my 8lb mix’s allergies I’m committing to an elimination diet and, since that will be a long process of me making his meals, am also looking into proper balancing of homemade and raw meals. I don’t want to go a pre-made/balanced route because, at least for the first few months, they would defeat the point of the diet. I understand the concepts of balancing the diet as a whole, took animal nutrition in college, and am confident that I can create a menu that serves him well. However, I also understand how and why the AAFCO standards exist and I like the concept of him having access to additional supplements should he need them without me risking over-dosing him by providing a daily vitamin along with a diet that is well-balanced.

    Thanks in advance for any input!

    (X-posted in the supplements forum)

    #142115
    AdinaFay
    Member

    Hey all,
    Has anyone ever tried or looked into free-feeding supplements to their pooch that’s on a homemade or raw diet? I’m interested in if this has been done before or if there is a specific reason that it is /not/ done. It’s (at least as far as I am aware) standard practice for livestock and horses, and most dogs/cats will already self-regulate to a certain extent with behaviors such as grass-eating.

    Background:
    After struggling for two years with my 8lb mix’s allergies I’m committing to an elimination diet and, since that will be a long process of me making his meals, am also looking into proper balancing of homemade and raw meals. I don’t want to go a pre-made/balanced route because, at least for the first few months, they would defeat the point of the diet. I understand the concepts of balancing the diet as a whole, took animal nutrition in college, and am confident that I can create a menu that serves him well. However, I also understand how and why the AAFCO standards exist and I like the concept of him having access to additional supplements should he need them without me risking over-dosing him by providing a daily vitamin along with a diet that is well-balanced.

    Thanks in advance for any input!

    #142027
    Sandy C
    Member

    I feed my 3 year lab Acana Duck and Pear as this seems to be the only product that does not affect his allergies, but listed on your sight it is listed as the highest in reports – what are some other food choices in the dry formula that do not have Chicken, chicken meal, or chicken fat in them – this has been my dilemma. And would be nice if this is something I could afford.
    Thank you.

    #142023
    Theresa O
    Member

    I just put my 15 year old Llasa down this year. He was very ill with congestive heart disease. I had been feeding him Rachael Rays grain free because of his allergies for years. I just discovered this may have been the cause or contributed to his disease. Stay away from this food. I know he was old but he was still a puppy to the day I had to put him down.
    So sad food like this is allowed on the market.

    #141966

    In reply to: find Good diet

    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Joanne,

    I don’t know which “Purina Lamb and Rice” you are feeding but the dry Purina Pro Plan Savor Shredded Lamb and Rice, Purina One Lamb and Rice, and Purina Beyond Simply 9 Lamb and Barley ALL contain CHICKEN.

    Pro Plan Sensitive Stomach and Skin Lamb and Oatmeal doesn’t appear to have chicken as an ingredient, so maybe that’s the one you’re using? It does contain eggs and SOME dogs with chicken allergies MAY also react to chicken eggs, though this isn’t a given in all cases. Maybe your dog is fine with eggs.

    Just figured I’d point this out, in case it helps.

    #141552
    anonymous
    Member

    “Most people take their dog to the vet when they feel something is not right with the dog”.

    Au contraire.
    Some of the dogs that have been diagnosed have absolutely no symptoms. People that live on a modest income don’t take their dog to the vet if they can avoid it.

    I do now, take them for annuals and such because I had a dog that came down with cancer, another one with allergies that needed the expertise of a specialist.
    For years I did not, just took them to Petco for the rabies shot every 3 years.

    anonymous
    Member

    Allergic or food sensitivities? Food allergies are rare. Best to work with a veterinarian, he may need a prescription food till you get an accurate diagnosis as to what he can tolerate.
    Then you should rule out environmental allergies if his symptoms continue. Talk to your vet.

    #141223
    Laura L
    Member

    Have you tried adding some probiotics or enzymes to her diet? There are some really good products for IBD/dog diarrhea/digestive issues. One of my dogs had a crazy bout of diarrhea that lasted for almost three months. He didn’t have any allergies, so we didn’t need to change the protein in his diet. It took time, but by adding supplements we were able to normalize his stool.

    #141222
    Laura L
    Member

    That is crazy that air fresheners can cause that much of a reaction. It makes sense though, I have allergies and can’t use them in my home. Your poor guy seems to have lots of allergy issues. Best of luck with his back.

    #140952
    Owen J
    Member

    Proper nutrition of dogs should be as close as possible to the diet of wild animals. Dogs should not be fed boiled dishes such as cereals, or high-calorie baked goods. In order for the intestinal microflora to be maintained in a normal state, and the body was able to perform protective functions, it is necessary to have raw foods in the dog menu. First of all, it should be meat and offal, less often should be given fish and fish products. Sources of vitamins and fiber are vegetables and fruits. After all, a decrease in immunity is a direct path to diseases such as obesity, allergies, cardiovascular disorders, and others.
    https://herepup.com/best-dog-food-for-toy-breeds/

    #140644
    anonymous
    Member

    https://www.gofromm.com/fromm-four-star-nutritionals-salmon-a-la-veg-food-for-dogs

    Both are doing well on this as a base. The terrier was fine on Classic Adult but my other one with allergies does best on a fish based food. It is easier to have them on the same food. I don’t “rotate”.

    I do change up the toppers and add a splash of water to meals.

    #140341
    anonymous
    Member

    https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/topic/inflammatory-bowel-disease/#post-140295

    Antibiotics and steroids are often prescribed for environmental allergies and other ailments. It’s a band aid fix. You are not getting to the root of the problem.

    The first step would be to get an accurate diagnosis via an internal medicine specialist or a veterinary dermatologist, whatever your vet thinks might be the most helpful.

    PS: Hope this helps http://skeptvet.com/Blog/?s=food+allergies

    How long did you try the prescription food for? Did you contact the vet to let him know of your concerns?
    Maybe more diagnostic testing is indicated? See what the treating vet advises, not the internet.

    How old is the dog? Has she had annual checkups? How did her last lab values look? Blood work is a good diagnostic tool.

    #140295
    anonymous
    Member

    “My dog is itchy but vets have said she is just an itchy dog. It could be allergies”.

    Ask your vet for a referral to an internal medicine specialist or a veterinary dermatologist.

    Her issues may have nothing to do with the food.

    #140293
    Pinky L
    Member

    Sorry, I just saw your response. She was on Royal Cainin for years,I switched a couple of months ago to Ultra-chicken. I thought the royal was possibly the cause of her stomach issues. So I did get a week of antibiotics from the doctor, along with some Pro-pectalin. Her stools formed but remained soft,however to accidents in the house. Now 2 days post completing medication and diarrhea is back,non formed and accidents in the house. There is still mucus present in the stool. I feel hopeless at this point. She has never had duck (never) or lamb alone. Possible allergy to the following: chicken,eggs,beef,wheat,bran. Both goods had those ingredients.

    I doubt the Purina EN is going to help. Her stools were not liquid on kibble. I am sure the vet wanted her system to rest,thus giving the wet food.

    I am thinking about limited ingredients by Koha. It is very expensive. I have spent at least 400 on visits, food,medication since January.

    My dog is itchy but vets have said she is just an itchy dog. It could be allergies. That is the reason I had started Royal Cainin (shih Tzu).

    Some articles say high fiber is best and others say low fiber foods are best.

    joanne l
    Member

    I was wondering if someone gives their dog a vegetarian dry food, but puts their own meat of choice in it will it be better? Example you can one night put chicken in there and then another time you can put beef, and another time you can use salmon and so on. That way they get their vitamins and minerals from the dry food and you add meats. Maybe better?? That way the dog get human grade meats. Maybe less allergies??

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 3 months ago by joanne l.
    #140260
    joanne l
    Member

    I read on the dog journal that probiotics and enzymes are really helpful with this. There is one called Forta Flora it is in individual packets and you put it on the dogs food. Also rule out allergies to food as well. I use that product as well. Always tell the vet what you are using or doing. So ask him or her about Forta Flora. In my opinion it may help a lot.
    I forgot to mention you can read the reviews on Forta Flora on chewy.com and that is were you can order it if you want.

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 3 months ago by joanne l.
    #140247
    Diane D
    Member

    My rescued Poodle/? Mix came to me with sore yeasty ears & she was licking her itchy feet all the time. She also had the poodle pink eye gunk that ran down her face under her eye. It took me a while to find this, but after I changed her over (and kept on treating her allergies topically) it went away. I use the salmon/sweet potato formula. We also switched the GSD over to it. He had no issues, but he just gleams with a healthy looking coat & eyes now. I hope this stuff stays as good as it is. So many times Ive found something great & the supplier changes or something gets bought out.

    #139457
    joanne l
    Member

    I don’t know if this will help you, but I will share it anyway. My friend had a dog with this condition. His vet did the same as your vet is doing. However, the owner found out it was a chicken allergy. He bought Natures Instinct limited ingredient diet of lamb and he never had a problem again. Now I don’t know if it will help your dog, but you can this food a try. It has an ingredient in there call Montrolle clay, sorry I can’t spell it but anyway they say it can help with IBD. Check chewy out and read the reviews. Other than that try cooking for the dog. Either boil ground meat and rice or chicken and rice. If the Rx diet is not working than do this. See if the cooked diet for a few days will work. If it does great, than you can add a very little of the dog food I mentioned and see what happens. I know some on here may say to go to a specialist. If you can afford it go but ask about food intolerance and allergies. What dog food was your dog on begore?? Look at the ingredients in it and let me know. I hope you can get this under control. Also by cooking you will know if she may have a allergy. If chicken and rice don’t work than try beef and rice. And please drain all the fat when boiling ground beef. Oh and only use white rice, do not use brown rice! White rice will be best for this condition. P.S. you said “RX diet may have made it worse”? There maybe something in the Purina that is not tolerated. I have a feeling your dog may do well on the cooking method I mentioned to get him back on track.

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 3 months ago by joanne l.
    • This reply was modified 1 year, 3 months ago by joanne l.
    #139309
    Cannoli
    Member

    Had a great visit at the Vet Dermatologist and it is pointing more to Food Allergies. Dermatologist notice some things that neither my regular vet nor I saw before. Specifically his paws and skin as I just kept concentrating on his head shaking only.

    Dermatology Physical Exam: Non-seasonal mild pedal licking lately shaking of the head and digging at the neck, tried
    apoquel in the past did not help ear symptoms.

    Skin Description: Mild erythema of a few areas under each ear and mild alopecia and oily seborrhea of the plantar
    aspect of the paws, subtle changes on his chin from prior pedal licking

    AS (left ear): Mild lichenification on concave pinna, no major excoriations noted AU (both ears)

    AD (right ear): No odor or pain reaction from ears AU, negative pinna-pedal reflex

    Otoscopic Exam – Left: Mild cobblestone hyperplasia on surfaces of all aspect of the ear canal, no stenosis and no
    ulcerations, mild edema and slight erythema AU

    Otoscopic Exam – Right: No excessive exudate note

    Assessment: We talked about how the diet trial would have to be a little stricter for the full 60-90 days to yield a
    conclusive answer… and if not seeing a significant effect over the next 5-7 weeks then we could potentially be going
    more towards environmental allergies as the likely life long trigger of the mild skin, paw and ear issues

    Also we looked within his ear canal and on the screen we saw his ear canals were red in irritation. Cool to see the inside of his ear cannals on a giant tv screen as he used his scope with a flashlight to go down deep into his ear.. The ear cannals were visibly red with mild irritation.

    M T
    Member

    Hello my bulldog cross puppy currently eats Purina pro plan savor with some generic wet food mixed in. I’ve been debating adding in a prescription diet for skin & digestion. Does anyone have awhich food could potentially help with allergies (ie how to compare Purina Dermatologic DRM vs Hills z/d or Hills Derm defense)? I’ve mixed in some cans of I/d with her food before and seems to agree with her system. I’m looking for ingredient and nutritional breakdowns and comparisons.

    Gretchen R
    Member

    We have a Chocolate English Labrador that has been plagued with allergies and seizures since he was a puppy. He was diagnosed with 5 different parasites when he came to us at 8 weeks old and it took almost 6 months to get him healthy and disease free. Because of this his system is very sensitive to food and it has been a battle every time we have had to switch food due to recalls (Your site has been an amazing help in tracking this).

    We have always fed him a high quality dog food kibble, but I was tired of recalls and reading of problems with imported ingredients even in the best of dog foods. We have now switched to a fresh diet from NomNomNow and could not be happier. This is not an endorsement for that specific company, it was just one of the ones that we found that had a recipe with ingredients that he is not allergic too. He has never looked this good, or been so healthy.

    I would really love it if you could expand to cover the companies who are delivering fresh food. It would be very helpful to see the ratings and track in case of a recall.

    Thank you for your time.

    #138569
    M T
    Member

    Hello my bulldog cross puppy currently eats Purina pro plan savor with some generic wet food mixed in. I’ve been debating adding in a prescription diet for skin & digestion. Does anyone have awhich food could potentially help with allergies (ie how to compare Purina Dermatologic vs Hills z/d or Hills Derm defense)?

    #138119
    Jack M
    Member

    You may need to try several different limited-ingredient diet foods. Your dog could be allergic to the potato, the rabbit, or something else in that particular brand. Try a different brand with completely different protein and carb source.

    It takes a lot of time to try a diet. You need about a week to switch. Then, you need to spend 2 or 3 weeks on a diet before you know it will work. It’s kind of frustrating when you don’t get immediate feedback. You have to wait for the reaction to the old food to subside before drawing a conclusion.

    One of my dogs is very allergic to chicken and somewhat sensitive to rice. When she was on commercial food, she could eat food with fish, lamb, and potato.

    Now that she’s on a raw diet, she gets lamb, goat, beef, mackerel, and canned salmon without any itching issues. I accidentally gave her a ground organ blend that included some chicken and the itching came back.

    https://ecopetlife.com/best-food-german-shepherds-skin-allergies/

    #137768
    anonymous
    Member

    For best results I would go to a veterinary dermatologist, especially if this is becoming a chronic condition and has not responded to treatment by the regular vet. The veterinary dermatologist can do skin testing to identify the environmental allergens responsible then they will discuss treatment options.
    If you suspect food sensitivities then the only way to rule out is to have the vet prescribe hydrolyzed food, difficult to follow, commercial brands do not compare.
    There is no cure for allergies but there is effective treatment and management.

    https://www.acvs.org/small-animal/otitis-externa excerpts below, click on link for full article

    Otitis externa is an inflammation of the ear canal. Because dogs’ ear canals are L-shaped (Figure 1), fluid does not drain easily from canal openings. Additionally, the lining of the ear can become inflamed and thickened, blocking air and fluid flow in and out of the canal. Animals with otitis externa can also develop otitis media (middle ear inflammation). Similar to the problem seen in children (especially after airplane flights), fluid can build up behind the ear drum, causing pressure and pain. Otitis externa and media are common conditions in dogs, particularly in specific breeds such as the Cocker spaniel and German shepherd.
    In puppies and kittens, otitis externa is often caused by ear mites. These tiny parasites cause terrible itching and a thick brown discharge. In adult dogs, the most common underlying cause is allergies- sensitivity to something in the environment or to food. In older animals, tumors can cause blockage of the ear canal and secondary infection. Other predisposing causes may include foreign bodies (such as grass seeds), or small ear canals (often seen in Shar peis) or long floppy ear flaps (for example, Basset hounds) that prevent air flow. Hormonal problems, such as poor thyroid function, or other underlying skin disorders may also be present.

    #137746

    In reply to: Grain Free

    Christie B
    Member

    On the topic of “the big 4”, I think it’s important to go beyond the parent company and look at the ingredients on the bag to determine what food you should buy. Some product lines within a company are better than others. I don’t think you can rank Dog Chow the same as Pro Plan or Pedigree the same as Nutro.

    Ingredients are important. 3 Chicken Formula Dry Food Ingredients Lists:

    GROUND WHOLE GRAIN CORN, POULTRY BY-PRODUCT MEAL (SOURCE OF GLUCOSAMINE AND CHONDROITIN SULFATE), CORN GLUTEN MEAL, ANIMAL FAT (SOURCE OF OMEGA 6 FATTY ACIDS [PRESERVED WITH BHA & CITRIC ACID]), MEAT AND BONE MEAL (SOURCE OF CALCIUM), SOYBEAN MEAL, GROUND WHOLE GRAIN WHEAT, BREWERS RICE, NATURAL FLAVOR, CHICKEN BY-PRODUCT MEAL, DRIED PLAIN BEET PULP, SALT, CALCIUM CARBONATE, POTASSIUM CHLORIDE, CHOLINE CHLORIDE, DRIED PEAS, ZINC SULFATE, DL-METHIONINE, MONOCALCIUM PHOSPHATE, VITAMIN E SUPPLEMENT, NIACIN [VITAMIN B3], BIOTIN, DRIED CARROTS, L-TRYPTOPHAN, BHA & CITRIC ACID (A PRESERVATIVE), BLUE 2, YELLOW 5, YELLOW 6, d-CALCIUM PANTOTHENATE [SOURCE OF VITAMIN B5], RIBOFLAVIN SUPPLEMENT [VITAMIN B2], RED 40, PYRIDOXINE HYDROCHLORIDE [VITAMIN B6], COPPER SULFATE, SODIUM SELENITE, POTASSIUM IODIDE, VITAMIN A SUPPLEMENT, THIAMINE MONONITRATE [VITAMIN B1], VITAMIN B12 SUPPLEMENT, VITAMIN D3 SUPPLEMENT, FOLIC ACID

    Chicken, brewers rice, poultry by-product meal (source of glucosamine), corn gluten meal, whole grain wheat, whole grain corn, oat meal, medium-chain triglyceride vegetable oil, pea fiber, dried egg product, natural flavor, fish oil, barley, fish meal (source of glucosamine), L-Arginine, mono and dicalcium phosphate, potassium chloride, salt, Vitamin E supplement, potassium citrate, L-ascorbyl-2-polyphosphate (source of Vitamin C), zinc sulfate, ferrous sulfate, niacin, Vitamin A supplement, manganese sulfate, thiamine mononitrate, calcium pantothenate, Vitamin B-12 supplement, copper sulfate, riboflavin supplement, pyridoxine hydrochloride, garlic oil, folic acid, menadione sodium bisulfite complex (source of Vitamin K activity), Vitamin D-3 supplement, calcium iodate, biotin, choline chloride, and sodium selenite

    Chicken, Chicken Meal, Pearled Barley, Brown Rice, White Rice, Oatmeal, Beet Pulp, Chicken Fat, Menhaden Fish Meal, Flaxseed, Dried Whole Egg, Cheese, Brewers Dried Yeast, Salt, Calcium Sulfate, Potassium Chloride, Monocalcium Phosphate, DL-Methionine, L-Tryptophan, Taurine, Chicory Root Extract, Yucca Schidigera Extract, Sodium Selenite, Sorbic Acid (Preservative), Vitamins, Minerals, Probiotics.

    So the first one is a mess of “poor quality” ingredients and artificial colors. I would give that food a hard pass every day. In fact, I know someone with a Lab who has fed this food for the dog’s entire life. This 10 year old has a lot of joint and mobility issues.

    The second one has the dreaded by-product label (at least it’s poultry and not ‘meat’ ) and lots of grains. Fish meal can be found a ways down the list for a boost of glucosamine.

    The third has chicken and chicken meal as the first two ingredients, a plus for sure… and then Barley, rice, more rice and oatmeal follow…not ideal.

    Are any of these GREAT food choices?

    Every single time I go to the pet store, I wander the aisles reading ingredients lists. All I see are legumes and potatoes. Are they causing DCM? There’s no concrete evidence one way or the other yet. Was the my dog doing fine on Chicken and Rice for the first few years of his life before I found this website and gasped at the low rating his food received? Absolutely. Did I switch the grain free after reading through these forums? Sure did. Has he done ok with switch, all these years later? Nope. He’s developed allergies and sensitivities. But is it because of grain free formulas? I haven’t found concrete evidence proving that x and y caused the issues.

    It’s a learning process to find what works best for your dog. Some can’t have grains, some can. My vet suggests feeding him boiled chicken and white rice when he’s not feeling well. Is my vet stupid or just telling me what he knows from his 30+ years of experience might help my dog. Has he called grain free food evil? No, but he cautions against it only because the inclusion of legumes and potatoes are ‘relatively’ new to animal nutrition and there isn’t enough research and studies done to prove that they are safe in the long term.

    He told me that he’s always given his dogs Pro Plan but have never pushed me to purchase any of the big 4 brands. In fact, he said the best thing I can do is read the ingredients list myself. And to transition food properly. And if my dog has issues after eating 1-2 bags of a food, to look at the current ingredients and find a food that’s different.

    #137733
    anonymous
    Member
    #137732
    anonymous
    Member

    I have a dog with environmental allergies. It started with ear infections, then pruritus, If you go to the search engine “environmental allergies” you will see my numerous posts.
    Of course there are other causes, get the dog properly diagnosed by a veterinary dermatologist.
    Or work closely with your regular vet, the steroids and antibiotics are just bandaid stuff. Get to the root of the problem.
    I am sorry but you may have a high maintenance pup.

    I hope this helps.

    http://www.mspca.org/angell_services/dermatology-allergies/Ear Diseases. excerpt below

    Otitis externa is the medical term for ear inflammation. Most cases of otitis externa also have an infection that is causing the ear inflammation.

    The structure of the ear in dogs and cats can make them more prone to ear infections. The ear canal in dogs and cats is longer than the ear canal in people. The ear canal is also “L-shaped” with vertical and horizontal parts.

    Because only some dogs and cats develop ear infections, other conditions often contribute to the development of otitis externa and ear infections in your pet. Allergies, parasites, and masses or tumors can all cause ear irritation and infection. Allergies are the most common cause of ear infections in dogs and cats. Since an ear infection can be secondary to an underlying problem, it is often important to diagnose and treat the cause of the ear infection while treating the ear infection.

    An ear infection can develop into a severe health problem for a dog or cat. Left untreated, ear infections can spread deeper into a pet’s ear (middle ear infection) and cause permanent damage to the ear canal (ear canal mineralization). Some chronic ear infections can develop resistance to antibiotics and become untreatable with medications.

    #137730
    Cannoli
    Member

    thanks Anon101.

    let me recap. Sorry I think I go the dates all wrong regarding the vet visit. I had to go visit my vet website to look at the dates I visited vet. I noticed he had something going on with his ears back in January but since he seemed fine and normal in regards to eating and playing I did not take him to the vet until March. My mistake….first time ever owning a dog.

    So March of this year was the first Vet visit in regards to the ear infection. We did the ear drops for about 7 days in March. That cleaned up his itching and smell. Did not notice the head shaking as much then because of all his ear scratching back in Jan and Feb. So was happy to see his ears smelly good and pup not scratching.

    Later that month in March Vet did a recheck..ear looked good..the infection was almost gone. Still the head shaking was not bothering me as much but he was still shaking his head. Vet recommended ear cleaning for the next few weeks maybe that might help with the head shaking.

    Now in march and april I followed the ear cleaning regiment. Notice his head shaking was not going away but was eating normally and playing. No scratching of his ears.

    In April I contact vet and noticed that his head shaking was still going on. not as much as back in January or February where he was shaking every 20 minutes. Now his head head shaking was about 20 times a day.

    Vet put him on an elimination diet in beginning of April. Notice head shaking but now about 10-15 times a day. So it went down some what. Went back to vet at end of April and asked what I can do to stop the head shaking forever.. He stated he wants to sedate dog and look deep with his ears and do a culture analysis. Vet thinks it is allergy related but the culture analysis could rule out that out. Also vet gave me steroids for 7 days.

    Culture analysis came back in beginning of of May or so where vet stated the lab found staph pseudointermedius. Recommended me to put pup back on Mometamax for 10 days to finish the bacteria and informed me to keep him on elimination diet.

    i have been seeing the same treating Vet since March so is not like a new vet every visit. My vet is very responsive. I send him emails with lots of questions and he always responds. He states allergies are very difficult to treat.

    Now why should I visit a veterinary dermatologist if he is not scratching his skin? But it is within the ear. I can definitely setup an appointment if you think that would help

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 4 months ago by Cannoli. Reason: spelling
    #137729
    anonymous
    Member

    Call the treating vet and see what he advises. Leave a message for the vet to call you back when he has a minute, don’t accept an answer from the vet tech.

    If the dog’s problems continue and you don’t see improvement after a reasonable amount of time, consider going to a veterinary dermatologist. Ear infections are sometimes indicative of allergies.

    Wait a minute the ear drops were prescribed in January? Only 7 days?

    He may very well have an ear infection and need antibiotics (ear drops or/and oral)

    SERIOUSLY, GO TO THE VET! asap
    Consequences of untreated ear infections in dogs include: Hearing loss.

    I reread your post, check with the vet, he may need a different antibiotic.

    anonymous
    Member

    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2011/09/integrating-myths-and-nonsense-with-standard-advice-for-allergic-pets/

    excerpt below, click on link for full article and comments

    “Of course, I’ve written about the raw diet nonsense before, and there is, once again, no evidence that raw diets have any benefit in terms of preventing or treating allergies. As for supplements, apart from limited evidence that fish oils can reduce the dosage of other drugs needed to control allergy symptoms, there is no solid data to support supplement recommendations. Overall, this section makes erroneous and misleading implications about the causes of food allergies, recommends a dubious diagnostic test, and then suggests treatments that have not been demonstrated to help”.

    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2018/11/hair-and-saliva-test-for-allergies-are-worthless-pseudoscience/
    excerpt below, click on link for full article and comments

    Hair and Saliva Test for Allergies are Worthless Pseudoscience
    Posted on November 6, 2018 by skeptvet
    There is a lot of mythology out there about food allergies. The recent concern about the potential risks of grain-free diets is only an issue at all because such diets became wildly popular with no evidence that grains were a problem in the first place. A lot of folks blame grains for allergies and other health problems, but there’s no real evidence this is true, and these ingredients probably play a fairly minor role in food allergies in dogs and cats.
    Other myths about food allergies include the idea that changing diets can cause them (actually, prolonged exposure is usually needed to develop a sensitivity), that raw foods are less allergenic (nope, only more likely to give you a food-borne illness), and that you can use blood, hair, or saliva tests to diagnose food allergies (sorry, a limited ingredient diet trial is the only way to do this). This last misconception is perpetuated despite evidence from human medicine that it is not true because, quite frankly, it makes people money.

    anonymous
    Member

    If you click on the link you will see hundreds of comments I have posted on the subject.
    It would take several hours to repeat the information you will find there.
    There is a search engine here for that reason.

    Better yet, make an appointment with a veterinary dermatologist asap to get your dog properly diagnosed and treated. There is no veterinary healthcare professional at this site. Even if there were they have not examined your dog nor can they provide specific advice regarding your pet. Best of luck!

    Example “The diet helps but it can only do so much.
    A multifaceted approach is often needed for environmental allergies. There is no cure.
    But there are effective treatments/management.
    PS: Bacterial skin infections that require antibiotics are common with atopic dermatitis. It is painful. Itchiness and burning….
    Next, ear infections.”

    example: “Please visit a board certified veterinarian asap for testing/diagnosis/treatment.
    It’s been a year/4 seasons without significant results by the regular vet.
    Do not give over the counter meds/supplements or apply ointments, creams that are not intended for veterinary use unless advised to do so by a veterinarian that has examined your dog”.

    Example: https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/topic/hes-got-good-and-environmental-allergies/#post-113364
    “Make an appointment with a board certified veterinary dermatologist. It’s not the food. Just my opinion, based on my experience and knowledge”.

    Very good information here: http://skeptvet.com/Blog/?s=environmental+allergies

    anonymous
    Member
    Bud J
    Member

    Hi, I’m just getting started in researching dog food. I’ve been fostering my current pup, Grayson, for about a year. He has seizures about once a week and is on keppra, phenobarbital and hemp. I’m currently doing research and looking for support because he is dealing with substantial allergies and I’m highly suspecting it’s food allergies. He has a lot of itching, chews at his feet and has bald spots and scabbing around his hips, hind legs and groin area. He has been an itchy dog pretty much entire time I’ve had him but the scabbing is by far the worst it’s ever been.

    He was put on a steroid for a couple weeks which really helped, but had it’s own side effects. The last 2 dog foods we’ve had are American Journey Grain Free Salmon and Sweet Potato and True Acre Foods Chicken and Vegetable Grain Free. He was mostly eating True Acre when the symptoms got bad, but then switched to American Journey and symptoms continued to progress. Both foods have chicken as a main ingredient and therefore I’m thinking he’s reacting to chicken. As of 2 days ago, I switched him to a Heritage Ranch Salmon and Sweet Potato Food only because it was the only dog food at my store which didn’t have chicken as a main ingredient.

    So, I’m currently l’m looking into switching him to a different simple ingredient dog food. Canidae salmon and sweet potato is the one I’m leaning towards, but I’m also researching doing a raw diet.
    I’m sure there’s several posts on this site which have helpful info, but wanted to introduce myself and I’ll start searching around to see what others have already posted.

    Thank you,
    Grandpa J

    #137316
    anonymous
    Member

    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/?s=environmental+allergies
    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2017/12/colloidal-silver-colorful-snake-oil-but-not-medicine/

    Stop the foolishness.

    Take the dog to a vet , have him examined , see what is recommended.

    This article is quite a slog and takes some grit to tackle. That said, it seems well-supported, fact-based, and objective. Bottom line: with the possible exception of fish oil (for prophylactic treatment of allergies like skin and coat issues), there is precious little to support the Madison Avenue-concocted nonsense built into claims about pet foods and supplements. (Illustration: There’s little solid science to support the claims of arthritis and joint ailments’ relief from taking glucosamine in humans, and virtually none as relates to pets.) So, read labels, feed your four-legged babies well-balanced diets and treats, get them to exercise (except for cats … unless they can be trained to use a treadmill), and give them a good belly-rub at least twice-a-day.

    https://sciencebasedmedicine.org/the-top-ten-pet-supplements-do-they-work/?fbclid=IwAR2AA4VoJK7XglKLwDkq7AiE49toHXcM8XmCTDKih2z-DWl1I5nVMbzTHgo

    #136685
    Susan
    Member

    Hi Denis,

    Sound like your GSD had a Furunculosis on his bum, my boy has IBD, Seasonal Skin Allergies (Summer/Autumn) & he has food sensitivities, food allergies are rare & the dog normally will suffer with IBD when he/she suffers with food allergies..
    Anal furunculosis is a chronic, progressive inflammatory disease of dogs that results in ulceration and inflammation in the area surrounding the anus.

    Here’s link – “What is Idiopathic Furunculosis (German Shepherds)?”
    https://wagwalking.com/condition/idiopathic-furunculosis-german-shepherds

    If your dog is eating the Hills Z/d vet diet, after 1 month if he is doing firm poos, no farts, no skin problems & he is doing really well this is when you start a food elimination diet & try too work out what ingredients your dog is sensitive too?? that’s if it is food related?? its Spring in America it could be environment allergies or his immune system is crashing from Allergies or vaccinations?? it takes a while doing food elimination diets, 1 month to trial 1 new ingredient at a time to his Hypoallergenic vet diet, it can take 20mins up to 6 weeks for the dog to react, with itchy skin, ears, red around mouth, paws, gas/wind/farts, vomiting, itchy yeasty ears, skin, anal gland problems take a bit longer 4-7days when dog is reacting to an ingredient..
    I found Patch reacted within 20mins of eating raw or cooked chicken, when he eats grains & carrots he took up to 5 days to react with sloppy yellow poo, farts & yeasty smelly skin & ears…
    Results are 100% correct with food elimination trial. Blood, Fur& Salvia testing can give false positives results, they’re a waste of money also it’s best to do food elimination diet in the cooler months when allergen are lower, its hard in Spring & Summer as your dog might be itchy cause of a plant, tree, grass, flowers, pollens in yard or next door & you think its what he’s eating & its not, keep a diary you will start to see a pattern with Seasonal Environment Allergies, also baths weekly, baths are best to wash off any allergens on skin, paws head etc ….
    I wipe Patch down with baby wipes days I don’t bath him, read the ingredients in the baby wipes & get the baby wipes that have Aloe leaf abstract in them, also Patch was getting furunculosis on bum & paws, when his immune system was down, when I first rescued him, so now after he poos I always wipe his bum with baby wipes & I wipe down his paws when he walks on wet grass or freshly cut grass he gets red paws..

    Get some “Sudocrem” its an anti-fungal, anti bacterial healing cream, for Dermatitis, Eczema, Nappy Rash, Pressure Sores, if you live US look on Amazon & I’ve read Walmart has started to sell Sudocrem, its an excellent cream… it heals sores, cuts, red paws, thinning of fur on head, excellent for itchy bum, when they scoot (bum surf)
    Make sure his immune system is healthy & its best to see a Dermatologist as they specialize in skin..

    Look at “Adored Breast” Healthy Gut & Love Bugs (Pre & Pro Biotics) made by Julie Anne Lee

    Please watch these videos below when you have the time, Julie explains what might be happening with your dog.

    Here’s Julie Anne Lee – Allergies, Skin Disease, or Autoimmune – PT 1
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FR7MeSLvK54&fbclid=IwAR1D6lxLF4LCZthsljwE_5IbERMFfCSQNn2ew0Ng6EQnihGi3wa2yjgvsTE

    Here’s Julie Anne Lee – Allergies, Skin Disease, or Autoimmune – PT 2
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1F__-CS7Y5w

    #136384
    Denis S
    Member

    Hello, my GSD has a new food allergy, I think. I noticed he had a wound next to his anus, approximately 2 inches in diameter. I rushed him to my vet. At first, it was mentioned that it could be a ruptured anal gland, then it would have been something the burrowed itself in, but, then was concluded that it was a food allergy. I went with it at first, as I brainstormed questions to ask. What made me stray away from it being, necessarily a food allergy, was that test’s were not conducted to rule out other possibilities; her explanation of how his immune system was forcing protein out through the path of least resistance (which would have made sense to me if something ruptured, forgive me I am not a vet.) It was a quick glance, and my (former) vet’s aggressive attempt’s to have me buy a $110.00 bag of 24lb Science Hill Hydrolyzed Z/D dog food. It really, gave me a terrible taste in my mouth.

    I went home and emailed Diamond dog food, a food I have used for year’s on my GSD’s and Rottweiler and never had any issues. Afterwards, I began my research on hydrolyzed dog food. Forgive me to all whom read my post, if I may seem like a novice here, which when it come’s to hydrolyzed dog food, I am. I concluded that the process of making the food itself is more difficult and requires more of a process than any other version. I didn’t feed him the Diamond dog food that night, instead I made him wild caught salmon with a few extra’s for omega-3’s and other nutrients for him. All on recommendations from a breeder friend and other GSD dad’s.

    The next day I received a response from Diamond (surprisingly quick) and they recommended their Diamond Care line. I read and read reviews and and found that it is indeed hydrolyzed dog food. I still continued my research on other brands, you never know what you’ll come across. I went to my local pet store and was disappointed that they had not received the Care line yet. Luckily for me as I was talking to the manager, a vet from another clinic over heard and jumped right in. I explained to him the situation, he nodded his head, looked down and right back up to me. He was apologetic and agreed more could have been done. He then went to explain to me, in detail exactly how hydrolyzed dog food work, what it is intended to do, the pro’s and con’s, who it is for and the potential outcome. He asked about symptom’s, behavior, stool frequency and consistency, his typical diet, what he does on a daily, where does he roam or like to hang out and do, etc. Then continued to explain Science Hill’s influence inside of veterinary medicine. I’ll leave all that for another topic. He then went on explaining how the allergies work with dog’s etc. He did recommend a few brands, the make up, and well the typical “less legs the better,” same rules I follow. Believe, me I felt stupid that I knew exactly what my body needs to stay optimal and didn’t apply it for my boy.

    I did schedule with his office for a visit.

    If you have any experience’s or recommendations please share. I do ask that we all have tact and be polite to one another.

    #135987

    In reply to: Hydrolyzed Diet

    anonymous
    Member

    “This explanation is, in fact, the exact opposite of the true nature of dietary allergies. Whole proteins are the primary trigger for allergies in animals predisposed to have them. And when there is a malfunction in the GI tract such that it fails to break proteins down into small enough pieces, this can make allergies more likely. Finally, one of the most effective treatments for food allergies is to feed hydrolyzed protein diets, diets in which the proteins are chemically processed (gasp!) into small enough pieces that they cannot trigger an allergy reaction.”
    “I certainly don’t expect lay people to be experts in the mechanics of digestion and food allergies, but this level of ignorance is frightening and inexcusable in a manufacturer of a pet food. It also indicates the blatant disregard for scientific fact so often seen in the marketing and promotion of raw and other unconventional pet diets”.

    Above is an excerpt from http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2012/01/misleading-advertising-for-raw-pet-food-again/
    click on link for full article and comments

    Hope this helps!

    #134632
    Patricia A
    Member

    crazy4cats the alternative feeding kibble
    ” Dry pet food, for all its convenience, is difficult to store in a way that preserves its nutritional value and freshness.”
    “Many unhealthy things can occur in a bag of kibble — especially an open bag — including fat rancidity, bacterial and fungal growth, nutrient depletion and storage mite infestation.”
    “Most dry pet food also has a number of other problems, including poor-quality, rendered and high-glycemic ingredients and extreme processing that creates cancerous byproducts.”
    “If you’re still buying kibble, there are several handling and storage guidelines you should follow to help prevent feeding unsafe food to your pet.”
    “A much better alternative to kibble is a nutritionally balanced, species-appropriate diet containing high-quality animal protein, moisture, healthy fats and fiber, and low to no starch content.”

    Primal and Stella’s goes through a HPP process as written above.

    “Without going into too much detail on the history of dry commercial kibble diets, the short end of the story is that it was introduced in response to the high cost of meat during the Great Depression and was heavily promoted at the end of WWII when it gained popularity for its convenience, ease of distribution and low cost.”

    “If our pets have managed to survive off this cheap, convenient, low quality protein source for the last 80 some years, why should we be concerned about it?”

    Even though our pets may be surviving off commercial kibble, can we really say that they are thriving on it?

    “The answer is pretty clear …

    “Chronic degenerative diseases, auto-immune diseases, allergies, kidney, pancreatic and liver disease are all rampant within our pet populations and cancer rates continue to rise. “

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 5 months ago by Patricia A.
    • This reply was modified 1 year, 5 months ago by Patricia A.
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