Search Results for 'environmental allergies'

Dog Food Advisor Forums Search Search Results for 'environmental allergies'

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  • #144743

    GSDsForever
    Participant

    Hi Karen.

    You really do need to see a vet, sooner than over a month from now.

    Pruritus (itching) can make a dog feel utterly miserable and can quickly spiral into bigger problems, whether from injuring the skin from scratching/biting/chewing to soothe itself which can then create secondary skin infection, or an ear hematoma (which I promise you, you do NOT want to have happen) from a hard shake or scratching.

    Did you know that most itching is not from a food allergy? It is more common for a dog to have other things causing the symptoms, like flea bites, mites, fungal/bacterial infection, or environmental & inhalant allergies.

    It’s great that your breeder is involved. Your breeder is right that chicken could be a food allergy for your puppy and food allergies do commonly show up before 1 yr of age. Chicken and beef are top food allergens for dogs with food allergies.

    But did you know that food allergies are actually not very common in dogs? Or that, in a food allergy, symptoms typically can continue for some time after switching over to another food? This is why a novel food must be fed for up to 12 weeks to see results, relief from symptoms. And it must be fed exclusively, without any treats or flavored medicines.

    In the vast majority of cases, a vet will be able to diagnose something OTHER THAN food allergy and be able to help your dog get relief very quickly from itching — whether diagnosing external parasite, fungal, or bacterial infection and treating for that, or providing relief from environmental allergies.

    For the environmental allergies, there are hypoallergenic and skin soothing shampoos and rinses, a cortisone shot, oral antihistamines, even a Cytopoint/CADI injection (a drug that can relieve itching within 24 hours and last up to 1-2 months) which has safe use approved for puppies as well as adults. Some dogs with pollen allergies just need a little extra help seasonally.

    Throwing up in young dogs can be nothing serious and pretty normal or it can be something that really means your vet should be involved and treating. Joanne is right that it matters also when your puppy does this and what it looks like/consists of, even though that may seem gross!

    #143878

    GSDsForever
    Participant

    I’m receiving an error message that does not correspond with what I see on my screen here. I don’t *think* this is a duplicate post, but a technical malfunction. (Please pardon me if it is.)

    Nadia,

    The only guidance I’ve ever received or read from trustworthy experts in diagnosing and treating dog food allergies is a food trial:

    *Novel protein diet for up to 12 weeks (or other hypoallergenic test diet, like hydrolyzed) to evaluate for relief
    *Followed by challenging testing the dog with one single food at a time, a former/suspected ingredient allergen

    I’ve been there, with a very itchy dog with food and other allergies. And the above is the route I’ve followed, with a primary care vet and boarded specialist. We also did things to exclude other diagnoses. That’s what I would recommend.

    I’ve heard (and read here) of others referencing blood tests, saliva tests, hair tests, etc. But to the best of my knowledge, there is not medical evidence to support their efficacy and they are not the standard of care in the medical community.

    I worry that such tests not only scam well-meaning pet owners out of money (which they could use otherwise to help their pets), but also lead people to come up with long lists of ingredients that their dogs are supposedly allergic to such that diet choices become severely limited. (IMO, it is very unlikely that these dogs are allergic to numerous and very uncommon things, things that the dog has never been exposed to.)

    Re fleas, allergy or standard reactions to them are more common than are food allergies. (Inhalant and environmental allergies also are common culprits for itching.)

    Vacuum, vacuum, vacuum. It will eliminate a lot of flea problems. Flea dirt is more likely to be discovered than fleas and fleas spend more of their life cycle off the dog in its environment than on. Vacuuming will also help keep pollen, irritants lower inside (as will removing shoes, etc.)

    #143875

    GSDsForever
    Participant

    Nadia,

    The only guidance I’ve ever received or read from trustworthy experts in diagnosing and treating dog food allergies is a food trial:

    *Novel protein diet for up to 12 weeks (or other hypoallergenic test diet, like hydrolyzed) to evaluate for relief
    *Followed by challenging testing the dog with one single food at a time, a former/suspected ingredient allergen

    I’ve been there, with a very itchy dog with food and other allergies. And the above is the route I’ve followed, with a primary care vet and boarded specialist. We also did things to exclude other diagnoses. That’s what I would recommend.

    I’ve heard (and read here) of others referencing blood tests, saliva tests, hair tests, etc. But to the best of my knowledge, there is not medical evidence to support their efficacy and they are not the standard of care in the medical community.

    I worry that such tests not only scam well-meaning pet owners out of money (which they could use otherwise to help their pets), but also lead people to come up with long lists of ingredients that their dogs are supposedly allergic to such that diet choices become severely limited. (IMO, it is very unlikely that these dogs are allergic to numerous and very uncommon things, things that the dog has never been exposed to.)

    Re fleas, allergy or standard reactions to them are more common than are food allergies. (Inhalant and environmental allergies also are common culprits for itching.)

    Vacuum, vacuum, vacuum. It will eliminate a lot of flea problems. Flea dirt is more likely to be discovered than fleas and fleas spend more of their life cycle off the dog in its environment than on. Vacuuming will also help keep pollen, irritants lower inside (as will removing shoes, etc.)

    • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 6 days ago by  GSDsForever.
    #143872

    anon101
    Member

    I knew it (carpeting)! If the dog has a flea allergy, you may not see any signs of fleas. Again one flea bite can wreak havoc.
    Work closely with your vet, however…
    If the dog’s symptoms continue, please consider consulting a veterinary dermatologist, that was the only thing that helped my dog. Intradermal allergy testing
    https://www.preventivevet.com/dogs/canine-atopic-dermatitis-environmental-allergies-in-dogs
    Final words about atopic dermatitis in dogs
    “It is also very important for any dog with atopic dermatitis to be on a year-round, comprehensive flea control program. Atopic dogs tend to be more sensitive to the bites of fleas, so even occasional fleabites should be prevented. Speak with your veterinarian about a safe and effective flea prevention program for all the pets in your home, and learn more about fleas here”.

    “Managing this lifelong condition takes some patience. By using various combinations of therapy, and altering the treatment when needed, your veterinarian can help your atopic dog feel and look their best. And for cases that prove difficult to manage, there are board-certified veterinary dermatology specialists that are available to help. You can search for a specialist in your area on the website for the American College of Veterinary Dermatology”.

    The only accurate way to do a food elimination trial is with prescription/therapeutic diet food.

    Otherwise, it’s a waste of time.

    #143866

    anon101
    Member

    Have fleas been ruled out? Let me guess, you have carpeting? Flea allergy is common and can wreak havoc even after just one flea bite.
    Talk to your vet.
    https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/environmental+allergies/

    • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 6 days ago by  anon101.
    #143507

    In reply to: Anal Gland Problems


    anon101
    Member

    Yeah, tried all that.

    The only thing that helped was having the anal glands expressed at least once a week by a vet tech.
    You can ask your vet to have the vet tech show you how to do it yourself.

    My dog with environmental allergies had anal gland issues, once she started treatment for atopic dermatitis by a veterinary dermatologist all anal gland issues went away.

    She does well on a variety of foods. The dog food did not appear to have anything to do with it.

    PS: GSDs have specific anal gland problems related to the breed.


    anon101
    Member

    Allergic or food sensitivities? Food allergies are rare. Best to work with a veterinarian, he may need a prescription food till you get an accurate diagnosis as to what he can tolerate.
    Then you should rule out environmental allergies if his symptoms continue. Talk to your vet.

    #140341

    anon101
    Member

    https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/topic/inflammatory-bowel-disease/#post-140295

    Antibiotics and steroids are often prescribed for environmental allergies and other ailments. It’s a band aid fix. You are not getting to the root of the problem.

    The first step would be to get an accurate diagnosis via an internal medicine specialist or a veterinary dermatologist, whatever your vet thinks might be the most helpful.

    PS: Hope this helps http://skeptvet.com/Blog/?s=food+allergies

    How long did you try the prescription food for? Did you contact the vet to let him know of your concerns?
    Maybe more diagnostic testing is indicated? See what the treating vet advises, not the internet.

    How old is the dog? Has she had annual checkups? How did her last lab values look? Blood work is a good diagnostic tool.

    #139309

    Cannoli
    Member

    Had a great visit at the Vet Dermatologist and it is pointing more to Food Allergies. Dermatologist notice some things that neither my regular vet nor I saw before. Specifically his paws and skin as I just kept concentrating on his head shaking only.

    Dermatology Physical Exam: Non-seasonal mild pedal licking lately shaking of the head and digging at the neck, tried
    apoquel in the past did not help ear symptoms.

    Skin Description: Mild erythema of a few areas under each ear and mild alopecia and oily seborrhea of the plantar
    aspect of the paws, subtle changes on his chin from prior pedal licking

    AS (left ear): Mild lichenification on concave pinna, no major excoriations noted AU (both ears)

    AD (right ear): No odor or pain reaction from ears AU, negative pinna-pedal reflex

    Otoscopic Exam – Left: Mild cobblestone hyperplasia on surfaces of all aspect of the ear canal, no stenosis and no
    ulcerations, mild edema and slight erythema AU

    Otoscopic Exam – Right: No excessive exudate note

    Assessment: We talked about how the diet trial would have to be a little stricter for the full 60-90 days to yield a
    conclusive answer… and if not seeing a significant effect over the next 5-7 weeks then we could potentially be going
    more towards environmental allergies as the likely life long trigger of the mild skin, paw and ear issues

    Also we looked within his ear canal and on the screen we saw his ear canals were red in irritation. Cool to see the inside of his ear cannals on a giant tv screen as he used his scope with a flashlight to go down deep into his ear.. The ear cannals were visibly red with mild irritation.

    #137768

    anon101
    Member

    For best results I would go to a veterinary dermatologist, especially if this is becoming a chronic condition and has not responded to treatment by the regular vet. The veterinary dermatologist can do skin testing to identify the environmental allergens responsible then they will discuss treatment options.
    If you suspect food sensitivities then the only way to rule out is to have the vet prescribe hydrolyzed food, difficult to follow, commercial brands do not compare.
    There is no cure for allergies but there is effective treatment and management.

    https://www.acvs.org/small-animal/otitis-externa excerpts below, click on link for full article

    Otitis externa is an inflammation of the ear canal. Because dogs’ ear canals are L-shaped (Figure 1), fluid does not drain easily from canal openings. Additionally, the lining of the ear can become inflamed and thickened, blocking air and fluid flow in and out of the canal. Animals with otitis externa can also develop otitis media (middle ear inflammation). Similar to the problem seen in children (especially after airplane flights), fluid can build up behind the ear drum, causing pressure and pain. Otitis externa and media are common conditions in dogs, particularly in specific breeds such as the Cocker spaniel and German shepherd.
    In puppies and kittens, otitis externa is often caused by ear mites. These tiny parasites cause terrible itching and a thick brown discharge. In adult dogs, the most common underlying cause is allergies- sensitivity to something in the environment or to food. In older animals, tumors can cause blockage of the ear canal and secondary infection. Other predisposing causes may include foreign bodies (such as grass seeds), or small ear canals (often seen in Shar peis) or long floppy ear flaps (for example, Basset hounds) that prevent air flow. Hormonal problems, such as poor thyroid function, or other underlying skin disorders may also be present.

    #137733

    anon101
    Member
    #137732

    anon101
    Member

    I have a dog with environmental allergies. It started with ear infections, then pruritus, If you go to the search engine “environmental allergies” you will see my numerous posts.
    Of course there are other causes, get the dog properly diagnosed by a veterinary dermatologist.
    Or work closely with your regular vet, the steroids and antibiotics are just bandaid stuff. Get to the root of the problem.
    I am sorry but you may have a high maintenance pup.

    I hope this helps.

    http://www.mspca.org/angell_services/dermatology-allergies/Ear Diseases. excerpt below

    Otitis externa is the medical term for ear inflammation. Most cases of otitis externa also have an infection that is causing the ear inflammation.

    The structure of the ear in dogs and cats can make them more prone to ear infections. The ear canal in dogs and cats is longer than the ear canal in people. The ear canal is also “L-shaped” with vertical and horizontal parts.

    Because only some dogs and cats develop ear infections, other conditions often contribute to the development of otitis externa and ear infections in your pet. Allergies, parasites, and masses or tumors can all cause ear irritation and infection. Allergies are the most common cause of ear infections in dogs and cats. Since an ear infection can be secondary to an underlying problem, it is often important to diagnose and treat the cause of the ear infection while treating the ear infection.

    An ear infection can develop into a severe health problem for a dog or cat. Left untreated, ear infections can spread deeper into a pet’s ear (middle ear infection) and cause permanent damage to the ear canal (ear canal mineralization). Some chronic ear infections can develop resistance to antibiotics and become untreatable with medications.


    anon101
    Member

    If you click on the link you will see hundreds of comments I have posted on the subject.
    It would take several hours to repeat the information you will find there.
    There is a search engine here for that reason.

    Better yet, make an appointment with a veterinary dermatologist asap to get your dog properly diagnosed and treated. There is no veterinary healthcare professional at this site. Even if there were they have not examined your dog nor can they provide specific advice regarding your pet. Best of luck!

    Example “The diet helps but it can only do so much.
    A multifaceted approach is often needed for environmental allergies. There is no cure.
    But there are effective treatments/management.
    PS: Bacterial skin infections that require antibiotics are common with atopic dermatitis. It is painful. Itchiness and burning….
    Next, ear infections.”

    example: “Please visit a board certified veterinarian asap for testing/diagnosis/treatment.
    It’s been a year/4 seasons without significant results by the regular vet.
    Do not give over the counter meds/supplements or apply ointments, creams that are not intended for veterinary use unless advised to do so by a veterinarian that has examined your dog”.

    Example: https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/topic/hes-got-good-and-environmental-allergies/#post-113364
    “Make an appointment with a board certified veterinary dermatologist. It’s not the food. Just my opinion, based on my experience and knowledge”.

    Very good information here: http://skeptvet.com/Blog/?s=environmental+allergies


    anon101
    Member
    #137316

    anon101
    Member

    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/?s=environmental+allergies
    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2017/12/colloidal-silver-colorful-snake-oil-but-not-medicine/

    Stop the foolishness.

    Take the dog to a vet , have him examined , see what is recommended.


    anon101
    Member

    Well, it certainly sounds like atopic dermatitis (environmental allergies) or some other skin condition. It sounds like the dog is in extreme discomfort and at risk for bacterial skin infection.

    Anything anyone tells you on these forums is just speculation and opinion (myself included)

    If your veterinarian has not been helpful I would ask for a referral to a veterinary dermatologist for testing to come up with an accurate diagnosis and treatment options.

    There is no miracle cure or magical supplement or food that will fix this.

    In fact the dog may have to go on steroids and antibiotics again to temporarily stop the suffering.
    Consult your vet, asap.


    anon101
    Member

    The diet helps but it can only do so much.

    A multifaceted approach is often needed for environmental allergies. There is no cure.

    But there are effective treatments/management.

    PS: Bacterial skin infections that require antibiotics are common with atopic dermatitis. It is painful. Itchiness and burning….

    Next, ear infections.


    Cody D
    Member

    He had antibiotics about about 2 months ago because the vet thought it was an infection. The scabs went away. Looked great for a while, then after a bit they came back. Idk how long before they came back my wife is actually the one who took him in for it both times. That was when we went to the diet he is on. Hills derm defense. Fights environmental allergies I guess. Not working a month or so in now. Oh well, I pine for the days where we jsut worried about stuff like that.


    anon101
    Member

    But what did the specialist suggest it is? Surely she must have an idea, what did she advise to do next? Besides the scope.

    I have been through it, it’s a nightmare.
    I never had a dog scoped though, usually they have a diagnosis after labs and x-ray.

    I currently have an a dog with atopic dermatitis (environmental allergies) there is no cure, just management ($$) and even with the best of treatment they can have flareups. She’s on antibiotics currently for a bacterial skin infection and we are trying Apoquel. Immunotherapy worked for years till now…

    I sure hope your dog feels better soon. And you and your wife too.

    #132793

    Deb D
    Member

    Samanthia, please do work with a veterinarian. We adopted an eight year old German shepherd dog nine months ago. She was a mess because of neglect and allergies. Imagine a GSD with no hair and infections in eyes, ears, urethra, anus, and toes. We have never dealt with a dog with allergies and, thankfully, let our vet guide us. We went through countless medicated baths and bottles of medicated ear cleaner, two Cytopoint shots (They were a real game changer for our girl.) and Z/D dog food. (Yep, we have also had to deal with the recall but, thank God, her Vitamin D levels are okay.) She is now on a maintenance schedule of one medicated bath a month and weekly ear cleanings. We think she has both environmental and food allergies so it is an excruciatingly slow process to figure things out BUT she is relatively comfortable so we can all sleep. She is not itch free but almost, and a world improved. And, we now have her at a point where we can experiment with one food and see if it causes increased symptoms.

    The hardest part for us is the food. First of all, we would never have fed a food like Z/D. Second, she is not fond of it and we want a highly palatable food for training because she was neglected in that area too. Hill’s Hypo Treats are not gonna make her do back flips. We hope that one day we can find food she loves that loves her and is not grain-free. But meanwhile, we are grateful for Z/D and know that if we have to, we can stick with it. (Hubby and I find it Very difficult to withhold treats because we have always shared our food with our dogs. Her allergies hurt us almost as much as they do her.)

    But our vet was the key. She tested swabs from between toes, from the ears, from everywhere so she would know exactly what was needed to treat her. Then she did it again after a few weeks so we made steady progress without overwhelming her (and us) with chemicals. It was beyond expensive but became less so as the diet/drugs/and chemicals did their job. She goes everywhere with us and now we hear, “What a beautiful German Shepherd.” A far cry from a nearly bald dog a year ago.

    #131652

    In reply to: Anxiety Scratching


    anon101
    Member

    Yes, make an appointment with a veterinary dermatologist and get the dog diagnosed.

    Pruritus is not a typical response to anxiety. Your vet is correct.

    She probably has atopic dermatitis/environmental allergies. There is no cure, allergies wax and wane. There is effective treatment but it will cost a few bucks.

    Environmental allergies tend to show up between ages 1 to 3 and get worse with age.
    Maybe that was why she was given up/abandoned.

    Don’t keep changing the food and trying all kinds of bogus remedies, it won’t work.

    Please see my posts, you may find something helpful.
    https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/atopic+dermatitis/

    Take the dog out for bathroom breaks every 2 hours and first thing in the morning and the last thing before bedtime. Try to be patient, it sounds like this dog has been through a lot.
    When her skin condition is properly diagnosed and treated you may notice a much more relaxed and comfortable dog.

    Regarding the separation anxiety you may want to talk to your vet about medication, as the dog continues to stabilize after a few months to a year she can be tapered off. It doesn’t have to be forever.

    #131630

    In reply to: Upset Stomach Drooling


    Candice A
    Member

    Hi Christie, that’s going to be really helpful to observe for triggers with the symptom journal. A couple of things to think about might be:
    ** A cyclic pancreatitis caused by protein-rich or fatty foods – this could cause nausea and drooling and maybe the skin irritation is due to the drool wetness.
    **A lack of acid in the stomach, which can be due to medications, dairy products, grains and large amounts of water- this lack of stomach acid leads to prolonged transit time of foods- and the protein begins to turn rancid. The body’s response is to push it through ASAP- and saliva helps that happen.
    **Imbalance of bacteria- this often results in random or intermitant signs of nausea with or without gassiness. I see great results with Herbsmith Microflora Plus as a probiotic. It helps the digestive tract do its job and also contains stomach calming herbs such as ginger and licorice. I usually have clients use this for 30 days and then re-eval.
    **Food sensitivity-or AKA food allergies-The signs and symptoms that you described do often correlate with food allergies. If your pup is doing a lot of paw and leg licking I have seen some pets get an upset tummy from all the hair. It can be irritating to the stomach so I guess that makes sense.
    **And lastly I always ask families to watch for any potential environmental allergies such as: laundry soaps, fabric softeners, fabric sprays like Feebreeze, air fresheners, candles, plug ins, strong essential oils, floor cleaners, dish soaps, added chemicals to city water sources ( just the chlorine and fluoride can sometimes cause my dogs to vomit), chemicals from hoses and wool rugs. These are the most common situations I see.
    I am happy to do a complimentary nutritional consult if you would like 🙂 (https://journeysmobilevet.com/nutritional-consult-options) Good Luck!

    #131621

    Christie B
    Member

    So for years now my dog has had issues with excessive drooling. I’ve never been able to pinpoint what causes it. Medical tests all come back normal. But the drooling never last for more that an hour or two so by the time the vet sees him he can only offer suggestions.

    The last time he noticed what he called signs of allergies: inflammation around his nose and mouth, head shaking and ear debris, watery eyes, paw and leg licking. He said that dogs can drool excessively when they have an upset stomach. Or if they come in contact with something in the environment that they’re allergic to.

    So he basically told me to give him 5 benedryl twice a day to prevent symptoms.

    Which I kind of thought was nuts because the drooling wasn’t happening all the time. So he told me to do it for 5 days, then give him a dose whenever symptoms presented.
    Benedryl does work, unfortunately it takes a while to kick in.

    But what triggers the episodes? How long does it take from exposure to symptoms?

    It didn’t occur to me or my vet, but someone in a dog wellness FB group suggested keeping a journal of when these drooling attacks occur. That way I can write down when he last ate, what he ate, did he go outside prior, did he do anything unusual before the drooling started while it is still fresh in my mind.

    He had a drooling episode today. The last one was a week ago while I was away. That day neither of my dogs ate much of anything (which happens sometimes when I go away). Thinking about possible food issues, all this past week I had given both dogs cooked ground beef. No incident. I ran out last night. This morning, I probably made the mistake of putting in a few crumbles of sausage that I had leftover. To make matters worse, when I ate eggs, sausage and cheese for breakfast about 60-90 minutes later, I gave the dogs the small remainder that I hadn’t finished.

    Within 20 or so minutes the drooling began.

    I’m kicking myself because I’ve been really good with the no table scraps treats.

    The vet had said that because it doesn’t happen every day and only 1 or 2 a week (sometimes even less) that it’s probably something he’s eating. That the environmental sensitivities can be a totally separate issue and that dogs can develop really sensitive stomachs as they get older. He suggested either a sensitive stomach dry food or limited ingredient food to make digestion easier. He also suggested staying away from bird proteins as bully breeds are known to be sensitive to fowl proteins.

    Any suggestions?

    #130245

    Cameron M
    Member

    Hi,
    perhaps read my post to Patti. You mention the fish kibble seems to work best..maybe it is the protein? I assume the others you tried had protein other than fish – such as the chicken you mention or beef which is common?

    My gal seems to do equally well on either grain free or regular salmon based food. beef seems the worst for her. Due to the concerns regarding “grain free” I am trying the regular salmon based food.

    Also – I have learned that only a small percentage of dog allergies are food based with the majority being caused by environmental triggers just like humans. Grasses, pollen and even dust triggers reactions in effected dogs.

    I hope your issue is easily resolved and hey a 3.5 star food isn’t necessarily bad. The reviewers tend to place emphasis on protein content etc…and frankly I try to have a lower but high quality protein percentage so as to avoid kidney issues later in life.

    Solid Gold has a great Salmon based dry kibble but since the protein is only 21% it has a lower rating. Just food for thought. ( and btw I am not pushing a certain brand…I used to stand by Solid Gold but haven’t checked…they may be sold out to some super large corp now? And I do realize marketing image is always in play)

    Cameron

    #130002

    Susan
    Member

    Hi Pat,
    Sorry for what has happened 🙁
    if you can afford it I’d cook meals or feed 1 cooked meal & the other meal feed a freeze dried dog food that has human grade ingredients, I’d stay away from dry kibbles & wet can dog foods…
    Take back the 3 bags of TOTW food & get your money back..if pet shop wont refund then contact TOTW..
    also here’s link for FDA to report a problem.
    https://www.fda.gov/AnimalVeterinary/SafetyHealth/ReportaProblem/ucm182403.htm

    Ask vet to do full blood test see if liver is OK ??

    My Patch was doing really well on TOTW Sierra Mountain Roasted Lamb from 2015-2017 then 2017-Nov he started to go down hill & refused to eat his TOTW Lamb kibble, Patch NEVER refuses food, thats when I knew something was wrong.
    I blammed the TOTW Lamb kibble he was eating had made him very ill being a Diamond product he didnt get better after I stopped teh TOTW kibble so in January 2018 he had endoscope & biopsies done & he has LES – his Lower Esophageal Sphincter flap doesnt close properly this was causing bad acid reflux washing back up & was burning his wind pipe & esophagus were both red & inflammmed but I still think TOTW made him ill aswell, his liver results weren’t good, I’d say a few things were happening cause he does have IBD & Skin Allergies but we are what we eat & he was eating the same dry food I wasnt rotating & feeding any other foods like I normally do….

    Never feed the same brand of pet food month after month, year after year, this is when health problems can start to happen…
    Now I rotate his foods again, I change between 3 different brands now & try & add as much fresh food as possible in his diet.. When I started feeding him “Wellness Core” Large Breed Adult dry & “Wellness Simple” Turkey & Potato he started to get better, he hasnt become ill again..but it took a while for him to get well again

    There’s a company that test/studies for toxins, heavy metals & contaminates they test
    the best selling Pet Foods in America, these dog foods are tested in an accredited analytical chemistry laboratory for 130 harmful environmental and industrial contaminants and toxins. Results are published as Product Ratings.
    I cant post the link as DFA, DFA doesn’t believe in this testing & blocks the link, different batches of Dog/Cat wet, dry & treats get tested every 3-4 months these are all “new different batches” that are being tested everytime, certain brands of pet foods keep coming back time & time again very high in toxins, heavy metals & contaminates &

    TOTW High Prairie adult formula & TOTW Pacific Stream Smoked Salmon have been on the 1 star – high toxins, heavy metals & contaminate list for nilly 2yrs now cause they have poison ingredients in them… 🙁

    Google, heavy metals, toxins in dry dog foods,
    so you can see all the 5 -1 star foods –

    Here’s C L P first 13 x 5 star dry dog foods that tested very well, if you cant find the dry food site C L P I’m talking about.
    Thats if you want to continue feeding a dog food..

    * Buckley Liberty Freeze-Dried Beef Recipe Dry Dog Food
    * Buckley Grain Free Liberty With Lamb Dry Dog Food
    * Buckley Liberty Freeze-Dried Chicken Recipe Dry Dog Food
    * Buckley Liberty Grain Free with Chicken Dry Dog Food
    * Canisource Grand Cru All Life Stages Turkey Formula Dehydrated Raw Dry Dog Food
    * CaniSource Grand Cru All Life Stages Pork and Lamb Formula Dehydrated Raw Dry Dog Food
    * CaniSource Grand Cru All Life Stages Red Meat Formula Dehydrated Raw Dry Dog Food
    * BIXBI Rawbble Freeze-Dried Dry Dog Food Duck Recipe
    * BIXBI Rawbble Freeze-Dried Dry Dog Food Chicken Recipe
    * BIXBI Rawbble Freeze-Dried Dry Dog Food Salmon & Chicken Recipe
    * BIXBI Rawbble Dry Dog Food Lamb Recipe
    * I and Love and You Grain Free Naked Essentials With Lamb + Bison Dry Dog Foo
    * I and Love and You Grain Free Naked Essentials With Chicken + Duck Dry Dog Food

    #129639

    Morgan A
    Member

    Thank you for the helpful reply, Susan!
    I did not consider omegas, I will have to ask my vet about that as far as fat in his diet.
    I have gotten his food allergies under control and that has substantially helped with his itchiness (white potatoes are a mild allergen for him, but not one that would trigger a severe reaction). He actually has a really great coat now! But he does also have a plethora of environmental allergies and there’s not much I can do about that other than what you’ve suggested. I will join the pages you mentioned and bring up these things with my vet! Hopefully something will help put a stop to this issue.

    #128306

    crazy4cats
    Member

    How about Purina ProPlan Beef and Rice or their Sensitive Skin Salmon formula? Neither have chicken and are made by a company with years of research and testing. They also have veterinary nutritionists on staff and own their own manufacturing facilities.

    Until a definite answer is found to the recent rise in DCM cases, I will only feed my pets a food made by a company that meets all those qualifications. Many dog owners who said they would never feed one of these brands have switched and their dogs are doing great. Including, my own!

    It’s not worth the risk!

    Have you done an elimination diet with a prescription food to find out exactly what your dog is sensitive to? Often it is discovered that the dog actually has environmental allergies. It would probably be beneficial for you to do one. Instead of switching food after food. I know that can be stressful. Good luck!

    #125619

    Christie B
    Member

    My American Bulldog mix has allergies to chicken, which I’ve heard is common with bully breeds. I rotated many different foods for the past 9 years that I’ve had him, in the hopes that I’d one day find the formula that wouldn’t trigger an attack.

    So many non chicken protein formula’s have chicken or chicken meal as the 3rd or 4th ingredient. I guess it’s an inexpensive protein to add to formulas.

    I’ve tried lamb, beef, pork, turkey… after a few weeks more often than not allergy symptoms appear. It’s harder to try a new food in the spring and winter because he also has environmental allergies, so it’s hard to figure out what triggers him.

    So far, fish seems to be the safest protein. He used to eat Blue Buffalo with no issue when he was younger but the vet recommended stopping it because he was gaining too much weight on it (even after I cut back on the feeding amounts).

    I went to Petsmart two weeks ago in search of a limited ingredient food. The previous bag that we tried was Zignature, but reviews here along with neither of my two dogs wanting to eat it (I literally had to put a small bit of shredded cheese on the food to make it appealing) turned me off that brand. I was looking at Nulo’s formulas when an associate wearing a Nulo shirt approached me (of course). She said they have a Salmon based limited ingredient formula. I read the label: Deboned salmon, salmon meal, yellow peas, chickpeas, canola oil, died sweet potatoes… didn’t see any chicken, beef, pork, turkey and gave it a shot.

    The bag is almost gone. Both dogs are actually eating it. Stool is ok. I haven’t noticed any excessive drooling that indicated a possible upset stomach. No uptick in eating grass (sometimes they just like to graze). It seems like so far, so good.

    However, there were some concerns in reviews that I read. I heard that peas and pea protein are also common allergens. Nulo has two product lines: Freestyle and Medal. Petsmart exclusively sells the Medal series and Freestyle is found online. I asked the rep in the store what the difference was and she said it was name only. The formulas were the same. However, when I went to order from Chewy yesterday (usually cheaper than Petsmart), their Freestyle was almost $20 more than the Medal at Petsmart. It made no sense. I contacted Nulo on their FB page and this was their response:

    Thanks for reaching out to us here at Nulo. We appreciate the opportunity to help!
    Our FreeStyle Limited+ and MedalSeries L.I.D. recipes are formulated using only one animal protein source and do not include the fruits and vegetables found in our other recipes. The difference between our FreeStyle Limited+ and MedalSeries L.I.D. recipes is simply the inclusion or exclusion of peas – our FreeStyle Limited+ recipes do not include peas or pea fiber.

    Is the exclusion of Peas worth the $20 difference? Are fruits and vegetables usually the cause of allergies that they would be omitted in the Limited formulas?

    #125580

    Christie B
    Member

    My 10 year old American Bulldog mix has food and environmental allergies. Paw licking, face rubbing, excessive drooling…it’s worse in the Spring and Fall but sometimes changes in diet can trigger a few days long reaction. The vet told me to give him 5 1mg Benedryl twice daily when he shows symptoms and if he’s drooling excessively to give him a Pepcid twice daily.

    10 Benedryl pills a day seems crazy. I know my dog is large at 120 pounds, but an adult human is only supposed to take 1-2 pills daily. Do dogs process the drug differently? Two pills twice daily has always ceased the licking and rubbing. I’m afraid to give him 5 at a time.

    • This topic was modified 9 months, 3 weeks ago by  Christie B.
    #125419

    anon101
    Member

    I am so glad you are working closely with your vet.

    If her problems continue even through the winter, I would ask for a referral to a veterinary dermatologist. Unless your vet feels confident he can treat the condtion.
    A positive response to Apoquel is indicative of environmental allergies.

    https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/topic/hes-got-good-and-environmental-allergies/#post-113364

    https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/topic/doodle-with-allergies/#post-119649

    #123129

    anon101
    Member

    I am not aware of any such thing. In fact, one of my dogs does best on fish based kibble as a base
    She is a senior with environmental allergies and has never had a uti.
    For best results discuss with a veterinarian that has examined your dog and knows the dogs history, not the internet.

    Per the search engine.
    https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/topic/bladder-stones-in-6-year-old-female-pug/#post-113166

    #122895

    anon101
    Member

    Call the vet and have her call you back, explain what is happening. I would try to work closely with your vet, prescription food and all.
    However, since the symptoms have been going on for several months and the dog has not responded to treatment I might ask her for a referral to a specialist, either a veterinary dermatologist or an internal medicine specialist.
    You can use the search engine here to look up “environmental allergies”
    Example:
    https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/topic/doodle-with-allergies/#post-119649

    PS: I am assuming routine labs/tests have been done and medical issues (other than allergies) have been ruled out.

    #121385

    Claire B
    Member

    We have been under treatment for yeast from a veterinary dermatologist for four months now and all I can tell you is it is a process of elimination of cause as well as treatment. Since my boy was under a year the first time we went she was sensitive to this and we started with a vinegar solution, then moved to topical foams and shampoos before trying an anti-fungal 3 x week in month four. They can be persistent if you can’t find the cause. He has zero environmental allergies at this moment, but a high storage mite allergy which we discovered in testing. We have adjusted for that and all his itchiness, runny nose and breathing issues are gone, but he still has the yeast feet although they have gone from a 3-4 to a 1-2 on the scale. If he has not improved to 0-1 by next month we will put him on a two ingredient prescription diet made with either rabbit or kangaroo since he has had no exposure to those unless I can find venison in abundance to do homecooked. We are still hoping this is all caused by a weakened gut from 3 rounds of antibiotics before he was 7 months old for an upper respiratory infection, persistent staph, then bronchitis which we now know the bronchitis issues was caused by his storage mite allergy.

    #121379

    anon101
    Member

    Quote “he vet gave me antibiotics and Apoquel. I don’t like either one since antibiotics kills the good and the bad bacteria and Apoquel suppresses the immune system and it just seems both aren’t the answer and would just make the situation worse. The groomer didn’t use anything new on her and she’d been going there since January. She does get incredibly stressed when she goes. any suggestions?” Unquote

    @lori T
    The antibiotics are important and necessary to stop infection, this indicates that her skin condition is serious. There are other treatments available for environmental allergies besides Apoquel, did she have a positive response to it? Make a list of questions to discuss with your vet.
    Once the skin condition is diagnosed and under control less medications should be needed. However, there is no cure for environmental allergies, they tend to wax and wane usually requiring lifelong treatment.
    Discuss your dog’s anxiety issues with your vet, he may recommend giving her a sedative 1 hour prior to the appointment.

    #121357

    anon101
    Member

    I would make an appointment with a veterinary dermatologist if the skin condition you described does not clear up within a reasonable amount of time. Otherwise the regular vet has no choice but to offer you bandaid solutions to stop the pain and discomfort.

    It could be anything from razor burn to environmental allergies or some other skin condition or a combination of all….…only a veterinarian that has examined your dog can diagnose and prescribe treatment.
    Apoquel is prescribed for environmental allergies and many dogs are doing well on it and are symptom free. Any effective medication has the potential for side effects.
    The question is does the risk outweigh the benefits? In most cases it does.

    I would go back to your vet and discuss your options first. Consider a new groomer? Maybe the groomer lets the blades get too hot? I groom my own dogs so I know of such things. I give the dog to be groomed a medicated bath before and after being groomed. See who your vet recommends for a groomer.

    Also, you can use the search engine here to look up environmental allergies.

    We recently transitioned to Fromm Classic Adult from a grain-free, no issues, just reacting to the grain-free scare.

    #120304

    Sabrina H
    Member

    I saw yet another vet and she insisted it was environmental allergies. She wasn’t at all concerned with the ear problem since there’s nothing visibly wrong and he’s had it for so long, and she didn’t seem to care much about the itchiness simply because he didn’t scratch during the vet appointment. I strongly dislike this vet. I took my cat to her and disliked her so much that I went to another clinic in a completely different town, yet somehow she ended up being there too. She wouldn’t even entertain the idea of it being a food allergy and just told me to try Benedryl. The Benedryl did seem to help the ear issue and switching his food to Zignature Turkey (my local feed store has a great price!) helped the anal gland problem. Even though it’s 6% fiber, this food doesn’t cause him issues like the 5.5% fiber foods did. He’s still itchy though! I’m thinking maybe pork is a problem. It seems like he gets aggressively itchy any time he has pork, and meat from domestic pigs makes him itchier than wild boar.

    #120217

    Sydney N
    Member

    My dog has awful allergies and it turned out she was allergic to all meat proteins, I then found the natural balance wet food and it solved all of our problems! Even the ones that involved her environmental allergies such as storage mites in dry dog food! I hope your baby gets to feeling better soon!

    #120214

    Sydney N
    Member

    I have had the exact same problem with my pure bred lab. She is 3 and I have spent thousands at the vet on her. Chronic ear infections, yeast infections, stomach boils, and itchy as can be. I have finally came to realize after environmental allergy tests she is allergic to dust mites as well as storage mites. These both found in dry dog food. She also is allergic to ALL meat protein. This has been so difficult and no vet has helped me. I finally read online about the meat allergy and thank goodness I did. I have since switched her to natural balance wet vegetarian dog food. And it has made ALL the difference. Her ears are crystal clean, her belly is happy and her skin is happy. This has never happened for me before, to tell you how bad it was I had an appointment with a dog dermatologist booked before this food. We tried zignature, elimination diet, royal canin, ultamino, hydrologized food, limited ingredient and nothing worked but this wet vegetarian food is amazing. She loves it too! I would recommend it and I also give probiotics with her dinner to her. She literally runs to her bowl now as does my other dog without allergies. I really hope this helps, I truly know how frustrating dogs with allergies are! If you have any questions please let me know!!:)

    #120213

    In reply to: Chronic Diarrhea


    Sydney N
    Member

    Hi! My Labrador has had ongoing food and environmental allergies for 3 years as well. I got her allergy tested for environmental allergens and she is allergic to dust mites as well as storage mites (in dry food). She also is allergic to pretty much all meat or animal derived protein. Saying this I have always had her to the vet for ear infections, skin infections, blisters, puking, loose stool, etc. I started her on natural balance wet vegetarian dog food and She has never been better. I tried her on multiple foods before such as. Zignature, royal canin, ultamino, and hydrologized foods, all which none worked. She has hard stool now, her health back, and clean ears and skin (I’ve never been able to say this before) and the diet is a full diet for dogs even though it’s vegetarian. I hope this helps you!

    #120078

    crazy4cats
    Member

    Hi Joanne-
    I have fed a lot of grain free WEF, Victor and TOTW along with some Purina, Fromm, Eagle Pack, Iams and Authority with grains. I’ve never thought grain free was necessarily better, but my dogs seem to do better poop wise with a little higher fiber. They had a rough start with parasites when they were pups and tend to have loose stools ever since.

    Fromm Gold weight control is not grain free, but is fairly high in fiber and now am wondering if that is an issue now too. I am planning on switching to their reduced activity recipe instead which is a little lower in fiber.

    It’s hard to know if there truly is a grain free concern since there is such a small sample of dogs so far. But having two lab/golden mix dogs, I’m going to play it safe. Both breeds are mentioned often in the different reports I’ve read.

    I feed my cats about half Royal Canin kibble and half various canned food. RC is a little too expensive for our pet budget for two large dogs, however.

    It doesn’t sound like your dog is sensitive to chicken. It’s so hard to tell with kibble because there are so many ingredients. Also, if your dog is anything like mine, they get into things they shouldn’t. Also, environmental allergies can also be an issue. The only way to know for sure is to do a true elimination diet with a hypoallergenic Rx dog food.

    Hope this helps. Good luck!

    #119649

    anon101
    Member

    I never did the blood test suggested by the regular vet, (got tired of the back and forth bandaid remedies). Consulted a specialist instead, the dermatologist told me it was not necessary. Allergen specific immunotherapy is the most natural treatment available, no meds involved. See my posts….
    The dog’s allergies appeared to be environmental.
    Environmental allergies wax and wane making it impossible to tell what food might or might not help.
    The intradermal skin testing is the only accurate way to identify environmental allergens.
    My allergy dog eats a variety of foods with a quality kibble as a base, lots of boiled chicken meat and boiled egg as toppers.

    My dogs are thriving on Zignature, but due to the recent “grain-free scare” I am trying Fromm Classic Adult for one of my dogs….. Don’t want to make a change with my allergy dog, but we’ll see.

    PS: The blood test, that’s the one you had, right? It is known to be unreliable.

    #119645

    anon101
    Member

    https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/topic/hes-got-good-and-environmental-allergies/#post-113364
    Make an appointment with a board certified veterinary dermatologist. It’s not the food. Just my opinion, based on my experience and knowledge.

    #119644

    Greg A
    Member

    First time poster here so I apologize if this is in the wrong category.

    I have a goldendoodle that is a year and a half that has battled allergies his entire life. Through elimination diet (or attempting to with a 5 kid year old who cant seem to eat over his plate!) I felt confident my dog was allergic to peas and chicken… When brodie was neutered he ripped his staples out and during the surgery to clean out an infection the vet recommended we do blood work to find out for sure what his intolerances were. The results were not what I was hoping for to say the least.

    Without showing his environmental allergies brodie is allergic to Pork, soybean, corn, rice (white and brown), white potato, sweet potato, and green peas. Beef and lamb are close to the positive however, the items above were way above normal range for intolerance.

    One of my first questions is does anyone know of any foods that fit this profile? I believe I found only a handful. One being Earthborn Holistic Venture Pollock & Pumpkin:

    Alaska Pollock Meal, Pumpkin, Tapioca, Sunflower Oil (Preserved with Mixed Tocopherols), Flaxseed, Natural Flavors, Potassium Chloride, Salt ,Choline Chloride, DL-Methionine, L-Lysine, Taurine, Vitamin A Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Vitamin E Supplement, Zinc Sulfate, Ferrous Sulfate, Niacin, Folic Acid, Biotin, Manganese Sulfate, Copper Sulfate, Calcium Pantothenate, Thiamine Mononitrate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Riboflavin Supplement, L-Ascorbyl-2-Polyphosphate (Source of Vitamin C), Zinc Proteinate, Manganese Proteinate, Copper Proteinate, Calcium Iodate, Sodium Selenite, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Yucca Schidigera Exrtract, Rosemary Extract, Green Tea Extract, Dried Enterococcus Faecium Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus Casei Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus Acidophilus Fermentation Product.

    Along with the Nature’s Logic line excluding the Pork flavor. The only problem i have had with this brand is loose stool.

    In most foods that i find that fits the bill they include pea starch at a minimum. Does anyone have experience with whether the starch would cause an issue or am i limited to the proteins to the allergy.

    The vet is kind of stumped because of potatoes and rice along with the peas. Do i have any hope?

    The only other brand / flavor was FARMINA CODFISH & ORANGE ADULT MEDIUM

    Fresh wild caught Cod(source of glucosamine & chondroitin sulfate), dehydrated cod (source of glucosamine & chondroitin sulfate), herring (preserved with mixed tocopherols), whole spelt, whole oats, dried beet pulp, dried carrots, sun-cured alfalfa meal, inulin, fructooligosaccharide, yeast extract (source of mannan-oligosaccharides), dehydrated sweet orange, dehydrated apple, dehydrated pomegranate, dehydrated spinach, psyllium seed husk, dehydrated blueberry, salt, brewers dried yeast, turmeric, glucosamine, chondroitin sulfate vitamin A supplement, vitamin D3 supplement, vitamin E supplement, ascorbic acid, niacin, calcium pantothenate, riboflavin, pyridoxine hydrochloride, thiamine mononitrate, biotin, folic acid, vitamin B12 supplement, choline chloride, beta-carotene, zinc proteinate, manganese proteinate, ferrous glycine, copper proteinate, selenium yeast, DL-methionine, taurine, L-carnitine, aloe vera gel concentrate, green tea extract, rosemary extract, mixed tocopherols (a preservative).

    This one contains “spelt” which isnt a tested ingredient but is close to wheat which is not an allergy.

    I am looking for any suggestions or off name brands that may be out there that are not main stream. We currently pay around 120-140 a month for dog food (we have a rescue goldendoodle and do not want to have different foods per dog). I would prefer not to keep him limited to one brand his entire life as I like have a choice should one flavor get discontinued.

    Thanks.


    crazy4cats
    Member

    Hi doginlaw-

    Zignature is pretty high in fat and calories. I’d get him on a lower calorie food to lose weight. That will help immensely!

    I have chubby labs and I try to keep their kibble on average at 350 calories per cup. Fromm has a senior/reduced activity recipe that you may want to look into. Also, more often than not, grain free food does not cure allergies. Especially, if they are environmental.

    Swimming is an excellent idea! Good luck with your pup!


    anon101
    Member

    Regarding the skin issues, I would make an appointment with a veterinary dermatologist.

    https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/topic/hes-got-good-and-environmental-allergies/#post-113364

    Regarding the “hip problems” have x-rays (hips/spine) been done to rule out hip dysplasia and other anomalies? Don’t assume it is age related arthritis until other causes have been ruled out.
    Swimming is the best for dogs with arthritis, also good for weight management.
    In fact, if you have pet health insurance hydrotherapy may be covered as a prescribed treatment.
    https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/topic/hip-dysplasia/#post-117881

    The supplements mentioned are okay, but they are not medication.
    If you want to get to the root of the problem often a specialist is indicated and/or more testing $, otherwise the vet has no choice but to recommend bandaid remedies.

    #118938

    Katie K
    Member

    I’ve heard about this twice within the past week and tried researching it. It sounds like the majority of people in this thread read the same article that I did. To me, it was very unclear. What makes them Think certain foods are causing this? Is it simply because the number of dogs with heart problems have gone up and more and more people are feeding their dogs grain-free? I would think that they would want something more conclusive before spreading this belief. What if a new vaccine is causing it? Or something environmental? Or it could be genetic, with the amounts of dogs in puppy mills. And the way it talks about taurine… A lot of dogs with a heart disease are deficient in taurine. But then again, a lot of them aren’t…?
    My dog does have sensitive skin. He has allergies to some things. I feed him grain-free. He does great with the food I have him on. Is he allergic to grain? I don’t know. I do know that when his skin is irritated, he chews. When he chews, moisture gets into his skin and yeast starts to build up. Grain feeds the yeast and causes it to spread. A grain-free food won’t worsen the problem. If you feed a grain-free food with the right balance/amounts of probiotics, it actually fights the yeast. If, for some reason, his food were to cause a taurine deficiency, I would rather give him a supplement than switch him to a food that causes him to be itchy all the time.
    This article isn’t just recommending to stay away from grain-free foods. It also says that “boutique” foods can cause heart problems. That term, “boutique foods” is kind of vague, no? So grain-free foods, “boutique” foods, and a raw diet.. According to this article, they’re all no good. Well, what does that leave us with? Hills Science Diet? This article talks about a vet who is researching this whole grain-free causing heart problems. Morris Animal Foundation is funding his research. Who started this foundation? The same person who started Hills Science Diet. What kind of food are vets recommending we switch our dogs to? Hills Science Diet.
    Vets have been recommending and selling this food for decades. The more they sell, the more perks they get from the company. This food is so unhealthy but was very popular for a very long time because people trusted their vets. Now that we have the internet, more and more pet owners are educating themselves and making informed decisions on what to give their dog. I am sure Hill’s sales have dropped dramatically. It sounds to me that they are desperate to get back on top.
    In my opinion, if your dog is doing well with the food s/he is eating, don’t change their diet. ESPECIALLY to Hill’s Science Diet. If they ever have proof to back this theory, of course I will take it seriously. But for now, it seems to me that they’re trying to take advantage of our love for our dogs to line their pockets.

    #118465

    In reply to: yeast issues


    pitlove
    Member

    Hi Sandy-

    Grain free and potatoe free have nothing to do with yeast in dogs unless your dog has an allergy to grain (fairly rare) or potatoe (also fairly rare). This is a popular internet myth. Dogs with yeast are not necessarily allergic to the food they are eating either. Yeast overgrowth on the skin is secondary to a larger problem like allergies, but environmental allergies can also cause yeast.

    The best thing you can do if you want to rule in or rule out food allergy is a elimination trial. This is the only realiable why to diagnois a food allergy. Using a food from the vet like Royal Canin Ultamino or a homecooked diet of a novel protein and carb for 3 months are your best options. But the dog can not eat anything else, but that diet for the full length of the trial. Then the idea is to challenge the dog by putting him back on the old food and see if he has a reaction. If the symptoms went away during the food trial and came back with the old dry food, then you will know its a food allergy. If the symptoms show no improvement on the elimination diet, then food is not the issue. If food is not the issue the next step is a veterinary dermatologist for environmental allergy testing (if you can afford it).

    I couldn’t afford the dermatologist, so I’ve been managing my dogs seasonal allergies with frequent bathing in Malaseb shampoo or Miconahex+Triz by Dechra. Both available on chewy.com.

    #118395

    anon101
    Member

    How long have you had the dog? No, idiopathic seizure disorder is not caused by food.

    Environmental allergies are not caused by food.

    The dog may need an anticonvulsant for the rest of her life. Sure there are triggers, in fact I would avoid vaccines with this dog and ask your vet to sign a waiver (rabies vaccine).

    Regarding allergies, see a veterinary dermatologist. Food allergies are rare.

    Use the search engine here at this site to look up “environmental allergies” and “seizures” and see my posts.

    Unfortunately, these issues may be why the dog was given up. There are good vets out there that will help you.

    Bottom line, it will cost about $1000 to $2000 a year to keep this dog comfortable.

    I could be way off, as only a veterinarian that has examined the dog and reviewed it’s history can advise you accordingly.

    PS: Be careful, don’t fall down the homeopathic rabbit hole.

    #118270

    anon101
    Member

    For best results see a board certified veterinary dermatologist.

    I hope you don’t fall down the homeopathic rabbit hole. A lot of scams out there.

    See my posts per the search engine https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/environmental+allergies/


    anon101
    Member

    For best results go to a board certified veterinary dermatologist. Food allergies are rare. Food sensitivities fluctuate.
    More often than not environmental allergies are the culprit.
    The only accurate test for that is intradermal skin testing. The most natural treatment for environmental allergies is allergen specific immunotherapy otherwise known as allergy shots or desensitization.
    See my posts, example https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/topic/hes-got-good-and-environmental-allergies/#post-113364

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