Anyone's dog allergic to PEAS?

Dog Food Advisor Forums Dog Food Ingredients Anyone's dog allergic to PEAS?

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  • #143865 Report Abuse
    Nadia K
    Member

    For those of you that have done allergy testing, what kind of test did you have run? Was it a blood test at your vet’s office or something different? I am thinking of having my puppy who is currently 10 months tested. When I got her from the breeder at 10 weeks, she was being fed Purina Pro Plan Sport. When she reached about 8 months old she flat out refused to eat her food. All the time she was on the Pro Plan she was itchy. I thought maybe it was the chicken in the kibble she was allergic to. I switched her over to Farmina Ancestral Grain lamb. Yet the itching continues. I also feed her an evening meal of Stella & Chewy freeze dried patties which she absolutely devours. They are a beef/salmon puppy formula. I really would like to figure out why she is so itchy. She has no hot spots or fur loss. Just often scratching.

    #143866 Report Abuse
    anonymous
    Member

    Have fleas been ruled out? Let me guess, you have carpeting? Flea allergy is common and can wreak havoc even after just one flea bite.
    Talk to your vet.
    https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/environmental+allergies/

    • This reply was modified 1 year ago by anonymous.
    #143869 Report Abuse
    aimee
    Member

    Hi Nadia,

    The only accurate test for food reactions including allergies is with a food trial. Blood tests, saliva tests, hair tests etc are not helpful as your dog can test positive for food they are not reacting to and negative for the food that is causing the problem.

    #143871 Report Abuse
    Nadia K
    Member

    I actually took my pup to the vet last week to have her checked for fleas as there was some debris in her fur. But the vet said it was just a little dirt from outside. She checked her thoroughly and said there was no signs of fleas. We do have carpeting in some rooms in our house. But she has been confined to just the kitchen and tile area of our family room due to potty training. I guess I will just have to do a food trial as suggested to see if I can narrow down what is causing her itching.

    #143872 Report Abuse
    anonymous
    Member

    I knew it (carpeting)! If the dog has a flea allergy, you may not see any signs of fleas. Again one flea bite can wreak havoc.
    Work closely with your vet, however…
    If the dog’s symptoms continue, please consider consulting a veterinary dermatologist, that was the only thing that helped my dog. Intradermal allergy testing
    https://www.preventivevet.com/dogs/canine-atopic-dermatitis-environmental-allergies-in-dogs
    Final words about atopic dermatitis in dogs
    “It is also very important for any dog with atopic dermatitis to be on a year-round, comprehensive flea control program. Atopic dogs tend to be more sensitive to the bites of fleas, so even occasional fleabites should be prevented. Speak with your veterinarian about a safe and effective flea prevention program for all the pets in your home, and learn more about fleas here”.

    “Managing this lifelong condition takes some patience. By using various combinations of therapy, and altering the treatment when needed, your veterinarian can help your atopic dog feel and look their best. And for cases that prove difficult to manage, there are board-certified veterinary dermatology specialists that are available to help. You can search for a specialist in your area on the website for the American College of Veterinary Dermatology”.

    The only accurate way to do a food elimination trial is with prescription/therapeutic diet food.

    Otherwise, it’s a waste of time.

    #143873 Report Abuse
    anonymous
    Member

    PS: Are you bathing the dog at least every 3 days with a gentle puppy shampoo? It might help a little.
    Again, talk to your vet.

    #143875 Report Abuse
    GSDsForever
    Participant

    Nadia,

    The only guidance I’ve ever received or read from trustworthy experts in diagnosing and treating dog food allergies is a food trial:

    *Novel protein diet for up to 12 weeks (or other hypoallergenic test diet, like hydrolyzed) to evaluate for relief
    *Followed by challenging testing the dog with one single food at a time, a former/suspected ingredient allergen

    I’ve been there, with a very itchy dog with food and other allergies. And the above is the route I’ve followed, with a primary care vet and boarded specialist. We also did things to exclude other diagnoses. That’s what I would recommend.

    I’ve heard (and read here) of others referencing blood tests, saliva tests, hair tests, etc. But to the best of my knowledge, there is not medical evidence to support their efficacy and they are not the standard of care in the medical community.

    I worry that such tests not only scam well-meaning pet owners out of money (which they could use otherwise to help their pets), but also lead people to come up with long lists of ingredients that their dogs are supposedly allergic to such that diet choices become severely limited. (IMO, it is very unlikely that these dogs are allergic to numerous and very uncommon things, things that the dog has never been exposed to.)

    Re fleas, allergy or standard reactions to them are more common than are food allergies. (Inhalant and environmental allergies also are common culprits for itching.)

    Vacuum, vacuum, vacuum. It will eliminate a lot of flea problems. Flea dirt is more likely to be discovered than fleas and fleas spend more of their life cycle off the dog in its environment than on. Vacuuming will also help keep pollen, irritants lower inside (as will removing shoes, etc.)

    #143877 Report Abuse
    GSDsForever
    Participant

    Hmmm . . . . My reply post to you, Nadia, disappeared or won’t post (I tried to edit a typo.). The site is now saying it’s a duplicate post, but nothing is showing on my end.

    If it doesn’t appear in a while, I’ll attempt to post it again below.

    #143878 Report Abuse
    GSDsForever
    Participant

    I’m receiving an error message that does not correspond with what I see on my screen here. I don’t *think* this is a duplicate post, but a technical malfunction. (Please pardon me if it is.)

    Nadia,

    The only guidance I’ve ever received or read from trustworthy experts in diagnosing and treating dog food allergies is a food trial:

    *Novel protein diet for up to 12 weeks (or other hypoallergenic test diet, like hydrolyzed) to evaluate for relief
    *Followed by challenging testing the dog with one single food at a time, a former/suspected ingredient allergen

    I’ve been there, with a very itchy dog with food and other allergies. And the above is the route I’ve followed, with a primary care vet and boarded specialist. We also did things to exclude other diagnoses. That’s what I would recommend.

    I’ve heard (and read here) of others referencing blood tests, saliva tests, hair tests, etc. But to the best of my knowledge, there is not medical evidence to support their efficacy and they are not the standard of care in the medical community.

    I worry that such tests not only scam well-meaning pet owners out of money (which they could use otherwise to help their pets), but also lead people to come up with long lists of ingredients that their dogs are supposedly allergic to such that diet choices become severely limited. (IMO, it is very unlikely that these dogs are allergic to numerous and very uncommon things, things that the dog has never been exposed to.)

    Re fleas, allergy or standard reactions to them are more common than are food allergies. (Inhalant and environmental allergies also are common culprits for itching.)

    Vacuum, vacuum, vacuum. It will eliminate a lot of flea problems. Flea dirt is more likely to be discovered than fleas and fleas spend more of their life cycle off the dog in its environment than on. Vacuuming will also help keep pollen, irritants lower inside (as will removing shoes, etc.)

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