Search Results for 'urinary tract infections'

Dog Food Advisor Forums Search Search Results for 'urinary tract infections'

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  • #153198

    In reply to: Urinary Crystals

    m3ntat
    Participant

    Prescription Royal Canin SO diet can help dissolve struvite uroliths specifically, and prevent formation of struvite and oxolate uroliths. RC also makes multiple diets with the SO index, including a behavior modifying diet, Calm. Stress is primary contributor to urinary disease, including bacterial infections, sterile inflammation, uroliths in the bladder (cystolith) or kidneys (nephrolith), as unsure which your vet has diagnosed. Moderating stress with diet, supplements, environment, and exercise, can help reduce stress induced disease and inflammation. Feliway (cat) and Dog Appeasing pheremone products are very helpful. Over the counter products by veterinary companies, such as Composure (Vetriscience), Zylkene (Vetoquinol), and Calming Care (Purina) are the most utilized amongst vet professionals. Long-term use of the rx urinary diet is recommended in repeat urethral obstruction or urolith affected pets. Obstruction by crystals blood/bladder cells, and stones is emergent, as blood cannot flow through the kidneys to filter toxins into urine, and toxins accumulate in the blood, leading to electrolyte imbalance, azotemia, dehydration, hypotension, and shock left untreated. Since he is older onset, ensuring water intake and more elimination opportunities on walks/yard visits will help decrease risk for concentrated urine accumulating crystals, which can form uroliths that gain size the longer crystals are present. Dilution decreases urine crystal formation. Inquire as to the serum kidney values, to ensure underlying kidney changes are not the contributors to the bacteria and crystals sited in his urine. Ultrasound is the best way to diagnose urinary tract changes, inflammation, and foreign material; limited abdominal U/S can find early kidney changes, prior to any abnormality in serum/blood work. Hope your boy continues to improve, as he already sounds 100% turnaround. Link to SO index Calm diet https://www.royalcanin.com/us/dogs/products/vet-products/canine-calm-dry-dog-food

    #151605

    In reply to: Urinary Crystals

    anonymous
    Member

    I would feed the food that your vet recommends. Was an ultrasound done to rule out bladder stones? Ask your vet…because often dogs can have more than one type of stones along with crystals.
    Food does not dissolve all types of stones, sometimes surgery is needed.

    had a dog with calcium oxalate bladder stones, struvite crystals and urinary tract infections. It was serious, emergency surgery and all.
    From what I could tell, the main culprits were genetic predisposition and inadequate water intake, not the food.
    A lot of pet owners serve kibble dry. Put down a bowl of water and assume their dogs are drinking enough….this is often not the case.
    Also, expecting these dogs to hold their urine for 10 hours a day is conducive to stagnant conditions in the bladder, perfect environment for crystals and bladder stones to form.
    Keep the bladder flushed, offer bathroom breaks at the minimum, every 4 hours (every 2 hours is ideal). Exercise, long walks, keep the weight down. Feed twice a day, measured amounts.

    #130415
    anonymous
    Member

    It depends on the type of stones, you may want to consider consulting with a specialist for follow up care. There are prescription meds for stubborn cases, talk to your vet.

    Below copied from a previous post:

    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2016/07/more-nonsense-from-holistic-vets-about-commercial-therapeutic-diets/

    Also, if the dog is overweight, get the extra weight off, increase walks/exercise/activity.

    “Dogs that get urinary tract infections and bladder stones tend to have a genetic predisposition, combine that with not enough water intake, not enough opportunities to urinate and you have a problem”.

    “Whatever you decide to feed, add water to the kibble or canned food, even presoak and add water. Take out to urinate at least every 4 hours (every 2 hours is ideal) stagnant conditions in the bladder are conducive to bladder stone formation”.
    “Always have fresh water available for the dog 24/7”.
    “Regarding supplements, I would check with your vet first. He may recommend something specific for your dog”. Otherwise, I would be careful, not all supplements are benign.

    Good luck

    anonymous
    Member

    No.
    Have you checked the internet for prices? As long as your vet okays it you don’t have to buy it from him.

    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2016/07/more-nonsense-from-holistic-vets-about-commercial-therapeutic-diets/
    Copied from a previous post:
    Also, if the dog is overweight, get the extra weight off, increase walks/exercise/activity.
    Work closely with your vet, when the dog has been stable 6 months to 1 year then you can talk about diet changes.
    “Dogs that get urinary tract infections and bladder stones tend to have a genetic predisposition, combine that with not enough water intake, not enough opportunities to urinate and you have a problem”.
    “Whatever you decide to feed, add water to the kibble or canned food, even presoak and add water. Take out to urinate at least every 4 hours (every 2 hours is ideal) stagnant conditions in the bladder are conducive to bladder stone formation”.
    “Always have fresh water available for the dog 24/7”.
    “Supplements are crap, don’t waste your money unless your vet recommends something specific for your dog”.
    Ps: You think the prescription food is expensive. Try emergency surgery for a blocked urethra.
    Been there, done that.
    Regarding cranberry: http://skeptvet.com/Blog/?s=cranberry
    Also there are prescription meds for stubborn cases, talk to your vet.
    Was an ultrasound done? Dogs can have more than one type of stone, such as calcium oxalate and struvite…that was the case with my dog that had reoccurring UTIs.
    This is not veterinary advice; consult your veterinarian.
    PS: Note recent question on struvite in comments: http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2016/09/science-based-veterinary-nutrition-success-stories/comment-page-1/#comment-121266
    Good luck

    #129524

    In reply to: Crystals in Dog Urine

    anonymous
    Member

    https://bichonhealth.org/kidneysbladder/management-of-bichons-with-urinary-stones/

    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2016/07/more-nonsense-from-holistic-vets-about-commercial-therapeutic-diets/

    Copied from a previous post:
    Also, if the dog is overweight, get the extra weight off, increase walks/exercise/activity.
    Work closely with your vet, when the dog has been stable 6 months to 1 year then you can talk about diet changes.
    “Dogs that get urinary tract infections and bladder stones tend to have a genetic predisposition, combine that with not enough water intake, not enough opportunities to urinate and you have a problem”.
    “Whatever you decide to feed, add water to the kibble or canned food, even presoak and add water. Take out to urinate at least every 4 hours (every 2 hours is ideal) stagnant conditions in the bladder are conducive to bladder stone formation”.
    “Always have fresh water available for the dog 24/7”.
    “Supplements are crap, don’t waste your money unless your vet recommends something specific for your dog”.
    Ps: You think the prescription food is expensive. Try emergency surgery for a blocked urethra.
    Been there, done that.
    Regarding cranberry: http://skeptvet.com/Blog/?s=cranberry
    Also there are prescription meds for stubborn cases, talk to your vet.
    Was an ultrasound done? Dogs can have more than one type of stone, such as calcium oxalate and struvite…that was the case with my dog that had reoccurring UTIs.
    This is not veterinary advice; consult your veterinarian.
    PS: Note recent question on struvite in comments: http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2016/09/science-based-veterinary-nutrition-success-stories/comment-page-1/#comment-121266
    Good luck

    #124260
    anonymous
    Member

    Overview of Omeprazole (Prilosec®) for Dogs and Cats
    Omeprazole, commonly known by the brand name Prilosec®, is used in the treatment and prevention of stomach (gastric) and intestinal ulcers in dogs and cats.
    The newest drugs used in the treatment of ulcers and heartburn (acid reflux from the stomach) belong to a class of drugs called proton pump inhibitors. Omeprazole is such a drug and has been used for the treatment and prevention of stomach ulcers.
    Omeprazole inhibits the movement of hydrogen ions – a constituent of hydrochloric stomach acid. Through this effect, omeprazole blocks acid secretion in the stomach. This creates a more favorable stomach pH to allow ulcers to heal.
    The duration of effect for omeprazole is 24 hours.
    Omeprazole is a prescription drug and can only be obtained from a veterinarian or by prescription from a veterinarian.
    This drug is not approved for use in animals by the Food and Drug Administration but it is prescribed legally by veterinarians as an extra-label drug.
    Brand Names and Other Names of Omeprazole
    This drug is registered for use in humans only.
    Human formulations: Prilosec® in the United States, Losec® in Canada (Astra-Merck)
    Veterinary formulations: Gastrogard®, Ulcergard®
    Uses of Omeprazole for Dogs and Cats
    Omeprazole is used in the treatment and prevention of stomach (gastric) and intestinal ulcers.
    Omeprazole promotes ulcer healing in animals with ulcers or erosions (shallow depressions in the stomach lining).
    Omeprazole may be useful in treatment of ulcers caused by ulcerogenic drugs (such as aspirin).
    Another use is management of acid reflux disease to reduce injury to the esophagus (food tube) caused by the upward movement of stomach acid.
    Precautions and Side Effects
    While generally safe and effective when prescribed by a veterinarian, omeprazole can cause side effects in some animals.
    Omeprazole should not be used in animals with known hypersensitivity or allergy to the drug.
    Omeprazole should be used with caution in animals with liver disease.
    Omeprazole may interact with other medications. Consult with your veterinarian to determine if other drugs your pet is receiving could interact with omeprazole. Such drugs include diazepam, cyclosporine, digoxin, rifampin, ketoconazole and ampicillin.
    Adverse reactions to omeprazole are uncommon as long as recommended doses are administered. Occasionally, some animals develop nausea, vomiting, flatulence, diarrhea or loose stools.
    Very rarely, omeprazole has precipitated some urinary tract infections and nervous system changes.
    How Omeprazole Is Supplied
    Omeprazole is supplied in 10 and 20 mg capsules. Also available as oral suspension in 2 mg/ml.
    Oral paste available in 2.28 g per syringe.
    Dosing Information of Omeprazole for Dogs and Cats
    Medication should never be administered without first consulting your veterinarian.
    The typical dose administered to dogs and cats is 0.25 to 0.5 mg per pound (0.5 to 1.0 mg/kg), every 24 hours or once daily.
    The duration of administration depends on the condition being treated, response to the medication and the development of any adverse effects. Be certain to complete the prescription unless specifically directed by your veterinarian. Even if your pet feels better, the entire treatment plan should be completed to prevent relapse or prevent the development of resistance.
    https://www.petplace.com/article/drug-library/drug-library/library/omeprazole-prilosec-gastrogard-for-dogs-and-cats/

    #123308
    Susan
    Member

    Hi Tanya,

    if she is throwing up I would take the vet food back to vet office for a refund or exchange, tell receptionist what is happening & can you try a different brand WET vet diet, the receptionist will go & see vet & ask him, you shouldn’t have to pay again for another vet visit..
    ask can you try the Hill i/d™ Low Fat Canine Rice, Vegetable & Chicken formula,
    it Reduces risk of urinary stone formation, has OK ingredients & is LOW in fat, Shih Tzu are prone to pancreatitis, I wouldnt be feeding a 10 yr old a high fat diet maybe the vet diet she is eating is high in fat or she could be vomiting cause she has only ever been fed the one food her whole life, I always recommend to rotate between a few different brands so immune system strengthens, plus some dry dog foods are high in toxins, heavy metals & contaminates especially the fish dry foods..
    Here’s the Hill I/d vet diet to try just till you work out what your doing & stop her vomiting.
    https://www.hillspet.com.au/dog-food/pd-id-low-fat-canine-rice-vegetable-and-chicken-stew-canned#accordion-content-400284275-0

    Which vet diet was she put on
    Royal Canine S/O Urinary wet & dry or
    Hills C/d Multicare wet & dry formula’s?

    She should be on a wet vet diet not a dry vet diet…

    I’d be contacting a Vet Nutrionist & ask about making a home made balanced wet diet, or you can contact “Balance It” they have nutritionist who prepare special diets & you add Balance it powder to balance diet.
    https://secure.balanceit.com/index.php?rotator=Front

    also are you adding Vitamin C Powder to diet?
    http://web-dvm.net/vitamin-c-for-prevention-of-chronic-urinary-tract-infections-in-dogs/

    Have a look at “D-Mannose” Pure Powder alot of people say its really good you also add cranberry powder aswell.
    https://www.nowfoods.com/supplements/d-mannose-powder

    Here’s a good link explaining how low protein isnt needed.
    https://www.whole-dog-journal.com/issues/13_4/features/Detecting-Urinary-Stones-Dogs_16215-1.html

    Here’s a good face book group to join you dont have to feed raw or cooked but will get some good advise, “Raw & Holistic Cat & Dog Support Group”
    https://www.facebook.com/groups/1411906099101822/

    Also follow “Dr Judy Morgan”
    look thru her video’s link below,
    I’m pretty sure her 17 yr old dog has urinary problems & she cooks for him, her recipes are very easy. Even if you feed 1/2 cooked diet & another food…
    https://www.facebook.com/pg/JudyMorganDVM/videos/?ref=page_internal

    also here’s “Just For Dogs” special diets
    https://www.justfoodfordogs.com/

    #123138
    Susan
    Member

    Hi Tara,
    TOTW is a high Legume diet, I’ve been seeing alot of dogs on f/b groups & on DFA, dogs that were eating Zignature who were feed a high legume diet they keep having UTI’s…
    Look for a Potato, Sweet Potato, Oats, Rice food that has NO Lentils or Chickpeas…

    Also stop feeding any fish pet foods as fish is the worse dog food for Heavy Metals, Toxins & Contaminates.. The TOTW Pacific Stream has been in the top 10 worse dry foods high in heavy meatals for the last 1 & 1/2 yrs…. 299 dry dog foods are tested every 3 months & TOTW Salmon & TOTW High Prairie formula’s have both stayed in the bad top 10 dry dog foods…
    Change her food to a different brand, feed more of a wet diet then dry diet…
    Can you cook or feed a raw diet instead of a dry diet?? wet diet would be heaps better then a dry diet even when you add water its still a dry process diet full of toxins….

    Have you tried D-mannose??
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27424995

    D-Mannose has been known to disrupt the ability of e-coli bacteria from sticking to the urinary tract. It is derived from mannose, which is a sugar molecule (binding). Some have reported combining cranberry with a dosage of D-Mannose and have seen great improvements in their dogs’ urinary tract conditions.

    Also Vitamin C has been known to help stengthen immune system & help with Urinary tratc problems..
    http://web-dvm.net/vitamin-c-for-prevention-of-chronic-urinary-tract-infections-in-dogs/

    #123128
    Tara M
    Member

    Hello all. I have an 8 year old spayed female pitbull with consistent recurrent UTI’s. X-rays are always negative. She’s on cranberry supplements as well as multiple immune support supplements. She eats Taste of the Wild Grain-Free Salmon recipe dog food (she also has allergies and salmon was recommended for thi). A friend who is very into the dog show world mentioned today that she thinks the fish-based dog food is what is causing my dog’s UTI’s and that I should change it to one of the more novel proteins such as kangaroo. Has anyone else heard of fish-based dog foods causing UTI issues? I can’t find anything about it anywhere online but she says that everyone in the breeding/dog show world will NOT feed their dogs primarily fish-based diets for this reason.

    #122794
    anonymous
    Member

    “The specialist called me today and said the bacteria is now resistant to all medication and she feels that he needs surgery to remove the stone. Naturally I am terrified to let him go under anesthesia with his heart condition, but I know if the infection continues it can lead to kidney issues”.

    If the bladder stone blocks his urethra (again) this is not only a extremely painful condition but life threatening as well. You will have to rush him to the nearest emergency vet and your treatment options will probably be quite limited.
    So, you can listen and go along with the recommendations of the specialist or you can roll the dice and see what happens. I would call the specialist and go over the risks involved with having the surgery versus not having the surgery.
    Urinary tract infections are painful too.
    No guarantees with anything in life. Best of luck.

    You can use the search engine to look up bladder stones. Example https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/topic/frequent-utis/#post-109553

    #114151
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Hi, Everyone. I have been participating in this forum about Dr. Marty’s pet food for a couple months. Today, I took my pup in for his annual physical and was surprised to learn that my dog’s liver numbers (ALP and ALT) were very high. These same numbers were normal when he had his blood chemistry done in December for a suspected urinary tract infection, which was successfully treated. I need to mention that my pup is diabetic.

    I had tried the Dr. Marty’s and had returned it, as neither of my dogs would eat it. I did find a dehydrated raw product that my dogs LOVED, called Wellness Core Tender Bites and had recommended it in this forum. I fed this to my diabetic pup for a little more than two months. Come to find out, diabetic dogs apparently don’t do well on a raw diet. They are already “immuno-compromised,” being diabetic. A raw diet can encourage infections in compromised dogs, which is what we think we’re dealing with, now. This is not anything against the Wellness Core Tender Bites or raw diets, but I just wanted to make sure that folks check with their vet before they get adventurous with diet changes. I have learned my lesson…..

    #113167
    anonymous
    Member

    Per the search engine: https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/bladder+stones/
    See my posts
    Also regarding prescription food:
    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2016/07/more-nonsense-from-holistic-vets-about-commercial-therapeutic-diets/
    I have used Royal Canin SO for a dog for a dog with bladder stones with good results.
    Zignature is a quality food, copy the ingredient list from Chewy and show your vet, maybe the dog could have that? Or, 1/2 and 1/2 with the prescription food? Check with your vet.
    Whatever you feed, add water and maybe soft food, presoak kibble and add water.
    Dogs that get bladder stones often have a genetic predisposition (struvite and calcium oxalate are the most common), not enough water is another contributing factor.
    Has she had an x-ray/ultrasound to rule out bladder stones? Because, they can have more than one type of stones. This also. can result in recurrent urinary tract infections.
    Add water to the kibble, and you can also presoak the kibble in water overnight in the fridge prior to serving.
    Offer frequent bathroom breaks/opportunities to urinate, keep the bladder flushed. Stagnant conditions in the bladder are conductive to stone formation.
    Don’t free feed, 2 or 3 small meals a day is better and always have fresh water available. Maybe add a little plain chicken broth (no onion) to the kibble.
    A blocked urethra is a medical emergency and can result in surgery to save the dog’s life.
    Did the vet talk to you about prescription meds for stubborn cases? Don’t confuse supplements with medication.
    Work with your vet, prescription food and all, when the dog has been stable for 6 months to 1 year you can discuss diet changes.
    Use the search engine here to see more threads on this topic.
    This is not veterinary advice; consult your veterinarian.
    Ps: You may find some helpful information here http://skeptvet.com/Blog/?s=urinary+tract+infection

    #113166
    anonymous
    Member

    Copied from a previous post:
    Also, if the dog is overweight, get the extra weight off, increase walks/exercise/activity.
    Work closely with your vet, when the dog has been stable 6 months to 1 year then you can talk about diet changes.
    “Dogs that get urinary tract infections and bladder stones tend to have a genetic predisposition, combine that with not enough water intake, not enough opportunities to urinate and you have a problem”.
    “Whatever you decide to feed, add water to the kibble or canned food, even presoak and add water. Take out to urinate at least every 4 hours (every 2 hours is ideal) stagnant conditions in the bladder are conducive to bladder stone formation”.
    “Always have fresh water available for the dog 24/7”.
    “Supplements are crap, don’t waste your money unless your vet recommends something specific for your dog”.
    Ps: You think the prescription food is expensive. Try emergency surgery for a blocked urethra.
    Been there, done that.
    Regarding cranberry: http://skeptvet.com/Blog/?s=cranberry
    Also there are prescription meds for stubborn cases, talk to your vet.
    Was an ultrasound done? Dogs can have more than one type of stone, such as calcium oxalate and struvite…that was the case with my dog that had reoccurring UTIs.
    This is not veterinary advice; consult your veterinarian.
    PS: Note recent question on struvite in comments: http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2016/09/science-based-veterinary-nutrition-success-stories/comment-page-1/#comment-121266
    Good luck

    crazy4cats
    Member

    Penny-
    Check out balanceit.com and/or petdiets.com. You can either request or formulate balanced recipes on these sites. They are run by vets who have specialized in nutrition.

    As Aimee stated, struvite crystals in dogs frequently are caused by urinary tract infections. Has this dog been on antibiotics to rid her of infection? Typically, they are not food related. Making sure she gets plenty of water in her diet and opportunities to go potty are both important.

    I have a cat that had a complete blockage due to Struvite crystals. I feed him Royal Canin Calm Rx kibble with a variety of regular canned food. He spent a couple of days in emergency clinic, but has been clear for a few years now! Apparently, male cats are very suseptible, but isn’t usually due to an infection.

    Good luck, I really hope you can find a way to take this pup in! What kind of dog is she?

    #112493
    anonymous
    Member

    Regarding urinary tract infections, hope this helps

    https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/topic/frequent-utis/#post-109553

    #110541

    In reply to: food advice

    anonymous
    Member

    “One case of UTI in 30 months doesn’t seems like a re-occuring issue”
    “Do you have any specific concerns about the Firstmate?”

    I am just saying keep an eye out for the urinary tract infections to return, if they do, I would have an ultrasound done.
    This is based on my experience with a small breed dog that had his first uti/crystals episode at the age of 11 after a late in life neuter (necessary due to a testicular tumor)
    All went well, antibiotics, prescription food……low and behold another uti 6 months later.
    Took him to the emergency vet, they did an ultrasound immediately and found multiple stones, emergency surgery performed, stones sent off for analysis, dog had BOTH struvite and calcium oxalate stones.
    Specific diet recommended, did the prescription food for a while (1 year)
    Water added to all meals, frequent bathroom breaks provided, no further problems.
    Dog lived another 5 years and passed due to unrelated causes.
    PS: FirstMate sounds good, just drench it in water 🙂

    #110535

    In reply to: food advice

    anonymous
    Member

    Well, if it was me, I would stay with the RC prescription/therapeutic diet for at least 6 months to a year. Then, if the dog has no reoccurrences (urinary tract infections)
    I would try another dog food to my liking.
    Again, increased water intake and increased bathroom breaks, opportunities to urinate are the best thing you can do for this condition that tends to be genetic.
    Did the dog have an ultrasound? Where other types of stones ruled out?
    I say this because there are specific dietary restrictions depending upon the type of stones the dog is making. Discuss with your vet at the next visit.
    Best of luck.

    #110274
    crazy4cats
    Member

    Hi Diane S-
    Sorry to hear about your pup! As you probably know, the s/d food can only be used short term due to it not being complete and balanced. The c/d food can be fed long term. That being said, they both are formulated to dissolve and prevent struvite stones. Neither work to dissolve the oxalate ones. They cannot be dissolved, only passed or removed.
    Are you using the dry or canned prescription food? If not using canned, I’d give it a try. It would add more moisture to the diet which in addition to dissolving helps flush both types of crystals/stones.
    Also, Royal Canin has an Rx food for bladder and urinary crystals as well. It has an S/O index which is supposed to help prevent both types of crystals. Maybe your vet would approve of one of their urinary formulas. That is what I feed to my cat with this issue. I also add plenty of canned food to his diet. I know that canned food is expensive, but as we both know, the surgery with an overnight stay cost a lot more!!!
    I’m curious, has your dog had urinary tract infections too? If yes, have they been treated with antibiotics?
    As was mentioned to you above, try to get as much water and plenty of bathroom breaks as possible to help your pup’s pee diluted. I wish you the best!

    #109733
    anonymous
    Member

    @ Lori H

    Exactly! Thanks for posting. I went through a similar experience with a dog.
    If I could go back I would have taken the dog to the vet sooner than I did…..,

    Bladder stones, emergency surgery. 🙁
    Despite treatment for urinary tract infections.
    X-ray/ultrasound is the only way to rule out bladder stones.

    #109553

    In reply to: Frequent UTIs

    anonymous
    Member

    Copied from a previous post:

    Also, if the dog is overweight, get the extra weight off, increase walks/exercise/activity.
    Work closely with your vet, when the dog has been stable 6 months to 1 year then you can talk about diet changes.
    “Dogs that get urinary tract infections and bladder stones tend to have a genetic predisposition, combine that with not enough water intake, not enough opportunities to urinate and you have a problem”.
    “Whatever you decide to feed, add water to the kibble or canned food, even presoak and add water. Take out to urinate at least every 4 hours (every 2 hours is ideal) stagnant conditions in the bladder are conducive to bladder stone formation”.
    “Always have fresh water available for the dog 24/7”.
    “Supplements are crap, don’t waste your money unless your vet recommends something specific for your dog”.
    Ps: You think the prescription food is expensive. Try emergency surgery for a blocked urethra.
    Been there, done that.

    Regarding cranberry: http://skeptvet.com/Blog/?s=cranberry
    Also there are prescription meds for stubborn cases, talk to your vet.
    Was an ultrasound done? Dogs can have more than one type of stone, such as calcium oxalate and struvite…that was the case with my dog that had reoccurring UTIs.
    This is not veterinary advice; consult your veterinarian.
    PS: Note recent question on struvite in comments: http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2016/09/science-based-veterinary-nutrition-success-stories/comment-page-1/#comment-121266
    Good luck

    #106083
    anonymous
    Member

    I think the broth is a good idea. How old is he? My peke had these issues at age 11. I did what I recommended that you do and he never had any more urinary tract infections, he made it to age 16 and passed due to unrelated causes, primarily dementia.

    See my posts in this thread
    .https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/topic/great-pyreneesanatolian-sheapard-mix-with-struvite-stones/

    Good luck

    #106066
    anonymous
    Member

    Also, if the dog is overweight, get the extra weight off, increase walks/exercise/activity.
    Work closely with your vet, when the dog has been stable 6 months to 1 year then you can talk about diet changes.
    “Dogs that get urinary tract infections and bladder stones tend to have a genetic predisposition, combine that with not enough water intake, not enough opportunities to urinate and you have a problem”.
    “Whatever you decide to feed, add water to the kibble or canned food, even presoak and add water. Take out to urinate at least every 4 hours (every 2 hours is ideal) stagnant conditions in the bladder are conducive to bladder stone formation”.
    “Always have fresh water available for the dog 24/7”.
    “Supplements are crap, don’t waste your money unless your vet recommends something specific for your dog”.
    Ps: You think the prescription food is expensive. Try emergency surgery for a blocked urethra.
    Been there, done that.
    Per the search engine: https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/urinary+tract+infections/
    Regarding cranberry: http://skeptvet.com/Blog/?s=cranberry
    Also there are prescription meds for stubborn cases, talk to your vet.
    Was an ultrasound done? Dogs can have more than one type of stone, such as calcium oxalate and struvite…that was the case with my dog that had reoccurring UTIs.
    This is not veterinary advice; consult your veterinarian.

    PS: Note recent question on struvite in comments: http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2016/09/science-based-veterinary-nutrition-success-stories/comment-page-1/#comment-121266
    Good luck

    #105153
    anonymous
    Member

    Regarding cranberry supplements. http://skeptvet.com/Blog/?s=cranberry. (excerpt below)
    Bottom Line
    Despite some promising laboratory studies suggesting cranberry supplements might help prevent or treat urinary tract infections, the evidence of studies in clinical patients has been disappointing. Conflicting studies in humans suggest, on balance, that there is probably no significant benefit. And now a high-quality clinical trial in dogs has failed to find any effect, even in the the of infections the pre-clinical research most strongly suggested there should be one.

    While the risks of cranberry supplements are probably negligible, pet owners should understand, and veterinarians should make in clear to their clients, that there is no good reason to believe they have any real value in preventing or treating urinary tract infections.

    #104909
    crazy4cats
    Member

    Here is a link with some great information on bladder stones: https://www.vetmed.umn.edu/centers-programs/minnesota-urolith-center/recommendations

    It’s been almost three years since my cat had his blockage so I’m not remembering a lot of the specifics. But, I was under the impression that most stones in dogs are the result of urinary tract infections. Was your dog tested and/or treated for an infection?

    Making sure that your dog gets plenty of water in her is extremely important!!!!

    Also, please remember that the food on this site is rated for healthy dogs, not ones that have medical conditions. Hopefully, as anon101 mentioned, you may be able to wean your dog off the Rx kibble once she has stabilized. Good luck!

    #104900
    anonymous
    Member

    Another thing, when the stone was removed, the vet usually sends it out to be analyzed.
    “The vet said she “thought” she had a Struvite bladder stone”.

    It is important to identify the type of stone, usually struvite or calcium oxalate, it makes a difference as to which foods should be restricted.

    Also, ask your vet about prescription medication for stubborn cases, if your dog is having recurring urinary tract infections and/or bladder stones.

    You may find this article helpful, excerpt below, click on link for full article and more information plus treatment recommendations
    http://bichonhealth.org/HealthInfo/UrinaryStones.htm

    Management of Bichons with Urinary Stones
     It has long been recognized that some Bichons Frises have a predisposition to formation of urinary stones (uroliths). This condition is known as urolithiasis. There are several types of stones that can form in the bladder, with struvite (also called magnesium triple phosphate or “infection” stones) and calcium oxalate being the most common in Bichons. The most important preventative for stone formation is free access to fresh water. For a dog predisposed to stone formation, there are other considerations as well. This article is intended to provide the pet owner with a better understanding of the prevention and treatment of urinary stones. Good veterinary treatment is the most reliable resource for the ongoing care of your dog. You may wish to copy this article for your veterinarian.
    The Bichon Frise Club of America, Inc. sought input from Carl A Osborne DVM, PhD in preparing this material. Dr. Osborne, Professor at the College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, is considered a leading authority on canine uroliths. We are grateful to him and to his team at the Minnesota Urolith Center for their assistance in making this information available. For more information, you and your veterinarian will be aided by the book “The ROCKet Science of Canine Uroliths”. You will find details in the article below.
    And now, please carefully read the following article, prepared by Dr. Osborne and his staff. At the end of the article, there are several paragraphs about Bichon health that need to be considered as a part of the total picture in treating Bichons with bladder infections and stones.

    #104899
    anonymous
    Member

    Per the search engine: https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/bladder+stones/
    See my posts
    Also regarding prescription food:
    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2016/07/more-nonsense-from-holistic-vets-about-commercial-therapeutic-diets/
    I have used Royal Canin SO for a dog for a dog with bladder stones with good results.
    Zignature is a quality food, copy the ingredient list from Chewy and show your vet, maybe the dog could have that? Or, 1/2 and 1/2 with the prescription food? Check with your vet.
    Whatever you feed, add water and maybe soft food, presoak kibble and add water.

    Dogs that get bladder stones often have a genetic predisposition (struvite and calcium oxalate are the most common), not enough water is another contributing factor.
    Has she had an x-ray/ultrasound to rule out bladder stones? Because, they can have more than one type of stones. This also. can result in recurrent urinary tract infections.
    Add water to the kibble, and you can also presoak the kibble in water overnight in the fridge prior to serving.
    Offer frequent bathroom breaks/opportunities to urinate, keep the bladder flushed. Stagnant conditions in the bladder are conductive to stone formation.
    Don’t free feed, 2 or 3 small meals a day is better and always have fresh water available. Maybe add a little plain chicken broth (no onion) to the kibble.
    A blocked urethra is a medical emergency and can result in surgery to save the dog’s life.
    Did the vet talk to you about prescription meds for stubborn cases? Don’t confuse supplements with medication.
    Work with your vet, prescription food and all, when the dog has been stable for 6 months to 1 year you can discuss diet changes.
    Use the search engine here to see more threads on this topic.
    This is not veterinary advice; consult your veterinarian.
    Ps: You may find some helpful information here http://skeptvet.com/Blog/?s=urinary+tract+infection

    #103596
    anonymous
    Member

    I don’t believe this negative stuff about Zignature. My two small breeds are doing very well on the whitefish (lowest in sodium) kibble, and the catfish.
    If you go to the Zignature website they answer your questions and disclose sodium levels on all their products.
    I had a dog with calcium oxalate bladder stones, struvite crystals and urinary tract infections. It was serious, emergency surgery and all.
    From what I could tell, the main culprits were genetic predisposition and inadequate water intake, not the food.
    A lot of pet owners serve kibble dry. Put down a bowl of water and assume their dogs are drinking enough….this is often not the case.
    Also, expecting these dogs to hold their urine for 10 hours a day is conducive to stagnant conditions in the bladder, perfect environment for crystals and bladder stones to form.
    Keep the bladder flushed, offer bathroom breaks at the minimum, every 4 hours (every 2 hours is ideal). Exercise, long walks, keep the weight down. Feed twice a day, measured amounts.
    Sorry, if I went off on a rant 🙂
    I am just sharing what worked for my dog with this problem.

    #103241
    anonymous
    Member

    Bump

    In response to recent post regarding “urinary tract infections”

    Per search engine. https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/urinary+tract+infections/

    Hope this helps 🙂

    #103238
    anonymous
    Member

    Example:
    Bump (response from previous thread on the same subject)
    “Dogs that get urinary tract infections and bladder stones tend to have a genetic predisposition, combine that with not enough water intake, not enough opportunities to urinate and you have a problem”.
    “Whatever you decide to feed, add water to the kibble or canned food, even presoak and add water. Take out to urinate at least every 4 hours (every 2 hours is ideal) stagnant conditions in the bladder are conducive to bladder stone formation”.
    “Always have fresh water available for the dog 24/7”.
    “Supplements are crap, don’t waste your money unless your vet recommends something specific for your dog”.
    Ps: You think the prescription food is expensive. Try emergency surgery for a blocked urethra.
    Been there, done that.
    Bump (response from a previous thread on the same subject)
    Per the search engine: https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/urinary+tract+infections/
    Regarding cranberry: http://skeptvet.com/Blog/?s=cranberry
    Also there are prescription meds for stubborn cases, talk to your vet.
    Was an ultrasound done? Dogs can have more than one type of stone, such as calcium oxalate and struvite…that was the case with my dog that had reoccurring UTIs.
    This is not veterinary advice; consult your veterinarian.

    #103237
    anonymous
    Member

    @ Kate B
    Please use the search engine here, I think you will find some helpful information:
    https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/urinary+tract+infections/

    #103235
    anonymous
    Member

    And:
    Bump (response from previous thread on the same subject)
    “Dogs that get urinary tract infections and bladder stones tend to have a genetic predisposition, combine that with not enough water intake, not enough opportunities to urinate and you have a problem”.
    “Whatever you decide to feed, add water to the kibble or canned food, even presoak and add water. Take out to urinate at least every 4 hours (every 2 hours is ideal) stagnant conditions in the bladder are conducive to bladder stone formation”.
    “Always have fresh water available for the dog 24/7”.
    “Supplements are crap, don’t waste your money unless your vet recommends something specific for your dog”.
    Ps: You think the prescription food is expensive. Try emergency surgery for a blocked urethra.
    Been there, done that.
    Bump (response from a previous thread on the same subject)
    Per the search engine: https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/urinary+tract+infections/
    Regarding cranberry: http://skeptvet.com/Blog/?s=cranberry
    I’m hoping someone might find this information helpful (even if the op doesn’t)
    After all, this topic comes up at least once a week.
    PS: I am able to read topics and replies in “Editors Choice” but am unable to post there.
    Hope you see this.

    #102996
    anonymous
    Member

    If the urinary tract infections reoccur despite treatment, I would ask the vet about doing an ultrasound to rule out bladder stones. Dogs can have more than one type of stone.
    For example: Struvite and Calcium Oxalate.

    #102994
    anonymous
    Member

    Bump (response from previous thread on the same subject)
    “Dogs that get urinary tract infections and bladder stones tend to have a genetic predisposition, combine that with not enough water intake, not enough opportunities to urinate and you have a problem”.
    “Whatever you decide to feed, add water to the kibble or canned food, even presoak and add water. Take out to urinate at least every 4 hours (every 2 hours is ideal) stagnant conditions in the bladder are conducive to bladder stone formation”.
    “Always have fresh water available for the dog 24/7”.
    “Supplements are crap, don’t waste your money unless your vet recommends something specific for your dog”.
    Ps: You think the prescription food is expensive. Try emergency surgery for a blocked urethra.
    Been there, done that.
    Bump (response from a previous thread on the same subject)
    Per the search engine: https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/urinary+tract+infections/
    Regarding cranberry: http://skeptvet.com/Blog/?s=cranberry

    I’m hoping someone might find this information helpful (even if the op doesn’t) 🙂
    After all, this topic comes up at least once a week.

    #102935

    In reply to: Prescription Diet

    anonymous
    Member

    Dogs that get urinary tract infections and bladder stones tend to have a genetic predisposition, combine that with not enough water intake, not enough opportunities to urinate and you have a problem.
    Whatever you decide to feed, add water to the kibble or canned food, even presoak and add water. Take out to urinate at least every 4 hours (every 2 hours is ideal) stagnant conditions in the bladder are conducive to bladder stone formation.
    Always have fresh water available for the dog 24/7.
    Supplements are crap, don’t waste your money unless your vet recommends something specific for your dog.

    Ps: You think the prescription food is expensive. Try emergency surgery for a blocked urethra.
    Been there, done that.

    #102934
    anonymous
    Member
    #102672
    anonymous
    Member

    Dogs that get bladder stones often have a genetic predisposition (struvite and calcium oxalate are the most common), not enough water is another contributing factor.
    Has she had an x-ray/ultrasound to rule out bladder stones? Because, they can have more than one type of stones. This also. can result in recurrent urinary tract infections.
    Add water to the kibble, and you can also presoak the kibble in water overnight in the fridge prior to serving.
    Offer frequent bathroom breaks/opportunities to urinate, keep the bladder flushed. Stagnant conditions in the bladder are conductive to stone formation.
    Don’t free feed, 2 or 3 small meals a day is better and always have fresh water available. Maybe add a little plain chicken broth (no onion) to the kibble.
    A blocked urethra is a medical emergency and can result in surgery to save the dog’s life.
    Did the vet talk to you about prescription meds for stubborn cases? Don’t confuse supplements with medication.
    Work with your vet, prescription food and all, when the dog has been stable for 6 months to 1 year you can discuss diet changes.
    Use the search engine here to see more threads on this topic and others.

    Ps: You may find some helpful information here http://skeptvet.com/Blog/?s=urinary+tract+infection
    Btw: I’d skip the supplements, glucosamine and such. They don’t really help and could contribute to the formation of bladder stones.
    Increase water intake and frequent bathroom breaks, opportunities to urinate is your best bet, just add water to the kibble of your choice, they lap it up to get to the food.
    This is not veterinary advice; consult your veterinarian.

    #102471
    anonymous
    Member

    Dogs that get bladder stones often have a genetic predisposition (struvite and calcium oxalate are the most common), not enough water is another contributing factor.
    Has she had an x-ray/ultrasound to rule out bladder stones? Because, they can have more than one type of stones. This also. can result in recurrent urinary tract infections.
    Add water to the kibble, and you can also presoak the kibble in water overnight in the fridge prior to serving.
    Offer frequent bathroom breaks/opportunities to urinate, keep the bladder flushed. Stagnant conditions in the bladder are conductive to stone formation.
    Don’t free feed, 2 or 3 small meals a day is better and always have fresh water available. Maybe add a little plain chicken broth (no onion) to the kibble.
    A blocked urethra is a medical emergency and can result in surgery to save the dog’s life.
    Did the vet talk to you about prescription meds for stubborn cases? Don’t confuse supplements with medication.
    Work with your vet, prescription food and all, when the dog has been stable for 6 months to 1 year you can discuss diet changes.
    Use the search engine here to see more threads on this topic.
    This is not veterinary advice; consult your veterinarian.
    Ps: You may find some helpful information here http://skeptvet.com/Blog/?s=urinary+tract+infection

    #95127
    Mark V
    Member

    My dog has recurring urinary tract infections. One possible treatment offered by my Vet is to switch to a food with no or low added minerals, to help avoid stones in the bladder if that is the cause (bladder ultrasound showed no stones). He suggested one of the Science Diet Vetiranary formulas. I don’t care for Science Diet. I found Acana Singles (USA) has only zinc added and Carna4 has no added vitamins and minerals. Can anyone recommend other dry dog foods with no added vitamins or minerals that are recommended by Dog Food Advisor??

    #94493

    In reply to: recurrent uti's

    anonymous
    Member

    Please use the search engine under sign in to look up “bladder stones”. and ” struvite” lots of information there that you may find helpful.

    Has he had an x-ray/ultrasound to rule out bladder stones? Because, they can have more than one type of stones. This also. can result in recurrent urinary tract infections.

    Add water to the kibble, and also presoak the kibble in water overnight in the fridge prior to serving.
    Offer frequent bathroom breaks/opportunities to urinate, keep the bladder flushed. Stagnant conditions in the bladder are conductive to stone formation.

    Don’t free feed, 2 or 3 small meals a day is better and always have fresh water available. Maybe add a little plain chicken broth (no onion) to the kibble.

    A blocked urethra is a medical emergency and can result in surgery to save the dog’s life.
    Did the vet talk to you about prescription meds for stubborn cases? Don’t confuse supplements with medication.

    https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/bladder+stones/

    Work with your vet, prescription food and all, when the dog has been stable for 6 months to 1 year you can discuss diet changes.

    #94190

    In reply to: Struvite Crystals

    anonymous
    Member

    “Despite some promising laboratory studies suggesting cranberry supplements might help prevent or treat urinary tract infections, the evidence of studies in clinical patients has been disappointing. Conflicting studies in humans suggest, on balance, that there is probably no significant benefit. And now a high-quality clinical trial in dogs has failed to find any effect, even in the the of infections the pre-clinical research most strongly suggested there should be one.
    While the risks of cranberry supplements are probably negligible, pet owners should understand, and veterinarians should make in clear to their clients, that there is no good reason to believe they have any real value in preventing or treating urinary tract infections.” (excerpt from link below)
    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2017/01/evidence-update-finally-a-clinical-trial-of-cranberry-supplements-for-urinary-tract-infections-in-dogs/

    #93476
    aimee
    Member

    Hi Matthew,

    From the Minnesota Urolith Center: “Control of urinary tract infection and appropriate antimicrobic administration is essential to prevent recurrence. Diets with reduced protein, phosphorus and magnesium that promote formation of acidic urine are helpful, but cannot be used as a substitute for appropriate control of urinary tract infections.

    https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B6sipzyMhHpyYTRLUnZJdm93eUU/view

    In addition to the diet recommendation what measures did your vet recommend to try to minimize recurrence of infections and monitor for early detection of same? Whatever you decide in regards to diet make sure you follow directions in regard to frequent monitoring for return of infection.

    #92408
    Susan
    Member

    Hi Natalie, here’s a link about “Vitamin C” & you make your own mind up, also my other post the bottom link was about Vitamin C doses, ingredients etc you can email the Naturopath Jacqueline Rudan on the bottom link on my other post & ask her any questions you may have & also ask about Giardia & your dog has no symptoms but is positive can they carry it?? she’ll know more then any of us, the only bad thing vitamin C can do is cause diarrhea when not slowly introduced & given too much…
    I strongly believe in feeding a healthy natural diet & natural supplements, you’ve already on the right track, feeding a healthy diet as you’ve posted, Penelope has already started a healthy life, I would do as Crazy4cats has suggested, she has had a few dogs with Giardia. give another round of Panacur & Metronidazole tablet 21 day course… I think you need to do the 2 drugs to kill this rotten parasite .. Why I posted about vitamin C is its an excellent immune booster when pets are sick & a lot of people don’t realise vitamin C can be given to their pets as long as it’s slowly introduced & it’s the right vitamin C….

    Here’s the beginning of the link below about Vitamin C,
    *Is it necessary to supplement vitamin C since dogs produce the vitamin C in their own bodies. True-but if a dog is stressed or sick their bodies output of vitamin C can quickly be depleted…It has been found that stress both physical (eg fever & infections etc) and emotional (eg stress caused by the change in the environment) is the best known cause of vitamin C depletion in dogs…In addition it has been found that dogs supplemented with vitamin C have stronger immune systems & show greater resistance to DISEASE & better ability to recover from illness or injuries, to read further click on link…
    http://www.natural-dog-health-remedies.com/vitamin-c-for-dogs.html

    * Anon101, it’s nilly 2017 not 1980, if vitamin C is so bad then how come in Australia it’s sold for dogs & cats & used as a supplement to strengthen the immune system, skin allergies, natural anti-histamine, IBD, ear infections, teeth & gums, upper respiratory problems, bladder & urinary tract infections, arthritis & other health problems…
    We all know you don’t believe or use any natural health products, you prefer to give hard drugs, that fix one health problem & end up causing other health problems …Just cause you believe in medications it doesn’t mean we all have to go down that track… You mustn’t of had a real sick pet or been ill yourself cause you’d know not all medication work & sometimes it’s the natural supplements that have worked the best and helped humans, animals have less side effects & aren’t hard on the body like the hard medications can be…. The drugs for Giardia are hard awful drugs that can make you feel very ill, nausea & diarrhea, with this all happening the immune system needs to be strong….

    #92390
    anonymous
    Member

    Some recent research on cranberry:
    “Evidence Update- Cranberry Extracts and Urinary Tract Infections in Dogs”
    April 12, 2016
    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/?s=cranberry

    #90749
    anonymous
    Member

    How long have you had him? He may be grieving his former owner and home, maybe there were other dogs there that he bonded with. It is very hard for some dogs, especially a senior.
    The first month will be the worst. Just be extra nice to him but give him his space, hopefully he’ll come around.

    You can presoak the kibble in water overnight in the fridg and then add a little plain homemade chicken broth (no onions) or mix with a soft topper. If you don’t see him drinking water, add a little to his food, senior small breeds are vulnerable to get bladder stones, struvite and urinary tract infections if they don’t drink enough water. Take him out frequently to urinate.

    Keep his diet simple, maybe a limited ingredient food, I like Nutrisca. I wouldn’t add vegetables for now, they can cause loose stools in some dogs. I wouldn’t add any supplements unless advised to do so by a veterinarian that has examined him.

    #90409
    anonymous
    Member

    This is not a DIY project. Discuss with your veterinarian how much monitoring, testing, x-rays and how often performed are necessary, take into consideration the dog’s age and ability to tolerate aggressive treatment, financial concerns. See what the vet recommends.

    Below is an excerpt from: http://www.vcahospitals.com/main/pet-health-information/article/animal-health/urate-bladder-stones-in-dogs/5841 (click on link for full article)

    “How can I prevent my dog from developing urate bladder stones in the future”?

    Dogs that have experienced urate bladder stones will often be fed a therapeutic diet for life. Dogs with liver disease will need to be treated appropriately prior to addressing urate bladder stone management. Diets lower in protein and therefore lower in purines, one of the building blocks of urate crystals, and promote slightly alkaline urine are recommended. Canned or wet diets are often preferred to help encourage water consumption. Dilute urine (urine specific gravity less than 1.020) helps decrease urate stone formation. In certain cases, medications such as allopurinol may be required. In addition, careful routine monitoring of the urine to detect any signs of bacterial infection is also recommended. Bladder x-rays and urinalysis will be performed one month after treatment and then every three to six months for life. Many dogs will need to have bladder ultrasound to detect early urate stones that are small and may not be visible on x-rays.

    Dogs displaying any clinical signs of urinary tract infections such as frequent urination, urinating in unusual places, painful urination or the presence of blood in the urine should be evaluated immediately.

    This client information sheet is based on material written by: Ernest Ward, DVM

    #88306
    anonymously
    Member

    I would go by whatever prescription food your vet recommends, I would get the vet’s approval for anything otherwise.

    http://www.vetbook.org/wiki/dog/index.php/Silica_uroliths

    Silica is a rare urolith which may cause urolithiasis and cystitis.

    The role of diet in spontaneously occurring silica urolithiasis has not been determined, although plants are often an abundant source of silica.

    These uroliths have been reported in many breeds, mainly purebred dogs[1].

    Urolithiasis in middle-aged male dogs is the most common presenting problem[2]. The stones are usually multiple and develop in the bladder and urethra. Silica uroliths are radio-opaque. They frequently, but not always, have a characteristic ‘jack-stone’ appearance.

    Identification requires spectrographic analysis and cannot be made with kits for qualitative stone analysis.

    When present, urinary tract infections should be eliminated. Diets high in plant proteins should be avoided.

    #88068
    anonymously
    Member

    I wouldn’t bother with those additives that are supposed to help, I have heard that not only are they ineffective but a poster on another forum reported that her dog developed struvite crystals/urinary tract infections after using one of these products.

    #87397
    anonymously
    Member

    Your dog has a serious enough condition that requires prescription medication. Whatever you decide to feed her, add water and more water, offer frequent bathroom breaks. Keep the bladder flushed.

    I would not only listen to your veterinarian, but where he has not managed to stabilize your dog as you inferred “recurring urinary tract infections”. I would ask him for a referral to a Veterinary Internal Medicine specialist and may an appointment as soon as possible.

    Has your dog had x-rays? Lab work? Often dogs have bladder stones, they go hand in hand with urinary tract infections. There may be a genetic factor. I imagine your vet has recommended a prescription diet, which I would comply with.

    I find this site helpful: http://skeptvet.com/Blog/category/nutrition/

    I would be leery of homeopathic remedies and supplements, they can cause harm.

    Have you tried the search engine here? From one of my previous posts:

    Dogs that have experienced struvite bladder stones will often be fed a therapeutic diet for life. Diets lower in protein, phosphorus and magnesium and promote acidic urine are recommended. The preventative diet is NOT the same as the diet that promotes dissolution of the stones. In certain cases, medications to acidify the urine may be required. In addition, careful routine monitoring of the urine to detect any signs of bacterial infection is also recommended. Bladder x-rays and urinalysis will be performed one month after successful treatment, dietary or surgical, and then every three to six months for life. Dogs displaying any clinical signs of urinary tract infections such as frequent urination, urinating in unusual places, painful urination or the presence of blood in the urine should be evaluated immediately. Keep in mind that the greatest risk factor for developing struvite bladder stones in the dog is a urinary tract infection.

    Above link is an excerpt from: http://www.michigananimalhospital.com/page/452425598

    #87396
    Lamar V
    Member

    Our 7 year old Portuguese water dog has recurring urinary tract infections. She is on Proin. Some anecdotal opinions suggest we should change her diet and have changed her dry dog food from Natural Balance to California Natural. Looked at Fromm’s but it has cheese in it and she is dairy allergic. Our vet thinks the dog food change is nonsense. Still, would like to hear what informed dog owners think.

    #86904
    anonymously
    Member

    If the dog continues to have urinary tract infections, there may be more to it.
    Did the veterinarian suggest an x-ray? That is the only way to tell if there are bladder stones irritating the bladder causing recurrent urinary tract infections.
    Also, they can have more than one type of stone and calcium oxalates don’t dissolve.

    That’s what happened to my dog, he would be treated with antibiotics be okay for a few months then the infection returned. He ended up at the 24/7 vet, got x-rayed and required emergency surgery 4 years ago.
    So, in retrospect I would have had the x-ray done sooner, the antibiotics are just a temporary fix.

    Regarding the comments about vets and nutrition, no one is here in a professional capacity. Opinions are being offered, that’s all they are.

    By homework if you mean Dr Google, then I would be leery of the information you gather. There is a lot of inaccurate information on the internet. Dogs that have a history of bladder stones should be on a special diet for the rest of their lives.

    I lean toward Science-based Veterinary Medicine. http://skeptvet.com/Blog/category/nutrition/

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