Search Results for 'struvite'

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  • #42184
    T
    Member

    I agree with InkedMarie. Extra moisture is a big help in preventing crystals/stones. Another factor to consider is the amount of carbohydrates in the dog food. Foods with a lot of plant-derived ingredients (high in carbs) tend to support the formation of urine with a higher pH. Struvite crystals are most likely to form in urine with a pH above 7.0. Yet another reason to move toward a diet closer to the so-called ancestral diet of dogs which had very little carbohydrate.

    Another thing to consider is traditional Chinese veterinary medicine. It can clear up bladder inflammation in ways that antibiotics sometimes cannot. I have an article about bladder inflammation on my blog if you’re interested: http://naturalalternativesvet.com/bladder-inflammation-cats-dogs/

    Tabitha

    #41968
    Megan S
    Member

    My 4 year old Papillon, Bandit, has had recurrent problems with crystals (struvite) in his urine for the past nearly two years and had to have surgery to remove bladder stones a year ago. The two or three times a culture has been done the crystals that have been found were not bacterial based although I do think he’s had some urinary infections at times as well, he’s been on several rounds of antibiotics over this time frame. Anyway, after the surgery a few months later x rays showed small stones again beginning to form so I started him on Solid Gold’s berry blend twice a day over his Wellness CORE Oceanfish food. After about 6 weeks we did another x ray and the stones appeared to be dissolved so I thought the problem was solved. Recent urinalysis have shown he again has crystals in his urine however… though again not bacterial in nature according to the culture. Because of this my vet said it might be time to try the Science Diet C/D food….she knows I’ve been reluctant to do this and she was reluctant as well. In addition to my loathing of all things Science Diet Bandit also has a long list of food allergies (corn, chicken, eggs, rice, and wheat) of which two are in this food (chicken and corn). There has been a very short list of foods I’ve found that do not have these things in them, and I have worked hard for four years to get his allergies under control. I just didn’t feel like I had any choice but to try this, I can’t put him through surgery for stones repeatedly…my question is does anyone know of any better quality foods that are alternatives to Science Diet’s C/D for this problem? I can’t be the only one who has a dog with allergies that this is an issue for but I haven’t had much luck with my research thus far… There’s got to be some combination of nutrition levels I need to look for that C/D has that helps this specific issue…

    Thanks in advance for any help anyone can give me!

    #41788
    Christina E
    Member

    I have a miniature schnauzer who was just diagnosed with bladder stones. The vet of course prescribed her to change her diet and eat Royal Canin s/o to try to dissolve the stones. I read the ingredients. Meat isn’t even listed first and it has corn in it. I’ve been researching online and it appears the best diet is a moisture rich food, so more likely canned food, grain free, low carb and potato (starch) free. I have been feeding her Nature’s Variety grain free and recently switched to Merrick b/c I didn’t like that Nature’s Variety adds tapioca, but Merrick uses sweet potatoes. Can anyone recommend a good canned food to help prevent the recurrence of struvite stones?

    #36644
    CSollers
    Member

    Our old vet prescribed Hills when one of our Pugs, Minni, had Struvite issues. After a bit of research, we switched her to prepared raw with absolutely no more problems. Both Pugs have been on a raw diet for around four years and are thriving. We rotate proteins and manufacturers to ensure they get all of the different macro-nutrients. The AAFCO standard is a minimum standard, and does not differentiate for bio-availabilty of nutrients. Low quality food with nutrients/vitamins that cannot be absorbed by the animal’s GI tract may meet the standard.

    #36047

    In reply to: STRUVITE CRYSTALS

    pugmomsandy
    Participant

    My dogs didn’t have any UTI’s but had a high pH and some struvites. They take Wysong Biotic pH- alternating with Mercola Bladder Support in one meal almost daily. They don’t get it when they eat raw food. I use it when they eat kibble/canned meals. I would recommend getting some urine pH test strips so you can monitor that at home or take in a urine sample to be tested monthly. The urine pH relates to the type of crystal. And my dogs did see a vet, a holistic one. I wouldn’t recommend cranberry juice especially it it has sugar in it. Try a D-mannose supplement. D-mannose attracts a certain type of bacteria from the bladder wall. It’s the active ingredient in cranberry and some other berries.

    • This reply was modified 7 years, 7 months ago by pugmomsandy.
    #36036
    Lynne F
    Member

    Following treatment for a UTI (her first infection), my vet now says my 16 mo. old JRT mix has struvite crystals in her urine. She is recommending prescription dog food. Instead of the Rx food, I have changed my dog’s food to Hill’s Ideal Balance grain-free, and am adding 100% pure cranberry juice to her water as an incentive to drink. Is there anything else I should be doing? And am I doing the right thing in NOT giving her the Rx dog food? Vet says UTI is cleared up after treatment with antibiotics.

    Any help would be appreciated. Thank you.

    #34675
    Mom2Cavs
    Member

    I agree with you, but my old vet didn’t look into things and wanted me to keep my Mix Breed on the Royal Canin SO for life when she had a uti with struvite crystals. Well, it said right on the bag that is was supplemental and not to be used for a long period of time! Let’s just say that anitbiotics killed the uti and the struvites went away. She has been on RC SO since then and that was years ago. Anyway, my vet now, a holistic vet practice, knows quite a bit about canine nutrition. He even does podcasts on onevetmed (or something like that lol). Very knowledgeable. Like I said before, he believes in raw feeding and carries Nature’s Variety, all forms, and Steve’s Real Food in his clinic and that is what he feeds his Goldens.

    #32684

    In reply to: UTI infection in Dogs

    InkedMarie
    Member

    I’ve had a dog have struvite crystals, not stones so I’m not that helpful. Go to dogaware.com and do a search there, pretty sure Mary Strauss. You can email her there.

    I do know it’s very important to get liquid into your dog. Raw, canned, dehydrated or cook would be better than dry. Add water to her food & make sure she has ample opportunity to urinate.

    #32653
    twin257
    Member

    My almost 3 year old Shi- Chon has been dealing with a UTI for 1 year. Two Vets later, and numerous Ultrasounds, Antibiotics, she had a Quarter Size Bladder Stone(Struvites) surgically removed, the Dr. still has her on Ciprofloxacin twice a day for the next 7 months, he also told me to put her on Cranberry D Mannose, due to her being prone to UTI’s. I have her on both now.
    My Vet suggests that I put her on a Special Prescription food Diet , that only the Vets sell.
    Everything that I have read says that Prescription diet dog foods only help to dissolve stones, they don’t prevent them, and if the dog is prone to UTI’s this special food won’t cure the problem.
    I’m worried about the long term effect of Ciprofloxacin to my dog, he did say it was safe, but I’m not sold on that, just like the expensive Special Prescription Dog Food they want to sell me. Has anyone dealt with a situation similar to this?

    #32214
    pugmomsandy
    Participant

    OK…so according to the website mentioned above, if whole birds are around 29-32% bone, where does the 80/10/10 come to play? Should I make raw grinds closer to 30% bone?? And what about dogs prone to struvites or ones that need decreased mineral content?

    • This reply was modified 7 years, 9 months ago by pugmomsandy.
    #25496
    pugmomsandy
    Participant

    Generally, meats are acidifying and increasing the protein in the diet can help with struvites. Try using meat treats like Stella & Chewy’s Carnivore Crunch or Kisses, Vital Essentials freeze dried nibbletts, Fresh is Best dehyrated meat treats, Pure Bites, or some safe jerky. But you also want to increase fluid intake with these dried treats and overall to flush out the bladder. A wet food diet might be better. When her UTI is gone and she’s on regular food, give her urinary tract supplements. There is one called Wysong Biotic pH- and Clear Tract or Berry Balance, etc.

    http://www.wysong.net/products/ph-dog-cat-supplement.php

    http://www.wysong.net/pet-health-and-nutrition/urinary-problems.php

    #25462
    mikeyd
    Participant

    New member and thanks1 My 7 year old Beagle Honey recently had bladder surgery to remove hundreds of struvite bladder stones. Vet put her on Hill’s prescription WD food to help get her urine Ph to where it does not let the bacteria from her UTI feed and therefore produce the stones. I am trying to find a homemade treat recipe that will not negate the effects of her new food. I contacted Hill’s and they gave me two recipes making their food into a treat which is OK but I want to try dehydrated sweet potatoes, chicken jerky, etc but I am not a chemist and have no idea what I can use. The vet said the same thing. He has no degree in chemistry. Anyone out there in the same situation as Honey is and have a home recipe for this particular problem?

    #25209
    K6RBS
    Participant

    Hills SD Killed our pug Abigail.

    5 years old, history of bladder stones.
    Started with a UTI, vet x-rayed her, put her on antibiotics and Hills SD (to dissolve the struvite stones). I gradually weaned her on to the SD (took a week). In the mean time the vet got the urinalysis tests back and the stones turned out to be calcium oxylate (?sp). I had 2 cans of SD left so we decided to leave her on it for a couple more days.
    Next morning she is lethargic, vomiting and off her food.
    She died a horrible death 5 days later due to pancreatitis followed by other organ failure caused by the fat content in the SD. I pleaded with Hills to put a warning on their cans and send a strong warning to the vets – they refused. Search the web – Abigail is not the first victim of Hills SD Dog food.

    https://www.facebook.com/abigail.pugsly

    • This reply was modified 8 years, 1 month ago by K6RBS. Reason: Added URL to Abby's FB page
    • This reply was modified 8 years, 1 month ago by K6RBS.
    #24757
    Lara
    Member

    I have a chocolate Lab that has had numerous issues. I rescued her off of Craigslist in Oct. The person I got Karma from had her on Rachel Ray Noutrish. I switched her to Blue Buffalo Freedom for puppies (grain free) It all started in December with a big ear infection to both ears and small, red bumps on her abdomen last December. Diagnosis: chicken allergy. Switched to Natural Balance Potato and Fish with tuna and salt-free peas which she did fine on…for awhile. I noticed increased itchiness..she scratched and bit everywhere…no fleas. She also developed a UTI with struvite crystals so I switched to NB Potato and Rabbit. My vet suggested Hill’s Prescription for the crystals and UTI which I refused. The vet also states to stop giving her tuna and peas as the peas may have contributed to the pH problem. My baby has had 2 back to back UTI’s one with the crystals and one without. During the 2nd UTI I switched to Nutrisca Lamb and Chickpea (grain and potato free) and canned Lamb from Wellness as a topper (only in a.m.) She seems to be doing better although she still itches and bites her paws but it appears to go in spurts….. I’m wondering if it is enviromental allergies and not food. She has some eye goobers but I started using Ark Naturals Eyes So Bright and that has helped tremendously. She also was very flaking but that has almost gone away since starting her on Nutrisca. She is on Claritin/Benadryl/probiotic/salmon oil/liquid glucosamine and sometimes coconut oil. She is also on a cranberry extract for a urine pH of 9.
    I have started to notice she is losing fur on the tips of her ears (just started last week). She has no ear infection that I can see. I had been cleaning 3x per week because they began to smell…now I am down to 1x per week
    I use Richard’s Organics Incredible Skin Spray for the itchy areas and any hotspots. I also at times will rub in coconut oil
    She has little red bumps on her belly which come and go….literally they are there in the morning and sometimes almost gone by night (could be the benadryl/claritin combo)
    I have tried digestive enzymes twice (different brands) and she has vomited with both…not sure she can tolerate them…I’ve started slowly both times
    I have to bring her back in for a re-check of her urine to see if the pH is down
    Every dog food she has been on she has liked….she is not a picky eater (she even eats pills as if they were a treat)
    Any ideas would be greatly appreciated and sorry it is long

    #24374
    shaunamacd
    Participant

    I have a schnauzer who has had panreatitis and is therefore on a very low fat veterinarian dogfood however has just had struvite crystals removed from his bladder. Although there is a food to decrease his chances of getting further stones, it is quite high in fat. Any suggestions with respect to diet?

    #23119

    In reply to: Crystals in urin

    InkedMarie
    Member

    When my dog had struvite crystals, my vet recommended on 500mg Vitamin C per day. Did your vet recommend that? The only other thing I had to do was make sure he got alot of liquid which I explained and ample opportunity to urinate.

    #23102

    In reply to: Crystals in urin

    ILoveDogs
    Participant

    I finally got the results. pH is 8.5, Protein 1+, struvite crystals: 2-3, Amorphous Phosphate crystals: 2-3m, no bacteria, no UTI.

    #23021

    In reply to: Crystals in urin

    pugmomsandy
    Participant

    Ok. My dogs see a holistic vet. They have some struvite but are not symptomatic of any kind of infection. I give them urinary health supplements and they continue with their regular diet.

    • This reply was modified 8 years, 2 months ago by pugmomsandy.
    #23017

    In reply to: Crystals in urin

    pugmomsandy
    Participant

    Is it struvite? The presence of crystals is undesirable, but not detrimental if there is no active urinary tract infection. A UTI can result in crystals forming into stones. What was the pH?

    pugmomsandy
    Participant

    If she just had crystals, she doesn’t necessarily need an Rx food. Crystals in general are not a problem, just undesired. Crystals become a problem when the pug gets a UTI. In a nutshell, the UTI promotes stone formation. If the pug has a healthy urinary tract, then UTI’s/stones should not be a problem. I would recommend visiting pugvillage.com. A community for pug lovers/owners. I’m over there too.

    My pugs go see a holistic vet. They have some struvites but we feed a high protein kibble and raw food and also vinegar, d-mannose/cranberry and some vitamin c.

    http://www.peteducation.com/article.cfm?c=2+2114&aid=400

    #19512
    pugmomsandy
    Participant

    Could she do a half/half diet of the c/d and Acana Wild Prairie? Two of my dogs have struvites, but no UTI’s or stones, not symptomatic. They still eat a normal diet (well, normal for them) and I give them cranberry/d-mannose and vinegar and up their moisture intake. They were just seen at the vet in May.

    #17952

    In reply to: Struvite Crystals

    Srmeadow
    Participant

    Thank you, Shelties mom for the video. It gave a lot of helpful info.

    Thanks, InkedMarie. I’m definitely trying to up her water intake.

    So, as for an update… Her urine was clear! So, vet told me she can go back to regular kibble and to just watch her for any urinating problems and up her water intake. Hopefully, she won’t have any more problems! I prayed so hard for this to be the case. Prayer works, people! :O) Have a great weekend and I appreciate all of your helpful insight.

    #17905

    In reply to: Struvite Crystals

    InkedMarie
    Member

    A prior dog of mine had these crystals. My vet did not mention a diet change, thankfully. She prescribed one 500 mg of Vitamin C daily and to up his water intake. Wht I did was add canned & warm water to his kibble and we then switched to The Honest Kitchen, a dehydrated. Make sure your dog has ample fluid and ample opportunity to urinate.

    #17899

    In reply to: Struvite Crystals

    shelties mom
    Participant
    #17887

    In reply to: Struvite Crystals

    Srmeadow
    Participant

    Thank you pugmomsandy and Hound Dog Mom. I’m new to all of this and it’s been a rollercoaster. The vet treated my dog with antibiotics for a “possible infection”. So, I’m guessing the treatment was more for a precaution rather than full-blown UTI. She goes back to vet on Friday (May 17) for a urine re-check! So, I’m hopeful and praying that her crystals will be better… I’m not sure how long it takes to get rid of them. It’s only been two weeks.

    I’m going to talk to my vet about Vitamin C and cranberry. I’m curious as to what she recommends and tells me based on Friday’s urine sample. I will update! Thank you! 🙂

    #17879

    In reply to: Struvite Crystals

    pugmomsandy
    Participant

    All my dogs have struvite in their urine but no infection and they are 5, 5 and 9 yrs old. I give vitamin C (recc’ by my vet) and d-mannose almost daily. My vet is more holistic. She even sells raw foods in her clinic and didn’t even mention any Rx foods. They have never had a UTI. That is not to say that some dogs aren’t more prone to get UTI’s and then have problems with stones.

    #17873

    In reply to: Struvite Crystals

    Hound Dog Mom
    Participant

    Hi Srmeadow –

    Does your dog currently have stuvites or have they been dissolved? Does your dog currently have a urinary tract infection? Stuvites only require treatment if the dog has a UTI and having stuvites does not require being on a prescription food or low protein diet for life.

    —————————————————————

    From Merck’s Veterinary Manual:

    “Struvite crystals are commonly observed in canine and feline urine. Struvite crystalluria in dogs is not a problem unless there is a concurrent bacterial urinary tract infection with a urease-producing microbe. Without an infection, struvite crystals in dogs will not be associated with struvite urolith formation.”

    ———————————————————————

    An article on Struvites written by CJ Puotinen and Mary Straus published in Whole Dog Journal states:

    “Struvite crystals do not require a change in diet. Because struvite crystals do not pose a problem unless the dog has a urinary tract infection, there is no required treatment for crystals, including dietary changes. If the dog does have a urinary tract infection, a prescription dog food will not cure it.”

    “If your veterinarian finds struvite crystals in the urine and suggests a diet change, you’d be well advised to find a new vet. You have to wonder how many other things he or she is misinformed about. It isn’t just a case of not keeping up with newer research; this recommendation is just plain wrong.”

    “Dogs prone to forming struvite stones should not be kept on a special diet for life. Struvites almost always form because of infections, for which dogs with a history of stones should be closely monitored and properly treated. No long-term dietary change is required, nor will a special diet prevent the formation of infection-induced struvites. However, short-term changes may help speed the dissolution of stones.”

    “Low-protein diets do not prevent stone formation. A low-protein diet can speed the dissolution of struvite stones — when accompanied by appropriate antibiotic treatment — but it is not necessary for the prevention of struvite formation in dogs who are prone to this problem. For almost all dogs, controlling infections will prevent more stones from forming.”

    ———————————————————–

    To prevent the re-occurrence of struvites it’s recommended to do the following:

    -Closely monitor your dog’s urinary pH to detect UTIs (dogs should have a pH of between 5.5 and 7.0).

    -Supplement with cranberry capsules. Compounds found in cranberries help to prevent bacteria from attaching to the tissue that lines the bladder and urinary tract.

    -Supplement with probiotics. Probiotics are beneficial bacteria. A healthy population of beneficial bacteria in the dog’s system will help to combat any unhealthy bacteria (such as the bacteria that causes UTIs).

    -Vitamin C is often recommended for dogs prone to UTIs due to its antiiinflammatory properties.

    -Uva Ursi is an herb often used to treat UTIs due to its anti-bacteria properties. It should only be used intermittently for short periods of time.

    #17871
    Srmeadow
    Participant

    My mini Aussie has been diagnosed with struvite crystals. She is 9 months old. Vet prescribed Royan Canin Urinary SO dry dog food and my dog only ate it for a few days and then refused to eat it. Vet then gave me the canned dog food and she does like it much better. However, I’m struggling with the fact that she’s on canned dog food and the only alternative dry food I know of is Hills Science Diet urinary food. I’ve heard that just increasing water intake and occasionally feeding canned food is acceptable. My only worry is if she does develop stones, this will require surgery. I’m avoiding this at ALL costs even if it does mean feeding her a lower quality of food. I’m at a loss and don’t know what to believe. The vet says one thing and many internet forums say other things. I want to listen to my vet, but does my dog REALLY need to be on prescription dog food forever to avoid further bladder issues. Help! Thanks in advance.

    #15226
    InkedMarie
    Member

    I wish I could help. I had a dog with struvite crystals, never stones.

    #15223
    K6RBS
    Participant

    Our 6 year old pug has a history of struvite bladder stones and following surgery to remove them she spent a year on Canine C/D. She recently developed a UTI and while diagnosing that the vet found that she had stones again. He put her on antibiotics and Canine S/D (to try to dissolve the stones). When the lab tests came back they showed that the stones were actually calcium oxalate and therefore could not be dissolved. By then she was fully on the S/D food (which she loved). The following day she started vomiting, became lethargic and shows signs of severe distress.

    The diagnosis was pancreatitis, triggered by the high fat content of the S/D food.
    5 days (and many $$$$ later) she is slowly recovering and we need to find a food that is low in fat (< 10%) yet unlikely to add to the calcium oxalate stone problem.

    Ideas are welcome.

    Thanks.

    #14302
    Jackie B
    Member

    Looking at the Royal Canin SO, it says the purpose is to increase urine flow.

    My dog had UTI’s, no crystals, and here is what I did: switched to all wet/moist food (4 or 5 star rated only, no white potato, I used to do all grain-free but he was gaining weight too easily) and bought him an electric circulating pet fountain (Cat Mate brand). He hasn’t had a UTI in almost 2 years, and none since I started that regimen. So try that if you want.

    Also, Solid Gold makes a supplement called Berry Balance that is supposed to help with that, you add it to the food. When I called the company, they said not to use it in conjunction with prescription food. I assume that if you add it to food, it would create the same effect as prescription food but you’d be able to avoid the junky ingredients that are typical in vet food.

    #14188
    danirobinson
    Participant

    I am so confused and asking for your help.

    To keep it short, my 7-year-old neutered male Pug was hospitalized for 3 days with urinary obstruction caused from a UTI and struvite crystals. He was being treated (x10 days) for a UTI (positive UA, negative culture) by our regular vet when he became obstructed on a weekend and we had to go to the animal ER. He received aggressive irrigation of his bladder and no stones were obtained, but massive amounts of sediment and crystals were irrigated. X-ray and ultrasound do not show stones. Lab analysis only identifies struvite crystals. His UA showed bacteria and WBCs, culture was again negative. He received a 10-day course of Clavamox and is now on a 10-day course of Baytril.

    The vet is insistent on feeding him Royal Canin Urinary SO. I would like your thoughts on this.

    Thank you.

    #12307

    In reply to: Crystals in urine

    risuchan
    Participant

    Thanks for the replies so far! Here’s an update: only struvites, no infection or bacteria, so the vet wants her to switch food. She of course put her on science diet C/D, and I will have her on it for the two weeks until the recheck but no longer than it takes to clear up the current crystals, so after that I am still looking for a new food. So far I am considering Honest Kitchen and FRR. Thanks for any more input y’all can give!

    #12286

    In reply to: Crystals in urine

    Mom2Cavs
    Member

    First, let me say that I’m not a vet. But, I would suggest a visit to your vet to determine the type of crystals and to see if there is an infection present. There are different types of crystals and treatments vary. Struvite crystals seem to form if there is an infection, but Oxalate crystals are a different matter. There are also other types. One thing is certain, though, and that a dog that is prone to uti’s or crytals needs lots of moisture in the diet. Moisture is actually good in any animal’s diet, imho. If I were you, after speaking to my vet, I would check into 4-5 star, high quality foods. Whether you feed all canned, regular raw or freeze dried raw that’s been rehydrated, or kibble topped with wet food of sime kind (either of the above mentioned or wholesome people food) moisture is necessary to help flush out the kidneys. If you feed only kibble, then I would still add water or no-sodium/low-sodium broth to it. There are also supplements that might help with urinary issues like cranberry, vit. C, omega 3’s etc. Again, I would ask your vet for recommendations. There are also regular posters here that have had dogs with kidney issues from birth that may post with some great suggestions. Good luck to you and I hope this helps!

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