Crystals in urine

Dog Food Advisor Forums Diet and Health Crystals in urine

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  • #12235 Report Abuse

    risuchan
    Participant

    Hi all, I have a 3 year old Chihuahua (possibly Papillon mix) who was rescued from a puppy mill 2 1/2 years ago. When I first got her (she was my foster at first), she had UTIs that would not quit. They delayed her being spayed even. She has not had any since then, but just this month I noticed crystals in her urine (she uses puppy pads, and it looked like she had eaten a tube full of glitter and peed it out!). Very tiny crystals, and no other symptoms. Anyone else run into this with their dogs and have any diet suggestions? She and her brother (rescued Corgi) eat Three Dog Bakery fish formula and have for the past 2 1/2 years with no problems. Thanks!! 🙂
    (Here is a picture of her, her name is Mushi: http://puppy-story.com/?p=212)

    -Mushi’s mom

    #12250 Report Abuse

    aimee
    Member

    Hi Risuchan,

    She is super cute!! No diet suggestions. The only suggestion I’d have is to have her urine checked for infection. With her past history of UTI it is possible that an infection with a bacteria that increases crystal formation is present.

    Good Luck

    #12286 Report Abuse

    Mom2Cavs
    Member

    First, let me say that I’m not a vet. But, I would suggest a visit to your vet to determine the type of crystals and to see if there is an infection present. There are different types of crystals and treatments vary. Struvite crystals seem to form if there is an infection, but Oxalate crystals are a different matter. There are also other types. One thing is certain, though, and that a dog that is prone to uti’s or crytals needs lots of moisture in the diet. Moisture is actually good in any animal’s diet, imho. If I were you, after speaking to my vet, I would check into 4-5 star, high quality foods. Whether you feed all canned, regular raw or freeze dried raw that’s been rehydrated, or kibble topped with wet food of sime kind (either of the above mentioned or wholesome people food) moisture is necessary to help flush out the kidneys. If you feed only kibble, then I would still add water or no-sodium/low-sodium broth to it. There are also supplements that might help with urinary issues like cranberry, vit. C, omega 3’s etc. Again, I would ask your vet for recommendations. There are also regular posters here that have had dogs with kidney issues from birth that may post with some great suggestions. Good luck to you and I hope this helps!

    #12307 Report Abuse

    risuchan
    Participant

    Thanks for the replies so far! Here’s an update: only struvites, no infection or bacteria, so the vet wants her to switch food. She of course put her on science diet C/D, and I will have her on it for the two weeks until the recheck but no longer than it takes to clear up the current crystals, so after that I am still looking for a new food. So far I am considering Honest Kitchen and FRR. Thanks for any more input y’all can give!

    #12308 Report Abuse

    Hound Dog Mom
    Participant

    Hi risuchan –

    If the two foods you are considering are The Honest Kitchen and Flint River Ranch I would DEFINITELY go with The Honest Kitchen. THK is one of only two pet foods that are certified human-grade and it’s minimally processed (much more species-appropriate than kibble). I fed two of my dogs a rotation of Love, Zeal, Embark and Thrive for about 6 months before switching them to a raw diet – it’s a great food. FRR is mediocre and incredibly overpriced for what it is – with FRR you’re paying a premium price for a mid-grade food, THK is expensive too but at least with THK you get what you pay for.

    #12309 Report Abuse

    Mom2Cavs
    Member

    I would second HDM….The Honest Kitchen is a “wet” diet after it’s hydrated and I think its ingredients are stellar! I would use it, but my crew just doesn’t like the “garlicy” smell of it. Like I said before, I use canned and freeze dried raw that’s been rehydrated for extra moisture.

    #12310 Report Abuse

    pugmomsandy
    Participant

    My vet suggested vit c to help with urine acidity. I started giving Garden of Life Raw C. One daily along with increasing protein intake.

    #77376 Report Abuse

    Theresa G
    Member

    My dog had suffered with struvite crystals. I went from prescription vet food, to making his food myself, but nothing seemed to keep them at bay very long, until I went to a holistic vet, whom I had visited with a previous dog.
    He immediately put him on vitamin C twice a day, which I sprinkled on his food, and within a week they were gone and have stayed gone.
    The dogs urine is too acidic or ph is not in balance. I purchased urine test strips and watched his PH stay in the normal range ever since we started the vitamin C.
    I omitted all staches and grains in his food, make sure he goes potty every 3 or 4 hours and has clean bottled water.
    I was kicked out of the first vets office because I challenges his prescription food, which told me the story behind his treating my dog.
    I hope it works for you as it has for me!!!!! Y dog is 20 lbs. and I gave him 500 mg. of C 2X daily.

    #77377 Report Abuse

    Theresa G
    Member

    My dog had suffered with struvite crystals. I went from prescription vet food, to making his food myself, but nothing seemed to keep them at bay very long, until I went to a holistic vet, whom I had visited with a previous dog.
    He immediately put him on vitamin C twice a day, which I sprinkled on his food, and within a week they were gone and have stayed gone.
    The dogs urine is too acidic or ph is not in balance. I purchased urine test strips and watched his PH stay in the normal range ever since we started the vitamin C.
    I omitted all staches and grains in his food, make sure he goes potty every 3 or 4 hours and has clean bottled water.
    I was kicked out of the first vets office because I challenges his prescription food, which told me the story behind his treating my dog?
    He now eats From. With pork and peas, no grains or starches and has been struvite crystal free for two years!!!!

    #77378 Report Abuse

    Anonymous
    Member

    For more information on this topic, check the search engine here: https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/struvite/

    #79848 Report Abuse

    shelly
    Member

    Hello I am new to this site and My Phystee a 5.5 pound Brindle chihuahua has just had her 2nd urine test come back and it had crystals in it and her vet is telling me that she may have struvite stones and she has to go on this c/d dog food and she needs to have xrays to make sure.My thing is why not take xrays to make sure she has the stones first before you change her food.He says the food wont dissolve the stones but if she dont have the stones and if she dont have the crystals it will keep her from getting the stones.But when we got the first urine test he said none of this,and he never said she would have to be on this special for the rest of her life.He just said this to me today.I am sold on any of this just like human docs I believe they too get kick backs on stuff they sell.Now if she really needs I have no problem giving it to her but why didnt he tell me this from the start.I live on disability and the xray $ 162.00 and the meds and urine test today was $80.00 and I’m not sure what the food will right now she a hi end food so the vet said c/d might be just a bit higher which if she needs it I’m ok with it.But if she has stone I dont even know what happens and what that cost would be.From the time I adopted her she has had urine infections and a few other problems but she is my world just like my other Chi’s.They are my babies and my Therapy babies and would do anything for them.But I dont know If he is giving all the information and the best or the best information for me and Phystee.Is there anyone here can give me some help on this matter. It would be appreciated and a great help. I thank you in an advance.

    Thank you
    Phystee’s
    mommy

    #79851 Report Abuse

    anonymously
    Member

    Check the search engine here: https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/bladder+stones/page/2/
    As your vet will confirm, dogs that have a tendency to make bladder stones have to be on a special diet the rest of their lives, this is a serious condition and it just doesn’t go away.

    The x-ray is important, but once she is stable for about 1 year, ask the vet if you can skip the x-rays and testing urine PH as long as she is urinating normally and having no difficulty? Ask him the warning signs to look for. You didn’t mention her age?

    I would comply with the prescription food for now.
    And don’t forget, water, water, and more water added to the diet. Ask the vet ….but I believe this helps big time. And frequent bathroom breaks, opportunities to urinate.

    Below is a previous post of mine:
    “My dog had both (struvite and calcium oxalate), no symptoms till the age of 11, started with UTIs. He has had no recurrences in 4 years since his emergency surgery.
    In fact, I just took him in for a geriatric workup and his lab work was good”.

    “I was afraid the vet would want to do x-rays and test his urine…..but he said as long as he is not having symptoms we are not going there (he’s too old to tolerate another surgery)”
    “I do monitor his urination habits and check for normal flow, stream, amount. If I note any discomfort I will take him to the vet”.

    “There is a genetic component and some breeds are more prone to bladder stones.

    “Anyway, if you do nothing else, add water and take her out to urinate frequently.
    I went along with the prescription diet for almost a year, since then he has been on Nutrisca salmon and chickpea kibble soaked with water +, I use the wet food too, but the canned foods seem so greasy to me”…

    PS: Soak the kibble, even the prescription food in water overnight in the fridg, add more water prior to serving. Keep the bladder flushed. Maybe add a little canned prescription food as a topper.

    • This reply was modified 3 years, 9 months ago by  anonymously.
    #79853 Report Abuse

    anonymously
    Member

    PS: If the x-ray is negative, she may just have struvite. These crystals often clear up after antibiotics to treat the infection, special diet and increase in water intake. Frequent bathroom breaks.
    Calcium oxalate are a little more concerning. But, there are meds and procedures to get rid of them, other than surgery (depending on the dog’s condition). Dogs can have both.

    #79854 Report Abuse

    anonymously
    Member

    In response to: “I am sold on any of this just like human docs I believe they too get kick backs on stuff they sell”.

    Excerpt from: http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2015/08/veterinary-medicine-is-a-business-and-that-includes-alternative-medicine/
    “The bottom line is that financial bias is a real issue in veterinary medicine at all levels, and it has to be investigated and managed. However, this is not the same as saying there is widespread fraud or a sinister conspiracy involving vets and companies that do business with them. There is no reason to believe that the majority of vets are doing anything other than the best they can to help their patients and clients. And there is absolutely no reason to believe vets offering alternative therapies are any less subject to financial bias or any purer in their motivation or behavior than vets practices science-based medicine”.

    #79946 Report Abuse

    anonymously
    Member

    This article was in today’s paper, I thought I would share. http://www.bostonherald.com/lifestyle/health/2015/10/diet_aids_bladder_stones
    Excerpt below:
    The cause of these stones developing is not well understood. It is thought to be an inborn error of metabolism that, given certain diets, causes the pH of urine to become more acidic than usual, leading to crystals and stones formation.

    Diagnosis is usually made by X-ray, palpation or ultrasound.

    These kinds of bladder stones are the second most commonly found (struvites being the most common). They each require different types of management with specific prescription diets. Several companies make these specific diets, and I would work with your veterinarian to choose one. Sadly, even with special diets, these stones can still come back, so if your dog shows any signs like before, get him right in for evaluation.

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