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WondrousPups

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  • WondrousPups
    Participant

    Hi Sienna!
    It’s not strange at all. It’s good of you to update what’s been going on with you and your beloved pup. Glad to hear that both the internist and the behaviorist seem to agree the issues are to do with digestive tract problems. Now you can focus your attentions to healing her gut and helping her immune system to be normal again! That’s good news.

    I highly recommend reading two books:

    Body into Balance by Maria Noel Groves and
    Dr. Kidd’s Guide to Herbal Dog Care by Randy Kidd, DVM, Ph.D.

    Both will give you specific ways to heal IBD, and you will have references on had to refer back to on each stage of your pup’s healing process. They are not big books, straight forward very practical.

    Another book you might consider adding to your library is Mosby’s Nursing Drug Reference just because you seem like a person who likes to use both allopathic medicine and herbal medicine. In this book, you can look up each herb-drug interaction as well as drug side effects. So long you are interested in continuing to use herbs and supplements (both for you and your pup), it might be a good one to have. Don’t rely on internet for reliable info. on this one.

    I understand you don’t want to get biopsy done right now, but if your pup’s condition doesn’t improve at all in a month or see any blood in her stool, I would get that biopsy done ASAP because there is a possibility of cancer in play. I think that’s why your internist was probably suggesting biopsy as well.

    Take care Sienna,
    WP

    in reply to: Supplementing dry kibble with fresh foods #162098 Report Abuse
    WondrousPups
    Participant

    Hi Aimee,
    Sounds like we are on a same boat right now , doing similar things. I’m still leaning towards feeding more home-cooked meals (not raw), but I don’t think I will ever convert to 100%. Just trying to find a balance that woks for me at this point. Thanks for dropping your thoughts!
    WP

    in reply to: Help mixing two dry kibbles #162012 Report Abuse
    WondrousPups
    Participant

    Hi there!
    Here is a nifty calculator I use on a regular bases. This calculator applies different set of factors Vets uses to figure out particular dog’s daily caloric needs. I’ve used different calculators in the past, and this app is more versatile and accurate than others.

    Tabby – since Boss needs to loose significant amount of weight, if I were in your shoes, I would start out with setting the initial weight goal as 65 lb. and base his daily caloric needs based on that. So for example, you would put 65 lb. as the current dog’s weight, and pick the activity level, and not the weight loss option. One of my dogs needed to loose significant weight a couple of years ago, and I made a mistake of using the “weight loss” option right off the bat. It’s really harsh reduction of calories. Try it and compare how much less the recommended daily calorie is for 70 lb. weight loss option and 65 lb. dog, moderately active option. I believe the “weight loss option” is pretty harsh meant to be used only under a vet’s close supervision because that’s pretty much the very bear bottom caloric needs of a dog.

    A safe weight loss for a healthy dog is 3-4% of body weight per month. For Boss, it’s 2.1 lb. – 2.8 lb for the first months.
    That’s 11 oz weight loss per week pace at most.

    If I were in your shoes, I would also consider switching to feeding less calorie dense formulas (I aim to find a formula that has 360 kcal per cup or less, but not extremely low fat kibbles during weight loss). The reason is that when you use a high calorie kibbles (400 kcal/cup is considered calorie dense) and fee it less, it often ends up not meeting the all of the nutrient needs. It sounds like an oxymoron, but less calorie dense kibbles end up containing more nutrients per calorie of kibble than high calorie kibbles when you have to restrict calorie intake.

    Calculators:
    Figure out daily calorie needs of your dog:
    https://thebark.com/rer/

    I just did a quick search, and DFA has one, too!
    https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/dog-feeding-tips/dog-food-calculator/

    Good luck!
    WP

    in reply to: Supplementing dry kibble with fresh foods #162011 Report Abuse
    WondrousPups
    Participant

    Hi Aimee!
    Woo, that’s scary that some commercial kibble don’t meet even AAFCO minimums! I’m usually pretty diligent about checking companies (safety measures, nutritionists on staff, ingredients, nutrition based on my pups’ actual caloric needs, etc) before trying any new commercial kibbles. I guess I should always erre on the side of caution. I’ll probably add a vitamin & mineral slurry to fresh recipes even the portion is relatively small.

    So do you usually add something to dry kibbles to patch any gaps when you feed your puppies, Aimee?
    WP

    in reply to: Supplementing dry kibble with fresh foods #162010 Report Abuse
    WondrousPups
    Participant

    Hi Marga,
    Nice to meet you, too. Thank you for the reply! The link didn’t appear to be anything pet related, though…. Was it a wrong link by any chance??? I’d love to know what you meant to share. Thanks!

    in reply to: Is it good to feed dog with supplement? #160920 Report Abuse
    WondrousPups
    Participant

    I guess it depends on what’s causing your pup to cough.

    WondrousPups
    Participant

    Hi Patricia – Thank you for your kind post. Like you said, I too, believe people are doing the best to be supportive of each other based on our experiences with our pet.

    Susan – I don’t think no one likes to be seen as a rude or insensitive person. We are not perfect, and we all make mistakes. That’s a given and that’s OK. It is also OK to accept the negative impacts of what’s been said to others. Making mistakes doesn’t make us bad people. What’s not kind to do is to shifting the blames the impacted people. I don’t think that’s never OK, and really hurtful.

    For the record, I am not an American. I do live in the US, but I didn’t grow up in the US culture. I’ve worked with many Aussies, American, Asians, Indians, Europeans and some Russians. Like I’ve said, you can do whatever you’d like to do with the information I shared. I share because it could be of help, but I don’t mind if people find it unhelpful. It doesn’t bother me and I honestly think people should make their educated decisions.

    Sienna – Best of luck to you, and hopefully you can get to the bottom of your pup’s health issues very soon. Take a gentle care of yourself, too. It is very stressful to be caring for sick fur-babies.

    • This reply was modified 8 months, 3 weeks ago by WondrousPups.
    WondrousPups
    Participant

    Hi Susan,
    Thank you for the clarification and sorry for mixing up IBD with IBS. I didn’t suggest turmeric to you. It’s peppermint oil. It’s still helpful for helping pains, gas, bloating associated with the disease. If you don’t find my offering helpful, that’s not a problem for me. My sharing is from my heart, and freely given, and it’s up to you to do whatever you’d like.

    I fine it very troubling and unethical for you to say things untrue about turmeric. It does not cause pain or upset stomach. Turmeric actually work as a pain killer in high doses much like aspirin would without upsetting stomach that NSAIDs often causes. It’s been well documented. I am also don’t suggest using purified forms of supplements. Whole plants as a food as medicine is my general approach.

    WondrousPups
    Participant

    Hi Sienna,

    If you are planning on biopsy and an endoscopic exam, I believe you need to have your pup off of any meds/supplements for two weeks before the exam to clear the system, and no food for three days before endoscopic exam. At least that’s what I had to do for my colonoscopy so that the test results will be sound. I can understand your urge to want to help your furbaby. Starting with new herbs before the tests can contaminate the results, though. If I were in your shoes, I’d wait until after the test results are back so that I’d be able to make a more informed decision, not shooting in blind. How can anyone treat something one doesn’t know what’s wrong? Do you know for sure your girl’s problem is from IBS? Slippery elm is helpful for protecting digestive lining. I would not use it before the exam because it increases mucilage in digestive tracks and it can make it difficult for the doctor to establish the base line. Does this make sense?

    I’m kind of scared for you right now. DO NOT start using Ashwagandha until after the vet exam. Your pup probably has to be sedated for the endoscopic exam, and ashwagandha can potentiate the sedative that the vet is going to use. VERY DANGEROUS! I don’t want you to risk getting adulterated powder somewhere as supplements and herbs are not regulated as medicine although some are potent enough to be as such, I’ll tell you where to get a safe supply, but again, I recommend waiting. With that said, I highly recommend buying herbs from Mountain Rose Herb – mountainroseherbs.com. They are highly ethical and well respected company. Prices are very reasonable for the quality (fresh, organic, ethically harvested, and sustainably sourced). Bulk is the least expensive way, but if you don’t use it quickly, quality diminishes (especially powder form). Some herbs, spices and tea make sense to buy in bulk, others, smallest quantities in powder from.

    Dosage (Upto, Roy, and Petrone, Cathirose, eds., Ashwagandha Root: Withania Somnifera – Analytical, Quality Control, and Therapeutic Monograph.):

    As powder, ¼ teaspoon (1/2g) – ½ teaspoon (1g) per day for your 50 lb. pup. You can add it to the turmeric concoction I shared earlier, but here it is again.

    2 servings (1 cup per serving daily)
    2 cups of full fat coconut milk – heated. In a blender, add the milk, 1 tsp turmeric powder, ½ tsp ginger powder, ½ tsp Ashwagandha powder, 1/8 tsp freshly ground black pepper, 1 tsp honey (optional). Blend on high for about 30 seconds.

    Remember – it is meant to be taken over time every day to restore nervous system and sleep cycle.

    Let me know if you have any questions.

    WondrousPups
    Participant

    Hi Susan,
    I know you didn’t ask, but I couldn’t help. You are a very devoted person for Patches wellness. If everyone is as half as devoted you are, there would be less suffering pets in the world for sure. I’m sorry for the on-going IBS troubles Patch has to go through 🙁 I’ve had my good share of sleepless nights with my pups over the years, but it pales in comparison the everyday struggles you have to bear with Patch.

    I’m glad to hear you are using slippery elm to help his gut wall integrity. I hear good things about it for IBS. If I may contribute, and you may have already doing this, if so, tell me – but I wanted to mention about another herb just in case because I don’t want to deprive you from options for Patch.

    With that said, have you heard of the efficacy of peppermint oil for severe IBS symptoms? There are studies to prove it helps with bloating, gas and abdominal pains, and it is safe for children, too. It does not cure IBS, but it alleviates serious digestive symptoms. Strong peppermint tea would do the trick a lot of the times, but I’m doubtful Patch would volunteer to drink it, so you would probably need to get enteric-coated capsules of peppermint oil for sever bouts of upsets like Patch’s, but I don’t think it’s hard to find it nowadays. Don’t take my word for it – Here are studies behind it:

    “Enteric-coated, pH-dependent peppermint oil capsules for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome in children”, Kline, Robert M., et al. Journal of Pediatrics

    “Effect of acute peppermint oil administration on gastric sensorimotor function and nutrient tolerance in health”, Papathanasopoulous, A., et al. Neurogastroenterrology & Motility

    “The effect of enteric-coated, delayed-release peppermint oil on irritable bowel syndrome”, Merat, Shahin, et al., Digestive Diseases and Sciences

    I think there are more, but I think you can get the ideas, and I hope this help you decide if peppermint oil make sense for Patch or not in addition to slippery elm.

    One other thing: If you are feeding kibbles with probiotics, avoid ones that include “Enterococus Faecium”. This strain causes more potential to cause damages than good for animals (including humans) with weakened immune systems and IBS. Off the top of my head, Whole Earth Farms/Merrick, Diamond, Victor, I & Love & You include this strain in their formulas.

    WondrousPups
    Participant

    Wow! You really tried e-v-e-r-y-t-h-i-n-g! Hats off to you for your dedication. There is no doubt you’ve extended your pup’s life. I didn’t know “Pet Health and Nutrition” website. I just now checked out the two tincture blends you’ve mentioned. I’m happy to say that I was on a same track with the master herbalist who formulated these. I am doubtful though that Ashwagandha in the adrenal blend is strong enough to be therapeutic. Ashwagandha and Astragalus are difficult to get therapeutic amount in tincture, and needs long term daily use to be effective. Eleuthero is very stimulating, so it would be counter productive to anxiety issue. Umm… I don’t know. This blend looks to me like formulated for very weakened animal who doesn’t have much energy or appetite. I remember you saying your pup tends to be always hungry. I agree with inclusion of Ashwagandha and Astragalus, but other ingredients might affect negatively as a whole for your particular situation with your pup.

    Since you have been trying so many different remedies without real success, it might be good idea not to add anything new until evaluating other factors before. So, what factors do you think is most important in determining health?

    A. Genetics
    B. Medical care
    C. Environmental factors and social circumstances
    D. Life style (personal behavior)

    The answer is – D! It counts for 40%! A (genetics) for 30% or less, C for 20%, and B (medical care) is 10%.

    With that said, eating healing foods is a part of a healthy life style, so if you’d like to try turmeric (or any other herbs), I recommend whole foods approach. The way I started out for my pups are infusion into coconut cream and mixing it with kibble for every day at dinner time. I like this turmeric chai blend from Mountain Rose Herb: https://mountainroseherbs.com/turmeric-chai or you can do a simpler homemade – coconut milk/cream + 1 tsp turmeric powder + 1/2 tsp ginger powder + 1/8 freshly ground black pepper. Black pepper is not optional because perperine in black pepper make any nutrients from food more bio-available in general, but turmeric in particular, it makes curcumin (active component in turmeric) 2,000% more bio-available than without. The turmeric chai taste good with a touch of honey for me, but my dogs likes it savory with food. If your pup does not have any bad reaction to it, then you can increase potency of turmeric. The recommended safe dosage of curcumin is about 600 mg for 50 lb. dog. Curcumin in Turmeric is 3%. For maintenance dosage, even for people, 1 g/day of turmeric is theraputic. Unless you are dealing with a sever chronic pain, I don’t think mega dosing is necessary.

    I hope this can get you started on turmeric!

    As for aroma therapy, no, I haven’t tried it, but I do use essential oils for flea and tick control instead of putting pesticides on my pups. So not healthy! I do agree with what you said about dogs can sniff and choose what’s good for them. My dogs volunteer grazing young shoots of herbs by sniffing!

    WondrousPups
    Participant

    Hi Sienna,
    I’m sorry for all the on-going stress and struggles with your pooch! Sounds like you are being given lots of good and supportive tips from Patricia and Susan 🙂 I’m not sure if you are a kind of a person who is comfortable with “food as a medicine” approach, and if not, this might sounds wacky, but it’s been working out for me personally and for my dogs, I just chime in as a food for thoughts since the conventional pharmaceuticals don’t sounds like helping out at all.

    At the first glance at the symptoms and history you’ve described, two herbs came to my mind immediately. First, Stinging Nettle. Nettle is an immuno-modulater (you mentioned high TLI). It treats hypothyroid (low T4 result), UTI, weak hair, and it supports kidney/adrenal restorative. It should be easy to grow in Florida, but you can buy it online, too.

    Second herb that came to my mind is Ashwagandha. This herb is mainly an adoptogen. It also good for hypothyroid. It also works for insomnia, anxiety, chronic degenerative disease that involves wasting wasting away. Some describe it as Indian version of ginseng (which I give to my dogs everyday), but ginseng tend to be very stimulating. So it’s probably not good for an anxious pup.

    Tow other herbs that support fat digestion and liver function are common sage and turmeric.

    They don’t work like a silver bullet, and takes a bit of time (except turmeric – the result tend to be immediate) for healing to happen and observed, but there is not down side except some patience and persistence.

    If you are open for trying and interested, let me know. I can direct you to resources and/or more details.

    Sending LOTS of support and healing thoughts !

    WondrousPups
    Participant

    For me, I wouldn’t ask my vets for food recommendations for my healthy pets unless they have degrees on animal nutrition. However, if my dog happens to get diagnosed with some disease that needs diet change, and if I deem the diagnosis to be sound, then I would rather go with prescription diet until I have the time to educate myself on better alternatives. Hill’s prescription diets have gone through feeding trials, so I’m comfortable feeding their prescription diets. I wouldn’t feed any prescription food that hasn’t gone through feeding trials. That seems too risky for already sick animals to me.

    in reply to: Frontline Side Effects #158364 Report Abuse
    WondrousPups
    Participant

    I’m sorry, Stephanie C 🙁 If I’m in your shoes, I’d take him to a vet ASAP. Take care, and I hope you are not blaming yourself for doing what you thought was the best for him.

    in reply to: Dog Allergies Must Read #158363 Report Abuse
    WondrousPups
    Participant

    I’m happy to hear your furbabie is doing better and happier!

    in reply to: Supplementing dry kibble with fresh foods #158362 Report Abuse
    WondrousPups
    Participant

    Just bumping this question up to the top as I’m having the exact question, and would appreciate learning what other folks who mix dry kibbles with fresh food on a regular bases.

    I’ve already followed the Acroyali’s link, and it recommends books such as “See Spot Live Longer the ABC Way” by Steve Brown and “Feed Your Best Friend Better: Easy, Nutritious Meals for Dogs” by Rick Woodford. I’ve read See Spot Live Longer the ABC way some time ago, and I’ve adapted weekly fresh food day as the author recommends (I’m only doing it more like monthly rather than weekly, though.)

    Right now, I am more interested in Rick Woodford’s approach – using dry kibble as a base, and adding freshly prepared food as much as 50%. I haven’t read his whole book yet, but I agree with his analysis that commercial dog food is supplemented with 200% – 600% of essential vitamins and minerals that it is safe to add excess of 10%-limit (by calorie) of fresh food to each meal. Does anyone using this approach? How long have you been feeding this way, and what has been like for you and your fur babies? Thank you for your input!

    in reply to: Pet food mfrs. #158128 Report Abuse
    WondrousPups
    Participant

    This is good news! I’d love manufacturer info available on DFA, too. Might it include a list of brands as well???

    WondrousPups
    Participant

    I found Red Barn Naturals Fish (canned) food is drier consistency. Just adding another option here:)

    in reply to: Large and Giant Breed Puppy Nutrition #158032 Report Abuse
    WondrousPups
    Participant

    Hi Erin,
    Have you checked out the new list posted by surplus yet? Diamond Naturals Small Breed Puppy formula seems like an answer for your situation. And yes, the Victor formulas you’ve mentioned got well above upper safe limit of calcium (Hi Pro Plus 6.3g/1000 kcal, Nutra Pro 4.5g/1000 kcal, Hero 6.4g/1000 kcal). Here is the link to the surplus’s post:
    https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/topic/large-and-giant-breed-puppy-nutrition/#post-117602

    in reply to: Dog Birthday Party Ideas #158022 Report Abuse
    WondrousPups
    Participant

    I’m celebrating one of my pups’ B-day in about ten days. I’m a patron of my local dog park, and some folks there bring a sheet of homemade B-day cake to the dog park and share a piece with everyone (owners and furkids) who happens to be there to mark the occasion 😀 Bacon is often involved. I can’t do that for obvious reasons this year, but my next door neighbor dropped off some “Pooch Cream” mix as a B-day gift! Has anyone tried ice cream mix for pooches? I heard humans can eat it, too (not quite sure if that’s true). No one at the dog park bother to decorate, but B-day Fidos are sometimes dressed for the occasion.

    in reply to: Soft Low Cal Treats for Pancreatitis #157936 Report Abuse
    WondrousPups
    Participant

    Hi Peggy,
    I’m sorry your pup is struggling 🙁 If I were in your shoes, I would try fresh fruits because they usually don’t have any fat, plenty soft fruits options and low in kcal. I would also make sure that the total calories coming from these treats to be less than 10% of total caloric needs/day. I like blueberries for tiny pups. I have a 7 lb. chi x papillon, and she can eat about 50 blueberries, which is about 40 kcal.

    in reply to: Is it good to feed dog with supplement? #157935 Report Abuse
    WondrousPups
    Participant

    I’m sorry your pup is in pain 🙁 I’ve posted this in another thread, but it is the same issue, so I thought to copy is here. I posted this originally on a turmeric dosage thread:

    I’ve been taking some curcumine suppliment for years now for the pain management for my knees and for my senior dogs with surprising success. I have a condition known as Patellofemoral syndrome, which have no known corrective surgical treatment similar to late stage osteoarthritis. A chiropractor gave a bottle of curcumin suppliment that he has been using for free for me to try. I was like, you are kidding me, right? None of the strong prescription meds worked for my pain, and you think a supplement made of a spice in curry take care of it?!? But it was give to me free from a chiropractor who had been helping me for my paint, so I took it. Within a couple of month of taking it everyday, my pain was completely gone! So some years back when my Dane x Lab. who started to limp the same supplement I was taking. He stopped limping, too.

    Anyhow, the reason it works is because curcumine is a powerful anti-inflammatory. It won’t stop from my condition or arthritis to worsen or cure it. But it helps with pain because the join pains are caused by inflammations. You need to look for the supplement with Bioperin in it because the body cannot absorb curcumine without the presence of bioperin (black pepper extract). I am 130 lb., and I started off by 3,000 mg of curcumine/day everyday. After my pain was gone, I reduced my dose to 1,000 – 1,200 mg /day. I give my Dane x Lab. who is 90 lb. 1,000 mg/day, and I haven’t taken him back to the vet for laser treatments. I hope this helps!

    in reply to: How Much Tumeric #157934 Report Abuse
    WondrousPups
    Participant

    I’ve been taking some curcumine suppliment for years now for the pain management for my knees and for my senior dogs with surprising success. I have a condition known as Patellofemoral syndrome, which have no known corrective surgical treatment similar to late stage osteoarthritis. A chiropractor gave a bottle of curcumin suppliment that he has been using for free for me to try. I was like, you are kidding me, right? None of the strong prescription meds worked for my pain, and you think a supplement made of a spice in curry take care of it?!? But it was give to me free from a chiropractor who had been helping me for my paint, so I took it. Within a couple of month of taking it everyday, my pain was completely gone! So some years back when my Dane x Lab. who started to limp the same supplement I was taking. He stopped limping, too.

    Anyhow, the reason it works is because curcumine is a powerful anti-inflammatory. It won’t stop from my condition or arthritis to worsen or cure it. But it helps with pain because the join pains are caused by inflammations. You need to look for the supplement with Bioperin in it because the body cannot absorb curcumine without the presence of bioperin (black pepper extract). I am 130 lb., and I started off by 3,000 mg of curcumine/day everyday. After my pain was gone, I reduced my dose to 1,000 – 1,200 mg /day. I give my Dane x Lab. who is 90 lb. 1,000 mg/day, and I haven’t taken him back to the vet for laser treatments. I hope this helps!

    in reply to: GreenMin for Detox? #157933 Report Abuse
    WondrousPups
    Participant

    Hi Chipy!
    I don’t use GreenMin brand, but I’ve been using Chrollera supplement for my three senior dogs for over a year everyday now for the same reason you are thinking about using GreenMin. I looked at different detox products from spirulina , chrollera, GreenMin, combinations of these, and after evaluating efficacy, price, and over-all safety, I settled on chrollera for humans from VitaCost. GreenMin seems to be a very solid product, too.

    As for when to give it, I think you probably don’t want to give it with a meal because it can inhibit the absorption of minerals that’s in the food which pups need. I give my pups the supplement by itself between meals.

    in reply to: 2018-2020 : NUTRITION- Does this make sense? #157932 Report Abuse
    WondrousPups
    Participant

    Nothing stands out to be out of the ordinary. Do you have any concerns?

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