Search Results for 'anal glands'

Dog Food Advisor Forums Search Search Results for 'anal glands'

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  • #102545
    Karen B
    Member

    We fed our lab Orijen Six Fish for at least six years. She had never been sick at all except for once a year having to have her anal glands expressed. The last order of Orijen we got had some bags that were vacuumed packed and others that were not. All of a sudden her white platelets plummeted way down and the blood vessels popped in her eyes and her gums bled.
    The emergency vet ruled out everything and finally said that sometimes the immune crashes with no reason. Well, I don’t believe an immune system crashes for NO reason. It is just that the reason it happens wasn’t discovered. After heavy doses of Prednisone, Birdie was miserable and aggressively hungry all the time. She had a huge amount of fluid in her belly. As the Prednisone was tapered off (this whole process took WEEKS), the fluid went down and she started perking up. She was on her way back to health then suddenly started vomiting uncontrollably one evening. That was stopped by the emergency vet and we were sent home. She couldn’t get comfortable at home so we started back for the emergency vet again. She died on the way. I didn’t want an autopsy done but the vet had seen plenty of Birdie’s ultrasounds over the past few weeks. Her liver and pancreas were horribly inflamed. We believe the Orijen killed her. It was just all of a sudden that she stopped wanting to eat it. Symptoms that she had corresponded with other reports we have seen on the internet. I think it was the bags that were not vacuumed packed and from Kentucky that were the killers. I think some dogs are just more vulnerable to poor quality dog foods.

    #102261
    Aidan B
    Member

    Have you tried using something like Glandex instead of expressing the glands?

    #102190
    Susan
    Participant

    Hi Tatiana R
    What is your girl eating????
    My boy bum surfs on carpet, ground, grass & tries to lick his bum from food sensitivities, he can NOT eat chicken, barley, oats, corn gluten meal he gets a itchy bum, a dog naturally empties their anal glands, there’s no need for us to do it, except when they have IBD IBS diarrhea sloppy poos etc & as the poo passes out it isn’t hard enough to empty the anal glands but once poos firm up they empty naturally, Patch had a weird vet always asking about his anal glands, have they been emptied, you see when they have just emptied, clear fluid runs down bum after a poo, Patch has a black bum & I see it… Your poor dog sometimes these vet can make things worse….
    I would not be giving a dog steroids for this problem & as you have written it doesn’t seem to work, of cause steroids wont fix this problem while she’s eating a food she has an intolerance too, change diet to a limited ingredient diet with a different protein to what she’s eating now, feed 1 single novel protein, also go to chemist or supermarket go in the baby section look for a cream called “Sudocrem” or another cream that has the ingredients that Sudocrem has, Sudocrem is for nappy rash, eczema, dermatitis thick white healing cream, as soon as Patch starts rubbing bum on carpet, I get 1 Huggies baby wipe, I use the Coconut oil wipes, I wipe his bum & hold the cool baby wipe on his bum for 20 seconds then apply the Sudocrem & the irritation stops straight away, if you did this in the beginning her bum wouldn’t be so red & sore now…the vet would have been better prescribing a Hydrocortisone 1% cream this will help her sore red bum, rubbing bum on the floor will make it worse, when she goes to rub her bum stop her, cool with a baby wipe then apply either the Hydrocortisone cream or the Sudocrem…… when she is getting better please post & tell us..

    #102153
    Tatiana R
    Member

    Anon101, yes her anal glands did get expressed. She is itching and licking her genitals far, far more after she got them expressed. It’s strange, the medication will help her for maybe a couple hours, and it seems like when it wears off, that is when she gets very itchy again. I’m sure we are bound to take her again, I am just worried and seeking answers because the vet slightly brushed off the fact that she is itching AFTER getting the glands expressed.

    #102147
    anonymous
    Member

    Did her anal glands get expressed? You may have to return her to the vet to rule out an abscess.
    Yes, it happens. She may have a hard deep pocket that the vet couldn’t express without general anesthesia. If this is the case, it has to be done, listen to your vet.
    It’s painful, it is what it is, call your vet and see what he advises.
    At 10 she is a senior, so you may not want to get aggressive about treatment, however, there are many treatments available to keep her comfortable.
    Give us an update….

    This is not veterinary advise; consult your veterinarian.

    Ps: See you tube for how to videos, re expressing anal glands.

    #102146
    Tatiana R
    Member

    My 10 year old dachshund itched her butt sligtly here and there, nothing that would worry me. Her annual visit came around and the vet said her glands are large and full, that he advised to express them (or pop them? first time I heard someone use “express” as a term for it) and ever since then.. my dog is licking her genitals and anal to the point where she is raw. She is now starting to scratch on her snout, as if her mouth is itchy. Doctor gave her allergy medicine and steroids, but she won’t stop itching… she looks like she’s getting a small blister around her genitals too, possibly from licking so much. PLEASE HELP. I thought expressing the glands is supposed to help a dog not itch, not make them itch worse than ever before!!

    #98735
    Acroyali
    Member

    Has she had IBD for awhile now? Sometimes IBD dogs don’t empty out their anal glands as they should, if they need emptied (or are impacted), that would explain a lot of the breath problem.
    As far as acid problems go, in humans the symptoms for low acid and high acid are very close and mimic one another a lot. One of my dogs has LOW stomach acid and acid reducers were making it worse long term, even though the symptoms of reflux (making us all think HIGH stomach acid) were there. A bit of Bragg’s apple cider vinegar whenever he acts as though he’s flaring up works for him, just mixed in with some food. For him it seemed to normalize the ph. I can’t say if this will work for your dog of course, but it might be something to research further.
    For ANY dog with IBD, probiotics for life will not be harmful. 🙂 3 days is not long enough to notice a difference, sometimes it takes weeks especially if she’s just coming off antibiotics.
    Best of luck. It’s a trying situation. IBD can be a pain in the butt (pun not intended) but once you find out what works for your dog and can get them relief, all the effort is worth it. Don’t give up!

    #96149

    In reply to: Anal glands and diet?

    Natarene T
    Member

    I’ve dealt with anal gland problems on my Lhasa for almost six months. He was going to the vet almost ever week to have his anal glands expressed or checked. Every situation is different but in my particular situation it had to do with diet rather than allergies.

    Is your dog scooting? Is that why you are taking him to get his glands checked? There can be many reasons a dog scoots. Itchy butt, full anal glands, peices of poo stuck to their bottom etc. It sounds to me like your vet told you benedryl because he is scooting from an itchy butt.

    If it doesn’t gross you out you can check them yourself too. The glands are located at 4 and 8o clock around the anus. If you can barely touch around there and it feels like large peas then most likely they are full but if you don’t feel anything then I would leave it alone.

    Full anal glands have to do with diet as well. Often times the dog is not getting enough fiber in their diet. I would try adding PURE Pumpkin to his diet. Just a tablespoon should work. Also, there is a product called Glandex that I have used and it works really well when the pumpkin doesn’t suffice.

    Dogs are supposed to empty their glands when they poop. The poop is supposed to be firm enough to push against the anal glands to release the fluid.

    Good luck to you.

    #96014

    In reply to: Anal glands and diet?

    anonymous
    Member

    Ask the vet why he suggested Benadryl? Does he think the dog’s anal gland issues are related to stress, anxiety? Allergies?
    You may want to try a grain free limited ingredient kibble, my dogs do well on Nutrisca Salmon and Chickpea as a base with a little water added twice a day. Ask the vet if the vet tech can show you how to express his anal glands yourself (and how often), youtube has some good how to videos.
    Oh, and I would forget the greenies, maybe an occasional 1/2 carrot instead (don’t be alarmed if you see orange chunks in the feces, it’s all fiber). I don’t like plastic bones either.
    And start brushing the teeth once a day, it only takes 5 minutes once you get in the habit, youtube has good videos for this too.
    Is he getting enough exercise? Get extra weight of off of him if he’s overweight. Increase walks (optimal for 1 hour a day or more)
    Check the search engine here: https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/anal+glands/

    From a previous post of mine per:
    Excerpts (out of context) from article below: https://www.vetsecure.com/veterinarymedicalclinic.com/articles/136
    Overview:
    Anal sacs are the reservoirs for the secretions of anal glands which are located on either side of a dog’s anus, at approximately four and eight o’clock. These sacs contain liquid secretions from the anal gland, which, in healthy animals, are normally pale yellow-brown to grayish in color. The contents are usually emptied during normal bowel movements, or when a dog is nervous or scared. In most animals, these sacs empty easily. However, some dogs, especially small breed dogs, are not able to empty the sacs properly and become susceptible to anal sac disease.
    Transmission or Cause:
    The cause of anal sac disease is unknown. Smaller dog breeds, such as Chihuahuas and poodles, are most often affected. Excessive anal gland production, soft feces or diarrhea, poor muscle tone, and obesity also contribute to higher risk of developing anal sac disease. Anal sac abscess tends to occur after an impacted anal gland has become so severely swollen and infected that the anal sac forms an abscess and ruptures.
    Prevention:
    Expression of the anal sacs every few weeks or months often will help prevent anal gland fluid from accumulating and becoming thickened again. High fiber diets have been shown to help prevent anal sac disease in at-risk dogs, especially those that are obese.

    #96011

    In reply to: Anal glands and diet?

    Shawn S
    Member

    Also, this has been the same for the past 4 years or so and just now he is having anal glands problems.

    #96010
    Shawn S
    Member

    In the past couple months, my dog has started having problems with his anal glands. Took him to the vet and had them released. Two days later, it starts up again. Vet told me to try giving him Benadryl. While on Benadryl the past couple days, he has been fine. No issues with anal glands. Does that mean it is his diet that is causing it? Right now I feed him eukanuba lamb and rice (stuck with this since a puppy due to sensitive stomach), 1 greenies each day during the week, and he chews on a Nyla bone occasionally. Not sure where to start, I know that greenies are not the best for him and I could do away with them and start brushing his teeth more often. My first thought was to change his food to a better product. As I started think more into it and trying to eliminate the small thing, I Was thinking of first starting by cutting out greenies. Maybe the nylabone too? Doesn’t seem like the small fragments that break off those bones are very healthy. Any suggestions would be much appreciated. Feel bad for the guy when he is scooting his butt on the ground.

    Kay W
    Member

    I have never written on any of these, but ALWAYS have read and researched dog foods and topics etc. I am so grateful for this site and finding ALL the information. My girl will be 3 on Feb 14th. She has been sick since Christmas day. I found it odd that she had calcium oxylate crystals and a UTI after a vet visit. True I read that with Orijen, they need to drink more BUT….she acted so different too and less energetic and alert. After I read a guy’s article about his dog getting crystals on the Orijen, I called the distributor and asked about the Acana……after all “Orijen is the best as I thought”. I had fed my 75 lb baby Orijen the last 2 years. First year, I fed her the supposed “best” new Blue Wilderness until she got lethargic and hair started shedding……then learned/read how they sold the co. at that time and went with cheaper products. So then went with Orijen Regional Red the past 2 years. Crystals went away and normal PH thank God. I didn’t realize at the time that it might be connected to the food. Had just bought a NEW huge bag of Regional Red….along with the Acana for lower protein. This past week, she got 3 bumps on her rear that then turned to larger bumpy rashes. She started chewing on her tail obsessively and scratching, ate to the bloody skin on all three places, and scratched ALL over. I didn’t know if it was a yeast infection from the antibiotics which it was NOT. I then started giving her the Acana food, bought at the same time, just about 2 weeks ago. OMG…..very lethargic, less alert than before, red eyes and insane itching….even after the new organic “itchless” shampoo. Was scratching her face and sides of her mouth yesterday and today this evening after her “supper” of Acana, which she has NEVER done. She woke up throwing up at 4:00 am yesterday. I found this info and site tonight and now I know FOR SURE that it is this food, and from that new plant. I had called the distributor to ask “where” the food came from…they said KY, not Canada anymore. I had read that on another site also. I “had” felt so assured and happy that she had Orijen and I had found a great food. I’m just praying hard on her to feel better, and throwing away BOTH huge bags tomorrow, the Acana and Orijen! Forget about “transitioning” to a new food…I’ll risk the diarrhea and clogged anal glands instead of giving her this nasty food. I have read hours and hours trying to find a good SAFE Grain Free for her. Will do chicken and rice, but NOW getting the Grain Free Candidae Duck. They have NOT had a recall since 2012, and it was the company that made the decision just for precautions. I pray this food will work and hope the potatoes don’t cause an issue relative to starch/sugar/yeast etc. My heart goes out to anyone and everyone that has had any heartache with their pets/loving part of the family, that has suffered in any way. It TRULY is horrible that more people and companies don’t care more about our pets. These are like our “children” to most of us! For me I know! Thank you truly for sharing your stories and experiences to educate and spare other people and their 4 legged babies etc. I’m praying hard on my baby girl to get back to her old self SOON! Take care, God bless!

    #93099
    Michelle F
    Member

    So, I’m new to this. We recently adopted a 3 year old pit bull/basset hound mix. He’s on a monthly flea preventative, and I’ve not seen one on him. Anal glands recently expressed. When we bathe him, we use an oatmeal/aloe based dog shampoo. I have NO clue where to begin with food, so we’ve just been feeding him Pedigree, which I see now is not ranked very highly. Anyway, he vomits a lot. Usually once-twice per day. Sometimes it’s only saliva. At first I thought maybe it was just stress of a change…but now he’s got an obvious skin irritation on his back, above his tail. The fur is raised in spots, and he’s even bleeding on one spot. He’s constantly biting and scratching. So, with all of this, I’m wondering if he has a food allergy….but as I said before, I have NO clue where to begin when it comes to choosing a food. Is there one I can try that won’t break the bank, but might help?
    TIA!

    #92909

    In reply to: Anal Gland Diet

    Krista B
    Member

    Hi,

    For anal gland issues try adding produce like canned pumpkin, other veggies and small amounts of fruits. Have you heard of olewo.com? They have dehydrated beets and carrots that you rehydrate and add to your dogs meals. These foods have fiber so this will be beneficial for the anal glands. There’s also a supplement called perfect form by the honest kitchen that can be used for fiber and to regulate stools. Fruitables has a digestive supplement that can be used as well which also has pumpkin as it’s main ingredient. Probiotics are good for helping firm up stool. You can but probiotic powder or use foods that naturally have probiotics in them such as yogurt, Keifer, or fermented vegetables. Also just ground bone from sardines will naturally firm up the stool. There’s many different ways to add fiber. You can pick one or a few and you will be good to go. Good luck!

    #92755
    anonymous
    Member

    From a previous post of mine per the search engine here:
    Excerpts (out of context) from article below: https://www.vetsecure.com/veterinarymedicalclinic.com/articles/136
    Overview:
    Anal sacs are the reservoirs for the secretions of anal glands which are located on either side of a dog’s anus, at approximately four and eight o’clock. These sacs contain liquid secretions from the anal gland, which, in healthy animals, are normally pale yellow-brown to grayish in color. The contents are usually emptied during normal bowel movements, or when a dog is nervous or scared. In most animals, these sacs empty easily. However, some dogs, especially small breed dogs, are not able to empty the sacs properly and become susceptible to anal sac disease.
    Transmission or Cause:
    The cause of anal sac disease is unknown. Smaller dog breeds, such as Chihuahuas and poodles, are most often affected. Excessive anal gland production, soft feces or diarrhea, poor muscle tone, and obesity also contribute to higher risk of developing anal sac disease. Anal sac abscess tends to occur after an impacted anal gland has become so severely swollen and infected that the anal sac forms an abscess and ruptures.
    Prevention:
    Expression of the anal sacs every few weeks or months often will help prevent anal gland fluid from accumulating and becoming thickened again. High fiber diets have been shown to help prevent anal sac disease in at-risk dogs, especially those that are obese.

    #92753
    anonymous
    Member

    Have you been to the vet? Their anal glands may be impacted. So, I would start there.
    Then I would stop free feeding, feed them twice a day at the same times, separate dishes and put space between them. If they don’t eat the food within 10 minutes, pick up and store in the fridg, offer at the next mealtime. It’s okay if they skip a meal now and then.

    Add a little water (1/4 cup) to their meals and always have fresh water available.
    If you are away a lot you have no way of knowing which ones are eating and drinking.
    They will look forward to meals if no food has been available for a few hours and enjoy it more, that is what I have observed in my experience.

    Adding water to the new food you’ve chosen, and most important, a vet visit to get their anal glands expressed should solve the problem (imo).
    How about adding a topper to the kibble, a little scrambled egg or something?
    Also, an increase in activity may help, a few brisk walks a few times a day will help them with elimination.

    If you decide to try a different food, my dogs do well on Nutrisca salmon and chickpea as a base.

    • This reply was modified 4 years, 10 months ago by anonymous.
    #92749
    anonymous
    Member

    @ D S
    Regarding the anal gland issue, did you check the search engine here? Hope this helps
    https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/anal+glands/

    PS: I am not here in a professional capacity, nor is anyone else, that I am aware of. Just voicing my opinion based on my experience and knowledge.

    #92546
    Acroyali
    Member

    Agreed with Susan, especially on probiotics.

    I’d also have the vet check to make sure this dog doesn’t have impacted anal glands; that alone can make their breath smell like rotting death.

    Old dogs shouldn’t smell just because they’re old. Something else has to be going on.

    #92179
    crazy4cats
    Participant

    Hi Carolyn-
    Are his stools firm? You might want to try a food with more fiber in it. Natur Vet makes a chew that contains psyllium that you could give a go. Also there is another supplement called Glandex that I’ve heard people mention on this site. Here is a link that has them both:

    https://www.chewy.com/s?query=anal+glands&nav-submit-button=

    Hope you find something that helps your poor pup. What a nice breed mix he is. I bet he’s so adorable!

    #92142
    Carolyn K
    Member

    I have a year and a half old 68 pound Goldendoodle/Bernese Mtn Dog mix and I have to bring him in to get his anal glands expressed every month. He constantly has issues; licking, redness, skidding his butt on floor, etc. I began feeding him pumpkin at each meal and this seemed to help for a few months but it is no longer helping. He has been on CANIDAE® ALL LIFE STAGES DOG FOOD WITH CHICKEN, TURKEY, LAMB & FISH MEALS for about a year and Canidae large breed puppy before that. Info for current dog food ——-> http://www.canidae.com/dog-food/products/canidae-all-life-stages-dry-formula/

    I am looking into maybe putting some Psyllium into his food instead of the pumpkin but I am unsure of how much. I also want to maybe switch his food to see if that helps. Can someone recommend a good kibble for dogs with this issue?

    Thank you all SO much!

    #92139
    Susie
    Member

    First is there a way to stay logged in to this forum?
    If it were my dog I would get a referral now to an internal medicine vet. I learned through an undiagnosed dog of two years to just try to go to the IM sooner than later. You can tell the IM vet that youmay not be ready for anything invasive or costly and want to start with his opinion uti experience with this issue. I just had a dog with an anal glands issue and it ruptured. Vet wanted to lance it. Instead we did antibiotics and Epsom compresses. He healed within a few days and all is good. I realize yours is internal and not related. My vet did say my dog could possibly have what toes may have going on. Can you log into some holistic dog groups on Facebook just for ideas? Maybe there is a simple way to at least help him if it’s not an actual tumor. Dog butts are strange. Mine had a dry matter coming out of his gland!

    #92135
    Ryan K
    Participant

    I have no information at all about the mass this vet felt other then her telling me it doesn’t appear to be related to the anal glands. She said anal glands can abscess and get cancerous but this seems to be along the rectal wall above or around that general area. She didn’t say anything was an emergency or that I should rush to get an x Ray or treatment ASAP. She just said that when I bring him in for his next anal gland expresssing that she will feel it to see if it has gotten larger. She said to watch for irritation and if he shows signs of struggling to defecate or continues to scoot his butt then I should possibly run him in sooner for the biopsy which would involve putting him under and prolapsing the anus to use a needle and aspirate the mass for a sample. I am wondering if this could be a hernia? His diet has been massively changed since his slipped disc issue as well. He’s had a life of strict grain free- high quality dog food but since he has been on tramadol, Prevacox and gabapentin his appetite is pretty much destroyed. He’s been living off peanut butter (I hide his pills in it), canned chicken and tuna fish and some raw hide chews which he only eats the coating off of and leaves the actual rawhide. So, I don’t know if this is dietary related? I ordered some Glandex to see if that helps his anal glands in the meantime. I doubt he will eat them though. He’s seriously so uninterested in dry kibble or even most scraps. Should I just stop giving him tuna, bones and treats and force him to only eat kibble? This is so frustrating. This whole experience has truly shown me that I don’t think I can handle another dog again. It’s so much emotional and financial stress and trauma. I love my dog though so I’m trying my best for him.

    #92132
    Ryan K
    Participant

    I have been taking my 7 year old dachshund/terrier for laser treatments at my vet’s office lately and I mentioned my dog had been repeatedly slamming his butt down on the carpet all day and night yesterday so a new vet came in and expressed his glands. She came out with him and told me she felt a “mass” in his rectal wall that was not connected to the anal glands themselves but that she suggested getting biopsied in a month if it has gotten bigger when he needs the glands expressed again. Has anyone dealt with anything like this? I am seriously at my wits end with my dog’s lately. I just lost my dog of 15 years a month ago and then 2 weeks ago my remaining dog jumps and slips a disc in his spine and now this. I am so stressed over him already and now this! I figured I would write in to see if anyone had gone through anything quite like this and whether it could be something totally benign and harmless or if the odds are bad? She didn’t tell me much else other then rechecking it and going for a biopsy in a month if it has gotten bigger. Help!

    #91993

    In reply to: Anal gland smell

    anonymous
    Member

    Hope this helps: http://www.michigananimalhospital.com/page/421552054

    Anal Sac Disease in Dogs

    What are the anal sacs?
    Commonly called ‘anal glands’, the anal sacs are two small pouches located on either side of the anus at approximately the four o’clock and eight o’clock positions. Numerous specialized sebaceous (sweat) glands that produce a foul smelling secretion line the walls of the sacs. Each sac is connected to the outside by a small duct that opens just inside the anus.
     
    What is their function?
    The secretion acts as a territorial marker – a dog’s ‘calling card’. The sacs are present in both male and female dogs and some of the secretion is squeezed out onto the feces by muscular contractions when the dog defecates. This is why dogs are so interested in smelling one another’s feces.

    Why are the anal sacs causing a problem in my dog?
    Anal sac disease is very common in dogs. The sacs frequently become impacted, usually due to inflammation of the ducts. The secretion within the impacted sacs will thicken and the sacs will become swollen and distended. It is then painful for your dog to pass feces. The secreted material within the anal sacs is an ideal medium for bacterial growth, allowing abscesses to form. The abscess will appear as a painful, red, hot swelling on one or both sides of the anus. If the abscess bursts, it will release a quantity of greenish yellow or bloody pus. If left untreated, the infection can quickly spread and cause severe damage to the anus and rectum.
     
     
    How will I know if my dog has anal sac problems?
    “The first sign is often scooting or dragging the rear along the ground.”
    The first sign is often scooting or dragging the rear along the ground. There may be excessive licking or biting, often at the root of the tail rather than the anal area. Anal sac disease is very painful. Even normally gentle dogs may snap or growl if you touch the tail or anus when they have anal sac disease. If the anal sac ruptures, you may see blood or pus draining from the rectum.
    In some cases, the dog had an episode of diarrhea or digestive upset a week or two before the clinical signs of anal sac disease became evident.
     
    How is anal sac disease treated?
    Problems with the anal sacs are common in all dogs, regardless of size or breed. If you are concerned that your pet may have an anal sac problem, call your veterinarian at once.  Treatment for impaction involves expressing or emptying the sacs. If the impaction is severe or if there is an infection, it may be necessary to flush out the affected sac to remove the solidified material. Since these conditions are painful, many pets will require a sedative or an anesthetic for this treatment. Antibiotics are often prescribed and sometimes may need to be instilled into the sacs over a period of several days. In advanced or severe cases, surgery may be necessary. Most dogs will require pain relief medications for several days until the swelling and inflammation have subsided.
     
    Is the condition likely to recur?
    Some dogs will have recurrent anal sac impactions or abscesses.
    “Overweight dogs tend to have chronic anal sac problems because their anal sacs do not empty well.”
    Overweight dogs tend to have chronic anal sac problems because their anal sacs do not empty well. Each impaction may cause further scarring and narrowing of the ducts, leading to recurrences that are even more frequent. If this condition recurs frequently, surgical removal of the sacs is indicated.
     
    Are anal sacs necessary for my dog?  Will removal have any adverse effects? 
    Anal glands produce the pungent smelling secretion that allows the dog to mark his or her territory. For our domesticated dogs, this is an unnecessary behavior and removal will not adversely affect your pet.
     
    Are there any risks associated with surgical removal of the anal sacs?
    “Removal of the anal sacs is a delicate and specialized surgery.”
    Removal of the anal sacs is a delicate and specialized surgery. Some veterinarians perform this procedure routinely; however, in severe cases, your veterinarian may recommend referral to a board-certified veterinary surgeon. Some dogs will experience loose stools or lack of bowel control for one to three weeks following surgery. This occurs because the nerves controlling the anal sphincters (muscles that close the rectum) run through the soft tissues near the anal sacs. If the infection is deep and extensive it can be impossible to avoid damaging the nerves during the surgery. This damage resolves without further treatment in the majority of pets. In rare cases, the nerve damage is permanent, and e, it can result in fecal incontinence or the inability to control bowel movements, with constant leakage of feces from your dog’s anus.
    As with any surgery, general anesthesia is required, this always carries some degree of risk. Advances in anesthesia drugs and monitoring continue to decrease these risks. For dogs suffering from chronic or recurrent anal sac infection or impaction, surgical removal is the best option to relieve the pet’s pain. 

    My dog is very nervous and sometimes seems to express his own glands. Is this normal?
    “It is common for dogs to release the contents of their anal sacs, particularly if frightened.”
    It is common for dogs to release the contents of their anal sacs, particularly if frightened. Some dogs even appear to lack control of the anus or anal sac ducts so that small quantities of fluid will drain out when they are resting, leaving an unpleasant lingering odor in the home. If your dog has this problem, you may elect to remove the anal sacs.

    #91992

    In reply to: Anal gland smell

    anonymous
    Member

    I would take her back to the vet for a quick check, they may not have gotten it all out or it built up again, or maybe the abscess is still draining?. If impacted anal glands is a chronic issue vs acute, discuss treatment options with your vet. In extreme cases the anal glands are removed and the problem is solved.

    From a previous post of mine per the search engine here:
    Excerpts (out of context) from article below: https://www.vetsecure.com/veterinarymedicalclinic.com/articles/136
    Overview:
    Anal sacs are the reservoirs for the secretions of anal glands which are located on either side of a dog’s anus, at approximately four and eight o’clock. These sacs contain liquid secretions from the anal gland, which, in healthy animals, are normally pale yellow-brown to grayish in color. The contents are usually emptied during normal bowel movements, or when a dog is nervous or scared. In most animals, these sacs empty easily. However, some dogs, especially small breed dogs, are not able to empty the sacs properly and become susceptible to anal sac disease.
    Transmission or Cause:
    The cause of anal sac disease is unknown. Smaller dog breeds, such as Chihuahuas and poodles, are most often affected. Excessive anal gland production, soft feces or diarrhea, poor muscle tone, and obesity also contribute to higher risk of developing anal sac disease. Anal sac abscess tends to occur after an impacted anal gland has become so severely swollen and infected that the anal sac forms an abscess and ruptures.
    Prevention:
    Expression of the anal sacs every few weeks or months often will help prevent anal gland fluid from accumulating and becoming thickened again. High fiber diets have been shown to help prevent anal sac disease in at-risk dogs, especially those that are obese.

    #91991
    Jennifer H
    Member

    Hi. My dog is a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel and she’s had to have her anal glands exoressed a few times a year. Recently, I noticed she was smelling and I took her to the vet. Her anal glands were very full and she had an abscess in one side. The vet tech drained her and they put her in an antibiotic for ten days. It’s been six days since they were drained and the smell is still there. I bathed her the same day they were expressed so she wouldn’t have that smell on her. I don’t know why she still smells after they expressed her anal glands and she’s been on an antibiotic. There doesn’t appear to be any swelling and she looks normal. Any advice or help would be greatly appreciated.
    Thank you!

    #90755

    In reply to: Anal Gland Problems

    Sharon S
    Member

    Well the vet said we did the right thing having his glands flushed. The glands were really swollen. Turns out this hot spot is the size of a grapefruit! Oliver is only a 20# dog! Gosh I hope this helps, we are in to day 8 of misery. I may yet have to have his stools analyses for a variety of possibilities. Wish me luck!

    #90747

    In reply to: Anal Gland Problems

    anonymous
    Member

    See my posts above under screen name “anonymously”
    It may not be about the food, in extreme cases the vet can remove the anal glands, it is a simple operation and solves the problem.

    Do you mean hot spots all over the body? Or just localized near the rectum……see what your vet recommends.

    PS: I have never fed pumpkin to a dog.

    #90745

    In reply to: Anal Gland Problems

    Sharon S
    Member

    I just left my Oliver at the vet to flush out & inject antibiotics in his anal glands. They are going to also clean up a very bad hot spot at the base of his tail. The vet said he could have as many as 3 issues going on ( this after a miserable week at home after getting his glands expressed last Monday)

    Issues: hot spot causing extreme pain
    Anal glad compaction continues
    Stool being too loose all the time

    I’ve decided to hold off on the stool issue presently.

    It’s been a horrible week for us both & my pocketbook. I did start the pumpkin purĂ©e. I don’t know what I will do if this doesn’t work.

    #87165

    In reply to: Soft stools

    harp31
    Participant

    Hi, I can relate to your loose stool issues.
    I have 2 Bostons, one is 11 lbs and one is 28 lbs. Both are 3 yrs old and female. I have been trying to find a low fat limited ingredient food for them. The larger one has had bouts of diarrhea (some was bloody) and some vomiting on and off for the past month. My vet had her on metronidazole for 2-3 weeks but she started to break out in hives from it so we had to discontinue the med. They had been eating Annamaet Option 24% dry food for the past year or more with some boiled chicken or ground turkey as a mix in to entice them to eat it. For some reason they don’t want to eat it anymore and are having loose stools, etc. They have been on a bland diet on and off for the last month (boiled chicken and rice or pasta) with no loose stools or vomiting but obviously are not getting the nutrition they need. Every time I start to re-introduce the dry food, the loose stools start up again. I am working with my vet to try to find a suitable food for them. They were eating Acana Ranchlands Regional previous to the Annamaet kibble. They had the same issues after eating that food for over a year also (not wanting to eat it, loose stools, etc). Anyone else experience this with their dogs? It’s so frustrating to find a food they like that they can tolerate. My vet mentioned Royal Canin Gastro. and Hill’s Prescription ID (which they sell in the office) but I am not a fan of those 2 choices. I’m also skeptical of TOTW because of Diamond manufacturing and California Natural due to previous recalls. The DFA has several low fat suggestions here, I just hate buying a whole 5 lb bag of something if they won’t eat it. I guess I will go into town and see what I can find at Petsmart or Soldan’s that is a decent food. May be that I have to find some nutritional add-ins and cook for them, they are picky.
    I also had my dog’s anal glands expressed at the vet about a month ago and she does sit and spin on her butt at times, maybe she needs them done again.

    • This reply was modified 5 years, 4 months ago by harp31.
    #87152

    In reply to: Soft stools

    Lori Y
    Member

    Thanks so much for all the information!! Susan, that’s my theory… if we can firm things up, I believe his anal glands will express on their own again. Unfortunately, we have a lot of anal gland knowledge since our other dog had to get hers expressed every three weeks until we made the very tough decision to get them removed. (The surgery went great, and she has been absolutely fine ever since!) Our vet is recommending Purina Pro Plan Gastrointestinal because we’ve had him on that a few times in the past when he had diarrhea, but that doesn’t seem to have very good reviews. I checked out Nutrisca and that looks like a great option!

    #87150

    In reply to: Soft stools

    Susan
    Participant

    Hi Lori, I have a dog with IBD stomach & skin allergies, have you seen a vet about the soft stools yet? when Patch was doing soft sloppy yellow poos he needed his anal sacs expressed… then once his poos started firming up his anal glands emptied by themselves, if his poo is yellow & smells bad he will need Metronidazole tablets, Metronidazole is an antibiotic for the bowel…
    When Patch was eating Wellness Simple kibble for 2-3months it started to make Patches poos go yellow, sloppy & smelly again, so I had to put him back on Metronidazole for 10days & I changed his kibble to Taste Of The Wild Roasted Lamb & so far he’s doing really well..
    First try another brand of kibble, have a look at “Taste Of The Wild” Pacific Stream Smoked Salmon or TOTW Sierra Mountain Roasted Lamb, a few dogs with EPI & IBD do really well on Taste Of The Wild Kibbles, Patch does the best poos when he eats TOTW I don’t know WHY?? stay away from kibbles with chicken if your dog isn’t OK with chicken……
    Also have a look at “California Natural” Lamb & Rice it has just 4 ingredients, no peas, Just Rice & Lamb, dogs with IBD & IBS do really well on California Natural Kibbles…. http://www.californianaturalpet.com/products
    If after trying a limited ingredient kibble like California Natural or TOTW & poos are same Yuk, then see a vet & ask for a course of Metronidazole you get 21 tablets in packet, that’s a 3 week course, if vet gives you a script you can get from chemist (Cheaper) & try the California Natural again, The Blue Buffalo could of made his bacteria in the bowel too much bad bacteria & not enough good bacteria google S.I.B.O or Dysbiosis (leaky Gut)

    #87095

    In reply to: Soft stools

    anonymously
    Member

    The best thing that you can do for a dog that has a tendency to have impacted anal glands is to learn how to express them yourself. Check YouTube for how to videos.
    Have your vet tech/vet go over how often this needs to be done for your dog (once a week?)
    With the right diet, exercise and routine care, you may find the condition will clear up quite a bit and you may not have to express the anal glands as often…if at all after a while.
    Make sure he is drinking adequate water, maybe add a splash to his meals.

    Find a food that will give him firm stools, rather than mushy (less likely to get clogged in the anal glands).
    Also, some dogs have better stools on canned food, others do better on kibble. Buy small amounts of the recommended foods and see what works, sometimes it takes a week or two to see a difference.
    Plus, feed only once or twice a day, don’t leave food down.

    http://www.vetmedclinic.com/?p=290 excerpt below
    Prevention:
    Expression of the anal sacs every few weeks or months often will help prevent anal gland fluid from accumulating and becoming thickened again. High fiber diets have been shown to help prevent anal sac disease in at-risk dogs, especially those that are obese.

    #87088

    Topic: Soft stools

    in forum Canine Nutrition
    Lori Y
    Member

    hi. I have an 8 year old cockapoo who has started having some digestion trouble and now has soft stools- not liquid but definitely soft. Last week we had to get his anal glands expressed for the first time (outside of groomings), and I believe it’s because of this. We fed him Blue Buffalo Basics Lamb and Rice (I now see on this site that BB isn’t highly rated- a total surprise to me!) and switched to the BB grain-free formula which hasn’t helped. He doesn’t do well with chicken products either. I would really appreciate any suggestions for what to try next. Thanks so much!

    boobear27
    Member

    Looking to switch my senior dog’s food..I have an 11 year old Rat terrier and I use to feed her Wellness complete health small breed dry food, but it was causing her to gain weight even when I gave less her less she just wasn’t shedding the pounds..When we took her out to the yard to play and have some exercise she will play for a little then just lose interest and not being too active like our Toy poodle is..She is kind of a couch potato too:) We switched her to Wellness core reduced fat and she loved it! She loved the bigger sized kibble she’s a small dog but a large dog chewer:) She actually crunched and munched on this formula, with the Wellness small breed tiny sized kibble she would just inhale it..This was also why we had to buy a small feeding bowl..She shed all those unwanted pounds and started being more active again:)..The problem I’m having now is that she lost interest in this formula..She is a food obsessive kind of dog everytime I use to give her her meal she will dig right in and now everytime I give her her meal she looks at it and walks away for a while then will come back and she will eat some of it then walk away again for awhile and then come back eat some more and then walk away again..It’s like she’s just forcing herself to eat it because she’s hungry and she won’t eat the whole portion I give her..The only way she gets excited about the food is when I put water or chicken broth in it and then she will dig right in and eat her full portion, but I don’t wet her food all the time I switch it up by giving it to her dry or wet..She also has a gas problem she has really stinky farts and I noticed she gets these loose or soft stools..We have to express her anal glands like twice a month. I was looking to switch her food to a different grain free food something that’s also reasonably priced..I was looking at the brands taste of wild, Victor, and 4Health, but can’t decide which would be the best choice..I’ve read some mixed reviews and they had some recalls in the past..Has anybody had any luck on these brands? Which will be the better choice for my senior dog? I’m gonna make a vet appt to get her teeth checked, but I think I’m done with the Wellness brand..My toy poodle doesn’t seem to be interested in her Wellness small breed either.

    #84722
    Jennifer P
    Member

    I’m checking back with yet another feeding issue and an update. After my problems with trying to get Taffy to eat a kibble food, I gave up and found Freshpet rolled food (refridgerated). He ate it with vigor for about 3 weeks and then decided he didn’t want it anymore. Since I have 2 rolls on my fridge, I started mixing in a little bit of various high quality canned food to try to get him to eat it. He reluctantly eats a bit if I sit on the floor and feed him with a fork. After this has gone on for a week, yesterday I took Taffy to the vet because he just seemed rather down and not as active. The vet did a blood check and looked at all his levels (various but not exactly sure which ones). Vet said his blood work is normal. He also looked at his ears, paws, spine, anal glands, eyes, etc. In general, the vet can’t see any medical reason for the sudden pickiness. He said it was okay to give scrambled eggs (my idea). Taffy ate scrambled eggs twice yesterday, and although I got him to eat a mixture of Freshpet and canned food for breakfast, he wouldn’t touch it for dinner. So I broke down and gave him a scrambled egg tonight. He has actually gained .7 pound in the last 6 weeks, but that was due to finding Freshpet and his prior vigorous eating. Since he only weighs 10 pounds, I’m worried about him not getting enough nutrition as he’s pretty active. Now I’m back to square one on the feeding situation. Any ideas on what to try next? He still won’t eat kibble. I have tried at least 5 types and probably 7-8 types of canned, all high quality. Since he’s so active, loves to go on walks, etc. I assume he doesn’t have any health issues. The vet says his teeth are also great. I’m really worried and frustrated.

    #84376

    In reply to: Anal Gland Problems

    theBCnut
    Member

    There are quite a number of people here with dogs that have food sensitivities that results in itching, rashes, staph infections, hotspots, anal gland fluid overproduction, sebum overproduction, etc., including my dog. I put him on an elimination diet and as soon as I got him off of the foods he reacts to all symptoms ceased. His symptoms only ever return when he is given a food that he reacts to, so yes, food sensitivities do result in the symptoms you are seeing, so it is definitely something to look into.

    If it is a food issue, with a properly run elimination diet, you can easily tell if the dog is reacting to certain foods. The only time there is difficulty is if there are also skin allergies that are causing the exact same responses. Those allergies tend to be seasonal. That’s how you know whether or not you are dealing with skin allergies. Also, certain types of allergies are recognizable due to where on the body the dog is reacting. That’s one area where a good vet comes in. They get to recognize those signs very quickly.

    You will notice that I use the term food sensitivity rather than allergy. If you read some of the many threads here about food allergies and food sensitivities, you will see that vets often use the terms interchangeably, but we are talking about different things due to the differences in the dog’s immune system. The different types of food sensitivities that dogs experience are because they may have several different types of immune responses, IgA, IgE, IgM, and others. The “true” allergy causes hives, localized swelling, breathing difficulty, anaphylactic shock and is rare. Food sensitivities may result from damage to the gut lining and cause itching, redness, heat, sebum(skin oil glands) overproduction, staph infections and hotspots, etc. Food intolerances cause symptoms like vomiting, diarrhea, colitis, gas, abdominal pain, etc. They are all different, but they are all immune problems and get lumped into the term allergies. And many vets try to treat them all the same with drugs that are not good for the dog, instead of trying to get to the cause of the problem.

    #84365

    In reply to: Anal Gland Problems

    anonymously
    Member

    Try malaseb shampoo, or any gentle shampoo (only) for now, twice a week if you notice it helps. Don’t put anything else on the skin as it may cause irritation and make it worse and don’t make diet changes until you see the vet and he approves.
    Her symptoms may have nothing to do with the food.
    Food sensitivies (food allergies are rare) usually result in GI disturbances such as vomiting and diarrhea, not pruritus (itching) and rashes.

    I have a dog with environmental allergies she responded to treatment from a dermatologist and is stable now, she can eat anything but does best on Nutrisca Salmon and Chickpea dry a base.
    She receives Allergen Specific Immunotherapy. It’s the only thing that helped.

    So work with your vet, he may have prescribe meds to get things under control, if you don’t see improvement within a month or two and the dog appears to be suffering, consider seeing a specialist for skin testing. The vet can do blood testing, but the skin testing is the most accurate for environmental allergies.

    Don’t be fooled by mail-in saliva and hair tests, they are not accurate. People complain that their dogs test positive for everything!

    Do not give any over the counter medication…or any medication unless it is prescribed by a veterinarian.

    Also, you can use the search engine here: “allergies” and “anal glands”

    #84287
    Analicia H
    Member

    Hello,
    I have a 4 month old Dane who was on Iams Smart puppy food plus Eukanuba Large Breed (half and half). Breeder has his Danes on this diet for years, and never had a problem. My puppy is constantly having soft stools and problems with anal glands. The vet recommends the Royal Canin Food because of probiotics and omegas added to it (he sells it at his office). From what I see this website has low ratings for that food. He cannot be on grain free or large breed (giant breed is recommended since they have different needs). I would love to be on Orijen but I can’t afford that… Any recommendations? Thank you 🙂

    #84199

    In reply to: Anal Gland Problems

    anonymously
    Member

    Excerpts (out of context) from article below: http://www.vetmedclinic.com/?p=290
    click on link for full article.

    Overview:
    Anal sacs are the reservoirs for the secretions of anal glands which are located on either side of a dog’s anus, at approximately four and eight o’clock. These sacs contain liquid secretions from the anal gland, which, in healthy animals, are normally pale yellow-brown to grayish in color. The contents are usually emptied during normal bowel movements, or when a dog is nervous or scared. In most animals, these sacs empty easily. However, some dogs, especially small breed dogs, are not able to empty the sacs properly and become susceptible to anal sac disease.
    Transmission or Cause:
    The cause of anal sac disease is unknown. Smaller dog breeds, such as Chihuahuas and poodles, are most often affected. Excessive anal gland production, soft feces or diarrhea, poor muscle tone, and obesity also contribute to higher risk of developing anal sac disease. Anal sac abscess tends to occur after an impacted anal gland has become so severely swollen and infected that the anal sac forms an abscess and ruptures.
    Prevention:
    Expression of the anal sacs every few weeks or months often will help prevent anal gland fluid from accumulating and becoming thickened again. High fiber diets have been shown to help prevent anal sac disease in at-risk dogs, especially those that are obese.

    PS: Hope this helps, I don’t want to play “Dr Google”, obviously anyone can look up stuff and find articles that support their opinions, however, some articles are better than others, imo 🙂 See what your vet recommends.

    #84198

    In reply to: Anal Gland Problems

    anonymously
    Member

    The best thing that you can do for a dog that has a tendency to have impacted anal glands is to learn how to express them yourself. Check YouTube for how to videos.
    Have your vet tech/vet go over how often this needs to be done for your dog (once a week?)
    With the right diet, exercise and routine care, you may find the condition will clear up quite a bit and you may not have to express the anal glands as often…if at all after a while.
    Make sure she is drinking adequate water, maybe add a splash to her meals.

    Find a food that will give her firm stools, rather than mushy (less likely to get clogged in the anal glands).
    Also, some dogs have better stools on canned food, others do better on kibble. Buy small amounts of the recommended foods and see what works, sometimes it takes a week or two to see a difference.
    Plus, feed only once or twice a day, don’t leave food down.

    PS: My 15 year old small breed who needs help to have 2 bowel movements a day does best on Nutrisca Salmon and Chickpea dry as a base soaked in water overnight with a tablespoon of a topper canned or chopped up chicken, meat or scrambled egg. Three small meals a day and a bite at bedtime.

    #81100

    In reply to: Vaginitis

    Kevin R
    Member

    Hi Anon. Yeah, I know and I’ve always leaned more towards her issues being environment related. However, she doesn’t really seem to change from one season to the next like some dogs. She has always had year round issues. I guess I’ve just been baffled by the these different issues she’s had recently, she’s never had the genital issue before and the anal glands haven’t been this bad. Yet, she isn’t very itchy. Her skin is constantly changing in redness though, from red to not red and in between. I’ll take a look at the link you provided. I’m looking to at least consult with a vet dermatologist or internal medicine specialist. There’s a couple places here locally. Maybe it will be helpful to discuss with her vet to determine the highest priority of what she needs as I’ll be going in a few days for blood work and talk to the doctor who will be removing these bumps. I’m afraid this procedure here will set me back a bit and delay the trip to vet dermatologist though. Thanks.

    #81095

    In reply to: Vaginitis

    Kevin R
    Member

    Thanks and sorry for the late response. I as well am trying to minimize anything in her environment that could cause a reaction. However, I do have carpet and she goes out in grassy areas whether it’s my yard or someone else’s yard when I’m walking her. The vaginitis appears to have cleared up, but I will keep an eye on it. Her problem now is her anal glands. She has always had to get them expressed either from the groomer or vet, but all of sudden I’ve had to get them expressed twice just this week. Typically, this has been needed every 2 – 4 weeks. I don’t know if this related to food, something environmental, or something else. It’s a ashame cause she is doing pretty good as far as her scratching. It doesn’t seem to be near as bad as it was before she went on Atopica and she has been off of that for about 5 months now. However, as a whole she seemed better when on the prescription diet and Atopica. No vaginitis, not as many anal gland issues, and as I’m writing this she acting like she’s about to throw up. Seems like it’s been a different or repeat ailment every week. I have been to the vet so many times its unreal. She has a couple of bumps on her skin as well, but I’ve had a couple of vets look at it them and they’re not highly concerned after looking at samples from a needle aspirate. One of them did however have a few cells that were “interesting.” I’m debating on going ahead and having them removed. With all this being said, I’m wondering if I should just go back to square one with the Rx diet and Atopica. I don’t want to cause the Atopica highly worries me, but I wonder about her quality of life as well. I am also looking into the tests everyone has mentioned because I am having a really tough time right now deciding on what to feed her. Thanks.

    #79997
    Susan
    Participant

    Hi Karen, my boy gets an itchy bum, he suffers from itchy skin, so sometimes he bum surfs on the carpet, I get a cream called Sudocrem its for Nappy Rash, Dermatitis, Eczema sold in the baby section of supermarket or chemist, I put a bit on his bum & around his tail area.. The Sudocrem seems to stop his itch & bum surfing, Patches vet was expressing his anal glands, then when he was doing firmer poos, he didn’t need his anal glands express no more, when he poos they get expressed naturally now I see clear fluid running down his bum…… another thing I started doing was wiping his bum after every poo with those Huggie Baby wipes Aloe & Cucumber….apply a soothing cream & see how she goes, it could be habit now..

    #79487
    Anonymous
    Member

    I can’t help but get the impression that many of the regulars at this site dislike veterinarians. I base this on all the negative remarks observed, plus blanket statements. Except of course, for the “homeopathic” vets that support their opinions.

    Ingredients are not accurate (imo), companies lie, they use different names for the same ingredients, even a chemist would not be able to figure it out! Therefore I trust my vet to guide me with dog food decisions, along with a little common sense 🙂

    After the second or third time I had to have a dog’s anal glands lanced (painful and expensive) I learned how to express them myself (supported by my vet), over 20 years ago. I never had an issue with any of them in that department again. Whatever works.

    PS: There is nothing wrong with having differing opinions….

    #79486
    InkedMarie
    Member

    Welcome to the forums! I’ve never expressed my dogs anal glands myself, never been told to do so. Amy W above said it correct: you’re here so it’s a good thing.
    I’m laughing at not reading ingredients due to causing a headache. JMO but the ingredients are the first thing to read. Regarding vets vs reviews: you don’t have to look at the reviews. Read articles here; that alone will allow you to choose a high quality food. Vets get very little nutritional education in veterinary school. Unless they are a nutritionist or holistic vet (or are interested in nutrition & learn just like we did), they don’t know a whole heck of alot.

    #79471
    C4D
    Member

    Hi Trevor,

    As I stated earlier, what you decide to feed is totally your decision. If you have only used 1 formula of NV, you might try switching to a different protein. You could also find a grain free that is slightly lower in protein as DF suggested. NV Instinct carries limited ingredient diets that are lower in protein and are specific proteins, so if it is food intolerance, that could solve the issue.

    I found that when my dog had an allergic reaction to a specific protein and I switched to a different protein and added a small amount of fiber until the stools adjusted, the anal gland issue was resolved. She did see a vet and had a bad issue including an abcess. This happened quickly. It was a combination of allergic reaction to food and antibiotics, which created diarrhea, causing an anal gland problem.

    What you need is a food that gives her a solid, normal sized stool (barring any medical issue relating to the anal glands). That’s the reason some added fiber was also suggested. I hope this helps your dilemma.

    #79467
    Trevor V
    Member

    Sorry all, my question wasn’t about what to do with her anal glands. The question was about how to figure out what to give her when this site recommends foods that 2 different vets don’t, and that the vets recommend 3 different foods that are rated poorly here.

    #79464
    Jenn H
    Member

    From my experience adding fiber has been what works best.
    My choice is canned pumpkin.

    Interestingly enough the dogs that have needed it for anal glands are the ones that don’t hang out with the horses. The ones that do I know snack on their manure and/or dropped grain. So they get plenty of fiber!

    #79458
    Anonymous
    Member

    Oops! I think a posted a wrong link, regarding using the search engine at this site: https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/anal+glands/

    This is the one where I meant to say I didn’t agree with all of the opinions expressed, not the youtube one.

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