Search Results for 'anal glands'

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  • #146060

    Patricia A
    Member

    Alice. I use kibble as a base also and top it with Stella’s freeze dried or Primal. I have Chihuahuas and they never had hard poops using these freeze dried brands. Maybe you can try these for your Poms and see if these agree with them . However, it seems there is a plus to harder stools as article below:

    Clean anal sacs – Diets that have natural sources of bone make the poops firmer which requires your pet to strain a bit harder to defecate. This is normal and even beneficial, as the harder stools help the dog express its anal glands, keeping it clean and reducing the likelihood of infection. If you notice your pet straining for too long, or they appear constipated, you may have to rethink the ratios of your raw ingredients. Furchild takes out all the guesswork because we have done the necessary research and all of our Meals for Dogs and Cats have been formulated by raw pet food experts.
    Less Gas

    • This reply was modified 1 week ago by  Patricia A.
    #144783

    Sue H
    Member

    Do speak with your vet about the breathing and other side effects. My Crystal was able to decrease the dose to 1/2 tablet (60 to 30 mg, and continued to do well walking.

    The scooting may be related to full anal glands, so ask your vet about this, too.

    Hope this helps and your dog will feel better!

    #144663

    In reply to: New to raw feeding


    D
    Member

    To me, it sounds like the raw food diet was a total disaster for your dogs and I don’t blame you for not wanting to going back. However, my results have been the complete opposite. Anal glands did not need to be expressed, no more need for allergy medication for the itching and no more topical sprays for his hot spots after transitioning to raw food.

    Some breeds may have a better time handling the diet than others.

    Anyway, I think we can both agree we won’t be changing either of our minds. Our journey’s just happened to take us on a different path.

    #143507

    In reply to: Anal Gland Problems


    anonymous
    Member

    Yeah, tried all that.

    The only thing that helped was having the anal glands expressed at least once a week by a vet tech.
    You can ask your vet to have the vet tech show you how to do it yourself.

    My dog with environmental allergies had anal gland issues, once she started treatment for atopic dermatitis by a veterinary dermatologist all anal gland issues went away.

    She does well on a variety of foods. The dog food did not appear to have anything to do with it.

    PS: GSDs have specific anal gland problems related to the breed.

    #141274

    In reply to: Anal Gland Problems


    anonymous
    Member

    What does the vet that examined her recommend? That’s where I would start.

    From a previous post, per the search engine, “anal glands”

    https://www.vetsecure.com/veterinarymedicalclinic.com/articles/136 (excerpts below out of context)
    Oops! It appears that the link doesn’t work anymore.
    Well you get the idea, I hope.
    Overview:
    Anal sacs are the reservoirs for the secretions of anal glands which are located on either side of a dog’s anus, at approximately four and eight o’clock. These sacs contain liquid secretions from the anal gland, which, in healthy animals, are normally pale yellow-brown to grayish in color. The contents are usually emptied during normal bowel movements, or when a dog is nervous or scared. In most animals, these sacs empty easily. However, some dogs, especially small breed dogs, are not able to empty the sacs properly and become susceptible to anal sac disease.
    Transmission or Cause:
    The cause of anal sac disease is unknown. Smaller dog breeds, such as Chihuahuas and poodles, are most often affected. Excessive anal gland production, soft feces or diarrhea, poor muscle tone, and obesity also contribute to higher risk of developing anal sac disease. Anal sac abscess tends to occur after an impacted anal gland has become so severely swollen and infected that the anal sac forms an abscess and ruptures.
    Prevention:
    Expression of the anal sacs every few weeks or months often will help prevent anal gland fluid from accumulating and becoming thickened again. High fiber diets have been shown to help prevent anal sac disease in at-risk dogs, especially those that are obese.

    #141273

    Therese M
    Member

    I adopted a mixed breed puppy about a year ago. She is a mix of German Shorthaired Pointer, Chocolate Lab and I think maybe Pit. Ever since we have had her, we have had issues with her glands. She does not really scoot. But she will be lying down and all of a sudden it squirts out on its own and stinks. I have been adding canned pumpkin, apple and canned green beans to her food. She is on ProPlan Puppy Shredded Chicken. Any suggestions. I have seen suggestions to get her on a probiotic supplement or even add bananas, pears and olive oil to her diet. Then I have seen posts about changing her dog food to something that is not chicken. Lots of information out there. Any suggestions?

    #137070

    joanne l
    Member

    Here is another article to read: Should anal glands be expressed manually?
    Dog lovers are often misinformed because they are told they should get their dog’s anal glands emptied. Some veterinarians and groomers believe that expressing them will prevent them from filling up, which is not correct. In reality, the more frequently they are squeezed, the less toned they are. It almost seems that the canine glands get ‘lazy’ by having them squeezed too often.
    Ideally, you should let your dog’s anal glands do their job and allow them to empty naturally. Most dogs’ anal glands tend to be semi-full when examined, but that is not a reason to have them expressed.
    That is from this website: https://peterdobias.com/blogs/blog/11014181-holistic-approach-to-anal-gland-problems-in-dogs

    There are different opinions on everything, I guess do what works.

    • This reply was modified 4 months, 1 week ago by  joanne l.
    #136961

    anonymous
    Member

    From a previous post of mine per:
    Excerpts (out of context) from article below: https://www.vetsecure.com/veterinarymedicalclinic.com/articles/136
    Overview:
    “Anal sacs are the reservoirs for the secretions of anal glands which are located on either side of a dog’s anus, at approximately four and eight o’clock. These sacs contain liquid secretions from the anal gland, which, in healthy animals, are normally pale yellow-brown to grayish in color. The contents are usually emptied during normal bowel movements, or when a dog is nervous or scared. In most animals, these sacs empty easily. However, some dogs, especially small breed dogs, are not able to empty the sacs properly and become susceptible to anal sac disease”.
    Transmission or Cause:
    “The cause of anal sac disease is unknown. Smaller dog breeds, such as Chihuahuas and poodles, are most often affected. Excessive anal gland production, soft feces or diarrhea, poor muscle tone, and obesity also contribute to higher risk of developing anal sac disease. Anal sac abscess tends to occur after an impacted anal gland has become so severely swollen and infected that the anal sac forms an abscess and ruptures”.
    Prevention:
    “Expression of the anal sacs every few weeks or months often will help prevent anal gland fluid from accumulating and becoming thickened again. High fiber diets have been shown to help prevent anal sac disease in at-risk dogs, especially those that are obese”.

    #136959

    joanne l
    Member

    I did and my vet said to me abut my dog, “give him food that will frim his stools and they will express naturally” So I would appreciate if you don’t quote me like that. And it is true that if they are expressed unnaturally too often will weaken their anal glands. You can read about it your self.

    #136762

    anonymous
    Member

    “Well anyway, getting them expressed will fix it but the down side of that is it will come back and you will need to do it often, which is not good for the dog. It will weaken his anal glands”

    INCORRECT.
    Please discuss your dog’s condition with a veterinarian that has examined him.

    #136723

    joanne l
    Member

    Hi I am sorry to hear about your dog I have a GSD too. He has anal gland issues as well. My vet did not know what was causes it. He said “could be diet or just a condition” Well anyway, getting them expressed will fix it but the down side of that is it will come back and you will need to do it often, which is not good for the dog. It will weaken his anal glands. Anyway he was eating pro plan so I switched to Holistic Select and he seems better. Still he will lick at his bum but not often like on Pro plan. So the next step is to change the protein in his diet. I know it is not the grains that is causing it for my dog, it may be the protein. So I would try the hypoallergenic dog food and see what happens. Or try to find a LID of another brand. Best of Luck.

    #133478

    Jo R
    Member

    No laughter here. Put my dog with constant digestive issues on Purina Pro Plan sensitive stomach salmon and rice and in less than a month, problems gone. One issue was leaking anal glands while asleep. I had tried adding fiber but just got larger, softer poops. Now with no added fiber, anal glands expressing normally, firm, small once a day poop and no gas. The transition needs to be slow as grain free vs grain inclusive changes the gut flora. The most important point is until the grain free / heart problem correlation is discovered and rectified, I can feel safe with my food choice.
    What I don’t understand about people that shout that Purina and other grain inclusive foods are bad because they have so called “fillers” is why they think field peas and other mass farmed legumes are so great. They are also sprayed with the same chemicals, are gmo and are stored in the same type of silos. Also agree, Taurinedcm.org is a great source of information.

    #132673

    Sabrina H
    Member

    His stool is fine on the foods I can find that have 5-6% fiber. It’s kept anal gland issues away for a few years now. Including large breed food would give us more options.

    Vet opinions vary. One vet insisted he come in every 2 weeks for the rest of his life to have his glands expressed even though higher fiber in his food fixed the problem. Other vets in the same office acknowledged that higher fiber fixed the problem and didn’t think he should come in unless he’s scooting, chewing, or smells fishy. The vets in the area we live in now think anything that’s not Science Diet or Royal Canin is horrible and toxic, so their solution to just about everything is to put the pet on Science Diet. They don’t even like to discuss options that don’t involve Science Diet.

    #132664

    Christie B
    Member

    I’m pretty good with making sure that my dogs see the vet annually for general checks and to make sure their up to date with necessary vaccinations. I was due to go back towards the end of 2018, but it completely slipped my mind.

    My 9.5 year old American Bulldog mix has 1 front bowed leg. He’s always had it and he walks and runs fine (he looks gimpy when walking, but it’s how he’s always been and it causes no discomfort). He’s also had issues with food and the environment around him, although we’ve never been able to pinpoint his exact sensitivities. I’m sure you can go back and see my many posts and responses related to his “excessive drooling” and allergies posts.

    So I noticed the other day when he was laying on his side (with the bowed leg up) that there appeared to be a large lump behind the leg. I never noticed it or just attributed it to the structure of his frame with the odd leg. So I went back to some old pictures I had, and I didn’t see the lump.

    Concerned, I contacted the vet’s office on Saturday to make an appointment to look at the leg, as well as have his annual exam. The receptionist asked what doctor I deal with there. I told her the name of the practice’s owner (Dr. B), who also was the one who I discussed his allergies with (which was something I wanted to ask him about while I was there since the drooling episodes persist at irregular intervals). The earliest appointment was Monday 5:30. I rushed out of work that afternoon, let my dogs out, put the one in the car (I left the other home alone for like the 2nd time ever in the 4 years that I’ve had her)

    When I arrived at the vet, I could see other dogs in the lobby. My big guy is loud and disruptive when he sees other dogs that he wants to meet. So I called and told them I was outside to call me when the room was ready. Nearly 30 minutes pass (we walked laps around the building) before we’re ushered into the hottest room ever. The vet tech asks me why we’re here. I explain about the lump and that I want to have his annual exam, etc.

    So then we wait even longer and my poor dog, recognizing where he is is now panting and barking and crying. So the door opens and this women walks in. Never met her before, but she certainly wasn’t the vet I booked the appointment with. One of her arms wasn’t through the armhole of her cardigan and instead stuck out of the bottom. So something was up with her. She introduced herself, asked what I was here for.

    Now, I understand my dog can be intimidating at first glance. He’s 119 pounds and has a giant pit head. But I never interacted with a vet who wouldn’t approach my dog. Even after telling her he’s 1000% friendly (and mind you I was holding him next to me), she made sure to keep the metal exam table between her and us.

    So a vet tech comes in to ‘hold the dog’. The doctor looks at the lump and tells me, without touching it, that it’s a lipoma. I say “are you sure”, then she hesitantly approaches and feels the lump for about 10 seconds and says yes. Then says it’s obviously hampering his movements. I tell her he’s always had the bowed leg and cued up a video on my phone from him running, jumping and playing with my other dog the day before. So she then says it’s not hampering him, but it should be removed. And unfortunately it’s so big that they probably shouldn’t do the surgery and should have a specialist come in to do it. Then she did said that he’s young enough to warrant doing it (like I was automatically going to say no because of the expense). I she knew me like the other vet did, then she would know the well being of my dog is my priority. I ask her to get me an estimate.

    I then ask if we can do a needle aspiration to make sure it’s not cancer. Why would I put my dog through a surgery, only to find out it may be cancerous and then make him go through treatments? If it’s cancer, he might still have to have surgery, but maybe they could try other methods to shrink it or kill it first. She says we can “for peace of mind”. And then tells me 30 seconds later that needle aspirations on lumps are highly inaccurate. The sample they take might not have cancer, but it can still be there.

    Peace of mind, indeed.

    Then she tries to dissuade me from the procedure by saying it will be expensive (but specialized surgery isn’t?)

    I tell her to go ahead and do it.

    While they try to formulate the price, she sells me on their “wellness package” which includes standard blood labs, urine and stool labs and heartworm test. Other than her 10 seconds spent feeling the lump and listening to his heart with a stethoscope, she didn’t touch my dog. The vet tech felt my dog’s body for lumps. Found a hard one in his chest. Doctor edges closes and feels for 1 second…”not concerned”. I tell them he has a lot of little lumps on his belly along with a bunch of skin tags of various size and color. She wasn’t interested in seeing them.

    I’ve had wellness exams every year. The vet normally checks my dog’s ears, mouth, teeth, runs his hands over the dog to looks for lumps or abnormalities, checks over his legs and makes sure his joints are ok, listens to his heart, listen to his lungs/respiration, asks me what he eats, asks about his energy level, talks about any sort of supplements he takes, sometimes takes his temperature and checks the anal glands.

    But this lady had her tech do the most cursory exam feeling for lumps on his back and sides and that’s it.

    So she leaves the room to get started with prepping for the needle aspiration. Time passes (so much time) and she pops her head in and says that Dr. B (the practice owner) has to be the one who does it because she just had shoulder surgery (thanks for finally telling me) and unfortunately he still has two other patients to see, so can I come back another time? I turn around and tell her that I work every day and I switched my schedule around to be there that day and not for nothing but my appointment was supposed to be with Dr. B in the first place. So she says that she hopes that I wasn’t disappointed in having her treat my dog (I should have said something, but I didn’t). But I made the point that had I had Dr. B like originally scheduled, I wouldn’t have had to wait for him to finish with other people in order to do this test because he would have done the exam and the test and finish with me before seeing anyone else.

    I wound up waiting. My poor dog, already traumatized by the blood test puncture was panting and crying and barking. At first, I kept shushing him. But then I just let him bark it out, because maybe they’d be so sick of hearing him that they’d hurry up. Dr. B finally came in, did the needle aspiration and left. In and out in less than 5 minutes.

    I had hoped that he was going to come in alone so I could give him a tell him how disappointed I was with the exam and the doctor. But she had come in with him and with the vet techs in the room holding the dog down, I didn’t want to speak in front of them.

    It’s been 3 days and I’m still annoyed. I didn’t get to discuss the drooling episodes (she was not interested at all in discussing it since it happens so randomly and the Benedryl and Pepcid help manage it). Who knows if the other lumps are lipomas or something else? I wanted to discuss senior nutrition (but not with her at this point).

    I didn’t want to say anything until all the lab tests were in. Everything was good (Cholesterol and Total Protein levels a bit high, but she wasn’t concerned) and the biopsy came back likely to be fatty deposit lipoma.

    Anyone else have inadequate vet exams?

    And yes, I could have made a separate appointment to do the wellness exam and focus this one on the lump. But my vet knows these visits aren’t cheap and always makes a point of asking if there’s anything else I want to address while I’m there so I don’t have to pay for another visit. This new vet couldn’t be bothered…how do you expect to go to work to thoroughly examine a pet when you only have the use of 1 arm?

    #132560

    anonymous
    Member

    Quote “Is there any harm in feeding a 40 lb dog large breed food?”

    I’m not sure. You could end up with loose stools when you increase the amount of fiber. What does the vet recommend?

    From a previous post of mine per:
    Excerpts (out of context) from article below: https://www.vetsecure.com/veterinarymedicalclinic.com/articles/136
    Overview:
    “Anal sacs are the reservoirs for the secretions of anal glands which are located on either side of a dog’s anus, at approximately four and eight o’clock. These sacs contain liquid secretions from the anal gland, which, in healthy animals, are normally pale yellow-brown to grayish in color. The contents are usually emptied during normal bowel movements, or when a dog is nervous or scared. In most animals, these sacs empty easily. However, some dogs, especially small breed dogs, are not able to empty the sacs properly and become susceptible to anal sac disease”.
    Transmission or Cause:
    “The cause of anal sac disease is unknown. Smaller dog breeds, such as Chihuahuas and poodles, are most often affected. Excessive anal gland production, soft feces or diarrhea, poor muscle tone, and obesity also contribute to higher risk of developing anal sac disease. Anal sac abscess tends to occur after an impacted anal gland has become so severely swollen and infected that the anal sac forms an abscess and ruptures”.
    Prevention:
    “Expression of the anal sacs every few weeks or months often will help prevent anal gland fluid from accumulating and becoming thickened again. High fiber diets have been shown to help prevent anal sac disease in at-risk dogs, especially those that are obese”.

    #128952

    George D
    Member

    I have been feeding my two working cocker spaniel for the last 7 years on a UK brand of Holistic muesli style dog food which you add hot water. It was recommended by a Crufts best in beard winner and could not ignore. My female cocker was only 3 years old at the time and suffered from bad breath and painful anal glands problems. Within days of changing to the recommended dog food, the bad breath disappeared and she has never suffered from anal glands issue she is now 10 years old. My other male cocker has the shiniest coat and pure white teeth beside being 12 years old now some people pass him off as a puppy LOL but its true.
    Just a few months back the small dog food manufacturer was placed on the market for sale and could not resist making an inquiry which lead to my purchasing the business just a few weeks back.
    I am now looking to grow the business and establish worldwide distributors in Europe, America, and Canada we have distributors in place in Japan and Ireland. If you are interested please contact me or find more information online at https://landofholisticpets.co.uk/

    • This topic was modified 8 months, 2 weeks ago by  George D.
    • This topic was modified 8 months, 2 weeks ago by  George D.
    #127536

    In reply to: dog licking bottom


    joanne l
    Member

    Susan I agree some batches can vary because of certain ingredients. From what I have seen over the years when this happens he will get diarrhea and when I get the right batch the diarrhea goes away. If his anal glands are impact it could be from a certain ingredient that is making this happen. He is 4 1/2 and I never seen this before. But I can tell you color change in kibble, for me, is bad news. That is from true experience no matter what the company says. Thanks to everyone for advice I really appreciate it. I have a vet that comes to my home and I will get him examined.
    I did hear about firmer stools to empty glands so I made him some white rice, sweet potatoe and meat for dinner. Anon thanks for that info. He is a GSD and I never had this problem before that is the only reason I suspect the food. He had been on the food for about 3 months so I might also change the diet after talking to the vet. What confuses me is that sometimes they need more fiber and sometimes they need less. So I guess it is trial and error. How does anyone know really if they need more or less? Because sometimes fiber can provoke soft stools and sometimes it firms it up. The one time a year ago when he had loose stools the vet said give him pumpkin, so I did what a BIG mistake so then I did white rice and it fixed his problem.

    • This reply was modified 9 months, 3 weeks ago by  joanne l.
    • This reply was modified 9 months, 3 weeks ago by  joanne l.
    #127535

    In reply to: dog licking bottom


    Susan
    Member

    Hi Joanne,
    it’s probably his food the batches can varying, there might be more of a certain grain maybe more oats then the barley or more barley then oats & he does better when there’s more of the grain that agrees with him?? then sometimes there’s less of that grain & more of another grain??..
    The same thing happened with Patch years ago, when he was eating “Earthborn Holistic” Ocean, when I bought the first small bag Ocean Fusion to try the kibbles were darker he did really well so I get another small bag with the same batch & use by dates he did well again, then I tried looking for the same batch nb & use by date in bigger bag cause Earthborn Holistic in small bags is expensive at $44 for 2kgs.
    I couldn’t fined the same batch nb & use by date so I ended up buying the bigger size bag 12kg with a different batch nb & Use by date, the kibbles were lighter in colour I knew straight away he’ll have problems with this batch, within 2 days his poos were soft & sloppy then diarrhea by day 3-4,
    I’d say there was more grounded barley, now I’ve discovered he cant eat barley..

    Have you looked at the “Pure Being” sold in Adli’s America, the ingredients look pretty good in the Pure Being, there’s the grain formula’s or grain free formulas, we have just gotten the new Adli’s wet dry & treats called “Natural Elements” but we only have the Grainfree Salmon or Chicken formula’s & the fat is 18%, it’s too high for Patch, the US “Pure Being” has better ingredients & lower in fat, so I just bought Patch the Natural Elements Kangaroo treats they had good ingredients, I’m getting a few things together for Xmas he loves opening presents, ripping the paper apart & getting a squeaky toy….

    Look at Batch nbs & use by dates when you get the darker kibbles that agree with him or try another brand see how he does, or look at the EarthBorn Holistic Ocean Fusion formula he might do good on this formula, it has no Oatmeal, no peas & has barley & Sweet potatoes, Rye Flour then Potatoes for the carbs.. these ingredients might firm up his poos more, you can try & see, firmer poos will empty anal glands better but I think he might be reacting to an ingredient Patch has to have kibbles rotated or sometimes he starts reacting after 3months.
    My vet feeds Earthborn Holistic the grain free Coastal Catch formula for her sensitive girl.
    https://www.earthbornholisticpetfood.com/dog-food-formulas/holistic/ocean-fusion

    #127500

    In reply to: dog licking bottom


    anonymous
    Member

    I would rule out impacted anal glands first.

    Excerpts (out of context) from article below: https://www.vetsecure.com/veterinarymedicalclinic.com/articles/136
    Overview:
    Anal sacs are the reservoirs for the secretions of anal glands which are located on either side of a dog’s anus, at approximately four and eight o’clock. These sacs contain liquid secretions from the anal gland, which, in healthy animals, are normally pale yellow-brown to grayish in color. The contents are usually emptied during normal bowel movements, or when a dog is nervous or scared. In most animals, these sacs empty easily. However, some dogs, especially small breed dogs, are not able to empty the sacs properly and become susceptible to anal sac disease.
    Transmission or Cause:
    The cause of anal sac disease is unknown. Smaller dog breeds, such as Chihuahuas and poodles, are most often affected. Excessive anal gland production, soft feces or diarrhea, poor muscle tone, and obesity also contribute to higher risk of developing anal sac disease. Anal sac abscess tends to occur after an impacted anal gland has become so severely swollen and infected that the anal sac forms an abscess and ruptures.
    Prevention:
    Expression of the anal sacs every few weeks or months often will help prevent anal gland fluid from accumulating and becoming thickened again. High fiber diets have been shown to help prevent anal sac disease in at-risk dogs, especially those that are obese.

    #127493

    In reply to: dog licking bottom


    anonymous
    Member

    Quote: “I called my vet and over the phone he suspects a food allergy. He didn’t have any appointments today, but I will ask him to exam him. thank you”.
    “Did anyone hear of a food allergy causing this”?

    Good idea!
    I would not apply anything to the area you could make the situation worse!
    Food allergies tend to present as gastrointestinal distress, in example: diarrhea and vomiting.

    Is there a vet tech at your clinic that could fit him in today? I would give them a call.
    I am sure they could determine if his anal glands need expressing and it only takes a minute.
    Plus it costs less for a 15 minute vet tech appointment.

    Good luck!

    #127482

    In reply to: dog licking bottom


    Susan
    Member

    Hi Joanne,

    Patch was licking bum cause of food sensitivities & his poos weren’t firm enough to empty the anal gland naturally & he was rubbing bum on floor, grass, carpet, concrete, it was awful…

    Are his poos firm?? Have you changed his diet recently or giving him new treats etc?
    If his poos are firm it’s not anal glands they’d be emptying naturally themselves, also he’s a big dog, its normally the smaller dogs who end up with anal gland problems cause owners start emptying their anal glands themselves or when they go to the dog groomers they empty the small dogs anal glands, my vet said this isnt necessary to do on a healthy dog..
    Patches 2nd vet was emptying Patches anal glands everytime we went for our monthly vets, then Patches 3rd good vet said NO, there’s no need to keep emptying his anal glands, he’ll empty his anal glands himself, then she took him off the grain vet diet & said look for a Fish or Lamb & Sweet Potato grain free kibble, a protein you know he does well on, she said stay away from chicken cause the Eukanuba Intestinal vet diet was Chicken & his skin was smelly of yeast, itchy & rubbing his bum all day, the Sudocrem did soothe it for him thats stopped the rubbing bum on ground a little but as soon as he started the TOTW Sierra Mountain Lamb formula he started to empty his own anal glands & now I can see after he does a poos sometimes a clear liquid is running down his black bum & I get a baby wipe & wipe his bum after a poo…

    I’d buy a baby cream, I use either “Sudocrem” or look for “Bepanthen” soothing cream, this will stop the itch & any redness..
    Look at diet change there’s some OK grain free dry foods, there’s probably an ingredient he may be sensitive too..
    Also has he been wormed? maybe worm him aswell especially if you go on walks, he may have worms..
    Then if after doing these things & he’s the same I’d see a good vet that gets to the bottom of the problem not just emptys his anal glands & sends you home you can do that yourself, I couldn’t do it to Patch, it smells awful when the anal glands do empty this is why I wipe Patches bum with a baby wipes after he does his poos..

    #127481

    In reply to: dog licking bottom


    Susan
    Member

    Hi Joanne,

    Patch was licking bum cause of food sensitivities & his poos weren’t firm enough to empty the anal gland naturally & he was rubbing bum on floor, grass, carpet, concrete, it was awful…

    Are his poos firm?? Have you changed his diet recently or giving him new treats etc?
    If his poos are firm it’s not anal glands they’d be emptying naturally themselves, also he’s a big dog, its normally the smaller dogs who end up with anal gland problems cause owners start emptying their anal glands themselves or when they go to the dog groomers they empty the small dogs anal glands, my vet said this isnt necessary to do on a healthy dog..
    Patches 2nd vet was emptying Patches anal glands everytime we went for our monthly vets, then Patches 3rd good vet said NO, there’s no need to keep emptying his anal glands, he’ll empty his anal glands himself, then she took him off the grain vet diet & said look for a Fish or Lamb & Sweet Potato grain free kibble, a protein you know he does well on, she said stay away from chicken cause the Eukanuba Intestinal vet diet was Chicken & his skin was smelly of yeast, itchy & rubbing his bum all day, the Sudocrem did soothe it for him thats stopped the rubbing bum on ground a little but as soon as he started the TOTW Sierra Mountain Lamb formula he started to empty his own anal glands & now I can see after he does a poos sometimes a clear liquid is running down his black bum & I get a baby wipe & wipe his bum after a poo…

    I’d buy a baby cream, I use either “Sudocrem” or look for “Bepanthen” soothing cream, this will stop the itch & any redness..
    Look at diet change there’s probably an ingredient he may be sensitive too..
    Also has he been wormed? maybe worm him aswell especially if you go on walks, he may have worms..
    Then if after doing these things & he’s the same I’d see a good vet that gets to the bottom of the problem not just emptys his anal glands & sends you home you can do that yourself, I couldn’t do it to Patch, it smells awful when the anal glands do empty this is why I wipe Patches bum with a baby wipes after he does his poos..

    #127451

    In reply to: dog licking bottom


    anonymous
    Member

    Anal gland issues? Take him to the vet. It will only get worse.

    Example: https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/anal+glands/

    Pruritus in the anal area could be caused by any number of things, only a veterinarian that has examined the dog can diagnose and advise you accordingly. Obviously the condition is causing him discomfort.

    #123223

    Atlas T
    Member

    Hi everyone,
    The good news is that my dog finally found a dog food he can tolerate: Natural Balance LID (both fish & sweet potato and duck & potato, haven’t tried any others). He’s been on this for more than six months now and his poop is a great consistency. However, in an ideal world, I’d like to move him over to another food for two main reasons: 1. Price! (yes, it’s not the most expensive, but it is more than I want to spend) and 2. Rating (only 3 stars on dog food advisor).

    Here’s the challenge: every time I transition him to a new food, his stool goes soft. I do it EXTREMELY slowly, and yet every time I hit about half a cup per day, I have to stop because of his stool. That all leads to another problem, which is that he starts obsessively licking his butt, which I think means that his anal glands aren’t being expressed with the soft stools. So then I go back to Natural Balance for a few weeks and starts again with a new food. I was hoping to have him be on either the Costco Natural Domain or there regular dog food, but no such luck. I’ve tried lots and lots of different brands with no luck. The only one he seemed to do somewhat alright on was the American Journey LID salmon and sweet potato.

    I’m hoping someone here can help me with a strategy for how to find the right food. I’ve tried shopping by protein (since he seems to be fine with at least fish and duck, thought probably with most others as well), by grain free, by things without legumes. Maybe I need to focus on fiber content? Or fat content? Or something I’m not thinking of altogether?

    I was also wondering if I should just buy some psyllium husks to add into his food to make his poop harder?

    And while I have lots of respect for folks who feed raw, that’s not a path we’ll be pursuing, so please give me other suggestions. Thanks so much!

    #122103

    In reply to: drinking alot of water


    Susan
    Member

    Hi,

    “I am thinking of changing his food, but I don’t want to upset his stomach”,

    his intestinal tract is already upset, if he was doing really well on this Purina Pro Plan Sensitive stomach formula, his poos would be nice & firm, he wouldn’t be drinking & drinking water & he wouldnt be licking his bum…

    DRINKING heaps of water- if his poos are soft/sloppy & not firm then he might be dehydrated, something in this formula might be dehydrating him like too many soluble fibers…your dog mighten have problems digesting his foods, your dog might be OK & can digest foods, he might digest his food too quickly like Patch does, so he doesnt need these type of ingredients that are high in soluble fibers that digest in teh small bowel, this could be the reason for drinking excess water??

    Licking bum area or rubbing bum on ground/grass could be food sensitivities, something in this Pro Plan formula he’s sensitive too….
    or his anal glands are full & need emptying, his poos mighten be firm enough & his anal glands are not naturally emptying now, this happens with Patch when he eats a grain kibble that’s higher in soluble fibers, maize/corn gluten meal, barley, oats, rice, & his poos aren’t firm enough to empty his anal glands…

    Have you seen the Purina Poo chart??
    https://www.proplanveterinarydiets.ca/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/PPPVD-Fecal-Scoring-Chart-EN-FINAL.pdf

    I really think alot of his Intestinal problems is to do with FIBER, Soluble fiber & Insoluble fiber & he cant handle too much soluble fiber ingredients as they digest too quickly in the small bowel & he might be like Patch & digests his food quickly anyway, so when they eat foods that are higher in soluble fibers this is when their poos are sloppy & are not firm.
    He needs a dry food that has more insoluble fiber & less soluble fiber & alot of grain free formulas have more insoluble fiber ingredients & less soluble fiber ingredients..

    Potatoes- Fiber from potatoes comes in both forms, soluble and insoluble, the “insoluble content is higher”. This is probably why dogs with IBS or IBD do really well when they eat a kibble that has potato in it…

    He’d probably do better on a Large Breed grain free kibble that has potato?? or a grain kibble that has potato in it…

    Make sure the next kibble you try has at least 2-3 meat protein meals as 1st & 2nd ingredients, so there’s less fiber in his diet & more meat but not too much meat 25%-34%, the Purina Pro plan Lamb & Oatmeal Sensitive Stomach doesnt have much meat protein in it, it has more plant proteins which = higher soluble fiber ingredients….

    Have a look at Victor, a few people say their dogs are doing really well eating Victor dog food..
    Look at the Victor Select formula’s, Victor uses the Montmorillonite clay.
    Chicken Meal & Brown Rice with Lamb meal.
    https://victorpetfood.com/products/chicken-meal-brown-rice-formula

    or look at “Whole Earth Farms” Adult, it’s made by Purina if you like Purina but I really would look at a different brand for now.
    https://www.feedgoodness.com/products/recipe?title=Adult-Recipe&id=6
    or
    “Whole Earth Farm” Grain Free Recipe with Pork, Beef & Lamb (Poultry-Free)
    For All Breeds & Life Stages
    https://www.feedgoodness.com/products/recipe?title=Whole-Earth-Farms-Grain-Free-Recipe-with-Pork%2C-Beef-&-Lamb-(Poultry-Free)&id=8

    #117222

    Sabrina H
    Member

    There is no form of specialist at all anywhere near my area (we would have to travel well over 200 miles to get to one and my car might not make it), and having just spent a small fortune and most of my savings on my senior cat money is tight. Both pets needed to have issues at the same time apparently. I recently moved and I’m having a hard time finding a decent vet up here. Some think all food except Royal Canin and Science Diet are terrible, others don’t seem to care about the pet and only want the money, and a couple of them seem like they slept through vet school.

    With Taste of the Wild, his skin was best on High Praire, his anal glands were in the best shape (until recently) on Southwest Canyon. Pine Forest caused him to be incredibly gassy and his feces were never well-formed. Pacific Stream really had no redeeming qualities.
    He was eating Southwest Canyon but the last bag I bought was High Praire to see if getting rid of the boar would help any. It’s only been a couple weeks but it does seem like his neck is itching less, though he’s still itching the base of his tail.

    I don’t remember quite all that I tried with 4Health. I know he started on the regular (not grain free) formula and I think I stuck mostly with the chicken option before switching to the salmon and potato in an effort to help his skin, then to the grain free ones. Grain-free does definitely help his condition.

    Beneful, unsurprisingly, left him with the worst dandruff and his feces weren’t formed at all, ever. They were just…mush.

    I give as few baths as possible. The frequency depends on whether or not he finds something stinky to roll in, like baby opossums passed out in the backyard or duck poop that the neighbor sprays over the fence. If he doesn’t find anything gross to roll in he gets a bath every 2 months with a moisturizing shampoo, usually with aloe/oatmeal in it. I’ve tried bathing less as well as bathing more and it doesn’t have much effect. A lack of baths for longer than 2 months does seem to make him itchier, probably because he’s dirty.

    In terms of fish oil, I’ve tried a couple different kinds. One was wild Alaskan salmon oil and the other was just omega-3 and didn’t specify anything other than fish from Norway. He was on each one for a few months and neither did anything. I refuse to give up apparently so I have a third kind to try when I’m done with the omega-3, which is another brand of wild Alaskan salmon oil.

    With the experience I’ve had with the vets here thus far, they’ll almost certainly tell me to put him on Science Diet to make all his problems disappear and leave it at that.

    #117164

    pitlove
    Member

    Hi Sabrina-

    Despite having normal hard stool, my bully mix will sometimes need to have his anal glands expressed. My boss/his vet explained to me that some dogs just do not have correct anatomy that allow them to express their anal glands on their own. You may simply need to learn how to do it at home, or bring him on occassion to the vet to have them do it. Sounds like you know what fiber % helps and what makes it worse, so find a food that has that fiber % and keep him on it.

    Our dog also gets an annual ear infection in his left ear. We treat the symptoms and they go away. It happens at the start of summer time. I have ear meds on hand at all times.

    As far as the dander goes, you didn’t mention how often you were bathing him and what you were bathing him with. Too frequent bathing can cause what you are seeing. Also how long did you use the fish oil supplements for and was the source of the fish wild caught? I did not notice a difference in my dog for a little over a month when I did fish oil supplements the first time. After about a month I started to see a difference.

    Also it is ok to get a second opinion from another vet. I’ve done it even though I like the vet I see.

    #117144

    Acroyali
    Member

    What formulas of 4-Health and TOTW is/was he on? Each company has several quality formulas and none of them are the same.
    When a dog is going after “rears (anal glands) and ears”, it’s usually (not always) a food issue.
    It’s silly IMO to assume owning a dog will set you back thousands of dollars. Vet care is expensive, but simply itchy ears/paws shouldn’t set an owner back thousands. It makes it impossible for the average Joe to own a pet.
    Keep a log of what they eat (the company, brand, formula, and ingredients list) and what that food contains and how they react. Talk with your vet. If they blow you off, fire them and find another vet that will talk to you.


    Sabrina H
    Member

    My dog has a few issues the vet has been overwhelmingly unhelpful in resolving. I’m hoping a food change can resolve some of it. He’s had a constant issue with impacted anal glands, which is mostly solved by keeping him on food that’s 4.5-5% fiber. 5.5% and up is too high, making his feces completely unformed and his anal glad problem worse. 4% and below gives him solid formed feces, but they aren’t large enough to clear the glands. He also has a constant problem with one ear that bothers him intermittently, and there’s no apparent pattern to when or why it happens. The vet can’t see any signs of any kind of issue in the ear at all and no treatment has worked. Finally, he has constant dandruff and has recently acquired an itchy neck. Fish oil supplements don’t help.

    Switching him off Beneful and on to 4Health helped his feces consistency a little, but the itchy skin and dandruff were horrid and the ear problems were still bad. Taste of the Wild greatly improved his skin over the last couple years, and certain formulas help keep the anal gland issues at bay. With his newly itchy neck, dandruff, and ear issues showing no improvement, it’s time to try another food. I’m only a very tight budget though with very little wiggle room and I can’t spend much over $2 per pound. $2.30 per pound is beyond pushing it, so I would not even go that high if possible. I’m having issues finding food that fits everything I need. Any recommendations would be greatly appreciated!

    #116224

    In reply to: Anal gland issues


    hOtRuNNeR L
    Member

    Hi all……I found for my dog, Havanese, in order to manage or cure his anal gland issue, since he doesn’t scoot or hasn’t figured out how to do it like my Maltese Terrier did, and since the groomer will NOT express his anal gland every six weeks when groomed, I had no their option. His anal gland has burst on its own twice now. Two months ago our vet could not see him when it happened. So we went to another vet clinic to have it looked after. Total misinformation and hungry for $$$$. It’s as if they want you to have the issue and to keep in coming back to spend $$$. The vet put him on Laxaday, boom, what a mistake. Thank goodness I tried it once to see the effect. Poop explosion 💥. I am going from bad to worse. It didn’t make his stool firm, it did the opposite. I cleaned it up, the. I put a small amount of Polysporin on the exterior skin, burst anal gland, he didn’t lick and wasn’t in any pain like the first time. He was happy that I was getting to know how to self diagnose and treat the issue without running to the vet every time and stress him out. So that’s when I went to the internet for help. We increased his diet by 100% increase in daily finer intake of his dry kibble. Then we (use to use pumpkin purée 100%) but then somehow he threw up from digesting it. Then I went to the highest form of probiotic non fat yogurt @ 1 tbsp per day…. VOILA !!! Probioticnin fat yogurt along with grain free pumpkin Cookies during the day, along with higher fiber dry kibble, seems to keep his anal gland in check. He doesn’t lick 👅 anymore like he use to endlessly during no the day. He is calm, relaxed, stools are firm and their are no bulging anal glands like before. BTW, one vet wanted me to think about removing his AG… NO WAY. Another vet wanted me to express his AG daily myself…NO WAY…(should only be done by a vet or groomer?)

    #115021

    anonymous
    Member

    Please go the the vet. No one here has examined your dog, but what you describe could be impacted anal glands (painful) among other things.

    #111935

    In reply to: Anal gland issues


    Susan
    Member

    Hi Sarah,
    sounds like your dog is in pain & needs a LTD food that has just 1 meat protein & 1 carb only,
    sometimes pet food companies do a recall just to be on the safe side & there was nothing wrong with their food…it will normally say they did a “Voluntry recall” …Canidae was one of these companies did voluntary recall, cause their food was being packed at the same plant as another pet food that was havinga recall but there was nothing wrong with the Canidae food they did the recall just to be safe..
    I wouldn’t be worrying about recalls, alot of these recalls were done years ago & the pet food companies have never had another recall since…..Its very hard to find a dry kibble that has 1 meat protein & only 1 carb…

    I would try “Natural Balance” LTD Sweet Potato & Bison or Sweet Potato & Fish or Potato & Duck formula.. or “Ziwi peak” air dried but Ziwi Peak is expensive or “Canidae Pure” Formula’s, Pure Wild, Pure Sea or Pure Sky but they have about 6-7 ingredients or Canidae’s other brand “Under The Sun” Large Breed formula..is very limited in ingredients.

    Potato & Sweet Potato firms up the poo & the firm poo will express the anal glands naturally…
    I can see when Patches poo has expressed Patches anal glands, I see clear fluid running down his black bum, then when we get home from our walk I use the Huggie baby wipes, I get the Coconut oil baby wipes & wipe his bum, the wipes are nice & cool on their bums..
    I’ve never seen Patch ever lick his bum or his wooohoo….

    Patch use to have anal gland problems, he has IBD the vet use to express every time we saw her monthly but since I found out what foods he’s sensitive too he has stopped his bum surfing on my rug…..

    #111919

    In reply to: Anal gland issues


    anonymous
    Member

    https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/anal+glands/

    Consider a grain free, potato free food such as Zignature or Nutrisca as a base.

    #111915

    Sarah G
    Member

    My medium golden mix, Lakita, just started having issues once she turned 3 years old.
    – We moved from Virginia to Md (3 hour difference) and had recently changed her diet when it started happening.
    – She was originally on Rachel Ray Just Six Lamb and was changed over to Nutro Wholesome Essentials Lamb when our other dog was having sensitive stomach issues.
    – Lakita does not scoot, but she will lick and chew the area constantly and she “screams” when she poops. She is a bit of a drama queen, and tends to cry very loudly when she’s unhappy or overly happy (like a stereotypical husky). The vet exclaimed that she isn’t in pain, just discomfort and is loudly letting us know this – but I do think she’s in at least some pain.
    – The vet has over one year preformed tests to determine that the issue is definitely her anal glands. They have never been infected, but are constantly full. Even after expressing, Lakita will still cry when she poops.
    – Fiber supplements helped a little. I changed her back to her original Rachel Ray food plus the fiber supplement and it finally went away for about 4 – 6 months.
    – After the supplement ran out and I was hoping she would normalize, she began having issues again. When I started giving the supplement to her, it didn’t help.
    – We’ve had her glands expressed around 4 -5 times throughout the year until she began to feel better. When it came back we did it again, but it doesn’t seem to have an actual affect.
    – It would seem to be seasonal since it basically when away on its own, but she never had the issue in Virginia just 3 hours away. And she has stayed in MD here in there with family sometimes for a couple weeks without issues.

    I honestly think diet is the biggest factor and I’m thinking of switching to Grain Free food – but I’m a little nervous to do so with all the recalls lately. Does anyone have suggestions? Especially ones without recall history would be most appreciated.

    #111725

    Eileen W
    Member

    I am posting an update on both dogs.
    1. Molly
    I sought a second opinion from another vet. Molly has been on a prescription diet for about 3 months. Her poops are well formed now and the last two times her anal glands were checked they did not need to be expressed. My next steps are to keep her on for another month and then move her to a novel protein and limited ingredient diet food. I plan to try Zignature Kangaroo. I am hopeful the trend will continue on a food more balanced. The prescription diet did confirm she is able to express on her own and the more solid poops likely helped with that process. I have read about the deficiencies in the prescription diets…it is not a long term plan so please refrain from beating me up about it. I started her on a prebiotic when I changed her food.

    2. Sierra
    I switched her from Pure Vita to Fromm Four Star Nutritionals (with grain). She is pooping about 1/3 of what she was on PV and they are also firm. She is no longer scratching or chewing on her feet. Her energy level is great and she seems better than on either Acana or PV. She is off her allergy meds completely now. She still needs her anal glands expressed and as I mentioned she has structural issues which have her anal glands in non standard positioning. I started her on a prebiotic when I changed her food. I am happy with her progress.

    My summation: after months of reading and many conversations with vet and other dog owners, I have come to believe there is no single food (brand, flavor, etc.) or medication or “recipe” that addresses this. I have to be willing to try something new if current plan is not working and it may take months to find the right balance. This is my opinion only and I am not a vet. Good Luck.

    #109822

    anonymous
    Member

    Zignature, for something a bit more reasonable, Nutrisca
    I have found that grain free and avoiding potatoes helps.
    From a previous post of mine per:
    Excerpts (out of context) from article below: https://www.vetsecure.com/veterinarymedicalclinic.com/articles/136
    Overview:
    “Anal sacs are the reservoirs for the secretions of anal glands which are located on either side of a dog’s anus, at approximately four and eight o’clock. These sacs contain liquid secretions from the anal gland, which, in healthy animals, are normally pale yellow-brown to grayish in color. The contents are usually emptied during normal bowel movements, or when a dog is nervous or scared. In most animals, these sacs empty easily. However, some dogs, especially small breed dogs, are not able to empty the sacs properly and become susceptible to anal sac disease”.
    Transmission or Cause:
    “The cause of anal sac disease is unknown. Smaller dog breeds, such as Chihuahuas and poodles, are most often affected. Excessive anal gland production, soft feces or diarrhea, poor muscle tone, and obesity also contribute to higher risk of developing anal sac disease. Anal sac abscess tends to occur after an impacted anal gland has become so severely swollen and infected that the anal sac forms an abscess and ruptures”.
    Prevention:
    “Expression of the anal sacs every few weeks or months often will help prevent anal gland fluid from accumulating and becoming thickened again. High fiber diets have been shown to help prevent anal sac disease in at-risk dogs, especially those that are obese”.

    Regarding allergies, it would be best to make an appointment with a board certified veterinary dermatologist for testing/ diagnosis/treatment, if you don’t have good results with your regular vet within a reasonable amount of time.
    In the meantime, has your vet recommended a prescription food/therapeutic diet? That may be a good place to start.
    Beware of homeopathic miracle cures, forget about mail-in hair and saliva tests (no good).
    For science-based veterinary medicine go here http://skeptvet.com/Blog/
    You can use the search engine there to look up topics.
    This site has a search engine too, see my posts.
    Good luck
    PS: Regarding the blood test via vet, food allergies are rare and food sensitivities tend to fluctuate. Intradermal skin testing done by a veterinary dermatologist is the most accurate. My dog has environmental allergies, her anal gland issues cleared up immediately after she started the prescribed treatment by the specialist.

    #109817

    Ryan K
    Member

    I recently started my dog on a prescription diet (Hills ZD) for itching/chewing from allergies. He actually loves the food BUT I am noticing that he’s pooping an almost insane amount and the poop is pretty “soft and mushy” looking. He’s been on this food for a month and I am still noticing this. His anal glands have also been bothering him a lot since starting this. He’s constantly scooting despite getting them expressed. I feel like the food just isn’t really impressing me enough to want to keep paying such a pricey amount for it. My question is this…is there a better dry food that I could get him on that will help his glands release naturally while firming his stool up and that will also alleviate his itching? I had him on California Naturals Kangaroo but it’s really become quite hard to find and it didn’t seem to help that much with his symptoms. Any thoughts?

    • This topic was modified 1 year, 7 months ago by  Ryan K.
    #108274

    anonymous
    Member

    Zignature, for something a bit more reasonable, Nutrisca
    I have found that grain free and avoiding potatoes helps.

    From a previous post of mine per:
    Excerpts (out of context) from article below: https://www.vetsecure.com/veterinarymedicalclinic.com/articles/136
    Overview:
    Anal sacs are the reservoirs for the secretions of anal glands which are located on either side of a dog’s anus, at approximately four and eight o’clock. These sacs contain liquid secretions from the anal gland, which, in healthy animals, are normally pale yellow-brown to grayish in color. The contents are usually emptied during normal bowel movements, or when a dog is nervous or scared. In most animals, these sacs empty easily. However, some dogs, especially small breed dogs, are not able to empty the sacs properly and become susceptible to anal sac disease.
    Transmission or Cause:
    The cause of anal sac disease is unknown. Smaller dog breeds, such as Chihuahuas and poodles, are most often affected. Excessive anal gland production, soft feces or diarrhea, poor muscle tone, and obesity also contribute to higher risk of developing anal sac disease. Anal sac abscess tends to occur after an impacted anal gland has become so severely swollen and infected that the anal sac forms an abscess and ruptures.
    Prevention:
    Expression of the anal sacs every few weeks or months often will help prevent anal gland fluid from accumulating and becoming thickened again. High fiber diets have been shown to help prevent anal sac disease in at-risk dogs, especially those that are obese.

    Regarding allergies, it would be best to make an appointment with a board certified veterinary dermatologist for testing/ diagnosis/treatment, if you don’t have good results with your regular vet within a reasonable amount of time.
    In the meantime, has your vet recommended a prescription food/therapeutic diet? That may be a good place to start.
    Beware of homeopathic miracle cures, forget about mail-in hair and saliva tests (no good).
    For science-based veterinary medicine go here http://skeptvet.com/Blog/
    You can use the search engine there to look up topics.
    This site has a search engine too, see my posts.
    Good luck

    PS: Regarding the blood test via vet, food allergies are rare and food sensitivities tend to fluctuate. Intradermal skin testing done by a veterinary dermatologist is the most accurate. My dog has environmental allergies, her anal gland issues cleared up immediately after she started the prescribed treatment by the specialist.

    #108272

    Eileen W
    Member

    Adopted rescue (Molly) in May and feeding Acana Heritage with my other dog. In the last 3 months, her anal glands have been expressed twice. Her poop is formed but not really solid. I have tried psyllium, pumpkin, pure form, glandex and no real change in stool. Vet has found no medical reason why they need to be done manually. I am seeking a dog food recommendation that is grain free, bird free (no chicken, turkey, duck,etc.), not Acana or Origen. Has anyone had gland issues, made a diet change and found a food that has really worked for them? I have read, on this forum, some correlation between allergies, diet and glands. So, wondering if anyone had an allergy test to help determine best food to try? Thanks!

    #102936

    Natalie C
    Member

    @anon101 I am not looking for a veterinary health care professional to respond, I am simply looking for alternative ways to help Charlie. We do bring him in for annual check ups, and as I have mentioned in my posts, it was always passed off as no big deal after getting an xray, anal glands expressed and switching food suggestions. Which is why I decided that we should take matters into our own hands because going to the vet is only raking up a bill and not providing us with solutions. I didn’t interpret anything, others were directly telling me that I am not a good owner for keeping him at home and not providing him with vet care. He’s not in a dire situation where blood comes out in his stool or urine. It’s just happening frequently which bothers him and also my family. It is concerning. Please read my post carefully before responding.

    #102927

    Natalie C
    Member

    Hey all,
    I have a 2 year old Chihuahua/Pug mix named Charlie. We’ve had him since he was about 9 weeks old and he’s always had a bit of a poo problem. At first we thought it was just terrible 2’s for the baby until he got older, and we moved him over to a crate. He kept having accidents in the crate and that’s when we thought, maybe it’s not potty training that’s the issue, maybe it’s the food. So we took him to the vet, around this time last year, and they said he was perfectly healthy, nothing was wrong and expressed his anal glands. He was okay for 3-4 months and the same problem happened. Went back to the vet, and nothing. After that we decided to take control of things, and he’s gone through SO many dog food brands from Royal Canin, Wellness, Solid Gold, Acana, Orijen, Sojos and Honest Kitchen.. and even home cooked, nothings worked. We took away broccoli because we think that’s one of the main things that causes his diarrhea, but it hasn’t helped much. We just lost our cat to HCM 2 months ago, which raked up quite a bill and we can’t afford to go to the vet again. He had diarrhea in his cage last night and a little poop/diarrhea this morning. He’s only had SOME kibble, water and rice thus far. Is there anything I can do to help him? I feel so bad for Charlie but I don’t know what to do. I don’t want him to keep having an upset stomach. He’s always lifting his bum in the air and I live in an apartment where I can’t let him be out whenever he would like.

    ****Sorry, please no rude comments about how I should be taking him to the vet. I tried asking Facebook forums and that’s all I got.. I know I should, but I can’t. I tried so hard to save my cat it nearly cost us all our savings.*****

    #102545

    Karen B
    Member

    We fed our lab Orijen Six Fish for at least six years. She had never been sick at all except for once a year having to have her anal glands expressed. The last order of Orijen we got had some bags that were vacuumed packed and others that were not. All of a sudden her white platelets plummeted way down and the blood vessels popped in her eyes and her gums bled.
    The emergency vet ruled out everything and finally said that sometimes the immune crashes with no reason. Well, I don’t believe an immune system crashes for NO reason. It is just that the reason it happens wasn’t discovered. After heavy doses of Prednisone, Birdie was miserable and aggressively hungry all the time. She had a huge amount of fluid in her belly. As the Prednisone was tapered off (this whole process took WEEKS), the fluid went down and she started perking up. She was on her way back to health then suddenly started vomiting uncontrollably one evening. That was stopped by the emergency vet and we were sent home. She couldn’t get comfortable at home so we started back for the emergency vet again. She died on the way. I didn’t want an autopsy done but the vet had seen plenty of Birdie’s ultrasounds over the past few weeks. Her liver and pancreas were horribly inflamed. We believe the Orijen killed her. It was just all of a sudden that she stopped wanting to eat it. Symptoms that she had corresponded with other reports we have seen on the internet. I think it was the bags that were not vacuumed packed and from Kentucky that were the killers. I think some dogs are just more vulnerable to poor quality dog foods.

    #102261

    Aidan B
    Member

    Have you tried using something like Glandex instead of expressing the glands?

    #102190

    Susan
    Member

    Hi Tatiana R
    What is your girl eating????
    My boy bum surfs on carpet, ground, grass & tries to lick his bum from food sensitivities, he can NOT eat chicken, barley, oats, corn gluten meal he gets a itchy bum, a dog naturally empties their anal glands, there’s no need for us to do it, except when they have IBD IBS diarrhea sloppy poos etc & as the poo passes out it isn’t hard enough to empty the anal glands but once poos firm up they empty naturally, Patch had a weird vet always asking about his anal glands, have they been emptied, you see when they have just emptied, clear fluid runs down bum after a poo, Patch has a black bum & I see it… Your poor dog sometimes these vet can make things worse….
    I would not be giving a dog steroids for this problem & as you have written it doesn’t seem to work, of cause steroids wont fix this problem while she’s eating a food she has an intolerance too, change diet to a limited ingredient diet with a different protein to what she’s eating now, feed 1 single novel protein, also go to chemist or supermarket go in the baby section look for a cream called “Sudocrem” or another cream that has the ingredients that Sudocrem has, Sudocrem is for nappy rash, eczema, dermatitis thick white healing cream, as soon as Patch starts rubbing bum on carpet, I get 1 Huggies baby wipe, I use the Coconut oil wipes, I wipe his bum & hold the cool baby wipe on his bum for 20 seconds then apply the Sudocrem & the irritation stops straight away, if you did this in the beginning her bum wouldn’t be so red & sore now…the vet would have been better prescribing a Hydrocortisone 1% cream this will help her sore red bum, rubbing bum on the floor will make it worse, when she goes to rub her bum stop her, cool with a baby wipe then apply either the Hydrocortisone cream or the Sudocrem…… when she is getting better please post & tell us..

    #102153

    Tatiana R
    Member

    Anon101, yes her anal glands did get expressed. She is itching and licking her genitals far, far more after she got them expressed. It’s strange, the medication will help her for maybe a couple hours, and it seems like when it wears off, that is when she gets very itchy again. I’m sure we are bound to take her again, I am just worried and seeking answers because the vet slightly brushed off the fact that she is itching AFTER getting the glands expressed.

    #102147

    anonymous
    Member

    Did her anal glands get expressed? You may have to return her to the vet to rule out an abscess.
    Yes, it happens. She may have a hard deep pocket that the vet couldn’t express without general anesthesia. If this is the case, it has to be done, listen to your vet.
    It’s painful, it is what it is, call your vet and see what he advises.
    At 10 she is a senior, so you may not want to get aggressive about treatment, however, there are many treatments available to keep her comfortable.
    Give us an update….

    This is not veterinary advise; consult your veterinarian.

    Ps: See you tube for how to videos, re expressing anal glands.

    #102146

    Tatiana R
    Member

    My 10 year old dachshund itched her butt sligtly here and there, nothing that would worry me. Her annual visit came around and the vet said her glands are large and full, that he advised to express them (or pop them? first time I heard someone use “express” as a term for it) and ever since then.. my dog is licking her genitals and anal to the point where she is raw. She is now starting to scratch on her snout, as if her mouth is itchy. Doctor gave her allergy medicine and steroids, but she won’t stop itching… she looks like she’s getting a small blister around her genitals too, possibly from licking so much. PLEASE HELP. I thought expressing the glands is supposed to help a dog not itch, not make them itch worse than ever before!!

    #98735

    Acroyali
    Member

    Has she had IBD for awhile now? Sometimes IBD dogs don’t empty out their anal glands as they should, if they need emptied (or are impacted), that would explain a lot of the breath problem.
    As far as acid problems go, in humans the symptoms for low acid and high acid are very close and mimic one another a lot. One of my dogs has LOW stomach acid and acid reducers were making it worse long term, even though the symptoms of reflux (making us all think HIGH stomach acid) were there. A bit of Bragg’s apple cider vinegar whenever he acts as though he’s flaring up works for him, just mixed in with some food. For him it seemed to normalize the ph. I can’t say if this will work for your dog of course, but it might be something to research further.
    For ANY dog with IBD, probiotics for life will not be harmful. 🙂 3 days is not long enough to notice a difference, sometimes it takes weeks especially if she’s just coming off antibiotics.
    Best of luck. It’s a trying situation. IBD can be a pain in the butt (pun not intended) but once you find out what works for your dog and can get them relief, all the effort is worth it. Don’t give up!

    #96149

    In reply to: Anal glands and diet?


    Natarene T
    Member

    I’ve dealt with anal gland problems on my Lhasa for almost six months. He was going to the vet almost ever week to have his anal glands expressed or checked. Every situation is different but in my particular situation it had to do with diet rather than allergies.

    Is your dog scooting? Is that why you are taking him to get his glands checked? There can be many reasons a dog scoots. Itchy butt, full anal glands, peices of poo stuck to their bottom etc. It sounds to me like your vet told you benedryl because he is scooting from an itchy butt.

    If it doesn’t gross you out you can check them yourself too. The glands are located at 4 and 8o clock around the anus. If you can barely touch around there and it feels like large peas then most likely they are full but if you don’t feel anything then I would leave it alone.

    Full anal glands have to do with diet as well. Often times the dog is not getting enough fiber in their diet. I would try adding PURE Pumpkin to his diet. Just a tablespoon should work. Also, there is a product called Glandex that I have used and it works really well when the pumpkin doesn’t suffice.

    Dogs are supposed to empty their glands when they poop. The poop is supposed to be firm enough to push against the anal glands to release the fluid.

    Good luck to you.

    #96014

    In reply to: Anal glands and diet?


    anonymous
    Member

    Ask the vet why he suggested Benadryl? Does he think the dog’s anal gland issues are related to stress, anxiety? Allergies?
    You may want to try a grain free limited ingredient kibble, my dogs do well on Nutrisca Salmon and Chickpea as a base with a little water added twice a day. Ask the vet if the vet tech can show you how to express his anal glands yourself (and how often), youtube has some good how to videos.
    Oh, and I would forget the greenies, maybe an occasional 1/2 carrot instead (don’t be alarmed if you see orange chunks in the feces, it’s all fiber). I don’t like plastic bones either.
    And start brushing the teeth once a day, it only takes 5 minutes once you get in the habit, youtube has good videos for this too.
    Is he getting enough exercise? Get extra weight of off of him if he’s overweight. Increase walks (optimal for 1 hour a day or more)
    Check the search engine here: https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/anal+glands/

    From a previous post of mine per:
    Excerpts (out of context) from article below: https://www.vetsecure.com/veterinarymedicalclinic.com/articles/136
    Overview:
    Anal sacs are the reservoirs for the secretions of anal glands which are located on either side of a dog’s anus, at approximately four and eight o’clock. These sacs contain liquid secretions from the anal gland, which, in healthy animals, are normally pale yellow-brown to grayish in color. The contents are usually emptied during normal bowel movements, or when a dog is nervous or scared. In most animals, these sacs empty easily. However, some dogs, especially small breed dogs, are not able to empty the sacs properly and become susceptible to anal sac disease.
    Transmission or Cause:
    The cause of anal sac disease is unknown. Smaller dog breeds, such as Chihuahuas and poodles, are most often affected. Excessive anal gland production, soft feces or diarrhea, poor muscle tone, and obesity also contribute to higher risk of developing anal sac disease. Anal sac abscess tends to occur after an impacted anal gland has become so severely swollen and infected that the anal sac forms an abscess and ruptures.
    Prevention:
    Expression of the anal sacs every few weeks or months often will help prevent anal gland fluid from accumulating and becoming thickened again. High fiber diets have been shown to help prevent anal sac disease in at-risk dogs, especially those that are obese.

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