Pea starch, protein, flour differences

Dog Food Advisor Forums Dog Food Ingredients Pea starch, protein, flour differences

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  • #101831 Report Abuse

    Amy Y
    Member

    Greetings! I have an English bull terrier that is allergic to EVERYTHING! (No joke, borderline allergic to human skin) So, he is allergic to beef, chicken, corn, lamb, oats, pork, shellfish, soy beans,tomato, turkey and green peas. I have to get particular food but almost all of them contain peas, pea starch, pea flour etc. My question is, is the pea starch and pea flour gonna be as bad for him as the peas? I’m completely at my wits end trying to help him, any advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks! Amy

    #101832 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    You can use the search engine here to look up environmental allergies.
    Until you get the environmental allergies under control, changing the food will make little to no difference.

    For the best results make an appointment with a veterinary dermatologist (asap).
    If the symptoms have been going on for 1 year 4 seasons without a significant response to treatment by your regular veterinarian, it is time to consult a specialist.

    You could ask your veterinarian about an elimination diet/prescription food, if you have not done so already. However, food allergies are rare and food sensitivities fluctuate.
    Don’t be fooled by saliva and hair food sensitivity mail-in tests (scams).
    If you are receptive to science based veterinary medicine, you may find this site helpful
    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/?s=allergies
    The veterinary dermatologist will accurately diagnose your dog, then you can evaluate your treatment options. Best of luck.

    This is not veterinary advice; consult your veterinarian.

    #101834 Report Abuse

    Amy Y
    Member

    Thank you for the help. I have had the comprehensive blood panel done and we live out in the “country” and have found that there are a bunch of trees, weeds and grasses that he is allergic to that we will never be able to control. I don’t want to have to resort to giving him shots forever.

    #101835 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    The shots, are not medication. Allergen Specific Immunotherapy (desensitization) is the most natural way to treat environmental allergies. It is now available sublingual (by mouth) if you are squeamish about shots.
    There is no cure for allergies. However there is treatment, it tends to be lifelong.
    Avoidance does not work, it’s impossible. for example, the common house dust mite (common allergen) is around all year round and on the skin of all living things.
    For all you know, your dog’s allergies may be mild/seasonal and receptive to medications certain times of the year.
    Intradermal skin testing done by a dermatologist is the most accurate way to identify environmental allergens.
    I skipped the blood test on the advice of the dermatologist (treatment specific to my dog)
    per the search engine
    https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/environmental+allergies/
    This is not veterinary advice; consult your veterinarian.

    #101836 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Ps: Good luck with whatever treatment you decide to pursue 🙂

    #101837 Report Abuse

    Susan
    Member

    Hi, pea flour & pea starch isn’t as bad as pea protein, Hills Vet Nutritionist explained to me it’s the protein in foods that the dog is sensitive or allergic too….
    I would avoid eating peas if your 100% sure he can’t eat peas……
    Have you tried a vet diet & done a proper food elimination diet? either using a vet diet or a raw diet?
    this is the only true why to find out what foods your dog has intolerances too…. also another way is thru the winter months your dog will do better then as soon as spring & summer come your dog gets worse then it’s seasonal environment allergies what my boy suffers with as long as I feed him foods he’s OK with we have a good winter until spring & summer come around ….. it’s so hard to work out what is causing what….best to feed a raw limited ingredient diet then start the CADI injections…It’s too hard to do food elimination diet while feeding a dry kibble too many allergens to deal with in a kibble…

    Join this face Book Group, “Dog issues, allergies and other information support group” there’s a new injection that has just come out made by the same makers of Apoquel called “Cytopoint” CADI injections, the way CADI injection works is it blocks the receptors completely & stops the itch where Apoquel blocks the reaction from the allergen receptors, so many dogs in America are enjoying an itch free Summer since having the CADI injections, it last 4-6 weeks, apparently the more CADI injection your dog has the injection seem to last longer & longer till he needs the CADI injection, find a vet or Dermatologist in your area & ask what they think of this new drug… my vet said results looks excellent….

    More info in this group from parents & their happy dogs, CADI isn’t in Australia yet but hopefully we’ll get it this spring/summer, we had an awful Summer so good luck, make sure you give baths to wash off the pollens, dirt. grass etc the days your dog isn’t doing well..
    https://www.facebook.com/groups/240043826044760/

    #101838 Report Abuse

    Susan
    Member

    Hi again Cytopoint Injections are not the same as Allergen Specific Immunotherapy injections, with Allergen Specific Immunotherapy injections, you need to do the Intradermal skin test where they inject allergens under the dogs skin & work out what in the environment your dog is allergic too, then they make a special mix with all the allergens your dog is allergic too & you inject small amounts of these allergens slowly building up to more & more as time goes by & your dog is suppose to build an immune to all these allergens, it takes a while to see any results & the dog still needs to use drugs like Apoquel to relieve the dogs itch……very expensive & time consuming….. Join the group above I recommended & read what people are getting best result with…

    #101839 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    You may find this article helpful, it describes the various treatments, written by a veterinary dermatologist.

    http://veterinarymedicine.dvm360.com/it-s-not-magic-skinny-treating-canine-atopic-dermatitis

    This is not veterinary advice; consult your veterinarian.

    #101842 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Per the search engine: https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/topic/environmental-allergy-relief/
    You may want to note that some of us have had excellent results by going to a veterinary dermatologist and have found it to be cost effective.
    When I think of all the money I wasted going back and forth to the regular vet, shampoos, creams, dehumidifiers, air purifiers, meat grinders, expensive dog foods……..
    Just saying.

    This is not veterinary advice; consult your veterinarian.

    #101843 Report Abuse

    Amy Y
    Member

    Thank you again. We are looking into a dermatologists in our area now. Thanks everyone!!!!

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