C L

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  • in reply to: Eggshells…grinding necessary? #104303 Report Abuse
    C L
    Member

    Norma, aren’t dairy products like yogurt considered a negative as a calcium Source, not to say it’s negative in general to add to a diet. The negative being that milk products also contain phosphorus and so then you’re getting too much phosphorus with the calcium while you’re trying to add more calcium and balance it with the phosphorus in the meat in the diet? That’s besides what you posted about it not being enough calcium in yogurt.

    in reply to: Eggshells…grinding necessary? #104225 Report Abuse
    C L
    Member

    Hi Norma, its best to use organic eggs. Also, in my raw group, they feel there is no clear research to say how much of that calcium is absorbed when feeding ground eggshells. Here is something interesting to read about including the membrane. http://ottawavalleydogwhisperer.blogspot.com/2013/11/natural-eggshell-membrane-nem.html

    in reply to: Vet Test after being on Raw #83804 Report Abuse
    C L
    Member

    You can do a blood test. FYI: There will be some too highs and too lows (slightly) to some values, because it’s normal for a raw fed dogs. I just don’t recall which ones will be effected by raw feeding, but not to be alarmed by them.

    in reply to: Eating Raw Meaty Bones #69596 Report Abuse
    C L
    Member

    Rhonda, I’m new to raw myself. What I see people do is to feed their dog in a space that’s easy to clean up, so a tiled area. You can feed your dog outside. You can provide a piece of linoleum for your dog to consume raw on it. You have to teach your dog to stay on it. Some put down a cloth, or you can use a drop cloth (plastic). It is a messy thing to feed raw. I’ve seen people feed their dogs in a large wire crate.

    You can take a bone or meat away and refrigerate it for another day. I’ve never seen anyone address if they bury it.

    Depending on the size of your dogs, some bones are more appropriate than others. People tend to feed bones that can be consumed. One that are hard are the ones that a dog can chip/break a tooth on, so many serve chicken. Where ever you feed your dog, you need to watch your dog consume the bone. They can choke. You have to be ready for that. I don’t see it mentioned on my raw site, but Capri got the keel bone of a chicken breast stuck in her mouth. I looked over and she was not moving. I removed it and gave her a few pressure compressions, because she looked like she wasn’t breathing, then she was okay. No one talks about that, so it’s something to be aware of and that they can choke.

    I belong to a raw FB page called Raw Feeding. You can join and ask questions there. They have files on the page that they want you to read up on first, because they can answer questions (they’re articles). I’m still learning.

    Something that they do that I didn’t learn right away is “trading up”. If your dog is at the end of their piece of meat or bone and you think they will gulp it, you offer them something they like better to get it away from them.

    in reply to: Eating Raw Meaty Bones #58523 Report Abuse
    C L
    Member

    LordF, I am new to feeding bones, but I think this one is a no brainer. Don’t give him pork rib bones anymore, problem solved, since he does so well with other things. Btw, you have a beautiful dog (looking at profile pic).

    in reply to: Eating Raw Meaty Bones #58522 Report Abuse
    C L
    Member

    theBCnut, thank you for your input. I’m trying to read as much as possible so that I help my dog and do not harm her in the process of helping her. I did read the marrow bone should be on the larger side so they can’t get a good grip to clamp down and break a tooth. I also read about the marrow thing, and how rich it can be, so I don’t let her consume it all in one day. Bones make me a little nervous , but I see how it does her good, and the level of enjoyment she has as she works on the bone. I picked out a marrow bone with as much meat as possible so she could work the outside of the bone. The butcher cut it down for me, since it was a big long bone, but not too small.

    The smoked bone that has a good amount of meat on it is hormone & antibiotic free. They told me it was naturally smoked. They told me how they do it, but I’ll have to ask again when I buy them.

    I’d like to try her on chicken or turkey necks next. I’m still a little nervous about her being able to eat the bone. I read that it could be good to hold onto it to see how the dog consumes it, to make sure they don’t gulp it, but I think holding it could encourage some dogs to want to consume it quickly as they resource guard it.

    in reply to: Eating Raw Meaty Bones #56229 Report Abuse
    C L
    Member

    If it wasn’t so late as I was watching your dogs eating the chicken necks and backs, my eyes would have be popping out of my head! Just watching that chicken neck disappear little by little, as you hear the crunching! Your dogs did very well.

    I’m just investigating feeding bones. I bought marrow bones for my 3-1/2 pd 12 year old Chi. She eats Nature’s Variety raw organic chicken mostly, so she’s used to raw food. I put an old bedsheet down, thinking maybe she will understand I want to to eat this bone on it, and she did stay on the sheet, long enough to bury the bone in the sheet by pushing the sheet over it with her nose! I tried giving it to her again, but this time, I dug some marrow out & put it on my finger, which enticed her to eat the marrow, but I took it away before she ate all of the marrow.

    I gave her this other type of bone that’s supposed to be a femur, but sliced lenghwise in half and lightly smoked with some meat on it. She really got into that to pull the meat off and the fat and I could see how that would clean her teeth.

    in reply to: Eggshells…grinding necessary? #54536 Report Abuse
    C L
    Member

    For anyone that is interested, this is a good site for info on dog nutrition. This link is for home made diets: http://dogaware.com/diet/homemade.html

    This article is specifically about calcium: http://dogaware.com/articles/dwcalcium.html

    in reply to: Eggshells…grinding necessary? #54444 Report Abuse
    C L
    Member

    I have a mini-cuisinart and it works really well for grinding them to a powder. I bought it for grinding & chopping my food, but now also use it for egg shells. The shells are supposed to baked at 350 degrees for 10 min. I don’t know the reason, maybe a salmonella issue, but it will also make the shells more crunchy & easier to grind down.

    in reply to: Your Most Recommended Dog Treats? #54443 Report Abuse
    C L
    Member

    I can tell you what treats shouldn’t have, by-products, coloring, preservatives (other than vit E), but would be a plus to have organic ingredients. I posted a recipe for my dog treats on this forum where someone asked for recipes for home made treats.

    in reply to: Has anyone made Homemade Dog Treats? #54442 Report Abuse
    C L
    Member

    Hi Kayla, There’s no need to buy treats when you can make much better ones at home. If you did try and buy better ones, they are extremely expensive. My recipe comes to about $2 a pound to make. I can’t find the exact recipe right now, but this is close. I made it up myself and all the ingredients are safe AND healthy!

    Costco organic peanut butter (has salt, has no sugar) 1/3 container = 9.3 oz.
    chick pea flour
    4 large eggs
    iodized salt (1 tsp)`

    Beat the eggs, beat in salt, then incorporate the peanut butter into it until it’s mixed pretty good. Add chick pea flour & mix in thoroughly. I can’t recall how much I use, approx 1 cup. The consistency should be extremely thick, if not, add more chick pea flour (possibly another 1/2 cup).

    Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

    Oil a baking sheet or pan. Oil your hands to keep the mixture from sticking. Grab about a lemon-sized amount in your hand and press between your hands to form a thick patty, about 3″ wide & 3/4 in thick. Place on greased surface, bake on 2nd shelf for 8-10 minutes. You can place the cookies close together, because they will not spread while cooking.

    I like them to come out firm, but soft. My dog likes them that way. I have a Chihuahua, so I keep one cookie in the refrigerator that will be good to feed her (pieces of it) for 4 days. I freeze the rest, since there are no preservatives. They are her most favorite cookie ever! My dog is 3-1/2 pounds so I don’t want to make the treats super small, but you may want to make it to a smaller serving size if you’re feeding an entire cooking at a time. Be aware, too many of these treats will make your dog fat. I give my dog a tiny piece when I go out (she can’t choke on it), and a tiny piece in the afternoon and a tiny piece in the evening. Good luck! Whoever makes this, your dog will love you even more!

Viewing 11 posts - 1 through 11 (of 11 total)