Doggy bones for a dog with pancreatitis history

Dog Food Advisor Forums Diet and Health Doggy bones for a dog with pancreatitis history

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  • #10423 Report Abuse

    sophia
    Participant

    My dog had a very mild pancreatitis reaction about two months ago. She just had some gas and loose stool, but tests showed elevated pancreas enzymes. Since I have been so careful with her diet, she is on low fat food, she gets boiled chicken or carrots as little treats, and that’s about it. However, the other day someone gave her a rawhide. She loved it and chewed on it for hours, but after I researched how this might affect her I had to take it away (apparently raw hides are no good for any dog, much less one with her history). What I am wondering is if there are any bones safe for dogs with her history? She’s an older girl, so something a little softer (like the softness of a rawhide) would be great. Thanks!

    #10426 Report Abuse

    Hound Dog Mom
    Participant

    Hi Sophia –

    Are you talking about real bones or dental chews?

    As far as real bones, most are quite high in fat due to the marrow. I’d stick with turkey necks, chicken necks or duck necks (raw) with the skin removed. You may be able to find some lean beef neck bones, my butcher carries them sometimes.

    If you’re referring to chew type treats, bully sticks are pretty low fat. If your dog likes antlers, they’re very long lasting and since most dogs actually can’t “eat” them you wouldn’t have to worry about fat content. Himalayan chews are low fat and long lasting as well.

    #10428 Report Abuse

    sophia
    Participant

    Hound Dog Mom-
    really just anything healthy she can chew on that a sort of picky dog might like. She has allergies, and I am working with my vet to treat these, but the bone seemed to take her mind off of chewing on her feet. She is older so she’s not extremely active, so giving her something to keep her occupied was a treat as well.

    I will check all of your suggestions. I honestly don’t know anything about bones or dental sticks, in all the years I’ve had her she would never chew on any bone I’d given her, so I was surprised when she took such a liking to this one (plus I don’t eat meat myself, so figuring out what parts of animals has more fat and what part doesn’t has been a learning process for me). I’m sure in the options you’ve listed we can find something though! Thanks so much for the help!

    #10702 Report Abuse

    Anonymous

    what are the symptoms of pancreatis that led you to get tested for it? I heard folks scoop out some of the marrow in the bones

    #10780 Report Abuse

    sophia
    Participant

    she had extremely bad gas one day (like every minute) so I got her into the vet. We had just gotten a new kitten so we thought maybe she got into her food. The vet sent us home with medicine and said to put her on chicken and rice for a few days. She had loose orangish stool for a day or two, and then none at all, so we decided to go back to the vet. The vet was concerned about possible bile in the stool, as she didn’t see any blood, so we did a blood test to check on her liver. Since we were doing the blood test, and it had been about 6 months since her last one I decided just to do the fullest test to be sure, the only thing that came back was slightly elevated pancreas enzyme.

    I got her a bully stick though, and she absolutely loves it! It doesn’t seem to be bothering her stomach, and she’s had the same one for about 3 days, and only eaten like 20% of it, so the little fat content it does have doesn’t worry me to much. I guess I meant chew treats though, as the bully stick is even a tiny bit hard for her, so I don’t think she would do well with a bone. thank you for the ideas though!

    #10789 Report Abuse

    Hi Sophia-

    All dogs are different of course, but I have never had a problem with rawhide and dogs with pancreatitis issues. On the other hand, marrow bones(even with it scooped out) can not be tolerated with mine.

    #10961 Report Abuse

    Jackie B
    Member

    Z Bones are supposed to be good for dogs with pancreatitis. They are made by Zuke’s company.

    #10964 Report Abuse

    Safe4pups
    Participant

    Hello Sophia~ Personally, I would never use rawhide nor bully sticks – they both have obstruction history and the dried penis is an organ that dogs have no need for, is usually imported and can include chemicals.
    I have a dog with the same issues – I keep her on Denamarin, Bactaquin and feed her a high grade, grain free food. For treats she gets Get Naked Gut or Low Cal Health Chews, Zukes Apple Crisp bones and Zoe Lifestyle Dog Treats.
    ~Tracey

    #11018 Report Abuse

    sophia
    Participant

    Thanks for all the suggestions!

    Tracey- can you tell me which brand of grain free food your feeding? She also suffers from allergies, I don’t believe they’re food related, however I’m wanting to try grain free to see if it provides any relief. I’ve been looking around a little, but I obviously need something low in fat. Her current food, Cal. Naturals, only has 8% fat, I’d love to keep it below 10%, any ideas?

    #11088 Report Abuse

    Hi Sophia-

    Try Blue Buffalo Wilderness Weight management(something to that effect, lol ) The fat content, if I recall is 10% and even our most fat sensitive dog could eat it just fine-Another food to try is Grandma Lucy’s Pureformance-chicken-its dehydrated and 8% or so fat. We use it as a topper several times a week.

    #11089 Report Abuse

    Hound Dog Mom
    Participant

    Sophia –

    Melissa had some good suggestions. In addition to her’s, I’d also recommend checking into The Honest Kitchen’s Zeal formula. It’s a pretty allergy-friendly food (grain-free, white potato free, uses fish which is a novel protein), it’s under 10% fat and rated 5 stars.

    #11113 Report Abuse

    Safe4pups
    Participant

    Hi Sophia – both of my allergy prone dogs use Nutrisca which is grain and potato free. They both have environmental allergies and one has a potato sensitivity, and one has pancreatitis. Grains and potatoes both aggravate allergies and feed yeast. I have used both the Salmon and Chicken varieties. I also use Orijen for another dog but it may be too rich for your pup – unless it’s the senior formula. Honestly, my girl is 10 and has suffered since she was a puppy and she has done measureably better on Nutrisca – and I have spared no expense trying to find the right food for her – including a home cooked diet.
    ~Tracey

    #11114 Report Abuse

    Safe4pups
    Participant

    By the way – have you tried a good raw bone? I wouldn’t leave the marrow in it because of her compromised immune system, but a good, clean, raw bone can keep a dogs chewing instinct satisfied as well as keep the teeth clean.

    #11148 Report Abuse

    sophia
    Participant

    She’s has never taken any interest in actual bones, I think they’re to hard for her.

    I’ve heard that the Blue Buffalo brand, although a good brand, can just be too rich for some dogs, and I just have a feeling my dog would be one of them. The Nutrisca actually looks very good except I think a fat content of 16% may be too high (?). I have looked for Grandma Lucys before but have not been able to find it around here! The Honest Kitchen looks like something she will do very well on though, I plan to try and find a smaller bag to test it out this weekend, thanks everyone!!

    #11388 Report Abuse

    crazy4cats
    Member

    Hi- I often see that many on this forum suggest giving raw meaty bones to their dogs. Which type of bones are the safest and where do you get them? If they still have meat on them, would they be considered a meal? Also, wondering if you should boil them or anything before giving to dogs. My dogs (lab mix) are extremely aggressive chewers and looking for something safe as well as something to keep them busy and satisfied for more than 5 minutes. Help!

    #11389 Report Abuse

    Hound Dog Mom
    Participant

    Hi crazy4cats –

    I would go with raw beef tracheas (I order mine from mypetcarnivore.com) – they last awhile. Turkey necks, chicken quarters, chicken backs, turkey feet, etc. are all great too but likely won’t last as long. They can be considered a meal. Knuckle bones and marrow bones are much harder but with an aggressive chewer I’d be careful as they’re so hard your dog could break a tooth.. Never cook bones, they should always be fed raw.

    #11393 Report Abuse

    Safe4pups
    Participant

    Stop at a butcher shop and ask for meaty marrow bones.

    #11414 Report Abuse

    crazy4cats
    Member

    So, when giving a turkey neck or chicken back, do they eat the bones too? Is this safe? Sounds a little scarey. My dogs are such “gobblers”. I’m going to check out the website. Thanks for your suggestions.i really need to keep these dogs busy ๐Ÿ™‚

    #11421 Report Abuse

    Hound Dog Mom
    Participant

    Hi crazy4cats –

    That’s actually a very common question! Most people are under the impression that all poultry bones are dangerous for dogs – this isn’t true. Raw bones are safe for dogs and any cooked bone is dangerous for dogs. Some people think only cooked poultry bones are dangerous, but even those big cooked ham bones or marrow bones are dangerous. Cooked bones become brittle which causes them to splinter when chewed and not digest as well. The reason cooked poultry bones generally cause more problems than larger cooked bones is because they’re so small that dogs can crunch them up more easily, swallow them, and then experience problems such as intestinal perforations and blockages. A dog is definitely less likely to be able to chew up a heavy bone and experience problems, but a large dog or a powerful chewer could definitely break off a piece of a large cooked bone and then experience the same sort of problems that are experienced with cooked poultry bones. When bones are raw – this includes poultry bones – they are more pliable, a lot less likely to splinter and digest better. Animals in the wild obviously must eat raw poultry bones all the time and they aren’t dying from intestinal perforations of blockages. RMBs that are completely consumable (like turkey necks and chicken backs) are nature’s toothbrush! My dogs get RMBs every night at dinner. ๐Ÿ™‚

    #11428 Report Abuse

    crazy4cats
    Member

    Hi Hound Dog Mom- I guess that all makes sense. Just grew up thinking all bones are dangerous for dogs. But, I did go to our local Mud Bay Pet food store yesterday and bought two marrow bones and a bag of turkey necks. Gave them the bones last night. Of course they loved them and woke up this morning looking for them! They are so aggressive, I was worried they would break a tooth! I will try the turkey necks later this week. I’m definitely gonna keep an eye on them. They are such gulpers. They have swallowed whole socks! We were told they are lab/retriever mix. But everyone says the one definitely looks like he has some blood hound also. And you know how they are about eating everything in site. Lol! They are a year and a half old. im hoping they will grow out of the chewing stage some day. I also checked out the raw food website that was recommended. I’ll have to say I was a little grossed out. But, prices did seemed cheaper than Mud Bay. I guess the days where it was recommended to only feed dogs kibble and to find one they liked and stick with it are over. Somehow I ended up with 4 cats and 2 dogs. (I can never say no to a cat) I’m trying to feed the best and still feed my human boys too. Lol! Thanks for the advise. I have learned a lot from this website. Maybe too much, our pet food budget has doubled.

    #11467 Report Abuse

    Safe4pups
    Participant

    Make sure your dogs aren’t using smoked or cooked bones – raw is what you want. ๐Ÿ™‚
    As for your budget, I have found that I can buy premium food online at MUCH better prices – including free shipping and NO tax! I have 3 dogs and 2 cats – 2 dogs on Nutrisca and the cats and 1 dog on Orijen and I pay about 23% less online.

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