Old Glory Dog Food (Dry)

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Rating: ★☆☆☆☆

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Old Glory Dog Food earns the Advisor’s lowest rating of 1 star.

The Old Glory Dog Food product line includes five kibbles, four claiming to meet AAFCO nutrient profiles for all life stages and one for adult maintenance.

  • Old Glory Puppy
  • Old Glory High Energy
  • Old Glory High Protein
  • Old Glory Premium Adult
  • Old Glory Adult Maintenance

Old Glory Premium Adult was selected to represent the others in the line for this review.

Old Glory Premium Adult

Dry Dog Food

Estimated Dry Matter Nutrient Content

Protein = 30% | Fat = 21% | Carbs = 42%

Ingredients: Meat and bone meal, ground yellow corn, corn distillers dried grain, rice bran, poultry fat (preserved with BHA), corn gluten feed, soybean meal, wheat middlings, poultry by-product meal, natural flavors, potassium chloride, salt, choline chloride, vitamin E supplement, vitamin A supplement, vitamin D3 supplement, niacin, zinc sulfate, calcium pantothenate, thiamine mononitrate (vitamin B1), copper sulfate, manganese sulfate, pyridoxine hydrochloride, riboflavin supplement, folic acid, biotin, vitamin B12 supplement, calcium iodate, cobalt carbonate, sodium selenite

Fiber (estimated dry matter content) = 5.1%

Red items when present indicate controversial ingredients

Estimated Nutrient Content
MethodProteinFatCarbs
Guaranteed Analysis26%18%NA
Dry Matter Basis30%21%42%
Calorie Weighted Basis24%41%35%

The first item in this dog food is meat and bone meal… a dry “rendered product from mammal tissues, including bone, exclusive of blood, hair, hoof, horn, hide trimmings, manure, stomach and rumen contents”.1

Meat and bone meal has a lower digestibility than most other meat meals.

Scientists believe this decreased protein quality may be due to the ingredient’s higher ash and lower essential amino acid content.2

What’s worse, this particular item is anonymous. It doesn’t even specify the source animal.

Even though meat and bone meals are still considered protein-rich meat concentrates, we do not consider a generic ingredient like this a quality item.

The second ingredient is corn. Now, contrary to what you may have heard, corn isn’t necessarily a bad ingredient.

On the other hand, although there’s no way to know from the list entry itself, the corn used in making many pet foods can be similar to the kind used to make feed for livestock.

And that can sometimes be problematic.

What’s more, corn is commonly linked to canine food allergies3.

For these reasons, we rarely consider corn a preferred component in any dog food.

The third ingredient is corn distillers dried grains. This item is a by-product of the ethanol (bio-fuel) industry. This low-quality ingredient is frequently found in cattle feed and only rarely used to make pet food.

The fourth ingredient is rice bran… a healthy by-product of rice milling. Though not as nutritionally complete as whole grain rice, brans are still unusually rich in fiber, protein, vitamins and minerals.

The fifth ingredient is poultry fat. Poultry fat is obtained from rendering… a process similar to making soup in which the fat itself is skimmed from the surface of the liquid.

Poultry fat is high in linoleic acid… an omega-6 fatty acid essential for life. However, we would have preferred a single-species item (like chicken fat).

Unfortunately, this fat is preserved with BHA… a suspected cancer-causing agent.

The sixth ingredient is corn gluten feed… a by-product from the manufacture of cornstarch and corn syrup. However, corn gluten feed should not be confused with corn gluten meal.

That’s because corn gluten feed contains just half the protein of corn gluten meal. And when compared to meat, glutens are inferior plant-based proteins lower in many of the essential amino acids dogs need for life.

It’s unusual to find this feed item in a commercial dog food. As its name suggests, corn gluten feed is primarily used as an ingredient in cattle feeds.

The seventh ingredient is soybean meal. Soybean meal is actually a useful by-product. It’s what remains of soybeans after all the oil has been removed.

Soybean meal contains 48% protein. However, compared to meat, this item is considered an inferior plant-based protein providing a lower biological value.

The protein content of both corn gluten feed and soybean meal must be taken into consideration when attempting to use the reported protein content of this product to estimate the actual meat content of this food.

The eighth ingredient lists wheat middlings… commonly known as “wheat mill run”. Though it may sound wholesome, wheat mill run is actually an inexpensive by-product of cereal grain processing.

In reality, middlings are nothing more than milling dust and floor sweepings.

The ninth ingredient is poultry by-product meal… a dry rendered product of slaughterhouse waste. It’s made from what’s left of slaughtered poultry after all the prime cuts have been removed.

This stuff can contain almost anything… feet, beaks, undeveloped eggs… you name it.

We consider poultry by-products slightly lower in quality than a single-species ingredient (like chicken by-products).

On the brighter side, by-product meals are meat concentrates and contain nearly 300% more protein than fresh poultry.

From here, the list goes on to include a number of other items.

But to be realistic, ingredients located this far down the list (other than nutritional supplements) are not likely to affect the overall rating of this product.

With two notable exceptions

First, we find no mention of probiotics… friendly bacteria applied to the surface of the kibble after processing.

And lastly, the minerals listed here do not appear to be chelated. And that can make them more difficult to absorb. Non-chelated minerals are usually associated with lower quality dog foods.

Old Glory Dog Food
The Bottom Line

Judging by its ingredients alone, Old Glory Dog Food looks to be a below-average kibble.

But ingredient quality by itself cannot tell the whole story. We still need to estimate the product’s meat content before determining a final rating.

The dashboard displays a dry matter protein reading of 30%, a fat level of 21% and estimated carbohydrates of about 42%.

As a group, the brand features an average protein content of 28% and a mean fat level of 17%. Together, these figures suggest a carbohydrate content of 47% for the overall product line.

Average protein. Average fat. And average carbs when compared to a typical dry dog food.

Yet when you consider the plant-based protein-boosting effect of the corn gluten feed and the soybean meal, this looks like the profile of a kibble containing only a modest amount of meat.

Bottom line?

Old Glory Dog Food is a corn-based kibble using a modest amount of meat and bone or chicken by-product meals as its main sources of animal protein… thus earning the brand 1 star.

Not recommended.

A Final Word

The descriptions and analyses expressed in this and every article on this website represent the views and opinions of the author.

We rely almost entirely on the integrity of the information posted by each company on its website. As such, the accuracy of every report is directly dependent upon the quality of that data.

Although it's our goal to ensure all the information on this website is correct, we cannot guarantee its completeness or its accuracy; nor can we commit to ensuring all the material is kept up-to-date on a daily basis.

Each review is offered in good faith and has been designed to help you make a more informed decision when buying dog food.

However, due to the biological uniqueness of every animal, none of our ratings are intended to suggest feeding a particular product will result in a specific dietary response or health benefit for your pet.

For a better understanding of how we analyze each product, please read our article, "The Problem with Dog Food Reviews".

Remember, no dog food can possibly be appropriate for every life stage, lifestyle or health condition. So, choose wisely. And when in doubt, consult a qualified veterinary professional for help.

In closing, we do not accept money, gifts or samples from pet food companies in exchange for special consideration in the preparation of our reviews or ratings.

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Have an opinion about this dog food? Or maybe the review itself? Please know we welcome your comments.

Notes and Updates

06/20/2014 Last Update

  1. Association of American Feed Control Officials, 2008 Edition
  2. Shirley RB and Parsons CM, , Effect of Ash Content on Protein Quality of Meat and Bone Meal, Department of Animal Sciences, University of Illinois, Poultry Science, 2001 80: 626-632
  3. White, S., “Update on food allergy in the dog and cat”, World Small Animal Veterinary Association, Vancouver, 2001
  • Pattyvaughn

    I have the same issue. I had to learn the hard way, NEVER EVER let the hubby pick up the dog food. They will always go for cheap c**p. They don’t understand that the computer phrase “garbage in, garbage out” applies equally well to dog food.

  • Bri

    My pit bulls ate it because they eat anything..my chihuahuas refused it, my dobermans took all day to eat through their bowl…. My chinese crested was offended that I tried to feed this to him, and my bloodhound threw it up all day. Everyone had loose stool all day and night. When you open the bag it smells like wheat and cardboard. I definitely wont be subjecting my dogs to this feed again. That’s what I get for letting the hubby pick up a bag of feed! Horrible stuff.

  • melissa

     it’s just running through your dog’s system like Usain Bolt runs the 100 meter dash.

    LOl.. you might have moved to Columbus, but your still a Ny’er..

  • Jess

    This is great stuff, waaay better than feeding raw garbage.

  • BryanV21

    Just look at what’s in it. Junk, junk, and more junk. I’d guess that your dog isn’t actually “using” much of any of this, and it’s just running through your dog’s system like Usain Bolt runs the 100 meter dash.

    You get what you pay for. There are good dog foods that don’t cost an arm and a leg. Nutrisource (I learned that it will be going into Kroger grocery stores, and they will be selling it for even less than we did), Zignature (this is the food we’re getting to replavce Nutrisource, as we won’t be able to compete with Kroger… and there’s one in the same plaza we’re at), Fromm Gold (this is a really good food, actually), and I believe Earthborn Holistic, are ones to check out.

  • Cheryl Boggess

    it is very affordable at 13.00 a bag but my dogs poop over 5 times a day and with 3 of them I am picking up a lot of waste. I have never seen anything like it from dog food before. 

  • Scott

    LOL !! premium……..