Best Low Fat Dog Foods

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The best low fat dog foods can be beneficial for pets suffering from specific health conditions like:
Woman looking for low fat dog food

  • Pancreatitis
  • Obesity

However, finding a quality low fat dog food can be difficult.

That’s because to cut back on fat, pet food companies are inclined to design dog foods that contain less meat.

So, most low fat dog foods also tend to be low in protein and high in carbs, too.

How We Select
the Best Low Fat Dog Foods

The average fat content1 and arbitrarily chosen low fat limit2 of all dog foods currently stored in The Dog Food Advisor database are included in the following table:

Table of Dog Food Fat Content

Best Low Fat Dog Foods

The following low fat dog foods have been selected by The Dog Food Advisor because they each meet three criteria:

  • Below-average fat content
  • Above-average protein content
  • Product rated 4 stars or higher
ProductProFatCalRtg
Acana Light and Fit (Dry)39113605
Annamaet Grain Free Lean Low Fat Formula (Dry)33103505
Castor and Pollux Indulgent Mix All-Beef Sausage Links and Sweet Potato (Canned)47163475
Dr. Tim’s Metabolite Weight Management (Dry)33112865
Fromm Four Star Nutritionals Shredded Chicken Entree (Canned)4473114.5
Halo Spot’s Stew Grain Free Healthy Weight Turkey Liver and Duck (Dry)31133584
Premium Edge Healthy Weight I (Dry)49133475
Taste of the Wild Southwest Canyon (Canned)44173735
Victor Senior/Healthy Weight Formula (Dry)30133604.5
Wellness Core Reduced Fat (Dry)37133605

A Low Fat Compromise Worth Considering

In our efforts to list only dog foods rich in meat-based protein, we have intentionally omitted some good candidates that are lower in fat content than the examples listed above.

So, if you’re looking for a dog food with a fat content even lower (say below 10%), you may have to settle for a recipe with less meat and more carbs.

And for especially sick animals, this could be a compromise worth considering.

A Final Word

The descriptions and analyses expressed in this and every article on this website represent the views and opinions of the author.

The Dog Food Advisor does not test dog food products.

We rely almost entirely on the integrity of the information posted by each company on its website. As such, the accuracy of every review is directly dependent upon the quality of the test results from any specific batch of food a company chooses to publish.

Although it's our goal to ensure all the information on this website is correct, we cannot guarantee its completeness or its accuracy; nor can we commit to ensuring all the material is kept up-to-date on a daily basis.

Each review is offered in good faith and has been designed to help you make a more informed decision when buying dog food.

However, due to the biological uniqueness of every animal, none of our ratings are intended to suggest feeding a particular product will result in a specific dietary response or health benefit for your pet.

For a better understanding of how we analyze each product, please read our article, "The Problem with Dog Food Reviews".

Remember, no dog food can possibly be appropriate for every life stage, lifestyle or health condition. So, choose wisely. And when in doubt, consult a qualified veterinary professional for help.

In closing, we do not accept money, gifts or samples from pet food companies in exchange for special consideration in the preparation of our reviews or ratings.

However, we do receive a fee from Chewy.com for each purchase made as a direct result of a referral from our website. This fee is a fixed dollar amount and has nothing to do with the size of an order or the brand selected for purchase.

Have an opinion about this dog food? Or maybe the review itself? Please know we welcome your comments.

Notes and Updates

The Advisor would like to personally thank research assistant, Sandy Brown, for her generous help in researching the low fat dog foods included on this list.

  1. Dry matter basis
  2. Significantly below-average
  • Donna Clark

    Thank you, I will!

  • Susan

    Hi have a look at Canidae all life stages Platinum. The fat is 8.5% min & Protein-20%min & has the matching wet tin food…, http://www.canidae.com/dog-food/products/canidae-all-life-stages-platinum-dry-formula

  • Donna Clark

    Can anyone recommend a high quality, low-fat and low- protein dog food? I have a foster dog that is in the beginning of pancreatitis and who also has extremely high phosphorus levels. Thx!

  • Julia JS

    We have a Labrador that was diagnosed with IBD/L when she was one year old. She is not 10 so the mix of food and meds have worked. Here is what she gets:

    Food: Royal Canin Rx – Digestive Low Fat

    Meds:

    — 1/8th teaspoon Tylan powder which I make into capsules every other day. She started with a daily dose.

    — 1 MG capsule of Budesonide once per week. You get these from a compounding pharmacy your vet should know. She started on a higher dose but is down to once per week. Check with your vet.

    — 3 ML MCT Oil over food at all meals. You can get this from any Health Food store. This provides a fat that can be absorbed by the stomach which is the issue with lymphangiectasia – the inability to absorb fat.
    She is a very picky eater. I add a heaping tablespoon of canned food — any lower fat food that she decides she likes. I also cook ground turkey and while cooking add some freeze dried liver (like the treats but available in a powder form).
    I hope this helps.

  • harp31

    Thank you Bobby dog!

  • Bobby dog

    Hi harp31:
    I believe this is the food sissytoo is referring to. Good luck finding a new food that agrees with your pups:

    https://www.proplanveterinarydiets.com/products/dco-dual-fiber-control-dog/

  • harp31

    Hi sissytoo,

    I have 2 Bostons, one is 11 lbs and one is 28 lbs. Both are 3 yrs old and female. I have been trying to find a low fat limited ingredient food for them. The larger one has had bouts of diarrhea and some vomiting on and off for the past month. My vet had her on metronidazole for 2-3 weeks but she started to break out in hives from it so we had to discontinue the med. They had been eating Annamaet Option 24% dry food for the past year or more with some boiled chicken or ground turkey as a mix in to entice them to eat it. For some reason they don’t want to eat it anymore and are having loose stools, etc. They have been on a bland diet on and off for the last month (boiled chicken and rice or pasta) with no loose stools or vomiting but obviously are not getting the nutrition they need. Every time I start to introduce the dry food, the loose stools start up again. I was just wondering what DCO high fiber food refers to in your post? I am working with my vet to try to find a suitable food for them. Thanks

  • LB

    ☝ from LB

  • LB

    Natural balance is lower in protein, but it’s ingredients from china, and is salty…..I don’t know why they don’t reformulate it…smuckers now owns the company…the venison is the lowest in salt I believe. I have a frenchie and she gets gassy from all these high protein, fruits, veggies and bean ingredients, merrick is a good company from USA there food is also lower in protein than others, and nicer company to deal with..good luck!

  • bojangles

    Hi Juliabrat,

    A low calorie raw food, meaning less calories per pound of food, would have to be low in fat, because fat has roughly twice the calories of protein and carbs per gram or pound.

    The problem is a food like this would probably be too high in carbohydrates for a diabetic dog, in my opinion

    You can always control the total calories you feed your dog. You first figure out how many calories you want your dog to eat each day. If she is at the weight you want her to be you would stick with the same amount of calories she is eating now.

    In commercial raw products I would look for a food that has less than 20% carbs on a dry matter basis, or less than 15% carbs on a calorie weighted basis. Most raw foods like this are going to be very high in fat. So if your pup has a problem with fat, then you will have to look for a lower fat food and this will increase the carbs.

    If your dog is NOT on a raw diet now, I would transition her slowly from whatever she’s eating now. Like start with 5% raw and go up by 5% a day for 20 days. If you run into any problems like diarrhea, or vomiting then reduce the % of raw to the last amount she was OK with. If she has a problem with the first 5% then that food is not for her and you could try a different food or get a raw food that doesn’t contain any ground bones and lightly cook it first.

    Probiotics could help ease food transitions, especially if she’s been eating the same food for a long time.

    Take your time and start looking at the raw food reviews on this website. Each review lists the protein, fat and carb content on a dry matter basis as well as a caloric basis.

    Good luck and keep asking questions until you have all the info you need!

  • Susan

    Email a few raw companies ask them which formula has the lowest calories for a diabetic dog & ask for the calorie percent then compare a few & see which one is better…In Australia we have BARF Dr B’s genuine BARF there’s” Lite Recipe” & “Kangaroo Recipe” both low in fat..
    http://www.barfaustralia.com/Home.aspx

  • Juliabrat

    Hello. Could someone please help me. I am searching for a low calorie raw dog food. My dog is diabetic and I prefer to feed her raw. I am disabled so it is easier for me to use a premade raw product. Please help.

  • sissytoo

    I have a dog that had had diarrhea for some time. I finally stumbled across a local vet who said he thought her duodenum was too large, that food went through her too quick which was accurate because the stool would sit in a puddle of water. He gave her Tylan powder which is an antibiotic used in the poultry industry. She is an 18 lb Boston and gets 1/6 tsp a day along with DCO high fiber food and Royal Cannine canned gastro diet. From the very first dose, no diarrhea. And it had been horrid. She is so healthy now, a dog that when I got her could barely stand, now she runs!!

  • Susan

    Maybe stay on the Metronidazole when you are stopping the Prednisone, the Metronidazole has an anti inflammatory in it as well, so stay on the 1/2 a tablet a day of Metro then you do the 1/4 prednisone every 2nd day for a couple of months then 1/4 prednisone every 3rd day etc but stay on the Metronidazole don’t quit the 2 together…The vet writes me a few repeat scripts to keep in the cupboard & every 6 months Patch seems to go down hill doing sloppy yellow poos, pain acid reflux, I’m thinking Small Intestinal Bacteria Overgrowth S.I.B.O….I understand about the Kibble but Patch regurgitates raw & sometimes the cooked meal, Kibble seems to be the only thing that stays down but I know its causes him problems….

  • Babslynne

    I just read the reviews on Amazon for the Herbsmith probiotic that Debbie recommended for you above, and you must read the second review entitled
    ” saved my dog”, this looks to be an awesome product. http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B009EUZ9LW?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=ox_sc_act_title_1&smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER

  • Nicole

    Will definitely take a look! Thanks 🙂

  • Nicole

    Hi Susan –
    I had talked to our vet about cooking for Hemi and she thought it might get cost prohibitive because of the quantities. I will look into Jacqueline’s program though, just to see. Thanks for sharing that.

    Hemi has been on Tylan over the course of the last year and it did nothing for her. Never even slowed down the diarrhea. Kibble was what she was on before all of this started (Acana limited ingredient). We eventually had to take her completely off it because she couldn’t tolerate it in any combination we tried.

    I’ll feel better once she’s off the Pred (she’s down to 1/4 day) and Metro (down to 1/2 day), but we’re taking it slow weaning her off because every time we’ve try to remove them completely another episode happens–and they’re severe.

    It’s most certainly a work in progress. Thanks again for the helpful info!

  • Susan

    Yes when you see a wet tin food or raw diets the fat is different, it hasn’t been converted to dry matter fat%…. The Barf original diets have the fat convert & have their Kangaroo or Lite Patties http://www.barfaustralia.com on your left top you’ll see “Products” hover over “Products” then 3rd one down you’ll see “Barf Flavours” click on Barf Flavours & they’ll all come up then click on the kangaroo & you’ll see fat-3% the when converted its 11% DM Basis I clicked on the Rabbit & it says 14% fat DM Basis is 40% fat it will give you an idea what the fat % is with the raw diet your girl is now eating…..I’ve been tooo scared to try the Pet Shop Raw diets after the Naturopath explained how they are made I started to cook instead Also boiled rice can irritate the bowel Patch cant eat boiled rice so I boiled potatoes instead..

  • Susan

    Hi I you thought of making ur own raw instead of pet food raw diets, My Patch has IBD & food sensitivities/Intolerances, I saw a Naturopath well over the phone I emailed all Patches problems etc he’s the Maintenance raw diet she put Patch on, I had to pick 2 proteins I picked Kangaroo for breakfast & chicken for dinner then I had to pick 2-4 veggies & 1-2 fruits, I picked broccoli, celery, carrot & apple you peel, cut veggies fruit up then put thru a blender & blend & stop just before its a pulp, dogs cant digest veggies then I had to add 1-2 spoons of the veggies/fruit mix with1 cup meat the meat is all human grade meat & no bone was used I had to use her DigestaVite Plus powder I froze the left over veggies/fruit mix in 2 spoon sections & took out the night before & put in fridge also the meat I froze 1 cup sections I had to add probiotic 1/2 a capsule to each meal also your dog can eat fish you buy the can fish a couple of sardines a day on her meal sardines are excellent omega 3 & vitamin D even if you give a small sardine as a treat a day I buy the Sardines in spring water from Aldis 69c ….http://www.naturalanimalsolutions.com.au/natural-diet.html Have you ever tried Tylan Powder or Metronidazole?? I put Patch back on the Metronidazole when his poos start going yellow & sloppy from S.I.B.O….. also how come you don’t feed a kibble low in fat & limited ingredients? Feed raw for breakfast & the kibble or wet tin food for dinner…

  • aimee

    Hi Crazy4dogs,

    The Primal doesn’t have any offensive odor when I cook it. But I had cooked a different brand and it was very smelly. Best way I can describe it is uremic. I wondered if it had to do with the kidney content in the food.

  • Crazy4dogs

    Hi Boxers 1,

    I have also lightly cooked raw for a dog I had many years ago. It smells terrible and destroys the enzymes, but it is feasible. I did it because he had been on kibble and canned for so long that he wouldn’t eat the raw unless it was lightly cooked. I now feed thawed raw to all of my current dogs.

  • aimee

    Hi Boxers!,

    The bone in Primal is ground very fine. I have no concerns about cooking it.

  • Crazy4dogs

    Take a look @ Grandma Lucy’s. I really like the Pureformance line. It has some novel proteins and is priced comparably.

  • Nicole

    Definitely not!

  • boxers1

    Just be sure NOT to cook raw food that has any bone in it

  • Nicole

    Yes – very helpful! Thanks so much. As I said above… my education continues! But this info goes a long way in helping make informed, good choices for Hemi 🙂

  • Nicole

    Will definitely look into it – many thanks for the tips and links! 🙂

  • Nicole

    Ah, ok… that makes sense. My education continues. Man, I can’t believe there was ever a time I just fed Acana kibble… a simpler time! 😉 Thanks again for the Primal info – very helpful.

  • Nicole

    Yes – the holistic vet we saw suggested a probiotic and we’ve been using that. I think it’s a little different than the one you shared (thank you, btw): http://www.holisticpetinfo.com/Bacillus_CoagulansVET-by-Thorne.html

    I will look a little closer at the comparison tonight. 🙂

  • Nicole

    We tried Honest Kitchen at one point (I’d have to look through one of my 4 notebooks to see when haha) and she continued having the diarrhea. Might not be a bad idea to take another look again, now that things are calmer. Thanks so much!

  • Nicole

    Hi there – yep, did that. We did some probiotics and other holistic supplements, for lack of a better term. We actually still use the probiotics just for general well-being but tapered off the other things. The holistic vet also recommended the raw – but wanted us to do a fully raw diet with no canned. The current mix was sort of the temporary compromise that I could accommodate. But like I said, am hoping to replace the prescription canned with a better quality low-fat food and get her off most of the prescriptions. I’m guessing she’ll probably need to be on something for the long-term.

  • boxers1

    Have you considered seeing a holistic vet that may have an entirely different approach?

  • aimee

    The cooked raw could be helping in part because of the high digestibility. I’d continue to cook as recommended by your vet especially if changing to Primal as that company doesn’t HPP their non poultry diets.

    The canned is safe as long as canned properly.

    A poster on the Purina HA thread named Jewel had success using that diet with her dog that was near death. It is a lower fat diet and the protein is hydrolyzed.

    Stella & Chewy Venison frozen raw is a moist diet which makes the fat level appear low on the as fed basis. But once you take the water out the fat level increases. Their freeze dried diet is essentially the same food without water .. The company reports the fat as min 30%.

  • Crazy4dogs

    Hi Nicole,

    I’m not sure if these would work for you, but you could look into some of the dehydrated meals that are rehydrated with warm water. Grandma Lucy’s has some novel proteins like goat and rabbit which are grain free. Bravo has a pork recipe in their homestyle complete line and the fat level is very low. The Honest Kitchen has a duck formula, but it is grain inclusive. It’s actually much less expensive than canned or raw (frozen or freeze dried) to feed and the fat levels are much lower. The Honest Kitchen and Grandma Lucy’s also have premixes that you could add your own protein, either cooked or raw. I’m sure there are others that posters have used, but these are the ones I’m most familiar with. I don’t have to use novel proteins for my dogs, just have to avoid a couple of proteins for a couple of dogs (and they both have different protein issues 🙁 ). Good luck with it!

  • Debbie

    My 13 year old golden had many tummy problems. Not sure what food to suggest, but if I can recommend this probiotic, it helped my dog tremendously.

    http://www.herbsmithinc.com/Home/Canine/Microflora/default.asp

  • Marshall

    Hi Nicole, We’ve been feeding our 6 year old female french bulldog Addiction kibble and canned for 3 years with good results. You’ll have to review and compare the ingredients and nutritional analysis with other foods to determine if you want to try their product line.

    Addiction has “novel” meats like brushtail, which they describe as ” a non-indigenous marsupial”, venison and kangaroo. I’ve found Addiction on Amazon and local pet stores.

    Copy and paste these links to your browser. Best wishes to you:
    Link to Amazon:
    http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_ss_i_1_9?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=addiction+dog+food&sprefix=Addiction%2Caps%2C273

    Link to Addiction:
    https://www.addictionfoods.com/products/dog-formulas/canned/new-zealand-brushtail-vegetables-entree

  • Crazy4cats

    Hi Nicole-
    I’m not Aimee, but I just looked up S&C venison compared to Primal’s and it has twice as much fat as Primal. You also have to take into consideration the dry matter basis. Here is a link: http://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/choosing-dog-food/dry-matter-basis/

    After taking this into consideration, S&C has around 33% fat and Primal has approximately 16%. Hope this helps!

  • Nicole

    Hi Aimee – thanks for the reply! We tried the Royal Canin and my dog wouldn’t eat it. (Seriously, I’d still be writing my first post if I tried to explain how many variations of things we’ve tried!). I also understand about the raw concerns – and that was one of my questions. What the vet told me to do is to cook it partially to reduce the risk of any contaminants, etc. I have no idea if that’s even really good to do. Sigh. But raw/ ‘partially raw’ if that’s a thing is honestly the only thing that’s come close to working so I wouldn’t even know where to turn beyond that. I’ll look into the Primal with regard to the fat content as that’s definitely something I’m watching – both because of Hemi’s IBD/L, but because about a month ago she had developed pancreatitis. It’s honestly maddening trying to find the right path.

    Edit: Actually just looked up S&C venison and it says the crude fat is 10%, which I thought was pretty low… am I misinterpreting that?

  • aimee

    Hi Nicole,

    My heart goes out to you and your dog for all that you have been through.

    In regards to low fat canned diets other than the I/D low fat there is a low fat canned by Royal Canin.

    My dog is on a venison based diet and I watch the fat levels as he has had pancreatitis in the past. Stella and Chewy venison is very high in fat.

    I incorporate Primal venison into my guy’s diet as the fat content in the food is much lower then Stella and Chewy’s food, but only as a topper and I cook it first.

    I’d be very concerned about feeding a raw diet when using immunosuppressants.

  • Nicole

    Hello all. This is my first time posting though I’ve spent many hours reading the helpful information on many of the threads. I’m hoping someone can share some info. I have a 7-year-old Pit/American Bulldog mix who in late 2014 was diagnosed with IBD/lymphangiectasia. We have literally spent the last year trying to get her condition under control. At the worst, she lost 17 lbs due to non-stop severe diarrhea and it was terrifying. We tried everything from the bland boiled chicken/rice to a variety of meds, foods, etc… the combination that started getting her back on track was a 1/2 raw, 1/2 low-fat canned I/D (Hills Prescription) diet. One raw patty & a half can, twice per day. (Along with Atopica, Prednisolone, Metronidazole and Prilosec). We’ve repeatedly tried to wean her off the Pred, but every attempt to lower the dosage (1/4 per day now) results in another diarrhea outbreak. Needless to say, it’s a work in progress. Ultimately I’d like to get her off as much of the meds as possible and off the I/D because I’m not crazy about the quality/ingredients. To that end, I’d be grateful for any suggestions on a replacement canned low-fat but high quality food to slowly integrate. I wish I could just do a fully raw diet, based on how well she responds to it, but it’s unfortunately out of my budget range. The hardest part is finding a protein that won’t aggravate her condition (chicken, beef, etc have proven reactionary and the vet said to avoid fish as it apparently is not the best for IBD/L) so that leaves us with more of the ‘novel’ proteins like rabbit, venison, and such. She is on Stella & Chewy’s venison formula for the raw portion. Apologies for the super-long post. There are so many bits of info to convey. Thanks in advance for any help at all! 🙂

  • JohnandCindyHamann

    Our 9 year old Cocker Spaniel, Minnie, had emergency surgery 12/16/15 for a ruptured gallbladder, no bacterial infection. Her blood work done 1/25/16 came back glowing! We are cooking for her – chicken, rice and green beans. Vet thinks a low-fat diet will be best. I would appreciate your opinion on food options.

  • FernMarie Ketterer Cox

    Thank you so much for the info!I will check into some of the recipes and the website you mentioned.
    God Bless

  • Susan

    Good looking boy, please read ingredients to his dry food its all grains I cant understand how Hills worked out that all of their stomach & Intestinal kibbles the I/D range will help dogs & cats with stomach bowel & Pancreatitis, their pancreas would need to work harder to digest this kibble, My Patch also had Pancreatitis & was put on the I/d Low Fat GI Restore, he got itchy smelt real yeasty then he was put on the Royal Canine Intestinal Low Fat the ingredients are a bit better in the Royal Canine Australian vet diets but Patch still smelt like an yeasty bread shop, now I cook chicken breast freeze 1 cup sections, then boil some broccoli. zucchini, potatoes fresh every 2-3 days….keep in fridge…
    I add 1 cup chicken, only a few cut potatoes about 4 little pieces, 1/2 a zucchini, some small broccoli heads all boiled lightly then I put every what I need in a blender & blend for a few seconds then put on
    1/2 teaspoon DigestaVite Plus powder, I add some salmon in spring water about 3 times thru the week you can go on the Balance It site & they do diets for you & you just add the “Balance it” is more healthy then any of the vet diets & your Oscar will love a fresh home cooked meal & be healthier….

  • FernMarie Ketterer Cox

    Hi all..I’m FernMarie from Fla.We are the proid parents of 20# Oscar..a schnorkie..a few months ago he became suddenly ill and was put in intensive care for 3 days with pancreatitis. our vet put him on low fat dog food and said he would need to be on it the rest of his life.. that once he had pancreatitis he was very high risk for it again .the food he has him on (that we buy from the vet is “Hills prescription diet digestive care ID low fat”.. we have to add a little amount of chicken or chicken broth which can be found fat free for him to like it we get the dry food and probably at some point going to find a homemade recipe for him as it seems to be hit and miss whether he will eat it because he is also finicky ..oh by the way he just turned 7 .:) hope this helps.

  • theBCnut

    Get a referral to a veterinary nutritionist who can help you balance your homemade diet or do research on your own into balancing your homemade diet and it will be the best that can be fed to any dog. Dogs don’t need starch and diabetics don’t need starch, and homemade is the best way to make sure your dog isn’t being fed starch. And as a really big plus, you have total control over the quality of ingredients.

  • Susan

    Your dog is very smart, vet is wrong, vets don’t know much about nutrition, human food is better then kibble. Kibble is hard to digest, kibble is processed, I cook chicken breast, sweet potatoes or potatoes, broccoli, zucchini, pumkin sometimes I add Salmon then next day I add Kangaroo baked into a rissole I put all together & thru a blender & blend for a few seconds & Patch loves it & he has gotten better with his stomach & no more Pancreas pain, he gets pancreas pain after eating kibble & the vet Diet Royal Canine Gastrointestinal Low Fat kibble made him itch & smell of yeasty paws & ears….. look online there’s heaps of cooked dog diets just make sure you add some omega 3, 6 & 9 oil that’s why I add salmon, here’s the lady I saw she is a Naturopath here’s her diets scroll down & click on “Diabetes Diet” they are raw diets so don’t cook any bones cooked bones are no good….I also add her DigestaVite Plus-100 powder with meals http://www.naturalanimalsolutions.com.au/natural-diet.html

  • DianeS

    I have a large 4-yr-old Japanese Chin (about 15#) and he has developed diabetes. I was told by the ER vet hospital where we had to take him – cost was over $3000 for 4 days!! We can’t do it again that he has diabetes – type I since he is just 4 years. He developed pancreatitis as a result and was a very sick little boy. However he is also a picky eater and we had to change his foods – right now he is eating Royal Canine 14 ? kibble and likes it but is not eating the wet food well at all. He prefers ‘people’ food, especially chicken breast (no skin – no fried) but my vet has recommended ‘Tiki’ canned food but at the price if he doesn’t eat it we are ‘stuck’. I need to talk to others with diabetic toy breeds (we are used to Rotties and German Shepherd Dogs but are too old for the huge breeds now). I don’t know where to turn – she says it is not good to feed him people food but I know where it is made, how it is made and certainly not in China! Also does anyone know any healthy treats? If this is too long and an answer would be the same you can email me at [email protected] with replies – please help! I keep reading that one thing is good and then find another article that says it is not – and he loves the Milo’s grilled chicken treats and I read that has killed dogs!
    Thanks anyone

  • Steph

    Grandma Lucy’s Pureformance Chicken says it is 14% fat and 34% protein. Have they changed the formula or are the numbers different because it is freeze dried and you have to add water? Would the number change after the water is added?

  • PepperMillieSophieAMA

    Oh Mary Ellen,
    I am so so sorry about your loss, my thoughts and prayers are with you and your family at this most difficult time. You have had a very difficult few months. I know what losing a mother means. i ,too lost mine & not a day goes by where I don’t think about her and how i miss her so. I can’t say it gets easier ,the loss is overwhelming,but it time it isn’t as painful as it is now.

    As for Bella, I do agree with Susan, keep the rice out of the mix, just add more food or another meal. She is hungry because thank goodness she is on the recovery road. I am going to give you my e-mail address, e-mail me with your address because I am going to send you some different foods, you don’t have the time now to research foods, and if i can help in this way ,at least i can ease some of your worries.
    [email protected]-now you if i remember correctly are going to wait for the november check up- I am going to send some kibble j
    & some dehydrated food (which all you have to do is add warm water to rehydrate.
    ME, my thoughts and prayers are with you and your entire family at this difficult time. Your Mom is with you remember that always and is so glad Sophia is with a new family.
    Hugs & please e-mail me
    Cheryl

  • Susan

    Hi Mary sorry to hear about your mom, she must of been looking down from heaven & made sure Sophia found a good home, that’s one thing I worry about, my Patch if anything happens to me, he has IBD & I have told my daughter over & over he cant eat this, he cant eat boiled rice etc, I’ve even written it all down so if anything happens to me, I know I will be watching to make sure Patch is OK, I had a heart attack on my birthday about 1 month ago & yes it is quick, I went shopping 8.30am & I didn’t feel good, then I had sharp pain running down my left arm, pain in my back & chest & I felt sick this all happened all at once & that’s all I remember, then I woke up in the ambulance.. I hope that’s how I leave this earth nice & quick or in my sleep……
    With Bella can you increase the sweet potato & chicken….. I feed 4 small meals a day, boiled rice ferments in the stomach so it’s not really that good to feed everyday, I was adding some boiled broccoli & boiled carrots, but the carrots made Patches ears itch…Can Bella have some kibble for 1 or 2 of her meals that’s what I’m doing at the moment, for breakfast Patch has his kibble, then lunch I give the opposite, Chicken & sweet potato, same for his last 2 dinners at 5pm & 8pm today he had chicken & sweet potato at 7am then at 12pm he had 1/2 cup his vet diet Royal Canine Intestinal Low Fat then at 5pm I’ll give him 1 cup of chicken & sweet potato then at 8pm I’ll give him 1/2 cup of his Royal Canine Intestinal Low Fat…. then next week I’ll change his kibble to his Wellness White Fish & Sweet Potato, I was feeding him the Earthborn Ocean Fusion but he was sick over the week end after eating the Earthborn Ocean Fusion kibble, so I’ve started him back on his vet Diet Royal Canine maybe to fat was too high in the Earthborn he was having the same symptoms when he had Pancreatitis….vomiting & pain right side stomach area…..also weigh Bella & make sure she’s at her right weight, if she is then she is eating enough food, my boy will keep eating & wanting more food, I have to tell him NO its finished, it’s all gone, sometimes I save a few kibbles out of his cup & give him a few kibbles as a treat , but really he’s just getting the rest of his lunch or I give a few of his kibble earlier….now I tell him out of the kitchen…

  • Mary Ellen

    Today is Tuesday Oct 13 and Bella is continuing to do well on sweat potato and boiled chicken. What do you think I should add into her mix? any rice at this time? She appears to become hungry more than we thought she did when she was eating the dog kibble.

    I lost my mom unexpectedly last Thursday, found her dead on her living room floor with her dog lying next to her. It appears she had a heartattck and went down quickly. We buried her today. It was a beautiful day and mass was just what she would have wanted. My niece sang and she sounded like an angel from heaven. We were luck to find a couple my age that has a shelty (male) who just fell in love with Sophia – they took her (another shelty) and she appears very settled in and happy.

    Hope all is well in your neck of the woods – let me know what you think about Bella’s diet. ME

  • PepperMillieSophieAMA

    ME
    You must get Bella’s results for everything-bloodwork test x-rays and ultrasounds etc. get a binder at walmart to file them in, this is the only way you can ask questions and know in which direction Bella is progressing . I have folders for all mine. Again bloodworm is just a snapshot at the moment, but it’s the only tool we have. I gave mine a 250mg capsule, with no side effects. Take some out of the capsule or like i said just wait for her workup in November.
    No rain here some beautiful cool mornings just a tease still warm ,it really gets nice in Nov.
    I am so jealous when I hear you are getting colder. I do love Winter and miss it.
    I agree don’t overfeed because you don’t want her to get acid reflux & start throwing up. Just stay on track. In the meantime while she is stable, start considering how you will feed her going forward. I like to decide even its early ,just so i have it onboard to transition her. I will say this, Bella must have a slow transition for many reasons, but especially since her diet has been so bland. You are doing great, Bella is lucky. Please keep me posted.

    I do agree with C4c completely, she was one of the posters that helped me with my pepper, very knowledgeable and helpful, so you might want to go the liquid way.
    I once read but I have forgotten where that cholesterol is not a problem in our 4-legged kids. If her liver enzymes are not elevated & you are not using it for protection against flea & heart worm meds, Bella may not need this particular supplement. As I said earlier ,maybe digestive enzyme &/or a probiotic is all she needs.
    I say all this just trying to save you money, i learned the hard way, overloading them with supplants etc, ,may not do anything but make your grass grow(if you get my point)
    I like to go more in the direction of a good diet without processed crap and fillers. That’s been my learning with Pepper & I am trying it on my 5 remaining-my owe shall we say experiment, if i do a good wholesome diet, minimal vaccinations, exercise, will I give them a healthy better quality of life? Now i didn’t mention there gene pool, if that’s good and they still get the horrible diseases that schnauzers get, I have failed miserably and it all is a crap shoot.

  • Crazy4dogs

    Your welcome! Blood tests are a dog’s and owner’s best friend. It lets you know exactly what’s going on. Good luck with your girl!

  • Mary Ellen

    Thank you so much for taking time to communicate with me – everyone on this site has been amazing to share their time and thoughts Mary Ellen

  • Crazy4dogs

    Hi Mary Ellen,

    Milk Thistle is an absolute wonder for the liver, especially high ALT levels. I’ve gotten a foster down from 300 to absolutely normal. It takes a bit of time (a few months). This was a small dog (12 lbs) so I used a vegetable based (non alcoholic) liquid milk thistle since she needed such a very low dose (a few drops) as opposed to capsules. You might want to check with your vet, but the standard medication for liver issues is denamarin which is sam-e combined with milk thistle. With the approval of my vet I used a low dose sam-e and milk thistle to get these results.

    Just as a side note, I ALWAYS get a copy of any and all of my dogs test results, whether they are urinalysis, blood work, etc. Good luck with your pup! 🙂

  • Mary Ellen

    Thank you for writing me back so quickly you just saved me some money… I have Milk Thistle as I have read for humans it can help to lower cholesterol . I have also been reading how it can help with liver and pancreas issues with dogs. How much do your dogs weight? My capsules are 300mg. Bella weighs about 17 lbs. Bella seems to be doing really well. She loves the sweet potato and chicken and gobbles it right down. She is eating 3 small meals a day, and at times barks because she wants more. She is on the small side and I hesitate to give her more because I do not want her to over indulge 🙂 I will hold off and ask them to do blood work. When they did it before, they never gave me a copy to show me what the $165 cost actually told them. I should probably ask for a copy of her results. I took a look at the site, thank you. I knew it was better to ask you – you have all ready done all the research! I will wait and then when we get the next results if you would ask based on them, I would be grateful. My back is finally starting to feel better – which is a good thing 🙂 thank you for asking. Did you get hit with all the rain?? We are starting to get quite cold up here and boy is it dark now in the morning when I get up for work.

  • PepperMillieSophieAMA

    Just looked at the site. I am not crazy Personally about their products. If you look at the list of ingredients yes it has a great deal,but in my opinion who knows if these dosages are in a therapeutic range for Bella’s benefit?
    Whole food supplementation works better for them. I use Milk thistle after giving hear worm meds for about 7-10 days, I use a 250mg tablet. No studies have been done to my knowledge if supplements work on them. I use milk thistle because I know it does benefit the liver. I used to use COQ-10 on Pepper for her heart. I do know that helps. They won’t hurt her,and maybe for the time she is on a bland diet you could use them. I am just fearful that she might throw them up. If it was me, since she goes in for Blood work in Nov. hold off, I would much rather see Bella on a good regular diet with maybe some good digestive enzymes and /or probiotics.
    If you want to giver her supplements there is a company that is called Standard Process they believe in whole food supplements and offer a very wide variety. If you are interested, I will get in touch with the woman who helped me, but again I would wait. just google the company name and check it out.
    I know i haven’t helped much but I am just sharing what people on this site have told me.
    How is Bella otherwise? How is your back?

  • Mary Ellen

    What do you think of these vitamins for Bella while she is on this bland diet? They are at “Only Natural Pet” website and called
    Vetri-Science Canine Plus Senior 60 Soft Chews. They seem to contain a lot including Milk Thistle. I would like to get them and try but don’t want to purchase until you weigh in on it? Let me know please.

  • Mary Ellen

    Bella has put her weight back on so that is a good thing. She is still eating sweet potato and either boiled chicken or turkey. She absolutely loves it 🙂 Over the weekend she ate grass a couple of times and thru that up – no food attached. Not sure why… other than that she had not thrown up or had any incidents in over a couple of weeks. She is still itching on and off. She is going to the groomers on Friday and I will ask her what she thinks is going on with the itching. Her hot spots have been gone. the neosporin healed it quickly. I have not deviated in her food so you will be proud of me. I think of you when she looks at me with those sad brown eyes. Bella goes in November for her yearly check up and shots, I think I will ask the vet to do blood work to be on the safe side. I will need to give her dog food I think in order to make sure she gets the nourishment she needs? Not sure?? I have given her tiny hard dog biscuit when she comes in, and she has tolerated without an issue.

    My back for the first time today is not as painful so I feel I am on the mend!! YEAH

    It has been raining here and on the cooler side in the 50’s. I did walk her tonight, we go about 2 miles in the city.

  • PepperMillieSophieAMA

    ME, I just saw this what the heck happened to my entire post?? URGHH. Now i completely forgot what I posted-Al Heimer (get it) has visited me again.
    How is Bella doing? Oh I meant no sunday breakfast goodies.
    How is the diet? I saw what Susan posted and since pepper never suffered pancreatitis I cannot speak to how long Bella should stay on a bland diet. Pepper had IBD & it usually resolved within 3-4 weeks. Eventually Pepper could no longer digest kibble & we went to a commercial raw & dehydrated diet.
    In Bella’s case if you choose to keep her on kibble when this does resolve i would suggest her kibble be soaked and even may have to be put thru a blender,now this all depends oh her particular symptoms.
    How are the hot spots?
    Please keep in touch. so sorry about the post.
    Hope your back issue has resolved
    You take care.
    Cheryl

  • Mary Ellen

    I’m sorry, I don’t know what you mean by breakfast goodies? ME

  • PepperMillieSophieAMA

    , breakfast goodies

  • Mary Ellen

    Cheryl I haven’t heard from you is all ok? Bella is doing good right now, holding her own. Still on sweet potato and mostly boiled chicken. We are walking again about 2 miles each time. My back is still pretty bad, but I am trying to keep moving hoping it will just miraculously be better lol

  • Mary Ellen

    Thank you Susan for sharing your experience and recipe with me. I appreciate all the positive input I have been receiving. I’m so new at this! Maybe this weekend I will be able to try out your turkey balls. Mary Ellen

  • Susan

    Hi I’ve been following your post about Bella, you need to keep Bella on a limited ingredient diet at least for a couple of months to let every thing heal & settle, I know Bella’s diet isn’t balanced at the moment but like my vet told me, 1-2 months on an unbalanced diet wont hurt them & time for their stomach, pancreas & bowel to rest & heal…..
    I was making turkey balls, I’d buy 1 kg (2lb) of lean 99% turkey breast grounded mince & I’d mix in 1 whisked egg, then I made little bite size turkey rissole balls, I lined a baking tray with foil & baked in oven for about 15-20mins, the turkey balls cook real quick, so you have to keep watching them & rolling them, I would roll them over after being in the oven for 8-10 mins as soon as they are cooked take them out, then I let them cool & froze them in a container putting some plastic in between the layers of turkey balls in the container if they stick when frozen I just banged the container on the bench & the frozen turkey balls separate.. I take a few out when needed they thaw in about 15 mins, I also would just crumble a few turkey balls & add sweet potato as a meal….
    A healthy treat I’ ve been giving my boy is the K-9 Natural Green Lipped Mussel snacks, they are low in fat & high in omega 3 excellent for the skin & coat, joints & digestion, http://www.chewy.com/dog/k9-natural-green-lipped-mussel/dp/118456
    I give 1 a day & that way Patch is getting his omega 3 for his skin & joints, Patch doesn’t do well on supplements like Fish oil or Coconut oil, so I try & feed foods that are high in omega 3 & 6……also only try 1 new ingredient a day, for a couple of days at the same time & then you will know if that agrees with Bella or doesn’t agree, when you add & try a few different things in 1 day you wont know what caused what if something happens…..

  • Mary Ellen

    Right now Bella has been eating breakfast, lunch and dinner. Prior to her problem, she had been eating Iams natural dry food (until I was talked into Rachel Ray’s salmon – which I now after reading reviews is not fit for a dog) that I put in her bowl in the morning and left it for her all day. Of course, she would have a taste of what we were eating. You are correct, Bella will not be indulging in people food any more. I am not sure if she is more hungry now because of what she is eating, or it just seems that way because she no longer has bad people food anymore during the day. I have not been a fan of canned dog food. So I would prefer dry food, but have not minded at all fixing her sweet potato and the chicken and turkey. I will give her a taste of the rice, but only as a treat and go back to the sweet potato. She loves the sweet potato.

    The fleas have been bad this year, but until now, we were lucky that Bella showed no signs of picking up any. Her topical still works – so we are lucky in that aspect.

    My lower back is starting to feel much better, which is a good thing! ME

  • PepperMillieSophieAMA

    oh ME so sorry to hear that.
    No ,its been awhile since i got an update. Sorry about the fleas,it’s been so bad here and none of the topicals worked anymore, I had to take a deep breadth and give them a product called Nexgard a chewable I put them on Milk Thistle to protect their livers,but am very nervous about this.
    You did exactly right I do the exact same thing, when they stet getting red spots on it goes I use a product called ANIMAX excellent triple antibiotic took it away quickly before they went into full blown hot spots that need clavamox antibiotics to be taken.
    Bella can get some rice as a change -just please keep in mind rice can be inflammatory and the goal is for all the inflammation to go away, but give her some. I pray and feel she is over the worst and in the next couple of weeks she has to get back on some food. I need to find out what you prefer to feed ? dry ,wet ,dehydrated, commercial raw? No more table food I know you don’t want to hear this but she can’t have anymore.
    How many times a day do you feed her ,does she have her bowl down all day or does Bella get fed at certain times? All this has to be considered. When you are up to it I do urge you to read those articles from Dr. Becker., it describes why diet is critical when an episode of pancreatitis occurs . I know you never want Bella to go through another episode.
    Sorry again to hear that your back went out, I know how you feel, i have a bad hip & back & that pain is debilitating. Feel good. so happy Bella is doing so so much better. I will wait to hear from you about her diet and what way you prefer to go and try and help with choices.
    Thanks for answering take it slow.
    Cheryl

  • Mary Ellen

    Hi Cheryl, I woke up 4 days ago and could hardly move – I threw my back out and YIKES! Sorry I haven’t written. Bella (keeping my fingers crossed) has not had any episodes with throwing up or bad poops. She has only been eating turkey, chicken with sweat potato. She seems to be eating more, than she did when she was on dog food (and our handouts). She appears healthy with her eyes and teeth. She caught some fleas out in the back yard, so we gave her a flea bath and put her prescription monthly medicine on her again. (I might have told you that all ready). She has a couple of sores on her belly where she was scratching, but I have put neosporin on them and they seem to be healing. I know, I’m leary about the neosporin, but she hasn’t licked it when I put it on her and rub it in. I used the spray kind. Do you have any suggestions. I have read all kinds of reviews on hot spot stuff, this is the first time she has ever had anything like this. Her belly is normal color and she is not showing signs of allergic reaction like she did with the pumpkin or when she originally broke out with the pancreatitis. She is perky, mouthy and appears back to her normal self. I was going to make her some rice just to switch it off with the sweet potato, what do you think??

  • PepperMillieSophieAMA

    Mary Ellen,
    How is everything going ?? Hadn’t been on the computer this weekend so I wanted to see how Miss Bella was feeling? Just let me know whenever you can. Thinking about you and hoping she is progressing well.
    Cheryl

  • Crazy4cats

    Total Cutie Pie! I hope you can get her healthy. Good luck!

  • PepperMillieSophieAMA

    Now that’s a little rascal cute as a bug. I don’t like the fact she threw up again. Do you think she got into something? trash .
    Yes she must stay on this bland diet until say she has a good few weeks of no vomiting good poo-poos’. In my opinion she is still inflamed. Could you try a few days of no rice, maybe add a little unsweetened applesauce just a tiny amount as a little extra? Now don’t get worried if she throws that up-it will indicate that sweet potato and the chicken & or turkey is the only thing (for now) that is good for her. Glad you posted. I have been checking my e-mail daily,will continue. Stay positive

  • Mary Ellen

    I am still giving Bella Sweat potato, chicken or turkey and every other day a small amount of rice. She seems to be doing good except for yesterday I found her in the yard throwing up grass mixed into clear bile. She has her full energy back, her gums are good, and her eyes are clear and perky. Do I just keep giving her the same food. She actually loves it, and she seems to actually be eating more than she did with her dog food. I wanted you to see what Bella looks like. This was taken a few months back, but she looks the same only a little thinner. She is my cutie pie 🙂

  • Whitney

    Hi,
    My dog has had Pancreatitis now for 3 1/2 years and we keep it at bay with Annamaet Grain Free/LEAN dry food, mixed with the Sojos base (no meats) and he is super healthy and no relapses and thin and shiny and full of energy!!! Chewy.com sells and free delivers for the best price! Good luck!

  • PepperMillieSophieAMA

    Well I am from the city born & raised in manhattan. I live in Louisiana now.
    You could give her some rice,just for a bit of variety,poor baby. I know how hard this is, believe me I cringe when I think back. I think it was harder for me limiting pepper than for her. I am sorry I don’t know why I thought it was 4 weeks, forgive me. i have gotten HORRIBLE about time. If she is only 2 weeks into the flare -up you will have to go with this bland diet some more weeks, so stock in the sweet potatoes and poultry & rice.
    Great we are on the right track so we have to keep this up-you are doing great!!! So glad to hear you won’t be giving egg today, believe me it’s just of the time being.
    Eventually an egg white every so often will be fine.
    Have a great sunday please keep me posted if you can.

  • Mary Ellen

    So far so good today, fingers crossed lol. I will not feed her an egg. It has been down pouring all day today, but from what I can tell her poop seems somewhat normal today. I have given her more sweat potato with some finely chopped turkey mixed into it three times today, small amounts. She woofs it down. She is laying next to me now, her nose is cold and wet and she seems peaceful. I will continue with the sweat potato and chicken/turkey. What about a little rice, or completely stay away from it? She had a peaceful night last night without incident and am hoping for the same tonight. We live in Lockport which is upstate NY in the middle of Buffalo, Niagara Falls, and Rochester – so I am on Eastern Std time. I will let you know how Bella does tonight. The vet had her on IV for two full days, pumped her full of antibiotics by way of shots she said and sent her home to me, it was two weeks last Thursday she released her, she got sick on August 25th.

  • Mary Ellen

    I am glad I have not offended you – thank you for being here for me.

  • PepperMillieSophieAMA

    Mary Ellen,
    Did you mean offend me? or another poster? If it was me in no way have you offended me

  • PepperMillieSophieAMA

    ME,
    Just seeing the above post, Right now don’t worry about the vitamins and nutrients, we can fix that later. She has got to get better.
    As to your question about the antibiotics possible but I doubt it because if I am correct she is on week (almost) 4 of getting the IV? i don’t know what they gave or how long it was going to be in her system.
    I understand about the reading, you need to be with her and I also understand about how you feel about her. I felt that way about my Pepper.
    I would ask your husband if he doesn’t mind to ask the butcher where their poultry comes from?
    I get mine at fresh market because I know where it comes from. But I wouldn’t worry to much now. she needs to eat.
    Bella will learn going forward that carrots apples green beans are much better than Redi-whip I guarantee
    No need to thank me, people on this site where so kind to me during my trial & tribulations, I call this paying it forward, and since Bella Is half schnauzer well you can say I have a vested interest in her well being!!! Also all my girls have my grandmother’s Name of Belle as their middle names & we used to call my grandmother Bella so we are connected in 2 ways!!!

  • PepperMillieSophieAMA

    Honestly Mary Ellen, I think it was the treats, it was something I did with my Pepper MANY TIMES-so please we move forward . Bella must stay on the bland diet-I wish I could say for 2 more weeks and all will be AOK. but this sliding back just means she can’t eat anything for now but boiled skinless white meat turkey or chicken,rice & sett potato. Mary Ellen I am not just saying this to make you feel better-we look at them and they look so pitiful & they seem to be doing better so we give them a little treat. Bella is looking to you to make her well so stay strong!!
    As for her bath, I can’t speak to the spray, honestly I just bathe my crew with a hypoallergenic shampoo & never spray them with any chemical perfume, now thats just me & because Pepper was so sensitive, I just don’t do it.
    I would watch the poo carefully and if she is still pooling with a gel like substance, I would take a sample to the vet on monday. I would not give her a scrambled egg for tomorrow, no matter how much you want to. It seems to me she is very very inflamed and this may take more time than you or the vet thought. I would not hesitate to phone the vet next week if she is not improving by next week,provided that she is kept to a very restrictive regime diet wise. I have read susans post below about feeding a late dinner, I couldn’t do that with Pepper because she also had acid reflux so we ate our supper by 3:30-4:00 P.M..
    Now I don’t know if Bella suffers from acid reflux. Has she belched a lot before this episode? Right now if I were in your place, I would just deal with her pancreatitis -get her over this.
    I will check back with you tomorrow to see how Bella does today & tomorrow. Please no egg tomorrow
    Good luck.
    Cheryl

  • Mary Ellen

    I hope I have not offended you in any way. Bella kept her lunch down yesterday, and dinner. No throwing up of bile or any thing else, and slept all night with out an issue. Is it ok to feed her a scrambled egg without adding anything into it? We do eggs on Sunday morning, and I would do a special one for her as she looks for it on Sundays. She is walking without an issue and seems to be her peppy self. I would really like to continue fixing what ever food I need to be feeding her. The sweat potato seems to be working well with her. I put the fruit treats away. I know you said when she was well we could try them with her, we did it too soon – I’m sorry I did not listen well enough to you.

  • sharron

    most welcome – lexee is nearly 7 yrs and i would say for the past 6 i have tried most of the foods made. we have done everything from dry to raw and everything in between, she is one fussy eater – she has numerous times brought up bile which the vet is acid reflux and she is prone to ibs – it isn’t chronic but it can show up at anytime, which happens to me quite often, i have ibs and colitis – with lexee i have
    always found royal canin to be the food that works for her – my vet told me to put her on royal canin since she likes it and keep her on it instead of going all over the map with different foods, she said doing thati is not going to help her at all

  • Mary Ellen

    Thank you for sharing – no I don’t mind I can use all the help I can get. Thanks!

  • sharron

    hi – l feed lexee, yorkie/chihuahua, royal canin gastrointestinal moderate calorie dry food mixed with a tbsp of royal canin gastrointestinal low fat wet food – i feed her 3 x/day, small meals, and everything with her is back to normal, her bm’s are good, the way they should be and no tummy issues or gastro issues – thought i would put my 2 cents in – hope you don’t mind

  • Susan

    HI just feed the vet diet, nothing else, no treats nothing, you can buy the Royal Canine Intestinal low fat kibble & use the kibble as little treats, when you give & do too many things in 1 day then you can not work out what she’s reacting tooo…. My vet always say’s, Susan 1 thing at a time, we wont know what is causing the problem,…… by giving her extra foods your not helping her, she’s a dog, she going to eat what ever you give her, she’ll get over not having any treats, her stomach & bowel has to heal, it takes time, months,dark tarry poos are not good, I kept my boy on the vet diet for 9 months then tried another kibble things didn’t go well, so I went back on the vet diet for another 3-6 months, finally after 1&1/2 years he can eat anything as long as it’s low in fat, gluten free & I know it agrees with him….give the boiled chicken, sweet potato say for breakfast then give the vet food for lunch & dinner but make the dinner a later dinner…. breakfast-7am lunch-1pm dinner-7pm..& no treats, tell your husband its not worth Bella getting sick…

  • Mary Ellen

    We had a bad night at 4:30am she got me up with throwing up a gel like formed bile – no food in it, then she went downstairs and pooped on her pad that was not formed as earlier. somewhat formed but had the gel type stuff all around it. She went out side and then about 15 minutes later was pooping out only this gel type substance three different times, like she was trying hard to get it out. This is what happened different yesterday. My husband gave her several of the different treats that were in the back of the fruit ones coco… that we bought off amazon, and we went in the hot tub last night and when Bella came over to us we petted her. Thinking back our hands were wet and we use chlorine in the hot tub. Her nose is cold and wet, but she certainly is not feeling well. I am off to work, and my husband is going to give her more sweat potato than chicken for breakfast. Oh, my husband also gave her a bath yesterday and when she was dry sprayed her so she would smell good with bounce for dogs that he got at pets plus.
    Was it the chlorine that got on her coat that made her sick when she licked herself? Or did we not feed her enough and she went to bed on a empty stomach, in the bile she thru up I did see a sign of the dried berry (a couple of itsy bitsy dots) that she was given as a treat, but that was the only thing I saw. Gotta run to work ME

  • Mary Ellen

    Right now I am boiling small white skinless chicken breasts that I get from Omaha Steaks single wrapped and slicing them thin and dicing them in very small pieces. I then mash it up in either the sweat potato or a couple of teaspoons of the boiled to soft and mush white rice. I go to work at 7 and don’t come home till 3:30 so my husband is helping me with her, he is retired. Today she is sooooooo much peppier and mouthy lol. Instead of feeding her once a day and letting her eat when she wants, we are giving her small amounts morning, lunch and dinner. You are so right my husband opens the fridge and she gets right up to where the red whip is, and we shut the door, she has such said eyes. BUT she will soon forget.

    We went to Wegmans today a grocery store local to our area and my husband talked with the butcher. He sold him some white turkey meat that he claims is not processed but all natural without any added ingredients. Should I trust it?

    Bella was given a good bath today, and she is still itching a little bit, but not like she was. Could the antibiotics she was given dry out her skin?? Her eyes look clear and alert, her gums look good, and her poop today was formed and a good color, given the sweat potato in it.

    I am willing to feed her whatever it takes going forward, I am afraid that not giving her dry food will be bad for her teeth and gums. I would never buy her canned food, and she does not appear to like it anyway.

    I have not had a chance to read the articles yet, I am planning on it this weekend. I have been extremely busy at work and when I get home I only want to walk with Bella and play with her and sit by her and massage her. She is my best friend and I just want her to be better and to live a long life!!

    Is she getting enough nutrients and the vitamins she needs for her system with what I am feeding her? That is a concern for me.

    Again thank you for talking with me, you are a great friend! Mary Ellen

  • Cheryl Pepper Millie Sophie

    Who cares what the vet thinks, they make a small fortune selling that food.Don’t get me started on that. I don’t want to cause anyone to get upset . I have had horrible experiences with vets and their traditional beliefs.
    Anyway, don’t go backwards you did what you did and now we go forward.
    At least you realize Redi whip may not be the best treat along with bacon.
    Eggs are not bad really but they have to be cooked differently.
    When Bella is ready she can have carrots green beans squash lightly cooked for treats. You might have to reconsider the dry food,but if you can’t i suggest looking at the Horizion brand Amicus senior pet food, you will have to soak it for her in warm water easier on the digestive system -the fat is 10% which is what you have to look for.
    Do you think you may be able to lightly boil some turkey for her for her meals say a weeks worth and add that as a topper?
    I can recommend some dehydrated food, that you just add warm water to reconstitute . You let me know what you will be able to do & I can guide you where to look. As for wet food, I am not the person to ask, never fed it, the only food i did look at was the weruva canned.
    When I said cook, I didn’t mean for you to cook from scratch ,just like i mentioned above boil some turkey chicken & when she is all aok some very very very lean beef, I use this as toppers for food.
    I use commercial raw, but that you must be careful with. Do not consider the freeze dried way too high in fat.
    Believe me mary Ellen, we will have plenty of choices. You will have to be strong ,when those eyes say to you why can’t I have that? I even have a healthy ice cream recipe for her bday
    So glad her poo is better , yes you are correct she is on the mend. I would stay bland for at least another few weeks . were you able to read those articles by Dr. Becker. I suggest you do, when you have some time.
    Keep in touch, Like I have said before , I will help you in any way I can.

  • Susan

    Hi sounds like Bella has acid reflux & needs an ant acid medication like Zantac (Ranitidine) or Pepcid (Famotidine), have you seen a vet?? she may need to have an Endoscope & Biopsies done to see what’s happen with her stomach & small bowel, she may have Ulcers, Helicobacter-Pylori or GERDS etc… I’d feed some Turkey Breast mince with some boiled Sweet potatoes, more turkey then the Sweet potatoes or if she does OK on the boiled rice but rice ferments & sits in the gut so you need foods that are insoluble fibers & move thru the stomach quicker, where soluble fiber foods sit in the stomach causing acid reflux then they vomit the food back up….Did Bella eat the Pumkin for breakfast & vomit the pumkin back up or did Bella eat the Pumkin the night before for dinner then vomit it up in the morning???.
    I feed about 4-5 smaller meals a day, I feed 7am 12pm 5pm & 8pm at 7am & 5pm the meals are a bit bigger, the meals at 12pm & 8pm are a bit smaller…. I do a late dinner 8pm so Patches stomach isn’t empty all thru the night so his acid in his stomach doesn’t start norring away at his stomach that’s when ulcers can happen….. I’d be seeing a vet that knows about the stomach & bowel & see if she needs an ant acid medication….. I found the Zantac worked the best & some liquid Mylanta about 3mls, I give the Mylanta some morning as soon as he wakes up 20mins before breakfast & thru the day if he looks sick & starts wanting to eat grass also low fat wet foods are better then kibbles..

  • Mary Ellen

    Bella appears to be doing so much better. She has not thrown up the bile now in two days, and her itching has almost subsided. I believe the pumpkin must have upset her. She loves the sweat potato, and turkey. I have to be honest I have been a horrible owner. I fed her Iams dog food for small breed up until a couple of months ago. A work friend talked me into buying the Rachel Ray dog food telling me it was organic and would be better for her. I have googled this food now and see all kinds of horrible stuff about dogs coming down with pancreatitis because of it. Bella turned 10 in July, and she ate her Iams, and ice cream when we had it, and she absolutely loved red whip, as a treat. In reading I now see where I must have been slowing killing her without realizing it. I would also give her scrambled eggs on Sunday morning when we fixed breakfast with small bits of baked bacon. OMG if I had only known what I was doing to her poor little body. She never gave me an inkling that it was hurting her.
    So yes, Bella is going to have to learn all over again what she will be able to eat, and those days of redi whip for a treat are gone, and she so loved it.

    We are into our third week and I don’t see me giving her anything but bland until I know she is all better. My vet has not called me, nor did she suggest I come back unless Bella had a problem. She is probably not happy with me returning the Purina EN canned food 🙂 Bella’s poop is now formed and a normal color, not dark and tarry which I would think is a good sign.

    We use to put her food out once a day in the morning and she would eat when she wanted. Now we are giving her small amounts 3 times a day. I work from 7 to 3:30, but my husband is retired and home with her.

    Thank you for taking time out of your life to converse with me, I greatly appreciate it. I will be looking to put Bella on a dog food that will be good for her, as I am not sure if I cook her food going forward that she will be getting the right amount of vitamins and nourishment that she will need??

  • Cheryl Pepper Millie Sophie

    Mary Was very busy.
    Were you able to open the articles from Dr Becker and read them. You will have to scroll day to get to them. Dr Becker suggests ground because of its anti inflammatory properties if memory serves me correctly.
    How did she do with the sweet potato? Any vomiting? I believe she may have an issue with pumpkin so just eliminate it, poor baby is suffering enough .
    You could try a tiny tsp of pumpkin during the early afternoon (if you are available) and see how she does as a treat.
    So glad she is perkier excellent sign, I know the diet is bland but she may need to be on it longer, even though she is acting better. May I ask during normal times what does her diet consist of, because as difficult as it is to do, her diet may have to be completely revamped. Don’t want you to worry now, there is time for that, just wanted you to start thinking ahead.
    So ,basically she is on week 3? of this episode correct? Does her vet want to see her again?
    Her itching is perplexing, because it should stop once the pumpkin is eliminated. Is she still itching??
    Let me know .Please forgive me if i don’t reply right away. I will check in daily to see if I can help. Best of luck

  • Mary Ellen

    Thank you for responding quickly. I have turkey for her – why ground? I sliced it thin and in very small pieces and then mushed it into the rice – and just a half hour ago I fixed a sweat potato and mushed it into about two teaspoons of that. I have bought Omaha Steaks (4 oz white lean chicken breasts no skin) boiled them and sliced them thin and cut into very very small pieces. Does that sound ok? Bella has never itched in her life – well maybe once in a blue moon :-). Now it is like she doesn’t want to stop. She is biting at the inside of her legs down by her private area and then itching with her feet underneath too. Could I have given her too much pumpkin at a time, or it just does not agree with her?
    She had no throwing up last night with the turkey and rice, nor all day today. I have just tried sweat potato so we will see what happens with that. She is getting more perky and wants to go for walks and sniff everything so that is a good sign.
    They did not send me home with any medication. They kept her on an IV for two full days and then said they gave her shot antibiotics so that she didn’t have to take pill form and that it would last a week. The week was up last Thursday.

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    The Hidden Inflammatory Bowel Disease That Threatens Your Pet’s Well-Being

    November 02, 2010 | 72,157 views

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    Listen as Dr. Karen Becker discusses the very common problem of IBD in companion animals – how it starts, what to look for, treatment options and how to prevent this miserable disorder in your furry family member.

    Dr. Becker’s Comments:

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a condition of inflammation of the intestines.

    There are four common types of IBD, classified by what kind of white blood cells infiltrate the intestine: lymphocytes, plasmacytes, eosinophils and neutrophils. Without a doubt, the most common cause of IBD in pets is lymphocytic-plasmacytic enteritis, gastritis and colitis.

    If your pet’s intestines are inflamed long enough, the situation can create a host of other debilitating health conditions.

    IBD and Leaky Gut

    Both cats and dogs get IBD. Both are susceptible to dysbiosis or ‘leaky gut,’ which means the balance of bad to good intestinal bacteria gets out of whack.

    Leaky or permeable gut is a condition in which inflammation weakens the tight junctions of the cells of the GI tract, allowing partially digested proteins and potential allergens to escape into your pet’s bloodstream.

    Allergens in the bloodstream trigger a systemic immune reaction – your pet’s body senses foreign invading substances and mounts a powerful defense. The result is allergies or worse – autoimmune or immune-mediated disease. A simple explanation for this condition is that your pet’s body is attacking itself.

    IBD Leads to Secondary Infections, Organ Degeneration, Nutritional Deficiencies and Even Cancer

    Secondary infections are very common in dogs and cats with inflammatory bowel disease. This is the result of not having a balanced, healthy digestive system.

    Over half your pet’s immune function is located in his GI tract, so if the intestines are inflamed and compromised, the immune system is compromised right along with it.

    Secondary organ degeneration is common with IBD, especially in the kidneys and liver.

    Nutritional deficiencies are also typical in IBD pets because inflammation disrupts the normal absorption and processing of nutrients from food.

    With kitties, there’s a correlation between GI cancer (lymphoma of the GI tract) and chronic IBD.

    A Common Cause of IBD – GI Parasites

    There are a few common causes of inflammatory bowel disease in dogs and cats.

    One that is often overlooked is the presence of parasites.

    My estimate is the vast majority of puppy mill pets and abandoned/rescued animals left at shelters are positive for parasites – roundworms, hookworms, tapeworms, coccidia, and Giardia. Parasites cause GI inflammation.

    Another source for parasite infestation is in litters whose mothers were not tested or treated prior to being bred. Responsible breeders arrange for testing and deworming of females before they are bred, which insures litters will be parasite free.

    Less responsible or unknowledgeable breeders don’t take the same precautions and end up selling litter after litter of puppies and kittens that have GI parasites.

    The next problem arises at the veterinary clinic, where broad spectrum dewormers are given to infected animals at regular intervals until 16 weeks. At the end of the 16 weeks, the pets are re-checked to see if the parasites are gone.

    But here’s the issue: if the specific parasite isn’t identified, it may not be killed by a broad spectrum dewormer. So pets wind up with several weeks of unnecessary medication that doesn’t even solve the problem.

    Many dogs I see at my Natural Pet hospital have been dewormed three or four times but are still having problems. When I check fecal samples for these pups, I often find they are coccidia or Giardia-positive. Broad spectrum dewormers don’t take care of these particular parasites. Giardia, for example, causes intermittent diarrhea and chronic low-grade inflammation of the GI tract. It is not responsive to the dewormers most vets prescribe.

    A saner, safer approach is for your vet to do at least three fecal analyses one month apart to determine the type of parasite and to confirm your pet is rid of them. Selecting the appropriate dewormer for the type of parasite, and treating the pet until the parasites are completely resolved is a crucial part of decreasing GI inflammation and preventing full-blown IBD.

    By the time these unfortunate pups are seen at my practice, they are over 16 weeks old, with intermittent soft stools indicating GI inflammation, and they typically still have a parasite problem which requires treatment before any other symptoms can be resolved.

    Another Root Cause – Antibiotics and Steroids

    Another of my frustrations is that animals with low-grade GI inflammation are treated with antibiotics by the traditional veterinary community.

    Antibiotics are a second common trigger for inflammatory bowel disease.

    GI antibiotics kill the healthy bacteria right along with the bad guys. When all bacteria is obliterated from your pet’s gut, the regrowth often results in an imbalance featuring too many gram-negative, unhealthy bacteria or opportunistic yeast and not enough of the friendly variety. This is the definition of dysbiosis.

    Now we have a 16+ week old puppy or kitten that has had several weeks of GI inflammation, ineffective deworming treatments, one or two rounds of antibiotics which have obliterated all the bacteria in his GI tract, and no re-seeding of bacteria with an appropriate probiotic to insure a healthy balance.

    This little guy is well on his way to low-grade GI inflammation and IBD.

    I’ve also seen dogs and cats that at six months of age are already on Prednisone therapy for GI inflammation. Prednisone is an immunosuppressive steroid, which turns the immune system down or completely off, wiping out troublesome symptoms and giving the appearance of a ‘cure.’ Unfortunately, this treatment doesn’t do a thing to uncover the root cause of the GI inflammation and ultimately postpones true healing.

    A Third Culprit: Food Intolerance

    In my practice I see many pets brought in for intermittent soft-to-watery stools, a situation many pet parents dub ‘sensitive stomach.’

    Typically, this ‘sensitive stomach’ means the dog or cat cannot undergo any sort of dietary change without major GI consequences. This isn’t what nature had in mind when it built your favorite furry friend.

    Just as you are designed to eat different foods at every meal without GI disturbance, pets with healthy, resilient GI tracts should be able to tolerate changes in the food they eat without negative consequences.

    Probably more than half the pet owners I talk to assume it’s normal for their dog or cat to have GI sensitivity to changes in diet. But what’s really going on is the animal’s gut is in some way compromised and therefore cannot withstand dietary variety. It could be a low-grade inflammation that has been present for weeks, months or even years by that time.

    Food intolerance or sensitivity can begin with a poor quality, non-species appropriate diet – one that is high in unnecessary carbohydrates. Processed pet food containing a lot of corn, wheat or rice can create inflammation in the gut of your carnivorous dog or cat, designed to digest meat – not grains.

    I also have clients that feed a raw, species-appropriate diet without carbohydrates, which is wonderful, except they feed the same protein source for weeks, months or years.

    Many animals (including humans) develop hypersensitivity to a food they eat over and over again. Inflammation is the result and can lead to IBD.

    So overfeeding too much of even the right foods can lead to problems in the digestive tract.

    Testing for IBD

    There are two different diagnostic tests that are commonly done to detect IBD.

    One test is what is known as a ‘confirming’ test, in which a biopsy is taken to assess morphologic characteristics common in the GI tracts of animals with inflammatory bowel disease. This is not my first choice because it’s expensive, invasive and involves anesthesia and the inherent risks that come with it.

    The other test, which I use often in my practice, is a functional gastrointestinal test using a blood sample.

    What we’re looking for with this test is two types of B vitamin absorption, the first of which is folate. Folate is a water-soluble B vitamin that is not easily absorbed in the small intestine unless it is deconjugated there.

    If your pet’s small intestine can’t deconjugate folate, meaning it can’t break it down into an absorbable form, she can end up folate-deficient, in which case her blood test will show low or suboptimal levels of folate.

    A low folate level means either your pet’s assimilation and absorption of nutrients is poor, or her body is challenged by the deconjugation process, indicating a disease or disorder of the small intestine.

    If your pet’s folate is high rather than low, it indicates another type of problem. Your pet’s small intestine contains a small amount of bacteria critical for the production and assimilation of certain B vitamins. If this bacteria blooms into an overgrowth, your pet can wind up with high folate levels and a condition known as SIBO – Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth.

    The second blood test I use to assess GI function involves another B vitamin called cobalamin, which is bound to protein.

    Cobalamin is released from protein through a complex series of events that starts in the stomach and finishes in the small intestine.

    If cobalamin levels are low, we can assume this complex process is not occurring optimally. Cobalamin levels are a measure of digestion. This condition of maldigestion can sometimes also involve the pancreas. The disorder is called EPI – Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency and can be diagnosed via another GI blood test called a TLI (Trypsin-like Immunoreactivity).

    If you suspect your pet has IBD but you’re not interested in doing a biopsy at this point, ask your vet to perform functional GI testing to determine a diagnosis.

    In my practice, I also do two additional functional tests, TLI and PLI, which assess pancreatic function. Secondary pancreatitis is a very common condition in IBD patients, so assessing your dog’s or cat’s pancreatic function is also important.

    These functional GI tests are available through the gastrointestinal lab at Texas A&M University.

    Dietary Recommendations for IBD

    Upon diagnosis, your veterinarian will probably tell you to feed a bland diet if your pet is symptomatic with vomiting, diarrhea or soft stool with mucus and/or blood.

    My idea of a bland diet is different from a traditional veterinarian’s. I recommend ground cooked turkey and canned pumpkin or cooked sweet potato. I don’t recommend the traditional beef and rice. Beef is high in fat, which can exacerbate GI inflammation and pancreatitis.

    Rice is a complex carb which can be fermented in the GI tract, causing gas, which can lead to additional digestive upset.

    I recommend a grain-free, bland diet because in my experience it’s more suitable to pets with active symptoms of IBD.

    While feeding your dog or cat a bland diet, you should be thinking about what’s next for her in terms of nutritional requirements. Bland is fine for a short time, but balance in the diet is crucial

    I recommend you work with an integrative veterinarian to select a novel protein source — one your pet has either never consumed or hasn’t for a long while. This will give the GI tract and your pet’s immune system a good rest.

    You’ll also want to select a novel vegetable or fiber source as well, to create an anti-inflammatory menu that will facilitate healing within both the large and small intestine.

    An integrative vet can help you build a comprehensive protocol for your pet that addresses not only dietary issues, but also vaccinations, the use of drug therapy, and any potential toxins in your pet’s environment or lifestyle that could be contributing to unaddressed inflammation.

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    HEALTHY PETS DISCLAIMER: This information is for educational purposes only and is not intended to replace the advice of your own veterinarian or doctor. Dr. Karen Becker cannot answer specific questions about your pet’s medical issues or make medical recommendations for your pet without first establishing a veterinarian-client-patient relationship. Your pet’s medical protocol should be given by your holistic veterinarian.

    If you want to use an article on your site please click here. This content may be copied in full, with copyright, contact, creation and information intact, without specific permission, when used only in a not-for-profit format. If any other use is desired, permission in writing from Mercola.com is required.

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    Don’t Let Your Pet’s Pancreas Inflammation Ruin Their Life

    December 16, 2009 | 74,011 views

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    Would you recognize the signs and symptoms of pancreatitis in your cat or dog? Dr. Karen Becker explains why this serious health problem is on the rise, and how to address it using natural methods.

    Dr. Becker’s Comments:

    Pancreatitis is inflammation of your pet’s pancreas that can disrupt its normal functions. This is often a serious issue, as the pancreas has two vital functions: it secretes insulin, which balances blood sugar, and it secretes digestive enzymes — amylase, lipase and proteases.

    Fever, lethargy, dehydration, abdominal pain, anorexia, vomiting and diarrhea in both dogs and cats can all have roots in pancreatitis.

    What’s even more interesting about pancreatitis is that inflammation of the pancreas can be very, very mild or it can be extremely life-threatening and even fatal in some cases.

    Inflammation of the pancreas is becoming more recognized as a problem in veterinary medicine and in fact brand new research states that up to 40 percent of cats that were autopsied had lesions of pancreatitis. Those cats didn’t die of a pancreatic problem, so we’re recognizing that the pancreas is not only a vital organ but one that may be increasingly prone to injury and damage secondary to other disease processes.

    I think the increase in diagnosed cases is partly because vets are beginning to check for it more often, but there seem to be other factors contributing as well.

    Why Pancreatitis Occurs

    As a holistic veterinarian, I don’t think it’s a fluke or happenstance that the pancreas has become more and more attacked as an organ. We know that the high carbohydrate-based diets that most dogs and cats eat are extremely taxing to pets’ insulin levels, which are, in turn, taxing to the pancreas.

    In addition, the foods that we feed our dogs and cats are entirely processed and devoid of natural enzymes, which help supplement your pet’s diet and reduce pancreatic stress. So, the pancreas really may live in a state of chronic inflammation and stress because the average American pet diet is dead (processed at high temperatures to create an extensive shelf life) and is therefore devoid of any naturally occurring amylase, lipase and protease enzymes that would naturally be found in raw foods. The canned or kibble (dry food) diet that you feed your pet causes the pancreas to have to secrete an abundance of digestive enzymes. If the pancreas fails to perform adequately, pancreatitis results.

    There are also some drugs that are well known to incite episodes of pancreatitis. For instance, anti-seizure drugs such as Potassium Bromide or Phenobarbital are well known to predispose pets to pancreatitis.

    Prednisone and other catabolic steroids are also well known to cause pancreatitis. Even the diuretic Lasix (Furosemide®), has been implicated in pancreatitis attacks in dogs and cats.

    However, diet also plays into recurrent pancreatitis episodes. Many cats and dogs eat a diet that is much too high in fat and we know that fat is also an inciting cause of low-grade, recurrent pancreatitis.

    Certain breeds, such as Miniature Schnauzers may also have a genetic predisposition to having recurrent pancreatitis, and German Shepherds can be born with pancreatic insufficiency causing enzyme deficiency symptoms from birth.

    Pancreatitis Often Recurs

    If you’ve been through the nightmare of pancreatitis, you know all too well that number one, it is very scary, and number two, many animals require hospitalization and very intense medical therapy to pull them through the crisis.

    What you may not know is that pancreatitis often recurs. You can easily spend thousands of dollars getting your pet stabilized with each occurrence of pancreatitis, and I wish I could tell you that just putting your pet on a low-residue, low-fat diet will eliminate their future risk. Unfortunately, the fact is that many pets end up with recurrent pancreatitis.

    Diagnosis of Pancreatitis

    Veterinarians diagnose pancreatitis through a blood test called the PLI (Pancreatic Lipase Immunoreactivity) Test. Your veterinarian may suggest that you run a PLI test if he or she suspects your pet may be dealing with pancreatitis.

    There are also two pancreatic enzymes, lipase and amylase, that can be elevated on traditional blood work when animals have pancreatitis, but most veterinarians rely on the PLI test for an accurate and quick diagnostic test to determine if your pet has pancreatic inflammation.

    What to do if Your Pet Has Pancreatitis

    If your pet has failed the PLI, which means the PLI levels are elevated beyond what they should be for your dog or cat, you should seek medical attention — especially if your pet is vomiting, lethargic, dealing with anorexia or has a fever.

    After the crisis has passed, the very best “insurance” that you can buy to lower your pet’s chances of having a repeat episode is to supply them with a rich source of digestive enzymes.

    We know that dogs’ and cats’ pancreases cannot secrete enough digestive enzymes to adequately process their foods. Dogs and cats were meant to acquire supplemental enzymes from the foods they consumed: living foods that contained abundant enzymes.

    Historically dogs and cats consumed parts of their preys’ GI tracts which provided adequate enzymes for them to process their food. Carnivores also consumed their preys’ glands, including pancreatic tissue, which was a rich source of naturally occurring enzymes.

    Although we advocate feeding a balanced, raw food diet, we don’t recommend feeding stomach contents of prey species, as this is how parasites can be transmitted to your pets. This means even pets consuming a species appropriate, raw food diet can be enzyme deficient.

    By you supplying a source of digestive enzymes in their diet, either by feeding pancreatic tissue (which is unappealing to most pet owners) or a supplement, , you can help reduce the stress and strain the pancreas is under to continually come up with enough enzymes to process t food.

    Mercola Healthy Pets is coming out with an excellent pet enzyme that I highly recommend. If you have pets that are dealing with pancreatitis, have dealt with pancreatitis, or if you want to reduce the likelihood of your pet exhibiting symptoms of pancreatitis, adding digestive enzymes to their food at mealtime is a perfect way to help avoid future complications and reduce pancreatic stress.

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  • Cheryl Pepper Millie Sophie

    Sorry Mary ellen
    Just saw this. Stop the pumpkin not agreeing with her. The sweet potato I would microwave depending on the size and scoop maybe 2 tsps.Have you tried group turkey (white meat)? I would try that next, then try getting ground white meat chicken no skin of course . I am not surprised poor baby is so hungry. maybe try a few tsps of unsweetened apple sauce . Give her the rice not the best but she has to eat. Throwing up bile is as I know you know caused by her being so empty.
    Is Bella still on any meds?
    Let me know I am going to research her food choices, but i know they are limited. That inflammation MUST go down before her diet can be expanded.
    I wouldn’t if I were you try anything new at nite. stick to rice and boiled turkey. feed early so it has a chance to be digested. Limit giving her water while she is in bed at nite.
    check Dr karen Becker on mercola.com excellent articles on pancreatitis
    Keep me posted

  • Mary Ellen

    UGH Bella thru up bile with the pumpkin early this morning when she got up. She is keeping the boiled chicken down . The night before she thru up a clear bile in the middle of the night. She is very hungry and I don’t know what to do with her. I tried boiled turkey with her tonight with a little rice – even though I didn’t want to give her rice. Since I have given her the pumpkin she is itching like crazy so either I am giving her to much or it is not agreeing with her. I bought some sweet potato tonight and need to know how to prepare it for her. Can you give me some direction for this?

  • Cheryl Pepper Millie Sophie

    Tressie,
    How about The Honest Kitchen grain free turkey -they just came out with a limited ingredient line, not sure if its protein she can eat though.
    Can she eat boiled ground white meat turkey, maybe a boiled sweet potato & or pumpkin (organic canned)

  • Treesie

    My 7yr old maltese was just diagnosed with chronic pancreatitis. I was told normal levels are 0-200…Her levels are 782. I own a dog store and carry all the top brand, holistic foods but I’m at a loss as to what to feed her. To add to this problem, she’s allergic to everything: ie; chicken, grains, potatoes, fish. I’m not a fan of the prescription foods such as Royal Canin or Hills Science diet due to the corn, by-products and gluten that are in them. Not to mention the amount of recalls they’ve had. Plus, most are chicken based. Tonight is our first night trying a new food and I went with SOJOs grain free. I will need to add some protein to her diet and have found that pork is a lean one to go with. I feel like I should know exactly what to feed her since I help customers every day with this issue but once it was my own baby, I am open to any suggestions to those with experience… Thank you for any help!!

  • Cheryl Pepper Millie Sophie

    Mary Ellen, How is Bella doing?

  • Cheryl Pepper Millie Sophie

    I give them treats from a company called cocotherapy-the fruit & veggie,& stars. I don’t buy any other treats commercially. they love carrots blueberries apples( I peel them) green beans-the veggies i lightly steam. When pepper was alive would cook them more so she digested them better.Bones are difficult, when the weather gets cooler here,I might have to consider raw meat bones.
    How old is Bella?
    Mary I would stop the rice, just stick with the boiled ground turkey or chicken with sweet potato & pumpkin. I wouldn’t give her anything else right now, maybe a tsp of unsweetened applesauce as a treat. It’s so hard cause they don’t understand why they aren’t getting anything else.
    Please keep me posted. I will help in any way that I can. I highly encourage you to stop the rice. The cocotherapy treats can be purchased on Amazon, when & if you want to look into them at some point when Bella is all aok.

  • Mary Ellen

    I am sending my husband this morning to pick up the pumpkin and a couple of sweet potatoes too, thank you. Bella is getting better but this morning she thru up again some some milky bile. I am thinking it is too much rice. Her enthusiasm is coming back, and she is alert again to which I am thankful. If you can think of anything else please let me know. Thank you

  • Mary Ellen

    Thank you so much for sharing.

  • JeremyScott10

    I get the organic canned pumpkin from Whole Foods and keep it in freezer bags. I flatten the pumpkin in the freezer bags so pumpkin ends up very thin when frozen and it’s easy to break off pieces when needed. It defrosts quickly but you can also put in a dish then put in a pan with hot water. I don’t use microwave b/c it changes the molecular structure of the food, along with nutrients. My dogs are small and I give 1-2 teaspoons in their meal once a day.

    Good to hear your pup is recovering.

  • Cheryl Pepper Millie Sophie

    Mary,
    I have 2 mini’s & 3 toy schnauzers.
    My late angel Pepper (who is pictured,my silver fox) had everything but pancreatitis -she had inflammatory bowel disease,so i am a pumpkin ,sweet potato old hand.
    I would get the organic pumpkin puree in a can-not pie filling. whole foods fresh market carry it or your local vitamin store,online vitacost.com has the best prices. I would serve it to her room temp. of course you have to keep it in the frig., so i would take a few spoonfuls out and microwave to get the chill out. I used to microwave a swat potato and depending on the size scoop out 1/2 & serve it with her boiled ground breast. If you can get some ground white meat turkey breast you can offer that as an alternative to the chicken. Of course no beef, I didn’t use rice at all because it is inflammatory. If i were you just try the seer potato and the pumpkin for a few days.
    When I first got pepper i really had to learn fast, I was pushed all the EN etc. With the guidance of the wonderful people on this site NO VETERINARY PRODUCTS WERE EVER FED AGAIN TO PEPPER, nor god willing will Millie, Sophie, Abe, Murray & Marlie ever be fed that.
    I feed the various grain free Honkest Kitchen varieties for breakfast with a topper of boiled grass fed beef & at nite they all get commercial raw.
    Every once in a while I give them some orijen kibble.
    All you need to do now is get your baby well.
    Hope this helps. I jet thought of something else,maybe some unsweetened apple sauce as a little treat on a tiny tsp.
    Good luck. keep me posted.

  • Mary Ellen

    Can you please share a recipe for how you fix the pumpkin or sweat potato I have a small miniature schnauzer with pancreatitis that is now getting back to normal. I have been boiling white rice and giving her 2 to 1 part parboiled chicken breast. She is bouncing back. The vet gave me EN purina but she will not have any part of it.

  • Mlynnrod

    Does anyone know why Weruva is no longer on the list? I have been feeding it to my pacreatitis prone girl for years. She loves it and is doing great. Hope nothing has changed!

  • Shawna

    I agree with you on protein. I have not seen any data directly relating protein either. AND I haven’t seen any medical sites suggesting the restriction of protein (amino acids).

    I posted this link below to Pitlove. They state protein (amino acid) needs may actually increase with pancreatitis. https://www.accp.com/docs/bookstore/psap/p5b7sample04.pdf

  • Crazy4dogs

    Hi Shawna,

    You are probably right about that and I probably used the wrong “wording” to the OP, but the question was regarding restricting protein for pancreatitis and I’m not aware of the benefit of restricting protein for pancreatitis, only fat. Have you seen any research on this?

  • Shawna

    I have yet to find any research linking dietary fat as a cause of pancreatitis. Of course, once the pancreas is inflamed, reducing dietary fat is important to prevent symptoms – much like protein with kidney disease. Doesn’t CAUSE kidney disease but does help reduce symptoms when they appear.

    Some holistic vets like Dr. Karen Becker and Dr. Fox feel that carbohydrates are the real cause of the inflammation that becomes pancreatitis. We know that grains are inflammatory so this makes sense to me. There have not however been any research, that I can find, linking carbs to pancreatitis. There has been to other issues with the pancreas though pancreatic acinar atrophy and type 1 diabetes (in humans at least).

    Dr. Becker writes
    “As a holistic veterinarian, I don’t think it’s a fluke or happenstance that the pancreas has become more and more attacked as an organ. We know that the high carbohydrate-based diets that most dogs and cats eat are extremely taxing to pets’ insulin levels, which are, in turn, taxing to the pancreas.

    In addition, the foods that we feed our dogs and cats are entirely processed and devoid of natural enzymes, which help supplement your pet’s diet and reduce pancreatic stress. So, the pancreas really may live in a state of chronic inflammation and stress because the average American pet diet is dead (processed at high temperatures to create an extensive shelf life) and is therefore devoid of any naturally occurring amylase, lipase and protease enzymes that would naturally be found in raw foods. The canned or kibble (dry food) diet that you feed your pet
    causes the pancreas to have to secrete an abundance of digestive enzymes. If the pancreas fails to perform adequately, pancreatitis results.” http://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2009/12/16/dont-let-this-organ-ruin-your-pets-life.aspx

    I don’t know that these vets are right but it does seem quite plausible, to me at least.

  • Shawna

    This research paper, Nutritional Management in Acute and Chronic Pancreatitis, based on humans with pancreatitis, they did not find a correlation to protein – “The amount of protein given (10–40% of the total calories) has not been associated with a significant difference in pancreatic enzyme secretion”

    It also states that protein protein (amino acid) needs may actually increase with pancreatitis. “These changes in amino acid release and metabolism have led to the belief that branched-chain amino acid and glutamine-enriched amino acid solutions might be of particular benefit in patients with pancreatitis. Although this idea makes sense from a physiological standpoint, controlled, clinical trials are still needed to confirm this theory.”

    Lastly, it states that medium chain triglycerides, digestive enzymes and hydrolyzed proteins are helpful in reducing pain associated with eating.

    “Exogenous pancreatic enzymes and EN with medium-chain triglycerides and hydrolyzed proteins have a role in reducing pain in these patients with chronic pancreatitis” https://www.accp.com/docs/bookstore/psap/p5b7sample04.pdf

  • Pitlove

    thank you!

  • Crazy4dogs
  • Bobby dog
  • Pitlove

    I’m not aware of any studies that say that protein can cause pancreatitis.

    Where is Aimee when we need her?!

  • Bobbie Chuck

    She says newest studies advise higher protein can kick of pancreatitis too. So looking to keep it around 20% give or take. So i guess it would be moderate protein rather than low. But thank you so much for your contact us and helping!! Appreciate that very much!!!

  • theBCnut

    Most commercial canned foods are under reporting their fat content, so you need to be really careful with that. Have you looked at The Honest Kitchen Zeal? It’s dehydrated rather than canned, but it is low fat, around 7%.

    Hmm, nevermind, I just saw that you are looking for low protein too. Why does your vet suggest low protein?

  • Bobbie Chuck

    OH WOW thank you so much! We will be getting on this info ASAP ! Appreciate this so very much!

  • Bobby dog

    Hi Bobbie Chuck:
    I don’t know if you are going to find something OTC that falls within the parameters you are looking for. I have a list of low fat canned foods available at my pet stores and the lowest on a DMB is 11%, but the DMB for protein falls between 30-40%. I think those are the ranges you will probably find for low fat OTC canned foods.

    Here are some companies that will work with your Vet that can formulate fresh customized Rx foods:
    Here are some Veterinary schools that have nutrition services:
    You could also look at other brands of Rx foods too. Good luck with your search!!

  • Crazy4cats

    You are welcome. You might want to give a base mix that you can mix with low fat turkey a try. Finding such a low fat canned food is going to be quite a challenge. Good luck! Your pup is lucky to have such a caring owner.

  • Bobbie Chuck

    Hi Crazy4cats! Thanks for your input. We are supposedly trying to get below 10% on the fat content. But also found out the latest bout of pancreatitis (worse one yet) might have been kicked off because of a special food the vet ordered (only one she could find that fit the criteria and avoided the allergies) was a kibble and it only came in kibble. So we have to try and stick with a wet food. Checked out Whole Earth Farms and the wet foods are about 15% dry matter content for the fat. but thank you so very much for your help!!

  • Bobbie Chuck

    Hi Susan thanks for the info. I checked and found at Wellness the fat content is still too high. the Wellness Complete Senior which is 3% comes out converted to 13.65 % fat dry matter content. Still have to try and get below 10% dry matter content. Roxie is a mini dachshund but is a large mini. Not fat, just bigger 14 lbs. We just tried a kibble soaked etc. as prescribed by our vet, in fact the only one she could come up with to eat and we almost lost her 2 nights ago because the kibble seemed to kick off the pancreatitis even though soaked. Horrible, the worst bout she has ever had. So yep we will try and stay with wet food for sure, you are right. You are right I did find the one Petite Entrees wet which is 2% fat. Converts to 11% dry matter fat which is better. BUT, the protein converts to 44% dry matter. Apparently it has come out that a high protein can kick off pancreatitis as well and we are supposed to find a food that is about 20% protein. Yikes… we are going crazy! LOL Anyway, thanks so much for your info!! Appreciate that so very much!!

  • Susan

    Hi wet food is best for Pancreatitis look for a wet tin food with the fat 3% & under 3% fat in wet tin food when converted to dry matter (Kibble) is around 7-9% fat, if you do feed a kibble just remember when the fat say Fat- 12%min add another 2% for the max fat% also soak the kibble in water until soft then fully drain all the water, then after squeezing out all water I put thru a blender for about 3-5sec..even thought you have soaked the kibble & soften It, its still kibble & harder to digest then a wet tin or cooked food, I use to boil chicken breast & pumkin or sweet potatoes & freeze little meals, you have a small dog so you wouldn’t have to cook much, I was cooking once a fortnight & making little meals & freezing them that way you know what is in her meals… Wellness has their little Petite Entrees wet tin food but only get the flavours in gravy the fat% is 2 % the Petite Entrees casseroles are 5% fat… & the Wellness Complete health Senior fat is 3% http://www.wellnesspetfood.com/recipes.aspx?pet=dog&ft=2#Petite

  • Crazy4cats

    Whole Earth Farms has a pork, beef and lamb recipe that has 26% protein and 13% fat. Are those percentages too high?

  • Bobbie Chuck

    We are so desperate. We have a 14 year old mini dachshund; She is post pancreatitis (just had anothert bout) She had been on Sojos with our own venison since that is pretty low fat. Anyway we just found out from testing she is allergic to: Corn, rice, Venison, Kangaroo and just below the 100 number is chicken. She isn’t allergic to beef, pork or lamb BUT of course we need low fat so that leaves out pretty much everything else including pork and lamb. Our vet says we need low fat and LOW PROTEIN. Put he on Hills food before finding out about the allergies and that food is mainly rice and corn so we have to get her off it. We can’t find a low fat, lowish protein dog food without grains!!!! We are desperate. Any ideas folks, we need help. Thank you

  • Dori

    I guess my first thought would be, was he throwing up before you started adding the enzymes? I would stop adding the enzymes and see if he continues to vomit. Some dogs can’t tolerate all enzymes. It took me a few years to find one that one of my dogs could tolerate.

  • Crazy4dogs

    Have you talked with your vet recently regarding the vomiting? Pancreatitis is a serious issue, so I’d check with him first.

  • Janet Hart

    My head is swimming with all the details on dog food! 🙂 I have a 7 year old Yorkie who was diagnosed with Pancreatitis about 2-3 weeks ago. I have been feeding him Hills Prescription ID GI Restore canned food. By reading another post below, I have been adding Enzyme Miracle powder over his food. He has thrown up twice (once on Saturday and once last night – this being Monday). I am at a total loss on which is the best food for him. Could this food just not be agreeing with his system? I am hesitant to switch foods, even gradually, with his system already being vunerable. Can anyone please help me on what I need to be doing, if it’s something different? I don’t know that it’s the food or just side effects of having pancreatitis. HELP please!

  • Shirley

    That sounds great, good luck and yes please stay in touch if you can.

  • Jo

    Thank you! I’m cooking lean ground Turkey for him now and giving him kibble. I will slowly switch him over to the Wellness Core and let you know. Thank you

  • Shirley

    OH my GOD…. He is adorable to say the least.

    Well I hate to tell you but you should start him out on the Wellness slow as not to upset his bowels first. Changing all at once might give him the runs. Some dogs do just fine and others get the runs so to speak. LOL
    Next, what calms dogs down and is natural is Melatonin. Vet told me to give my labs a 3mg per day a week before the 4th of July to keep them calm. The 4th of July really upsets them. Next time you see your vet ask him to look up the dose for your little boy.
    Next, the prebiotic and enzyme is both for digestion. I do not like other things added to enzymes that I use for Icy. My opinion is separate is best so you can stop one and keep using the other if you have to.
    As for his teeth, what I get my girls are “bully sticks” which are low fat and good for them. Since Austi has been chewing on the bully stick her teeth are very clean now. I give them one maybe every week or so.
    Four months ago the vet wanted to clean them and I said no because they but the out and I don’t like doing that unless absolutely needed. I have had tons of dogs through my life, I am 68 now and none needed their teeth cleaned because they always had something to chew on. Anyway, you can try the OptaGest but in my opinion I would keep everything separate that you give him, keeps it manageable if one or the other doesn’t agree, imo.
    By the way, when the vet does blood work does she check his thyroid level???? Very important for the pancreas and other organs.
    Icy hardly had a Thyroid count when she got her first pancreas attack, now she is on thyroid pills and right where she should be on the count… in the middle 2.0 by the way Austi is on thyroid also, females are prone to it because of being spaded I think. Will have to as next time at the vets.

    All in all, I would keep things separate and as simple as possible. Add one thing at a time and don’t over load him. LOL
    Keep in touch please, would love to know how the little guy is doing.
    Hugs,
    Shirley

  • Susan

    Hi, Hills converts all their wet foods to dry matter (kibble) so the fat has been converted already…The Hills I/d Low Fat Gi Restore is 1.7% fat converted its 8.5%fat there’s the Hills I/d Gastro fat-13% converted But they all have corn so does the Royal Canine intestinal Low Fat at 1.7%-fat converted to 8.5%-fat
    .. The Wellness Core Grain Free weight management is 3.5%min fat so add another 1-2% on for fat for max % converted that’s around 8-11%-fat, but the Core is higher in fiber-2%.. so I looked & looked & the Wellness Petite Entrees Mini Fillets in Gravy have 2%-fat converted is around 9%-fat the Petite Entrees Casserole has 5%-fat so becareful getting the casseroles instead of the Mini fillets…or there’s the Wellness Complete health Senior fat-3%min but the fiber is 3%max…if you can cook a lean white meat like turkey & potatoes, carrots, broccoli, beans etc..that way you know its fresh & what’s in it…

  • Jo Comai McGinn

    Cute!
    Thank you for getting back with me so fast. The good thing is I can get my money back on the Id so, I will take it back. I’ll get the Wellness Core Reduced Fat. What canned food should I get? He isn’t too keen on dry. However, if I give him only canned he gets the runs. He never had those problems on raw. Part of his problem is he is very up tight and too much going on gets him upset then he gets sick. We also try to keep him calm. However, he is a active dog and once you get him moving he get hyper. I should tell you, his teeth are really bad but, the vet will not clean them until we get this other issue in control. I wonder if we are in a vicious circle. I wonder if his teeth are part of his problem. I haven’t been very happy with this vet. She keeps wanting to keep taking blood and I can’t pay for anymore to be taken. I told her he can’t have corn, she gives him food with corn…. Ugh!
    When I read his blood work when it was at his worst his teeth were also on the list of reasons why the levels were so high.
    The pet supply store gave me OptaGest, I haven’t given it to him yet. It’s a PreBiotic Enzyme Blend made by: Inclover have you heard of it?
    Thank you,

  • Shirley

    Yes you are very correct in rotating and giving variety of foods to our pets. I told a friend once, hey, come live with me for 2 months and I will feed you fish everyday and night for your entire stay… she said, I get the picture and no thanks…. LOL we both laughed but she understands now. We still joke about it even though at the time that was the only way I could explain to her what the dogs system was going through.

  • Shirley

    Janet,
    I know what you are going through. I refused to give my girl Hills ID period so I looked at every food that was out there. I really swear by Wellness Core Grain Free Reduced Fat… It has made a wonderful difference and now I give even give her choices with their canned food. I put a spoonful of different flavors every now and then. She is doing great.
    Also, look into enzymes as I said before I use Enzyme Miracle by nusentia that I purchase on Amazon and all I can say is ….. she is so much more healthy now in every way.
    Shirley

  • Shirley

    Rebecca, Has the vet told you what could be the problem with your Shih Tzu? It’s odd that feeding her three times a day and she still vomits bile. What is his take on her problem?

  • Shirley

    Rebecca, I would get her off all foods with wheat, corn, grains etc… that is where the more poo comes from. My two labs do go about 3 times a day but I also feed them twice a day and a bite at lunch time so that is not unusual.
    I feed, Wellness Core Reduced fat Grain Free and protein focused.

  • Shirley

    Hi Jo,
    First off, 3% fat is way to low for any dog whether the dog has a bad pancreas or not.
    First I would get some enzymes for his food. What I use for Icy is “Enzyme Miracle” vegetarian pet digestive enzymes. Follow the direction on the container every time you feed him.
    Second, my vet said 10% fat is fine so I put Icy on Wellness Core Reduced Fat, which is around 10% and this has been working wonderfully. It is a high end dog food that is made here in the states and all the ingredients are from USA sources no where else. It has NO meat by-products, wheat-gluten, corn, soy, artificial colors, Flavors or Preservatives in it. First ingredient is Turkey. My other girl Austi is on this also.
    I put the food in their bowl, put the Enzymes on Icys, add filtered water and stir, then I put a little Wellness Canned food and mix in. Icy has been doing really great with this food and am able to give her a little variation with different flavors of their canned food they make.
    I really love Wellness Dog Food and am able to purchase at Petsmart or Petco.
    Icy is 104 lbs and I only have to feed here about a cup in the morning and night, it really keeps her and Austi satisfied.
    If you have more questions about the Enzyme Miracle please let me know, I purchase it at Amazon. I had to find out the hard way about Enzymes and the Pancreas because my vet didn’t tell me exactly what the pancreas does and how it works. I think I know more than him about the pancreas now..LOL Just kidding but with all due respect vets sometimes leave important things out of the equation.
    I sourced and sourced on the net until I found a vet that specializes in problems with animals with Pancreatitis. He wrote that all animals with this problem need Enzymes to help digest their food and he was correct. It will help calm his stomach down some also.
    The food is also very nourishing and yes my vet tried to get me to give Icy the ID food and I said no way. :>)
    Please if you have more questions just let me know, we can work through this I know for sure.

    Shirley
    PS… Picture of Icy and Austi, chocolate is Icy …yellow is Austi

  • Jo Comai McGinn

    Shirley,
    My vet put my Pomeranian on Id formula. I told the vet he has a problem with corn and I see corn meal in the ingredients. He has pancrtitus. Originally he was fed a raw diet. He is not happy about this new diet,I need to find him something without corn and low in fat. Do you think the Wellness Core reduce fat would be better? The vet also told me 3% fat. Yet the Id has 10% on the ingredients.
    I know part of the dogs problem is if he gets too upset the next day he has a upset! Plz help!

  • Mary Greco

    My dog is doing well with wellness healthy weight…it has a low fat content…my dog had a severe case of pancreatitis…her gallbladder ruptured n had to be removed…she was hospitalized for weeks….She was on the rx science diet for a while…the vet wants her on a low fat diet n recommended science diet light dry but it made her sick and set her back for a few days

  • Shari Wolfe

    Shirley, I absolutely agree with you! I’ve been feeding them HK for over a year, and so far, so good. This is what’s important for our fur kids.

  • Shirley

    Hi Shari,
    I feel really, really good feeding my girls these foods and it is made in a human manufacturing company with all human grade food. Finally someone took the first step in changing the way for excellent dog food that is digestible for their stomach.

  • Shari Wolfe

    Yes, I know, great website, and it’s good information to have. Also, if you call them, they are very knowledgeable and helpful in addressing all questions or concerns.

  • Shirley

    This is great information on “The Honest Kitchen” website about nutrient profiles of all their food. Shows each food when dry and then after re-hydration. Read and open each page for each food they carry. http://www.thehonestkitchen.com/help-center/nutrient-profiles this is great information at our fingertips.

  • Shirley

    I would change her to Wellness Core grain free protein focused reduced fat withTurkey & Chicken. All grains are not equal though. Some grains for dogs are easy for them to digest. CORN is not one of them… LOL Oats, flaxseed etc are much easier for them to digest.
    I give Icy the Wellness Core I mentioned above for her pancreas along with Enzyme Miracle each feeding which helps with digestion.

  • Shirley

    Dori, Yes I love The Honest Kitchen food and Zeal is great and so is the Turkey. I feed both my girls only grain & gluten free dog food 99% of the time. Only occasionally I feed the beef or duck which do have some grain in them but no corn. They have listed for grain these which are good: organic oats, organic buckwheat and organic flaxseed. So once in a while they get a treat of digestible grain. Works very well for me.

  • Shirley

    Ashley, My lab has had pancreatitis since she was about 1 year old. I started her on WELLNESS CORE reduced fat turkey and it’s be great. She just turned 6 years old.
    Also, I read from a vet where his specialty is dog pancreatitis and he said they NEED enzymes to help digest the food they eat & my vet said the same thing.
    I purchased ENZYME MIRACLE from amazon. Just follow the directions and boy what a difference it has made. I didn’t want to give her the hot enzyme’s from pork pancreas so Enzyme Miracle was a God send.

    She has been on the Enzyme’s for about 4 years and it works great. My other lab is fine but I also give her the enzyme’s so her pancreas doesn’t have to work so hard to digest the food she eats.
    I also purchase “the honest kitchen fish and their turkey for variety and mix a little in with the dry. I find adding water to the dry then sprinkle the enzyme on and stir works great.

    I feed them both 7:30 in morning and around 5 at night. Icy my chocolate lab with the problem is about 110 lbs and I feed her a cup in the morning with about 3/4 cups of water plus enzyme and a tablespoon of mixed “the honest kitchen” turkey morning and night. Austi my yellow lab is about 90 lbs and she gets 1/2 cup and 2 tablespoons of honest kitchen with 1/2 cup water and the enzyme.
    THE MAIN THING IS…. DO NOT OVER FEED it puts a burden on the pancreas. I have noticed since dog food hit the market whether dry or wet there have been tons of dogs with over worked pancreas, problem starts as a weened puppy that gets feed manufactured dog food. Never was much of a problem in the old days when there wasn’t manufactured dog food except sometimes the dog received to much table fat. The pancreas was able to digest left overs.

    I hope this was some help for you. I know what you are going through but I had to find out about the ENZYMES and the pancreas all by myself, my vet should have told me long, long ago. When I brought it up to him about the enzymes he just said, oh yes dogs with pancreaitis should have enzymes for digestion. My girl suffered but I wasn’t going to quit til I found out why and what to do about it …a lot of sleepless nights til I did.

  • Shari Wolfe

    I thank you for your reply, and have sifted through all the comments. I’d like to think I did my research in choosing this food – the NL sardine – with the assistance of two holistic vets, my own vet, and a wonderful nutritionist, who helped me with my Brittany several years ago, and was right on target. I don’t think there is such a thing as a perfect food, across the board. I was feeding one of the best, Orijen, and changed. Honest Kitchen may be the best that I, personally, have found. Having said this, I chose to go with what the above mentioned recommended, based on the fat content, and the needs of my dogs. Hence, Nature’s Logic Sardine at night, soaked in water, with added pumpkin, an enzyme and a probiotic. I never say never to changing foods, and will ultimately feed whatever works best for the health of my Cavaliers. Thanks again!

  • Bobby dog

    No, I have never considered NL due to how they list GA’s for their foods and other concerns brought to light by several posters on DFA. If you scroll down and keep loading comments on the “Nature’s Logic (Dry)” review page you can read several discussions on the subject. Here’s a few comments and a forum discussion about NL:
    http://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/topic/natures-logic-food-fortifier-supplement/
    http://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/dog-food-reviews/natures-logic-dog-food-dry/#comment-1138453081
    http://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/dog-food-reviews/natures-logic-dog-food-dry/#comment-1095247238

    DFA ratings are just a starting place for me. The foods I feed range anywhere from 2.5 – 5 stars depending on what I am looking for in a food. The foods I looked into for my friends dog were available locally, she needed something ASAP.

  • Shari Wolfe

    It is, thank goodness, they love it, and it agrees with them. What you’re doing is good, as well!

  • Crazy4dogs

    I didn’t realize Zeal was that low in fat. That’s the only THK grain free I haven’t used as it is so expensive and I use sardines and kibble formulas that have fish, when feeding fish.

  • Shari Wolfe

    Yes, I’ve used Preference, as well. I actually started with that, then changed to Zeal, which is still very low in fat – 8.50%. My girls love it, and it was also recommended.

  • Shari Wolfe

    Absolutely, with pleasure!

  • Shari Wolfe

    Dori, I highly respect what you’re doing, and understand. It’s so difficult when our dogs are ill, and need special attention, including foods. We will do anything within our power and means to help them.
    Before my Cavaliers, we had a beautiful Brittany, Suzi. She was a certified therapy dog, and active in the field, excelling in agility. Suzi also had severe food allergies, inflammatory bowel disease, plus a sensitive tummy. She had one episode of pancreatitis at age 6. After months of working with our vet, specialists, extensive testing, enzyme levels and blood tests too numerous to count, we were able to devise a diet, which agreed with her. It was very costly, but it worked, and she ate this, 4 times a day, along with a careful and safe protocol of medication. This lasted 14 1/2 years, when Suzi sadly left us. I would not have changed a thing for her, nor would I, for whatever my Cavs may need.

  • Crazy4dogs

    Sorry, I know you are using some THK, but not sure if you’ve ever used the premix. They are pretty low in fat and if you used chicken breasts or drained the fat off of whatever meat you cook, that would be considerably lower fat that could work. Preference is only 6% fat in the base mix.

  • Dori

    You’re very welcome. We all try to help each other out with the different issues that come up with our dogs. At some point in time you too will be “paying it forward” as we have.

  • Shari Wolfe

    Thank you, Dori, I absolutely agree, and thought the protein in NB is just too low. I will take a look at NV Healthy Weight.
    I am finding this wonderful discussion group to be so knowledgeable and helpful, and so I appreciate all your comments and of course, your recommendations.

  • Crazy4dogs

    I know it’s a bit high @ 12%, but I know a couple of people with chronic pancreatitis dogs that feed up to 14% fat in their kibble and the dogs have done well. It might not be right at the recovery stage, but could possibly work.

    Earthborn has a weight control that’s only 7% fat, but it has a lot of fiber. Here’s the G/A:

    Earthborn Holistic® Weight Control Natural Dog Food: Guaranteed Analysis
    Crude Protein, not less than25.00%
    Crude Fat, not less than7.00%
    Crude Fiber, not more than9.00%
    Moisture, not more than10.00%

  • Dori

    The fat might be too high for her dog that is recovering from pancreatitis.

  • Crazy4dogs

    It’s in a different spot on DFA:
    http://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/dog-food-reviews/natures-variety-instinct-raw-boost/
    Sometimes I use it in the frozen tundra months, when exercise is low.
    I never used Natural Balance because the protein is so low & the carb is 1st. They do have some brand new formulas that look decent.
    Thanks on the ☆! Gotta love a cell phone! 🙂

  • Dori

    Hi c4d. I may need glasses but where are you finding the review on NV Healthy Weight. I just edited my post to her to let her know that I wouldn’t feed Natural Balance, I didn’t realize how low the protein is in that food. I’ve never fed Natural Balance.

    By the way I like that “star”.

  • Dori

    Shari, I was just looking at the Natural Balance and I agree with you that the protein is much too low to feed. At least I wouldn’t. I’d advise you to go with NV Healthy Weight if they have it in a protein you’re able to feed. Crazy 4 Dogs suggested it. Much better company and better food. Just check the ingredients first.

  • Dori

    One of my girls is highly intolerant of anything that contains fowl. She’s the dog in our life that started the quest onto DFA, grain free, then eventually onto raw. Too many dry foods contained something or other that she couldn’t tolerate somewhere on the ingredient list. It’s much easier for me to manage her food issues with the commercial raws. It’s been a challenge but we finally made it.

  • Dori

    Oh, I get it. I wasn’t thinking of it as a limited ingredient food I was thinking Healthy Weight as a weight loss food. Yes, I do think it would work as a replacement for the Natural Balance. I certainly like the company better than Natural Balance or she can just add it as a fourth food for rotation. The more foods you have in rotation the better as far as I’m concerned.

  • Dori

    I don’t feed any kibble at all. I only feed my three commercial raw frozen diets, the occasional freeze dried (Primal and Vital Essentials) and THK. Nothing wrong at all with Nature’s Logic or their kibble I just don’t feed kibble anymore. I do use their frozen raw diets in rotation.

  • Shari Wolfe

    Thank you for replying! I feed different foods for breakfast and dinner, as you’ve read. I’ll transition only, as I introduce new proteins in their diet. One thing that still concerns me is the considerably lower percentage of protein in a good like Natural Balance Limited Ingredient recipes, regardless of the protein – they are all low. Are they TOO low? I like the fact that there are fewer ingredients, but I still have concerns about this food and protein. I welcome anyone’s comments here.

  • Shari Wolfe

    I’m curious. Did you check Nature’s Logic? I was led to this by a nutritionist, who has experience with several dogs who have had pancreatitis. Also, a holistic vet. What is your opinion, if you have one about this food? It does have 5 stars.

  • Shari Wolfe

    Susan, I’m not familiar with this food, but will explore. Thank you!

  • Shari Wolfe

    Sandy, I have done this, using Weruva, and now Nature’s Logic Sardine, the same as you. Works well for them, with dry. I also always soak the dry, using 1/4 cup of water, to their 1/4 cup of food at night.

  • Shari Wolfe

    No oils for my pancreatitis girl, at this point. I also have two, who are sensitive to poultry, and will not use this protein source at all.

  • Shari Wolfe

    I agree, which is why I’ve chosen all the foods I’ve fed in the last six years. I always research to see if any of the companies outsource. If they do, it’s a no for me.

  • Shari Wolfe

    Why did you discontinue NL Sardine?

  • Shari Wolfe

    I did check into this, as I like Orijen. Right now, they’re just completing a transition to one premium food. I need to give this a little time, along with their Honest Kitchen, and then will explore more good choices, but I appreciate your suggestion. I must tell you that I am not a huge fan of Wellness Cors, from past experience. I believe they changed their recipe, at one point. They have also eaten Venison, which is an excellent protein.

  • Crazy4dogs

    NV Healthy Weight Isn’t a limited ingredient formula & gets 5☆ on DFA.

  • theBCnut

    I use as many different high quality foods as I can find that my dog tolerates. For one of my dogs, this is only about 3 different foods, but for the other 2, I think I have about 20 foods on their rotation. Variety promotes good health.

  • Crazy4dogs

    I was thinking of this as a replacement for Natural Balance in the rotation. Just not a fan of NB.

  • Dori

    I don’t think it would necessarily hurt, but as you know I’m not particularly an advocate for specific diets. I have never believed, in my experiences with canines and in my opinion, that specific diets work for specific conditions. If research is done by the individuals and a high quality company with high quality, non garbage food, high protein, moderate to high quality fats, and low carb diets a variety of illnesses can be checked, if not reversed. I’m very diligent with any and all foods that I feed my three dogs. But I do research not just the ingredients, but the companies and where they source their ingredients and, if given the opportunity from their web sites, I research the companies that they source their ingredients.

  • Dori

    I do give my dogs 1/4 tsp. on a regular basis once a day, but if that is not recommended for a dog that has pancreatitis, than please don’t. I divide a can of sardines in with no salt in water once or twice a week split amongst my three dogs. Because I feed raw commercial frozen diets in rotation (I rotate brands and proteins with the exception of any fowl as I have a food sensitive girl) I don’t feel the need for supplements other than my soon to be 16 year old (Maltese, Hannah) in September with multiple cancers (diagnosed a little over a year ago). She gets whole food supplements from Standard Process.

  • DogFoodie

    I agree with Dori. I’d look for some other proteins to rotate that aren’t fish based. If you’re wanting some more low fat dry foods, take a look at Orijen Senior, Go! Senior and Wellness Core Reduced Fat. All are lower fat, but still have higher protein than some other kibbles.

  • Crazy4dogs

    Dori, do you think the NV Instinct Healthy weight I suggested on an earlier post might work here as well in this situation?

  • Crazy4dogs

    Hi Shari, I know Dori has been helping you and she’s done a good job.
    I just wanted to let you know that I also rotate my dogs’ food on a regular basis. I do kibble/canned for breakfast and raw/fresh with a premix for dinner. My dogs are all doing well.

  • Shari Wolfe

    Thank you, Dori. This is good for thought. I would certainly do anything to help prevent another bout of pancreatitis, or chronic, heaven forbid. The girls have not shown an allergy to fish so far, and have eaten it since they were puppies – Fromm salmon before Orijen. They have also eaten venison medallians, another great protein.
    Do you use marine oils – salmon, krill, as well? Once in a great while, coconut, but rarely, as it is not recommended for dogs who have had pancreatitis. I also use probiotic and enzyme powders twice a day, mixed with their food.

  • Dori

    Once you know all is well with the Nature’s Logic you can then transition to Natural Balance and with every bag just switch. I rotate with 9 different foods. Two are freeze dried raw and another is THK Zeal. The other 6 are commercial raw diets, so 3 is definitely not too many. I have been feeding my dogs this way for over 3 1/2 years. Just feed the Nature’s Logic Sardine and before you finish the bag start the transition with the Natural Balance that you have chosen. With time, the more often you transition with foods that your dogs do well on the healthier their guts get and the easier they take to transitioning. You’ll get to a point that you won’t have to go through the transition phase. One more thing I wanted to point out is that as your already feeding THK Zeal, and now the Nature’s Logic Sardine, I would encourage you to find a different protein for the Natural Balance. You don’t want fish to be the only protein they are eating. It’s healthier also. FYI when I did have a kibble in rotation it was Nature’s Logic Sardine.

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