Why low ratings on senior dog foods?

Dog Food Advisor Forums Editors Choice Forum Why low ratings on senior dog foods?

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  • #43179 Report Abuse
    Constance D
    Member

    I am new to this board, and looking for good senior food for the 9 year old foxhound mix that I have inherited. It appears to me, after cruising the website this evening, that all the senior foods (wet and dry) receive only a 3 or 3.5 rating, no matter how well the product line is reviewed overall. Why is this? Please help me know why this is, so I can make an informed choice. Thanks, Connie

    #43204 Report Abuse
    pugmomsandy
    Moderator

    This might help you: https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/frequently-asked-questions/rate-dog-food/

    Alot of “senior” foods are low in protein so they get a mid-range rating. I’d just look for some that have few “red flagged” ingredients if you’re looking for a low protein food. The new school of thought is that seniors actually need more quality protein as they age, not less.

    #43251 Report Abuse
    Constance D
    Member

    Thanks for the info–it helped. I guess I should have added that I’m trying to feed two overweight 4 year old Chihuahuas with this same food. I thought that since all three dogs are “couch potatoes” I could feed them all the lower protein food. They all eat each other’s food anyway. I tried the small bites food, but the foxhound gets into it and swallows it whole and winds up throwing up big undigested globs of it. Any suggestions out there? Should I be looking for a higher protein food for all of them?

    #43259 Report Abuse
    InkedMarie
    Member

    I used a Wellness Core reduced fat food, with good success. While I haven’t tried it, I know people who have used Annamaet Lean.

    #43378 Report Abuse
    Darenka
    Member

    While I do a rotational diet switching between dog foods, everyone in my house gets the same dog food from 6 month old to 15-year senior. It makes my life easier and unless there is a specific reason (allergies, kidney, liver disease or such) there is little compelling reason to keep numerous bags of dog food around–everyone benefits from good protein no matter what the age. Blood work on seniors is perfect even with proteins in the 30%+ category. They just get fed less to make up for a more sedate pace. Does the Foxhound get fed prior to exercise or gulp his food? If the throwing up continues, talk to your vet and rule out an illness.

    #43382 Report Abuse
    pugmomsandy
    Moderator

    I have couch potato pugs and they eat at least 30% protein and regular fat kibble and get less than the recommended amount on the bag. They also eat raw food which is alot higher in protein too and much lower carbs than kibble and get around 6 oz per day. They have maintained their body shape this way and not by “light” or other “diet” foods.

    #43414 Report Abuse
    aquariangt
    Member

    Sandy-how much do you cut back on for weight maintenance? I actually have a pug client (I don’t even want to tell you how much he weighs) and am helping his owner with their weight issues, and id like to try your tactic next

    #43433 Report Abuse
    pugmomsandy
    Moderator

    It depends on the size of the pug. They come in so many sizes now. I don’t have “standard” sized pugs, lol! My “normal size” pugs at age 6 eat 2/3 cup a day and weigh 22-24 lbs. My 10 yr old large pug eats a rounded 2/3 cup a day with treats and weighs 28-29 lbs. I’ve fed my “standard” sized fosters 2/3 cups a day. My 15 yr old xlarge (and I mean tall and long – showing some Mastiff traits) pug eats 1 cup day. I had a large female who looked optimal at 27-28 lbs as she was wideset – big head, chest and hips and short legs like a bulldog. And sometimes they get a little wet food on top of the kibble. If they were only eating kibble and canned regulary, they would get 1/3 can and 1/4 cup kibble. The younger ones I might feed 1 cup a day. For my personal ones, they eat such a variety. Dry and wet, raw and wet, just raw, just RMB.

    This is one of my standard ones: looks great, but technically overweight (that’s why I don’t go by weight, I use body condition)

    http://i1326.photobucket.com/albums/u651/pugmomsandy/pictures%20for%20posting/plutoharness2_zps6d5c006c.jpg

    This is a regular and large pug:

    http://i1326.photobucket.com/albums/u651/pugmomsandy/pictures%20for%20posting/0bd6f2d9-225c-454e-9521-122834da060d_zps44b288af.jpg

    Here’s what I mean when I say they aren’t just “standard” size anymore! These are both adults:

    http://i1326.photobucket.com/albums/u651/pugmomsandy/pictures%20for%20posting/dooceyboss_zps22223e38.jpg

    I’ve had obese ones here. And guess what – I fed them 2/3 cup of kibble to get them down. I’ve had a 43 lb pug before too. Down here in my area, it’s too hot now for outdoor fun. No walking or dog parks until October.

    #43434 Report Abuse
    aquariangt
    Member

    well good to hear you’ve had one that big, because this guy is around 40 lbs. He isn’t the smallest boned guy I’ve met, but he could stand to lose 10+ lbs. Hard to compare to a picture of course, but he looks maybe around the size of the one on the right in your last picture, but much, much rounder. 2/3 sounds good-of course this girl says she is doing what we’ve recommended and his weight hasn’t gone down, so I don’t know if she’s doing much about it.

    Too hot for walks, I get that! I go to an indoor dog gym for playtime now…

    #43435 Report Abuse
    pugmomsandy
    Moderator

    Also, the pugs gained muscle weight when fed the mod-high protein foods but they lost in size that’s why I usually suggest that people take body measurements. My fawn in the first photo has a 22 inch chest and 17 inch waist and 13 inch back but he is 22-23 lbs not 18 like a similarly sized foster pug is. I had one small foster who weighed only 13 lbs and I swear the wind blew her over several times! She was fragile, no muscle mass.

    #43436 Report Abuse
    pugmomsandy
    Moderator

    Here is the 43 lb (originally) on the left. He was 39 lbs in this picture, then the 28 lb pug and then my 23 lb pug.

    http://i1326.photobucket.com/albums/u651/pugmomsandy/IMG_7406_zps14e96bc5.jpg

    It can be done (pug weight loss without diet food). One of mine gained 10 lbs (to be 38 lbs) the year after neutering then lost it all the next couple of years.

    #43439 Report Abuse
    Tina
    Member

    Most “Senior” dog food is very low in protein and tends to be more of a weight-loss dog food then a dog food for senior dogs. If you read the AAFCO label on all “Senior” dog food, you’ll see that it is the same label as an “Adult” dog food. Your best bet would be to find either a really good “Adult” dog food or an “All-Life-Stages” dog food. Any of the brands listed on any of the lists on Editors Choice would make a good choice. If you have a concern with weight then Wellness CORE Reduced Fat is a fantastic dog food.

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