Pedigree Dog Food (Dry)

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Rating: ★☆☆☆☆

Pedigree Dog Food receives the Advisor’s lowest rating of 1 star.

The Pedigree Dog Food product line includes nine dry recipes. However, since we’re unable to locate AAFCO nutritional adequacy statements for these dog foods on the product’s web page, it’s impossible for us to report specific life stage recommendations for these recipes.

The following is a list of recipes available at the time of this review.

  • Pedigree Healthy Joints
  • Pedigree Active Nutrition
  • Pedigree Healthy Weight
  • Pedigree Healthy Longevity
  • Pedigree Sensitive Nutrition
  • Pedigree Large Breed Nutrition
  • Pedigree Small Breed Nutrition
  • Pedigree Adult Complete Nutrition
  • Pedigree Puppy Complete Nutrition

Pedigree Active Nutrition was selected to represent the other products in the line for this review.

Pedigree Active Nutrition

Dry Dog Food

Estimated Dry Matter Nutrient Content

Protein = 30% | Fat = 14% | Carbs = 49%

Ingredients: Ground whole corn, corn gluten meal, poultry by-product meal, meat and bone meal, animal fat (preserved with BHA and citric acid), chicken, brewers rice, peas, dried plain beet pulp, ground whole wheat, natural flavor, salt, potassium chloride, vegetable oil ([source of linoleic acid] preserved with BHA/BHT), carrots, vitamins (choline chloride, a-tocopherol acetate [source of vitamin E], niacin, biotin, d-calcium pantothenate, riboflavin supplement [vitamin B2], pyridoxine hydrochloride, vitamin A supplement, vitamin B12 supplement, thiamine mononitrate [vitamin B1], vitamin D3 supplement), minerals (zinc sulfate, zinc proteinate, copper sulfate, copper proteinate, manganese proteinate, potassium iodide), added FD&C colors (red 40, yellow 5, blue 2)

Fiber (estimated dry matter content) = 4.5%

Red items when present indicate controversial ingredients

Estimated Nutrient Content
MethodProteinFatCarbs
Guaranteed Analysis26%12%NA
Dry Matter Basis30%14%49%
Calorie Weighted Basis27%30%44%

The first ingredient in this dog food is corn. Corn is an inexpensive and controversial cereal grain. And aside from its energy content, this grain is of only modest nutritional value to a dog.

For this reason, we do not consider corn a preferred component in any dog food.

The second ingredient is corn gluten meal. Gluten is the rubbery residue remaining once corn has had most of its starchy carbohydrate washed out of it.

Compared to meat, glutens are inferior grain-based proteins lower in some of the essential amino acids dogs need for life.

This inexpensive plant-based ingredient can significantly boost the total protein reported on the label — a factor that must be considered when judging the actual meat content of this dog food.

The third ingredient is poultry by-product meal, a dry rendered product of slaughterhouse waste. It’s made from what’s left of slaughtered poultry after all the prime cuts have been removed.

In addition to organs (the nourishing part), this stuff can contain almost anything — feet, beaks, undeveloped eggs — anything except quality skeletal muscle (real meat).

We consider poultry by-products slightly lower in quality than a single-species ingredient (like chicken by-products).

On the brighter side, by-product meals are meat concentrates and contain nearly 300% more protein than fresh poultry.

The fourth ingredient is meat and bone meal, a dry “rendered product from mammal tissues, including bone, exclusive of any added blood, hair, hoof, horn, hide trimmings, manure, stomach and rumen contents”.1

Meat and bone meal can have a lower digestibility than most other meat meals.

Scientists believe this decreased absorption may be due to the ingredient’s higher ash and lower essential amino acid content.2

What’s worse, this particular item is anonymous. Since there’s no mention of a specific animal, this ingredient could come from almost anywhere: spoiled supermarket meat, roadkill, dead, diseased or dying livestock — even euthanized farm animals.

Even though meat and bone meals are still considered protein-rich meat concentrates, we do not consider a generic ingredient like this a quality item.

The fifth ingredient is animal fat. Animal fat is a generic by-product of rendering, the same high-temperature process used to make meat meals.

Since there’s no mention of a specific animal, this item could come from almost anywhere: roadkill, spoiled supermarket meat, dead, diseased or dying cattle — even euthanized pets.

For this reason, we do not consider generic animal fat a quality ingredient.

What’s worse, this fat is preserved with BHA, a suspected cancer-causing agent.

The sixth ingredient is chicken. Although it is a quality item, raw chicken contains about 80% water. After cooking, most of that moisture is lost, reducing the meat content to just a fraction of its original weight.

After processing, this item would probably account for a smaller part of the total content of the finished product.

The seventh ingredient is brewers rice. Brewers rice is a cereal grain by-product consisting of the small fragments left over after milling whole rice. Aside from the caloric energy it contains, this item is of only modest nutritional value to a dog.

The eighth ingredient includes peas. Peas are a quality source of carbohydrates. And like all legumes, they’re rich in natural fiber.

However, peas contain about 25% protein, a factor that must be considered when judging the meat content of this dog food.

From here, the list goes on to include a number of other items.

But to be realistic, ingredients located this far down the list (other than nutritional supplements) are not likely to affect the overall rating of this product.

With five notable exceptions

First, beet pulp is a controversial ingredient, a high fiber by-product of sugar beet processing.

Some denounce beet pulp as an inexpensive filler while others cite its outstanding intestinal health and blood sugar benefits.

We only call your attention here to the controversy and believe the inclusion of beet pulp in reasonable amounts in most dog foods is entirely acceptable.

Next, we find vegetable oil, a generic oil of unknown origin. The ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 fats in any oil is nutritionally critical and can vary significantly (depending on the source).

Without knowing more, it’s impossible to judge the quality of an item so vaguely described. However, compared to a named animal fat, a generic vegetable oil cannot be considered a quality ingredient.

What’s worse, this fat is also preserved with BHA and BHT, suspected cancer-causing agents.

In addition, we’re always disappointed to find artificial coloring in any pet food. That’s because coloring is used to make the product more appealing to humans — not your dog. After all, do you really think your dog cares what color his kibble is?

Next, we find no mention of probiotics, friendly bacteria applied to the surface of the kibble after processing to help with digestion.

And lastly, this food also contains chelated minerals, minerals that have been chemically attached to protein. This makes them easier to absorb. Chelated minerals are usually found in better dog foods.

Pedigree Dog Food
The Bottom Line

Judging by its ingredients alone, Pedigree Dog Food looks like a below-average dry product.

But ingredient quality by itself cannot tell the whole story. We still need to estimate the product’s meat content before determining a final rating.

The dashboard displays a dry matter protein reading of 30%, a fat level of 14% and estimated carbohydrates of about 49%.

As a group, the brand features an average protein content of 27% and a mean fat level of 12%. Together, these figures suggest a carbohydrate content of 52% for the overall product line.

And a fat-to-protein ratio of about 47%.

Near-average protein. Below-average fat. And above-average carbs when compared to a typical dry dog food.

When you consider the protein-boosting effect of the corn gluten or soybean meals contained in other recipes, this looks like the profile of a kibble containing a below-average amount of meat.

Bottom line?

Pedigree is a plant-based dry dog food using a below-average amount of poultry by-product or meat-and-bone meals as its main sources of animal protein, thus earning the brand 1 star.

Not recommended.

A Final Word

The descriptions and analyses expressed in this and every article on this website represent the views and opinions of the author.

Although it's our goal to ensure all the information on this website is correct, we cannot guarantee its completeness or its accuracy; nor can we commit to ensuring all the material is kept up-to-date on a daily basis.

Each review is offered in good faith and has been designed to help you make a more informed decision when buying dog food.

However, due to the biological uniqueness of every animal, none of our ratings are intended to suggest feeding a particular product will result in a specific dietary response or health benefit for your pet.

For a better understanding of how we analyze each product, please read our article, "The Problem with Dog Food Reviews".

Remember, no dog food can possibly be appropriate for every life stage, lifestyle or health condition. So, choose wisely. And when in doubt, consult a qualified veterinary professional for help.

In closing, we do not accept money, gifts or samples from pet food companies in exchange for special consideration in the preparation of our reviews or ratings.

To learn how we support the cost of operating this website, please visit our public Disclosure and Disclaimer page.

Have an opinion about this dog food? Or maybe the review itself? Please know we welcome your comments.

Notes

11/08/2009 Original review
05/20/2010 Review updated
10/06/2013 Review updated
10/06/2013 Last Update

  1. Association of American Feed Control Officials, 2008 Edition
  2. Shirley RB and Parsons CM, Effect of Ash Content on Protein Quality of Meat and Bone Meal, Department of Animal Sciences, University of Illinois, Poultry Science, 2001 80: 626-632
  • Shar24

    LOVE this

  • Rebecca Lynne Aubin

    My dog was on Pedigree Vitality chicken and rice for 15 years and was in fantastic health.We only recently had to put him down as his arthritis was so bad he could no longer walk.So I just wonder what all this hype is about. My female does have issues with her digestive system and is gassy does not matter what brand high end or low end she has really bad days, Vet told me lean ground beef and rice…Rice is grain.I had a hunting dog that ate raw deer meat and he was healthy and he also ate pedigree. We do give our dogs carrots other veggies and fruit that dogs can have.The vet is always impressed and advised there are only a few foods that have been scientifically prove healthy for dogs the rest there is no proof either way for all other dogs foods are good or bad.

  • Kelly061384

    I haven’t tried it, but I have heard Presidents Choice is coming out with a grain free alternative. I believe it is a 3 star rated food, so although not all the products in it are ‘whole’, they are all sourced from NA, and the reduction in grain is great for large breeds. The price is about a 3rd of all other grain free options.

  • Crazy4cats

    Hi Raymond-
    I think switching your dogs off of Pedigree is a great idea. Have they been eating it for a long time? If yes, then I’d recommend transitioning to a new food slowly. In addition you should probably start with a 3 or 4 star food. A big jump in protein and fat might be tough on their systems. I like Victor foods. They have a couple of 3.5 star foods that are budget friendly. Also, although we haven’t fed it, Fromm’s Family classics looks like a winner. I too stick to budget friendly foods to feed my big dogs. In addition, I like to add canned or fresh foods to their meals to bump up the healthy nutrition that kibble lacks. Good luck!

  • Raymond J Kowal

    I have 4 dogs does anyone know a healthy alternative to pedigree that is reasonably priced, I just don’t have money for high end products.

  • Cyndi

    Lmao!! Adorable!

  • LabsRawesome
  • LabsRawesome

    Hahaha.

  • Cyndi

    I love cheese! :)

  • LabsRawesome

    Do some research before you come here and post ridiculous nonsense. As you have no idea what you’re talking about. Corn IS NOT “good” for dogs. TOTW might not work for your dog, not every food will. Just because Dog Chow gives your dog hard poop doesn’t make it a good food. I can eat a bunch of cheese and get hard poo, that doesn’t mean it’s good for me.

  • charles reinhardt

    My dogs eats Dog Chow. Btw the corn is cooked and is highly digestible. Only 3.25 cups per day for 65 lb Labrador. And the same for my german shepherd. TOW is 4-5 cups plus nasty hard to clean up poop. The grain free stuff is a fade.

  • Gensai Kawakami

    For those who feed Pedigree to their dogs, compare the quality and the quantity you have to feed daily to your dog to a better quality dog food and. you’ll arrive to the conclusion:
    1 You are feeding your dog garbage
    2. You can spend the same amount for a better quality dog food, due to the feeding ratio.
    3. You actually paying more by feeding this food on vet bills and medication that can be linked directly to unhealthy food.

  • theBCnut

    The last finished steer that I got liver from had almost 20 lbs of liver, close to 2 1/2 lbs of kidney, and I don’t even know how much lung, heart, tripe, etc. I could probably run out to the freezer and weigh the heart now that I think about it, I believe I still have it. It looked to be about 3 lbs. maybe a bit more.

  • Shawna

    Excellent point BCnut!!

  • theBCnut

    A full grown cow’s organs are enough food for several days for one wolf. A pair of wolves still wouldn’t need to eat again for a few days. A large pack would have eaten everything that they could have. This tale says more about the number of wolves involved than anything else. They aren’t going to stay in the area to eat a carcass that has been discovered by humans, too dangerous. A cow can be 1200 lbs. or more, at least half of that is meat. The US doesn’t have very many large packs of wolves these days.

  • ProbioticsForDogsHQ

    I would have thought wolves would have finished all of the meat too! You learn something new everyday…

  • Shawna

    The “experts” disagree as to whether wolf eat the contents of the stomach. For arguments sake lets say they do though. Those stomach contents have been subjected to bacteria fermentation making them very different from what is used in dog food.

    Additionally if left to their own devices, those herbivores would not eat grains in the same manner as what we feed them. They might eat some “sprouted” grains and seeds as well as different grasses.

    The breeding pair is usually the first to eat at a kill from my understanding. They go after the most nutrient dense parts — the organs. However it is for breeding purposes verses their “favorite” parts. Dr. Weston Price studied indigenous people all over the world. He found that the most nutrient dense foods available to the people were reserved for those ready for parenthood.

  • Crazy4cats

    Never a dull moment!

  • LabsRawesome

    You never know…LOL

  • Fishermanroly

    Mabey my buddies Cows are being abducted by aliens or better yet a Chupa Cabra.

  • LabsRawesome

    The world’s leading Wolf biologist disagrees with you/your friend. http://rawfed.com/myths/stomachcontents.html

  • Fishermanroly

    same goes for the food we eat they are GMO and sprayed with bug killer/roundup And Asians eat rice 3 times a day and outlive us by many many years.

  • Fishermanroly

    Their FAVORITE part is Yes the intestines that are full of Grain and Grass he says that MOST of the time that that’s all they take .Notice the word most i never said always but just like ourselves they go for their FAVORITE part 1st just in case a rancher pops up.

  • LabsRawesome

    I doubt wolves leave anything behind.

  • LabsRawesome

    I don’t like grains in dog food because grains are inflammatory to the dogs system. Also they are GMO and sprayed with bug killer/roundup. Dogs have no biological need for grains.

  • Crazy4cats

    Hi-
    While I don’t automatically feel that grain free is better. In fact I am using a food with grains right now. But, I do believe in diet rotation. Especially where rice is concerned due to the low levels of arsenic found in most of it. If it is eaten everyday for your entire life, I’d be afraid the arsenic could be an issue.

  • Fishermanroly

    Wow this thing has gotten crazy in here i myself feed Wholesomes Chicken and rice but honestly people come on grain free lol . My freind up in Idaho raises cattle and they lose some to the Wolves and guess what their favorite part is Yes the intestines that are full of Grain and Grass he says that most of the time that that’s all they take and the organs of course and skip the meat lol Grain free

  • Fishermanroly

    Yeah i posted it i get it from TSC about once a month and at .75 cents a pound you cant go wrong my dogs love it . We only get the chicken and rice they don’t like the others as much. Plus its a 4 star food.

  • Darcy Bono

    However, you were right about one thing. This conversation is over. I have better things to do than trade insults with a man who can’t do something as simple as read user names before responding. Looks like you can act pretty “thick” sometimes too.

  • Darcy Bono

    I think you’re getting me confused with the user known as “aimee” who you were having the original argument with. In my previous post, I never said that I didn’t know what you meant by “work”, my comment was merely to call you out on how rude you were being to “aimee” (the original person who wanted clarification on what you meant by “work”).

  • Stan Rawlinson

    Darcy if you cannot reply to things without profanity, and as you are unable to understand that grain is difficult to metabolise in Canids. Then this conversation is at an end.

    I really hope you understand that as you have had difficulty understanding simple information on my previous comments no one else has on this website.

    It appears that you are the only one that is playing semantics.

    I normally find people like you, have a pecuniary interest in the product I have mentioned.

    I need say no more except that I made it clear what work meant but for you I way repeat again.

    Protein comes in many forms, even shoe leather, corn gluten, chicken beaks or eyeballs have a high crude protein content, but the dog is only able to process part of it. As the cost of a lot of hard work by the kidneys and liver.

    Proteins are processed through the liver; any waste materials are then filtered and excreted through the kidneys.

    Plant protein diets are hard on your pet’s liver and kidneys. That means that these organs have to WORK HARD to process this food.

    Is that really difficult to understand what work hard or overwork means.

    As I said either you are thick or you are being awkward. What is an absolute is you do not understand or you choose not to understand the word WORK in this situation.

  • Cindy Moynan

    this is garbage, if you want to feed your dog actual food, Acana Dog Food

    The Bottom Line

    Judging by its ingredients alone, Acana Dog Food looks to be an above-average dry dog food.

    But ingredient quality by itself cannot tell the whole story. We still need to estimate the product’s meat content before determining a final rating.

    The dashboard displays a dry matter protein reading of 36%, a fat level of 21% and estimated carbohydrates of about 35%.

    Unfortunately, with a protein content of about 28% (and their apparently lower meat content), the duck and lamb recipes did not qualify for our top rating.

    As a group, the brand features an average protein content of 34% and a mean fat level of 19%. Together, these figures suggest a carbohydrate content of 39% for the overall product line.

    And a fat-to-protein ratio of about 55%.

    Above-average protein. Above-average fat. And below-average carbs when compared to a typical dry dog food.

    Even when you consider the protein-boosting effect of the peas, this looks like the profile of a dry kibble containing a significant amount of meat.

    Bottom line?

    Acana Classic Series Dog Food is a plant-based dry kibble using a significant amount of poultry or lamb meal as its main sources of animal protein, thus earning the brand 5 stars.

    Enthusiastically recommended.

    Please note some products may have been given higher or lower ratings based upon our estimate of their total meat content.

    Those looking for a grain-free version of the same brand may wish to visit our review of Acana Grain Free dry dog food.

  • aimee

    For effective communication you should be able to define the terms you use. I see the word “work”often used but I have no idea what people mean by it. Different people mean different things even when using the same word.

    So that we can better communicate I asked if by “work” you meant energy expenditure (number of ATP used)

    I myself have an extensive background in biology but in case I’m just “thick” I asked my husband who has a PhD in biochemistry/cell/molecular biology what “work” means. He doesn’t know what you mean by it either.

  • Stan Rawlinson

    Either you are being awkward or you are thick.

    Perhaps you could explain which one it is. What do imagine the work means. Let me explain simply>

    The kidneys and liver have to WORK. Note the word work to metabolise grain through the Liver and Kidneys.

    I am not the only person to say this. Every single assessment organisation and dog food analyser says it. So please stop being stupid and asking me the what the word WORK. means

  • LabsRawesome

    I realize that. I was just letting you know that for another $6 you could go from a 2 star food to a 4 star food.

  • aimee

    I’m not arguing anything.

    I’m asking you to clarify what you mean by “work” ( are you referring to ATP) and “Plant protein diets are hard on your pet’s liver and kidneys”

  • Stan Rawlinson

    I am sorry ? Are you suggesting that meat protein is no better than grain protein. The proof is in the effluence that is created.

    Three to four large soft faeces produced daily with the corn and 1 or two small hard faeces with meat protein.

    You are arguing the indefensible. Look at the overview on this Page.

    Let me quote it.

    The first ingredient in this dog food is corn. Corn is an inexpensive and controversial cereal grain. And aside from its energy content, this grain is of only modest nutritional value to a dog.

    For this reason, we do not consider corn a preferred component in any dog food.

    The second ingredient is corn gluten meal. Gluten is the rubbery residue remaining once corn has had most of its starchy carbohydrate washed out of it.

    Compared to meat, glutens are inferior grain-based proteins lower in some of the essential amino acids dogs need for life.

  • Jana Maria Shaw Church

    Yeah, it is that price for the wholsomes. I’m feeding Sportmix premium adult maintenance. It’s $23 for #40

  • LabsRawesome

    I was on Sportmix Wholesomes review, and I saw a post that said it costs $29 for 40lbs at Tractor Supply. The chicken formula is rated 4 stars and the other formulas are rated 3.5 stars. Here’s the review. http://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/dog-food-reviews/sportmix-wholesomes-dog-food/

  • aimee

    “Plant protein diets are hard on your pet’s liver and kidneys. They have to work far harder to get the goodness out” Please detail the differences in the biochemical reactions and the cost expense in units of ATP between plant and animal based proteins.

    Is that what you mean by work?

  • Stan Rawlinson

    This is a snippet from an article I wrote called Dispelling the myth of high protein.
    Protein and Organs:
    Protein comes in many forms, even shoe leather, corn gluten, chicken beaks or eyeballs have a high crude protein content, but the dog is only able to process part of it. As the cost of a lot of hard work by the kidneys and liver.

    Proteins are processed through the liver; any waste materials are then filtered and excreted through the kidneys.

    Plant protein diets are hard on your pet’s liver and kidneys. They have to work far harder to get the goodness out of cheap fillers such as wheat, corn, gluten, and poor quality animal derivatives.

    High meat based protein diets aren’t just healthy for your aging pet, they are absolutely essential. Yet “The Old Wives Tales” promulgated by the pet food manufacturers.

    These are the ones that fill their pet food with the worst and cheapest type of protein they can buy suggesting that low levels of protein are better.

    Some like Bakers Complete or Pedigree Complete do not always mention the type of plant protein in their food. Why? Simple, they buy whatever is cheapest at the time of manufacture.

    – See more at: http://www.doglistener.co.uk/high-protein-myth-regarding-dog-food#sthash.WoNukROk.dpuf

  • aimee

    Stan, dogs digest cereals quite efficiently. I think this is one of the reason they are often included in diets for dogs with medical problems involving the GI system.

    I don’t know what you mean by “strain on the kidneys” and “affects the liver”.
    Perhaps you can elaborate further as to the exact mechanism.

    I understand very well how food affects dogs and have no concerns about using cereals as part of their diet.

  • MJfromGA

    Not all dogs on Pedigree are fat. Not all of them are unhealthy to the point of needing tons of medications. I don’t feed this food because there is no way my dog would tolerate it, and I can afford a bit better but if I had to, I’d feed it. I feed Pure Balance which some people say is inadequate, but oh, well.

    Dogs did well on this kind of garbage food for a long time long ago. Only semi recently have all these “grain free” and more scientific foods come out, and dogs are more unhealthy than ever with cancer rates, allergies, etc. soaring.

    The new foods are better, but their presence is not improving the health of dogs as a whole IMO.

  • MJfromGA

    Because she can barely afford anything else. She is trying. I feed my 82 lb dog mostly Pure Balance Chicken and rice formula. It is most cost effective for me and he eats it like he should.

    I try and add in different foods sometimes, but he has turned his nose up at some, including Canidae All Life Stages which he would not eat at all and he disliked SportsMix Wholesomes and picked at it.

    I cannot risk wasting money by getting food that is costly that he does not like and I end up having to give it away or throw it away. Not everyone can afford to feed their dogs the best foods.

  • Stan Rawlinson

    Why are you feeding your dogs corn they are not chickens. Dogs have difficulty metabolising cereals. It puts an enormous strain on the kidneys and affects the liver.

    If you understand how food affects our dogs you would far more careful in what you feed them

  • SandyandMila

    Super quick shipping!! I ordered yesterday and the order arrives today.

  • Cyndi

    No problem! :)

  • Shawna

    Thank you Cyndi!!! :)

  • Cyndi

    Hi Shawna! :) I know you’re the resident expert on kidney disease, but I just noticed someone asked a question about diet for a dog in kidney failure. The question is here if you can help her/him (can’t remember the op’s name, lol!) I have no memory.

    http://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/dog-food-reviews/pet-botanics/#comment-1375871658

  • LabsRawesome

    Oh. Maybe the TSC webite needs updated? IDK. Either way Sportmix is a step up from Pedigree. :)

  • Jana Maria Shaw Church

    The ingredient list didn’t mention fish meal.

  • LabsRawesome

    Yeah that’s the one. I saw it on TSC website. It’s got fish meal too. And no BHA/BHT. or dyes, like Pedigree. You definitely made a step up.

  • Jana Maria Shaw Church

    Meat meal, ground yellow corn, chicken by product meal, ground wheat, chicken fat, dried beet pulp, salt are the first ingredients, then the vitamin list.
    In the green bag.

  • LabsRawesome

    That.s good. You went from a 1 star to a 2 star food, and that is a step in the right direction. If I’m looking at the right ingredient list then you are feeding Chicken by-product meal and fish meal. And Chicken fat. Much better ingredients than Pedigree. Well done.

  • Jana Maria Shaw Church

    Thanks. I hope they are happy with it! I haven’t fed them yet.

  • Crazy4cats

    That’s great. It has a lot less red ingredients. Good luck to you and all your doggies!

  • Shawna

    Looking up cat kd info for a friend I ran across this statement by Dr. Hofve. VERY SAD but something many of us have heard and believed for quite a while now.

    Dr. Hofve writes in reply to a poster on her site regarding the myth of feeding kd dogs low protein and Dr. Bovee’s paper. Posted in 2011.

    “Yes, I agree with much of what he says; but the establishment would point out that this article is ancient history: 1998. The low-protein myth has become ever more entrenched, with the companies that make such diets publishing only the research favorable to them. Recently I was asked by Colorado State University to stop quoting them, because the four CSU professors I learned from (and who maintained that opinion ever since) have all moved on or retired. Whatever happened to the respect given to wisdom gained from experience? I guess the lesson is: don’t look to academia for original thinking any more! Now it’s all about following the dictates of Science Diet, Purina, Waltham’s–i.e., the ones who donate the big bucks to vet schools. Personally, I still recommend feeding cats actual nutritious food that they enjoy–certainly not over-processed slaughterhouse waste loaded with artificial preservatives, synthetic vitamins, and other toxic chemical additives.
    Ack!” http://www.littlebigcat.com/health/kidney-disease-in-older-cats/

  • Shawna

    I don’t think Dr. Morris intended to prove that old boot could be used in dog food but rather to demonstrate that the “quality” of the ingredient used could be quite inferior.

    I’m not sure of the relevance of this list any longer but as an example, this says nothing at all about the quality of the egg used (those rejected from human use due to cracks or old eggs?). “Dehydrated Eggs – dried whole poultry eggs freed of moisture by thermal means.”

    Several of the definitions specifically state “undecomposed” but not “meat and bone meal”
    “Meat and Bone Meal – the rendered product from mammal tissues, including bone, exclusive of blood, hair, hoof, horn, hide trimmings, manure, stomach and rumen contents, except in such amounts as may occur unavoidably in good processing practices.”

    “Soybean Meal (De-hulled, solvent Extracted) – obtained by grinding the flakes remaining after removal of most of the oil from de-hulled soybeans by a solvent extraction process.” GMO or not? Some of us care. http://www.braypets.com/FRR/aafcodef.htm

  • Shawna

    I obviously didn’t word that post correctly and stated after the fact, in reply to Antonio, “The only way to fairly determine which dogs were on which foods is if
    they were all the same breeds, living in the same environment, of
    similar ages and genetic backgrounds.”

    Although it was a misinterpretation, I admit that I probably caused that misinterpretation. Happy :)

    I don’t have time right now to read through these but here is one from 2006 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3076704/ Here’s one from 2009 (which I found in the references at the bottom of the first). It’s much shorter ” Oral tolerance is a key feature of intestinal immunity, generating systemic tolerance to ingested antigens” http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19446579
    2006 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16439314
    2009 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19805371
    2008 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18242716
    Several of these looked to be republished in different journals. One pulled up as 2009 and again in the journal Blood in 2010.??

    Facsinating isn’t it…

  • aimee

    I don’t see that Antiono misinterpreted your post.

    He said “At our local club we have dogs eating everything from Ol Roy to Orijen, ……no one
    can tell a difference” and you replied “You may not be able to tell the difference between dogs fed different diets but I sure can.”

    I’d interpret it as he did. That you were saying you could tell the dogs from his dog club apart based on the diet they ate.

    Oh Well…

    Say, since the article you linked to is from 20 years ago and the studies to investigate this were underway please post links to the results of the studies mentioned in the article.

  • Jana Maria Shaw Church

    Hi guys! I got another dog food…. Sportmix premium adult mini chunk.

  • Shawna

    Oops, meant to mention in last post. I will be the first to admit that a poorly designed home made meal is the worst type of diet one can feed. I like how Veterinary Nutritionist Dr. Meg Smart puts it..

    “I like to see variety in a dog’s diet as their digestive tract is not designed to be fed the same diet day in and day out. Homemade diets are not for every dog owner. I always ask clients” what do you or did you feed your children” if they reply “Kraft dinners and the likes” I do not advise a homemade diet.” – See more at:
    http://www.angryvet.com/angryvet-nutrition-interview-drs-joseph-wakshlag-and-meg-smart/#sthash.mW8WPtuq.dpuf

  • Shawna

    I think you misinterpreted my post. The only way to fairly determine which dogs were on which foods is if they were all the same breeds, living in the same environment, of similar ages and genetic backgrounds. I freely admit that all of that plays a role. Diet is not the only factor involved in keeping my kd dog alive for the last eight years. She also gets no chemicals or vaccs. Her living environment is, and always has been, cleaner than many in the same situation. I don’t allow certain chemicals (like clorox) because of the toxic load it would place on everyone in the house. I am careful to purchase scented products that are pthalate free. I limit the particle board furniture in my home to only those pieces I can’t afford real wood for (our floors are real wood and original to the house, luckily). I don’t have scotch guarding put on the new furniture we buy. Everyone in my home, including the dogs, drink reverse osmosis water. I don’t use cookware made with PFOA (like teflon) due to the off gassing. The laundry detergent, dish detergent, perfumes, air fresheners, most cleaning products and more come from clean sources purchased at the health food store or similar locations. Example, the laundry detergent I use is scented with pure essential oils not pthalate laden, chemically derived perfumes.

    Even with all of that, possibly because it is an immediate change, diet has the most profound influence on all those dogs that have come through my home.

    Do you know “food” can actually reverse autoimmune disease. There’s a great article on it in the New York Times called “Hair of the Dog”. :) Note — if it can reverse these diseases, it can certainly PREVENT them as well. I give Audrey a specific food nutrient for her kidneys that does just that. It’s called a protomorphogen. Science however calls the phenomena “oral tolerization”. They have reversed such things as autoimmune heart disease “Oral Tolerization with Cardiac Myosin Peptide (614–629) Ameliorates Experimental Autoimmune Myocarditis” http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10875-009-9290-z
    And the immune attack created in some transplant situations. ”

    Oral tolerization ameliorates liver disorders associated with chronic graft versus host disease in mice.” http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10706554 There are many more examples.

    Here’s the Hair of the Dog article if interested.

    “‘Hair of Dog’ Tried as Cure For Autoimmune Disease

    USING a technique reminiscent of the proverbial “hair of the dog, “researchers have modernized an ancient Chinese remedy that shows great promise for treating and perhaps preventing various autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, insulin-dependent diabetes and uveitis, an inflammation of the eye that can cause blindness….

    The treatment, called oral tolerization, seeks to turn off patients’ rejection of their own tissue by feeding them small amounts of a protein directly or indirectly involved in the attack by their immune systems. The approach was derived from the well-established fact that people rarely mount an immune response to food.

    In early tests on human patients, oral tolerization has enabled some to stop taking steroids or other powerful immunosuppressant drugs with serious side effects; others have been able to greatly reduce their dependence on these medications, which indiscriminately interfere with the immune response. Instead of subjecting patients to an overall dampening of their immune systems with immunosuppressant drugs, induction of oral tolerance shuts down only one specific aspect of the immune response: the part that is causing disease.

    Dr. Howard Weiner, an immunologist and specialist in multiple sclerosis at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston, calls oral tolerization “a form of vaccination via the gut.”

    “It stimulates the immune system in a way that helps the host suppress autoimmune disease,” he said. Perhaps most remarkable about the technique is its apparent safety. Dr. Weiner, a leader in the field, said, “There appear to be no side effects.” This fact has prompted the Food and Drug Administration to sanction studies on people, some of which now involve hundreds of patients with autoimmune diseases.”
    http://www.nytimes.com/1994/10/18/science/hair-of-dog-tried-as-cure-for-autoimmune-disease.html

    The right kinds of “food” CAN heal and the wrong kinds can harm plain and simple. How long it takes for that harm to show as symptoms is different for different individuals. Certified Clinical Nutritionist Radhia Gleis states, in a video, that about 60% of the bodies resources are used up before symptoms appear (CCN’s, among other things, study how foods harm/heal). At that point, well before actually, disease is already set in and prevention is no longer an option.

    Sorry this is so long. Got kinda carried away.. :)

  • Antonio Fisher

    I agree certain element can cause cancer I wouldn’t be so naïve to suggest otherwise. But I don’t think we nor even the scientific community have a good grasp on those elements just yet. Case in point take a guy like George Burns who started smoking as a youth and lived to be 100 years old in great health, in comparison to a guy like Jack Lelane who was a health conscious individual who lived to reach 96. Both guys had extraordinarily long, healthy lives by today’s standard, yet the smoker actually lived about 4 years longer than the healthy eating non smoker. It doesn’t mean every situation will be this way, but it does show as of right now there’s not an absolute science on identifying these things as we need to take a close look at genetics

  • Antonio Fisher

    I absolutely agree w/ your statement as I often do, but the point I continue to emphasize is the same you hinted on in your statement. Unless an animal or human has a genetic predisposition to a gluten allergy there’s not problem with glutens, which again goes back to the point I was making regarding weaker genetics. I think we both are right in our assessment but choose different avenues in how we wish to accomplish those goals. Thanks again for the info

  • Antonio Fisher

    Shawna, you bring about some great points, and I admit I’m not familiar with every single study currently going on regarding human and animal nutrition. But if you are serious in stating that you can tell which dogs are eating a particular diet just from looking at them physically I would be willing to offer up a bet if you’d like to come out evaluate the club dogs and see if you can accurately access them. I know I’m not a rich guy but I can likely find enough members and we can place a small wager of $500 or so if you can accurately guess which dogs received “x” diet in comparison to “y” just based on physical evaluations alone. But if you lose we’d expect the same $500 payment in return from you :), email me [email protected] and let me know if that sounds like a deal? But I seriously doubt anyone at the club, myself included would actually take your money even if you were wrong as it’s pointless b/c we’ve been down the same avenue with many new members who are shocked to find out what some dogs at the club are eating as to what they assumed was fed to the dog. I find it fascinating that you’ve raised many dogs to 18 years and longer, I hope I can have that same fortune at some point with my Dobermans. I am interested in viewing the link about you posted regarding glutathione. I can’t promise I’ll research it right away but I will get around to it as it does seem interesting, and as stated previously I don’t have all the answers but I have been fortunate to find out that everyone in the pet food business even some large businesses aren’t out to kill our animals in fact the consensus is that if these animals live longer that helps creates a longer trust in the company and assures the customer will become a repeat customer and likely use word of mouth as free advertising.

  • Jake The Snake

    WORST DOG FOOD! ABSOLUTE GARBAGE!!!!!!!! Try living off McDonald’s or Burger King your whole life. You WILL be FAT. You WILL be UNHEALTHY. You WILL be making daily trips to the doctor with 30 prescription bottles keeping you alive.

  • aimee

    I remember the “old boot” promotional piece from Hills! However, I doubt that shoe leather and motor oil are AAFCO defined ingredients. LOL

    Royal Canin told me they purchase the AA’s for their diet from a company which supplies the product to the makers of the infant formula Neocate.

    What exactly do you find ridiculous about using a product produced for infants in dog food?

    The RC product is the only dog food I know of that uses AA from feathers. What other ones are out there?

    Thanks for the link on food regulation. It was very through and one of the best I’ve read!

  • Shawna

    It’s actually not a study but a website that gives the nutrient profiles of different foods.

    How has a dogs stomach “evolved” to handle heavy grain/carbohydrate loads while a cows has not?

    PS — in the 80′s and 90′s I fed my dogs a Purina product. One lived to 18 years of age and the other lived to 15 years of age. BUT, neither one was particularly “healthy”. And would be considered quite unhealthy if compared to my current eight – one of which is currently 18. AND a very telling sign for me — my one with kidney disease has better coat quality and overall general healthy than the two eating Purina.

    I definitely do agree that genetics, the environment, exercise etc have a very large impact on health. Particle board furniture gives off formaldehyde for the life of the piece. That can’t be good for people or pets. BUT, every single cell of the body (the liver, kidneys, brain, heart) are dependent on the nutrients eaten. And how the body deals with that formaldehyde is very dependent on the quality of the nutrition consumed.

    If you get an opportunity, do some research on glutathione. Here’s a blurb to hopefully peak your interest. This is on the Global Research website.

    “Glutathoine is your body’s “master antiojxidant”.

    Every cell of your body contains gluathione.

    And glutathione makes any other antioxidant which you ingest more effective.

    Numerous studies have shown that glutathione can help protect cells against radiation damage, including studies published in the following journals:….

    We’ve previously told you how to get past the hype to find the foods that are highest in antioxidants.

    But glutathione – as the “master antioxidant”, which is in every cell of your body – is probably the most important one to focus on.

    Dr. Jimmy Gutman – a practicing physician, former Undergraduate Director and Residency Training Director of Emergency Medicine at McGill University in Montreal, Quebec, who has served on the Board of Directors of the Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians – claims:

    Raising glutathione levels protects cells from damage from the most dangerous of free radicals, the hydroxyl-radical, is released when ionizing radiation hits us.

    How Can We Boost Glutathione Levels?…..

    But you can eat foods that are high in the precursors to glutathione … and your body will use them to make more glutathione.

    Specifically, 3 amino acides – cysteine, glycine and glutamate – are the precursors to glutathione production.

    Protein-rich foods tends to be high in all 3. But heating or pasteurizing them destroys many of the glutathione-producing properties.

    For example, raw eggs and raw meat are high in cysteine, but cooking destroys the cysteine.” http://www.globalresearch.ca/glutathione-boost-your-health-and-help-protect-yourself-from-radiation/5359303

    Toxins deplete glutathione. Exercise helps to reserve glutathione but the food one eats helps (or not) create glutathione. In time this could be disastrous to ones health.

  • Shawna

    It isn’t rumored that old leather boots and motor oil ARE used but that they COULD be used to make an AAFCO complete and balanced pet food. Dr. Jean Hofve wrote an article for Whole Dog Journal and mentions it in her article. An excerpt (bolded emphasis mine)

    “The Nutrient Profile system of formulation does not address the issue of ingredient quality whatsoever. One critic of this method (Dr. Mark Morris, who also founded Hill’s Pet of feed formulation designed a “food” that met all the AAFCO nutrient profile requirements – even though the food was primarily formulated from old shoe leather, sawdust and motor oil with a multi-vitamin-mineral supplement. Obviously, there would be no guarantee that any animal would eat such a food, or could digest it, even though it contained all the vitamins, minerals, protein, fat, etc. that the nutrient profiles required.” http://www.littlebigcat.com/nutrition/pet-food-regulation/

    You may not be able to tell the difference between dogs fed different diets but I sure can. Between mine and foster dogs I’ve had over 30 dogs in the last eight to ten years and ALL of them but one came to me feeding a lower quality food then what I feed. All, every single one of them but the one, had noticeably improved health.

    Tyson supplies chicken meals to different producers. Tyson makes (from memory) five different qualities and types of product.

    Tyson states

    “Our meals are a sustainable resource for nutrient-rich proteins that have proven highly digestible for most species. We produce five different chicken-based meals; chicken meal, chicken by product meal, low ash chicken by product meal, feed grade poultry meal, and feather meal.

    Chicken meal is made from premium parts. Chicken by product meals offer a variety of options to meet the needs of different animal protein requirements. Our low ash chicken by product meal is a good ingredient for species that requires less ash content for their specific health needs. We offer multiple options of target ranges and antioxidants for each of these ingredients.” http://www.tysonanimalnutrition.com/Premium-Products/Chicken-Meals.aspx

    Some companies are going to use the top of their line “chicken meal” and others are going to use the lower quality ingredients.

    Their now even making dog foods with “protein” made from feathers. They have to hydrolyze it to make it efficiently digestible. It’s becoming ridiculous.

  • Antonio Fisher

    Read my post above, but a quick excerpt regarding the study posted, it’s impossible to do comparative study of a bovine obligate herbivore such as cattle and make the comparison with a scavenger like a canid animal who’s stomach has evolved much differently in comparison to a cow that has multiple stomachs.

  • Antonio Fisher

    LOL it’s okay to disagree if we always agreed the world would be a dull place, and no one wants to be a clone right? LOL. The point I was attempting to make wasn’t to defend Pedigree as I feel they could spend less on advertising and more on the overall quality of the feed or at least lower the cost and make it more economical to it’s customers. As far as AAFCO testing is concerned, I assure you the rumors floating online about using old leather boots and motor oil couldn’t be farther from the truth. At our local club we have dogs eating everything from Ol Roy to Orijen, and everything in the between as well as a few raw feeders and no one can tell a difference in the dogs at their levels based on performance, looks, or general health and appearance. The biggest difference in pet food is how one brand is marketed versus a different brand. Perception is the biggest player in pet food, think of this for a moment during the 80′s and 90′s feed like Pedigree and Dog Chow were considered top shelf in contrast of todays trend in dog food, but yet those dogs fed those brands during that time seem to live long lives and were fairly healthy given their age. I didn’t mean to rant on this too much, but I think if given the chance to tour a pet food manufacturing facility it will surprise many to find out that most feed isn’t as bad or as good as we all may think. Many facilities are proud to open their doors to the public and let possible consumers see what’s going on inside. I advice anyone that likes the idea of pet nutrition to take that opportunity if given, it can be eye awakening and educational in helping debunk truth and myth regarding this business.

  • Jana Maria Shaw Church

    I started a topic in off topic called euthanasia.

  • Jana Maria Shaw Church

    I didn’t realize, sorry.

  • http://DogFoodAdvisor.com/ Mike Sagman

    Hey Guys,

    This unfriendly debate has gone on far too long now and has become a distraction to others. Please give it a rest.

  • http://DogFoodAdvisor.com/ Mike Sagman

    Yours aren’t the only comments that have been removed. You have made your point many times. By repeatedly posting the same remarks, you are only causing unfriendly conflict. Please move on to another topic.

  • LabsRawesome

    Probably because you are yelling. And accusing people of things that they are not doing.

  • LabsRawesome

    No one is forcing you to do anything. No one is “forcing” you to be on this site. People were just trying to let you know that their are better choices for the same price your paying. We gave you lists of foods that cost $1 per pound, that use good ingredients. No one ever got an acknowledgement or a reply from you. You only reply to posts when the poster is sympathetic to you and tells you what you want to hear. If you’re not here for help or recommendations, then what are you here for? Why do you keep coming back if you think everyone is mean to you? Whats you’re point?

  • Jana Maria Shaw Church

    Mike, why are you deleting my comments? I see nothing wrong with them. I’m simply telling the truth. I’m saying what I feel.

  • Shawna

    You shouldn’t feel that way at all. I don’t think anyone here means that. They are simply trying to explain that there ARE foods better than Pedigree that could still be within your budget.

    Edit — they are not suggesting that you feed the best of the best (or what they consider the best of the best) but simply better than Pedigree. They are just trying to be helpful and everyone seems to be getting frustrated in the process.

  • Jana Maria Shaw Church

    Thank you. I feel as though these people are forcing me to do what they want me to. Like I’m being forced to feed what they say or I’m a nobody.

  • LabsRawesome

    Oh Antonio. I couldn’t disagree with your post more. Nutrition is more complicated than you are leading us to believe. There’s more to it than just meeting a dogs fat & protein requirements. The source of the fat and protein obviously does matter. I read somewhere that you could meet AAFCO standards for dog food by mixing used motor oil, sawdust and feathers. You can get the correct percentages. But the dog isn’t going to get the right nutrition out of it. Of course there are different grades of dog food. Depending on ingredients used. Sorry, but your post is silly. :)

  • Shawna

    In humans the “wheat gluten” in the above Pedigree food can cause a disease known as gluten ataxia (I think I’ve mentioned it before in posts to you?). Gluten ataxia can cause symptoms such as blindness and brain damage. Although I am not aware of any studies of gluten ataxia in dogs, I can’t help but think it likely isn’t any better for them than for us.

    I will give you that being reactive to gluten is a genetic thing but it IS the gluten that triggers the reaction. If gluten is not eaten the disease does not manifest no matter the environment and genetic coding.

  • Shawna

    Certain foods can “cause” cancer and others can prevent cancer. It isn’t simply all about genetics and environment however they to have a role to play. Garlic as just one example is a food that can “kill” cancer cells.

  • Shawna

    I just can’t disagree with your statements more. Looking at foods as “nutrients” is an oversimplified, at best, way of viewing them.

    As just one example — conventionally raised beef has a significantly different nutrient profile than does that same meat if raised on grass. Doesn’t matter if both cows came from the same parents. Per nutritiondata.com

    100grams of grass fed/finished beef has 13 grams of fat, 5 of which is saturated, and 19 grams of protein. There is 427mg of omega 6 and 88mg of omega 3 — or roughly 4.85:1 omega 6 to 3. Well within the dietary guidelines for dogs.

    100grams of 85% lean conventionally raised beef (that fed corn and grains) has 15gr total fat, 6 saturated, and 19gr protein. And 354mg of 6 and 42 of 3 for a ratio of 8.43:1.

    100grams of 90% lean has 10gr total fat, 4 of which is saturated, and 20gm of protein. The omega 6 to 3 ratio is still however more than the grass finished beef at 7.8:1. http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/beef-products/6193/2

    Grains/cattle “feed” cause an imbalance in the fats of conventionally raised beef. Imagine what those same foods do to carnivorous dogs (and worse CATS).

    Another example — coconut oil and animal fat are both “fat”. But coconut oil is metabolized primarily in the stomach versus the small intestines sparing the pancreas.

    Soy versus meat is another example. Some companies use soy as it is a “complete” protein but the bioavailability of that protein is less than that from meats.

    I could go on and on. Food is much more than simply the nutrients within that food.

  • Antonio Fisher

    I agree is does indeed vary by regions.

  • Antonio Fisher

    Thanks for the reply theBCnut, I am aware of the studies that support, dyes, preservatives and things of that nature as possible cancer causing agents, but then we have to consider what is the cause for cancer and other diseases for the host of other dogs that aren’t eating those ingredients? I wish studies would aim toward breeding practices, poor genetics, obesity, lack of exercise, and lack of sunlight and see how those things or lack thereof has led to an increase in pet diseases and allergens. I know things have changed today and more people are taking their animals to the vet, but dogs have lived long lives eating feeds like pedigree. I’m not saying Pedigree is the best feed on the market as I don’t believe in a best dog food, but I do believe there are many good dog feeds on the market.

  • theBCnut

    My dogs don’t have a daily requirement or preference for food dyes and they have been proven to cause problems, like cancer and behavior issues. So why include them in dog foods? Same with BHA and BHT, they are known to cause problems, so why include them? You can feed that to your dogs all you like, but I’ve had more than my share of dogs with strange cancers that had no family history of cancer. I won’t be feeding it.
    You may believe that diet plays no part in health, but science is telling us to shop the perimeter of the store where the unprocessed foods are because processed foods cause problems. That tells me that diet does play a role in health.

  • theBCnut

    LOL!! I was discussing this a couple months ago with some friends/aquainances that are in the feed formulation business. My take away was that it is feed if you are feeding it to food animals, i.e. herbivores, livestock, etc. I buy horse, goat, and cattle feed, but I buy dog, cat, and ferret food. Then we talked about the 101 exceptions. I buy bird feed, but parrot food, and so on. It really got rather funny and some of it was regionally different.

  • Antonio Fisher

    Well considering the fact neither my dogs can read “that I know of” I don’t think they mind me calling it dog feed as oppose to dog food. But if the feed I use isn’t supplying their daily nutrition requirement that would be a problem.

  • Antonio Fisher

    Well to say “Dog Feed” is not an expression used for pet food in my area isn’t true. In fact I buy most of my pet food at the local feed store. But that’s minor.

  • Betsy Greer

    I think of the standards for “feeds” as being lower than what I would want for my dog’s “food.” http://truthaboutpetfood.com/is-it-feed-or-food

  • Antonio Fisher

    LOL you won’t catch fire from me, I more than welcome your posts and replies and would hope there’s something I can take from it and learn. I have no arguments about what we as dog owners feel is best. To assume I know it all would be fools play on my part.

  • Betsy Greer

    It’s not a Southern expression.

    It was just a thought that I had in reading your post, which I disagree with, but chose not to respond. I too am free to post my thoughts.

  • Antonio Fisher

    Betsy I apologize if my southern expression of using animal feed versus animal food was bothersome for you. If I’m thinking about it when I’m posting I’ll try to avoid such usage in offense of your preference. But growing up we used the terminology dog food and feed interchangeably. I would hope from the post above you took more from it than my lack of vocabulary expressions and realize some of the depth of what I was trying to express on the matter of pet food.

  • Betsy Greer

    I find the expression “feed,” as opposed to “food,” for dogs, odd.

  • Antonio Fisher

    Pedigree has been around a long time your dog won’t live any longer or any less by switching feeds. Pending environment conditions and vet care your dog will live according to it’s genetics. Dog food has become overkill. We all strive to do OUR best, but one has to consider that the term BEST is an opinion. What is best for one individual versus another will purely be a matter of that individuals opinion and I’m no different. But I assure you if I take two dogs of identical genetics with one dog eating a 21% protein 10% fat kibble of a “better” brand and the other eating Pedigree so long as those dogs receive the same vet care, exercise, grooming, etc.. I can pretty much guarantee no one will be able to tell any difference in the dog being fed the Pedigree versus the dog eating the “better” brand. To the OP don’t complicate things, do what works best for YOUR dogs and YOUR budget, anything I or anyone else suggest is just a matter of personal opinion as to what works best. I don’t believe this website was created to make you or anyone else feeding an economical brand of kibble feel bad about that choice. This site is here to give a better understanding of certain ingredients, but keep in mind when it comes to pet food the key is balance and the ingredients in any formula should be used in conjunction and be formulated to work together w/ the other ingredients in the formula makeup. One ingredient shouldn’t define a dog food and any chemist or nutritionist with experience formulating pet food can confirm this statement. If there was truly a “BETTER or BEST” dog food then I would have to believe we all would be feeding it since we all want what is best for OUR pets. As long as your pets are happy, healthy, fed, and cared for keep doing what your doing.

  • Jana Maria Shaw Church

    OK. I’m done here. Maybe someone else could do a better job at feeding than I can. I’ll rehome half of my dogs so next month I can buy better feed with less dogs to feed. Less dogs = less feed = more money to buy better feed. I already have 1 going to a new home today. Thanks for all your help.

  • Cyndi

    Yeah, same here. I’m done trying to help her. So many people tried and gave her a better food that would cost LESS than what she was.

  • aquariangt

    I kinda think she’s a troll

  • Cyndi

    How many people on here mentioned different foods that were better than what you’re using for the SAME price? People are just trying to help! No one wants your dogs to starve. If you couldn’t find anything that was mentioned, you should have kept the Pedigree. That is your fault, not any of ours. No one FORCED you to return that food and not get anything else. You were given many food options for the same price as what you were paying.

  • Jana Maria Shaw Church

    Well, I hope you all are happy now. I took the pedigree back, I couldn’t find anything better for the price and weight I need. Now my dogs have nothing to eat. I guess you all would rather see them starve than eat low grade food. I’m a poor, low grade person of no value to anyone, I can’t afford the high dollar foods like you people can. But I listened to you and became of that, my dogs will starve because I can’t feed them better food.

  • Jana Maria Shaw Church

    Fine, I’ll return the pedigree to the store and get something else, OK? You win.. It was $23 . Wonder what I can get that’s any better for that price. I have no extra $ to add to it. .I need @ least 40 lbs to feed them for a month.

  • LabsRawesome

    LMAO

  • theBCnut

    Might have been the only real meat in her diet.

  • LabsRawesome

    There’s no need to yell. You’re right. I don’t know you, except from your posts on this site. I did not lie. You do not respond to anyone that gives you suggestions or lists for dog foods that you may be able to switch to. Your only responses have nothing to do with anything except Pedigree, and how much your dogs love it. Or defending Pedigree, like it’s a good food. It obviously is not. If you don’t want or need anyone’s advice, and are not going to respond to it, then why are you here? Just curious.

  • LabsRawesome

    Please stop yelling. No one is judging you. Just giving you suggestions on healthier foods for your dogs. For about the same price your paying for Pedigree. Funny how you never answer those posts…..

  • LabsRawesome

    Okay thanks. I’ll let you know if they like it. :)

  • sue66b

    God she must of been hungry to eat a dead dog….

  • Crazy4cats

    No, I’ve not tried it, but I think others have mentioned it in the forum on the cat food thread. I think it got thumbs up.

  • Kimi_Forever

    no one is judging you just letting you know you might have other options

  • Jana Maria Shaw Church

    GO JUDGE YOURSELVES BEFORE YOU JUDGE SOMEONE ELSE!!!

  • Jana Maria Shaw Church

    DON’T YOU DARE SAY THAT I DON’T CARE!! U DON’T KNOW ME!!!!

  • LabsRawesome

    We all keep telling her. She obviously doesn’t care. Because she does not respond to anyone. Except to say how much her dogs love Pedigree with water mixed in.

  • Shar24

    Actually, to be fair she stated that she is well aware that it isn’t a great pet food but is what she can afford….

    “I’m in limited income, I’m feeding 6 adult dogs. I can’t afford that high dollar stuff. Pedigree isn’t the best, I know, but it’s better than nothing, its better than what I was feeding. The dogs love it, if their happy, I’m happy.”

    I can respect that.

  • LabsRawesome

    Awesome. Hey I just bought a bag of Simply Nourish Source Grain Free cat food @ Petsmart. Chicken & Turkey formula. Do you have any experience with this cat food? Comments?

  • JaketheMutt

    Tractor Supply has a brand called 4Health,according to their paper ad which Im looking at now,the following formulas are $29.99 for a 35lb bag:Healthy Weight,Lamb and Rice,Large Breed,Small Bites,Chicken and Rice. Their Salmon and Potato,Performance,Mature Adult,and Puppy food are $32.99 for a 35lb bag.They also have a grain free line,Turkey and Potato,Beef and Potato,Whitefish and Potato,Duck and Pork which is $34.99 for a 30lb bag. As Kimi pointed out you can actually feed less with a higher quality kibble,because your dog will be utilizing more of the ingredients,versus Pedigree which is full of fillers that a dog cant use and harmful additives.

  • Crazy4cats

    Thanks. I just ordered the other grain free. Maybe I’ll give the ultra pro a try next time since I’d be feeding less. I’m actually feeding 3/4 Natures Logic and 1/4 Victor right now with various toppers and they are doing ok!

  • LabsRawesome

    Yes. The proof is on the ingredients list. Just look up all the ingredients listed in RED.

  • LabsRawesome

    Oh it has to be floor sweepings, and mill waste. :(

  • Kimi_Forever

    online the 46.8lb bag is 22.99 http://www.tractorsupply.com/en/store/pedigreereg%3B-adult-complete-nutrition-dog-food-468-lb

    How much cheaper can it be? and considering how much more you use a day of that then you would another food ( about 6.5 cups more a day, thats more then a lb of any brand of food) you use about 30lbs more of pedigree a month then you would for instance fromm. the predigree is still cheaper but, really if you consider what you are paying for the real ripoff is the cheap stuff not the fromm..

  • Jana Maria Shaw Church

    FYI…..
    I get my dog food from tractor supply, not Walmart. It’s a bit cheaper.
    I buy 50lbs a month. 1 50 pound bag lasts the whole month.

  • Kimi_Forever

    they dont have twin pet priced online at walmart so i cant say…But a 13lb bag of twin pet is 5 dollars http://www.walmart.com/ip/Twin-Pet-Adult-Dog-Food-13-lb-Dogs/20525242 …I didnt know they made food cheaper then pedigree or the purina dog chow my grandmother buys. That really is sad. i mean 5 dollars? i dont want to even know what is in a food that costs 5 dollars for 13lbs this is bad enough

  • Kimi_Forever

    I do not feed victor…However the new puppy i am getting is comming to on Victor select hi pro plus…I know it’s highly rated brand and made in the USA, so while i dont have experience with it personally i can say on the surface it looks like a solid buy. esp for the price.

  • LabsRawesome

    I didn’t realize it was that cheap at Walmart. Which reminds me, the last time I was in Walmart some Lady had a huge bag of Pedigree Maybe 50lbs? She was complaining to her husband that the price went up a dollar or something. Then she said I’m going to quit buying Pedigree, and switch to something cheaper. What could possibly be cheaper? Twin Pet? How sad.

  • LabsRawesome

    Hey C4C, I just checked my bag of Ultra Pro and it says 479 cal per cup. My Lab only eats 2 cups of Victor and 1 can per day. :)

  • Kimi_Forever

    i guess i need to look around some more because there are some local indepent stores from me, they are a little bit of a drive, but i just assumed they were higher priced like petco and petsmart…Ill have to check them out

  • SandyandMila

    Sure will! I’ll probably make an order Friday and try Yukon River. :)

  • LabsRawesome

    Yeah I should have said, I shop at my local independent pet stores. They have awesome prices. Victor Ultra Pro GF is $38.99 for a 30lb bag!! Yukon River is $42.99 for 30lbs. Victor is only sold at Farm stores and Indy Pet stores. :) And obviously online.

  • Crazy4cats

    Hi Labs-
    I was checking out the Ultra Pro on their website. It shows that it has 437 calories, but then when you click on the product guide brochure, it states 479 calories. Do you know which one is correct? I haven’t tried it yet, as it is more expensive. Thanks for your help.

  • Kimi_Forever

    I need to find better places to shop for foods then! places i go food is more expensive in store. and i just priced fromm at the only store i know of around me and it’s the same as chewy http://www.jackspets.com/Sales-Flyer.aspx 49.99 for the gold, but they are giving away a free 5lb bag with it! jeeze…I thought i was doing good shopping at chewy, because i thought petco and petsmart were such a ripoff

  • LabsRawesome

    Oh no problem. Yes foods are always cheaper in store than online. It’s the price of convenience. :)

  • LabsRawesome

    My 3 love Ultra Pro, and Yukon River. But everyone probably already knows that. Lol. :) Everyone else answered your where to buy question. If you do try Victor let me know how it goes.

  • LabsRawesome

    My dogs always eat less than whats recommended on the bag.

  • SandyandMila

    Duh lol I probably could’ve figured that out myself if I would’ve looked more into it. Thanks for the link. Do you feed Victor yourself? Do you recommend it?

  • Kimi_Forever

    Well contrary to you i’ve never priced fromm at a store and only online! Yes it was from chewy.com 33lb bag for 37.99, at chewy the gold is 49.00 for the the 33lb bag. Chewy is usually pretty good on their prices so i figured they would be better then most local stores but i dont know about that!

    EDIT It’s actually a 15lb bag they have on chewy for 20.99…so chewy may be a little higher then where you were looking…where as pedigree is 11.98 for a 17lb bag at walmart…

  • LabsRawesome

    Hi Kimi, I’ve never priced Pedigree at a store, so I was going by the online price. Is the price for Fromm Family Classics that you quoted an online or an in store price? Because the last time I looked a FFC in a store it was around $18 for a 20lb bag. And the 33lb bag for $37.99 was the Fromm Gold. Which is a step up from the Classic line. I obviously agree with you about it being worth it to pay a little more for the Fromm tho.

  • Kimi_Forever

    If she has six dogs that would be over a pound difference per day in total amount fed. Over a month that really adds up…Guess the pedigree isnt as cheap as jana thinks…not to mention the not having to worry about possible expense of vet trips because of reaction to the food…I feel for jana on the money end, but the math doesnt lie. like i said before my whole family feeds these types of foods, and i always feel so bad for the animals but i cant convince them either. In the end trying to save money on food like this can also end up in expensive vet bills like sylk willy….

  • Crazy4cats

    There we go. That is what I was hoping for. Thanks for checking. I don’t think the feeding guidelines on the bags are universal. With a lot of dogs that would be a significant difference in the amount of bags to buy in my opinion. Good work!

  • Kimi_Forever

    Surprisingly the Feeding guidelines are similar, for instance, a 70lb dog on fromm is suggested 4 1/4 cups while with pedigree a 75lb dog is suggested 4 1/2 cups…

    Fromm: 404 kcal/cup

    Pedigree: 311 kcal/cup

    http://frommfamily.com/products/classics/dog/dry/adult

    http://www.pedigree.com/really-good-food/adult-complete-nutrition-for-dogs.aspx

    ….So maybe not as much difference at the end of the day as i hoped but still to go from meat and bone meal to chicken meal, and from corn gluten meal to brown rice and from “animal fat” to chicken fat all for 18 bucks. I dunno man, i know times are tough and money is tight but thats quite a difference….

    EDIT: on a recheck with this sites food calculator it suggests for a 70lb dog with typical activity:
    fromm: 3.65 cups

    pedigree:4.74
    ..So thats over a cup difference a day per dog…

  • Crazy4cats

    Hey-
    What is the difference in the calories? Did you happen to check that out? I am wondering if she would be feeding less with the Fromm.

  • Crazy4cats

    Hi-
    rocketpetz dot com also sells the grain free varieties. I have also seen it on ebay before. Good luck!

  • Kimi_Forever

    Labsrawesome, in all fairness at walmart, where jana is more likely to shop then wag Pedigree is 19.98 for a 40lb bag http://www.walmart.com/ip/Pedigree-Adult-Complete-Nutrition-Dog-Food-40-lb-Dogs/10451120…It’s a step up to consider a food like fromm classics for 37.99 for 33lbs,…But jeeze is it worth the difference in price…

  • Kimi_Forever

    To buy Victor:
    http://www.victorpet.com/#!sport-dog-food-store/ci6h

    Or try Amazon.com they sell victor there as well.

  • SandyandMila

    You guys have been such great promoters for Victor I’m considering trying it with Mila! I searched their site for a local dealer but the closest are in NY and I live in MA so which site should I use to purchase it online?

  • Crazy4cats

    It’s frustrating, isn’t it? I work at Costco and we sell huge bags of Pedigree. I have coworkers that feed it to their dogs. And they don’t have multiple dogs and are not on a tight budget. They are just buying it because of the name and the pretty dog picture on the bag. They don’t even think twice about it. I’ve just learned to show them the ingredient label and ask them if that is what they truly want to feed their dogs. I don’t argue with anyone, I just try to educate them as much as possible. We cannot control what anyone feeds their dogs. You just need to let it go. I honestly wish we didn’t sell it.

  • Hater & Molly’s Mom

    Hi Jana, I saw a photo of your dog on your Facebook page. I know you claim that your dogs are doing well on the Pedigree but the dog in the photo seems to have a few things going on with its coat. It does not look healthy at all.

  • Cyndi

    After reading all these posts, I don’t understand how ANYONE can stand by Pedigree and still confidently feed it to their dogs. I am and always will be thankful for this site and everyone on here who helped open my eyes!

  • Shawna

    Morning Cyndi and thanks,

    I look at this as an opportunity to plant a seed of doubt if nothing else. My, our, words may not be enough to promote change but they may make it easier for someone else down the line to do so. Sometimes baby steps is all we can hope for. :)

  • Shawna

    Good morning aimee :)

    Green Med Info links to 12 different research articles on the topic. http://www.greenmedinfo.com/greenmed/topic/55314/focus/1656/page

  • LabsRawesome

    I don’t know why you keep posting here, if you’re just going to use Pedigree. What’s the point? Pedigree and all similar dog foods are garbage plain and simple. There’s no arguing that point. There are higher quality foods for just a little bit more money. No one is saying you have to buy the most expensive foods like Orijen or whatever. But there are very good kibbles that only cost about $1 per lb. Victor grain inclusive, 4health, Fromm Classics, Lassie Natural way. And many others.

  • Cyndi

    I don’t think she reads all our comments, because she thinks she’s feeding a great food because her dogs love it. Maybe someone else will read all this and change their minds about Pedigree. Some people just have their minds made up already. Great post Shawna! :)

  • aimee

    I’m posting the authors conclusion so that those that don’t read the paper can see what the authors found

    “it remains to be established to what extent intestinal
    inflammation is gluten dependent and if it precedes the occurrence of diabetes.”

    I found a few more current articles on the prevention of diabetes and there are no recommendations to avoid gluten.

    Since it doesn’t seem established gluten is a risk factor in people I see it as a huge stretch to think gluten is a risk factor in dogs

  • Shawna

    I spoke with a manufacturer once and asked where the meat in their food came from. You are correct it is left over but not always what we might think. When Tyson slaughters chickens they must fulfill orders from grocers etc. There’s two legs, two breasts, a back, two thighs and two wings. The manufacturer explained it this way — when the grocer wants 10 thighs, 30 breasts and 12 wings there’s going to be a log of wings and thighs left over. There’s nothing wrong with them but they have to be utilized. I don’t know if this is correct data but it does make sense to me.

    In another post you stated you are against euthanized animals being used in pet foods. An easy way to ensure you aren’t feeding a food that utilizes these POOR quality of ingredients is to look for specific ingredients. The FDA did testing and found there were four ingredients that could potentially contain euthanized animals. Those four ingredients are “meat and bone meal”, “beef and bone meal”, “animal fat” and “animal digest”. If any one of those ingredients are in the food, it is a possibility that the source was a euthanized animal. At the very least it speaks for the quality of the ingredients used.

    The FDA states “There appear to be associations between rendered or hydrolyzed ingredients and
    the presence of pentobarbital in dog food. The ingredients Meat and Bone Meal (MBM), Beef and Bone Meal (BBM), Animal Fat (AF), and Animal Digest (AD) are rendered or hydrolyzed from animal sources that could include euthanized animals.” http://www.fda.gov/aboutfda/centersoffices/officeoffoods/cvm/cvmfoiaelectronicreadingroom/ucm129134.htm

  • JaketheMutt

    There are numerous dog food companies that use human grade,fresh meat/ingredients for there foods.The Honest Kitchen and Grandma Lucys are 2 companies that come to mind,in fact THK openly states that there food is fit for human consumption.

  • Kimi_Forever

    “From cage-free poultry, nest-laid eggs, ranch-raised meats and wild-caught fish to sun-ripened fruits & vegetables, our fresh ingredients are raised locally, passed fit for human consumption, and then delivered to our kitchens fresh, preservative-free and loaded with goodness”

    http://www.orijen.ca/bafrino/fresh-regional-ingredients/

  • Shar24

    My thoughts and prayers are with your Maggie. And with you, having a sick baby is just so heart-wrenching.

  • Betsy Greer

    Oh Jana, some do. It’s our job as pet owners to ferret out those that do, if we want what’s best for our pets.

  • Jana Maria Shaw Church

    Understand something. I DO NOT AGREE with euthanized animals in pet foods.
    But, if it hasn’t been euthanized, it’s OK to use in the feeds.
    No, I don’t agree with dogs and cats in pet foods either.
    No pet food company is going to use fresh, human quality meat!

  • Jana Maria Shaw Church

    It’s dog food, no one, not even high end dog food companies are going to put good meat, human quality meat in it! Even high end pet food companies are going to use slaughter house leftovers in feed.
    The animal remains have to go somewhere.

  • Cyndi

    I’m sure they do love it, that’s what Pedigree counts on. It’s up to YOU as their owner and caregiver to not provide crap that can kill them as their food.

  • theBCnut

    I’m there!

  • LabsRawesome

    Oh yeah! I love me some meat and bone meal!! And non discript animal fat is on our dessert menu for tonight. We’re leaving out the carcinogenic added coloring/preservatives tonight. Who wants to come over for dinner? 8pm

  • theBCnut

    And those are in all my human food, stuff I eat for every meal every day. You too, right?

  • Shar24

    OMG. that must have been horrifying. I don’t think I would be the same after that. lol

  • Shawna

    Sometimes there isn’t a way to prove things. But, certain ingredients in the Pedigree food Mike reviews above have been shown to increase the risk factor, in humans, for type 1 diabetes (the kind dogs are most likely to get). I’m not sure if studies have been done in dogs.

    “Dietary gluten has been associated with an increased risk of type 1 diabetes.” http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15220190

  • LabsRawesome

    Yeah. Check the ingredients list. Meat & bone meal, Animal fat, BHA, BHT, red40, yellow5, blue2.

  • Jana Maria Shaw Church

    I feed pedigree on a regular basis, mixed with hot water. They love it.

  • Jana Maria Shaw Church

    The was gross, especially since we had to pick up the leftovers!

  • Shawna

    I think you were very lucky…

    Eagles and other prey birds/wildlife have died due to eating euthanized carcasses. The US Fish & Wildlife Service put out data on it including the below warning statement.

    “Rendering is not an acceptable way to dispose of a pentobarbital-tainted carcass. The drug residues are not
    destroyed in the rendering process, so the tissues and by-products may
    contain poison and must not be used for animal feed….

    All pentobarbital-euthanized carcasses should be prominently tagged with one or more highly-visible “POISON” warning labels. Bagged animals should have a label affixed to the carcass itself and also attached to the outside of the bag.” http://cpharm.vetmed.vt.edu/USFWS/USFWSFPentobarbFactSheet.pdf

    I’ve read that cannibalism is rare in dogs. I wonder why she would have resorted to it in the first place? My guess is a dog that resorts to cannibalism isn’t “fine” at all?? Just a guess though.

    A dogs “natural” diet is in dog foods but that is not at all the same as saying dog food (kibble) is a dogs natural diet. Far from it in fact.

    I definitely do understand finances as a justification for feeding certain foods. I appreciate the fact that you’ve given these dogs a loving home and that you vet them as necessary!! You should be commended. That said, trying to convince well informed individuals that the budget friendly food we feed is a good food is somewhat pointless in my opinion. Rather than appreciating you for what you DO, folks are, rightfully so, trying to show you why the food is problematic in their opinion.

  • Kimi_Forever

    Sorry to jump to conclusions that you “allowed” it to happen. i just was really grossed out.

  • Cyndi

    & now you feed that on a regular basis in your dog’s food. That will definitely have negative effects over time…

  • Jana Maria Shaw Church

    We came home and cought her eating the dog. That was 15 years ago.

  • Jana Maria Shaw Church

    They said she was fine. She lived to be 16. We had her euthanized due to old age problems.
    She was a year old when she ate the other dog.

  • aquariangt

    I hope you brought your dog to the vet after eating a euthanized animal, as that is pretty dangerous for him, if you are being honest here

  • Kimi_Forever

    No, No they arent in human foods, thats the point. The waste they cant use for human consumption goes to cheap pet foods..And no a dog’s natural diet is not in all dog foods, for instance pedigree does not mimic a natural diet…And also rotting meat is not good for dogs…Neither are the chemicals from euthanized animals. They CAN cause problems….And also one of the complaints about kibble is the fact that it’s cooked and NOT raw…I am sorry to hear you let your dog eat euthanized animals…I feel for you on the economics of expensive dog food, but this post makes me worry about your dogs.

  • Jana Maria Shaw Church

    Of course they are, so are human food companies. There’s a lot if crap in human foods too.. A dog will eat a dead, rotting animal and come out with no problems. A dog’s natural diet is in dog foods, except in dog foods, the rotting meat is at least cooked, where in the wild, it’s not.. I once had a dog dig up and eat a euthanized dog, no problems.

  • Cyndi

    Because it’s crap food and it’s made with rendered 4D animals. Pedigree, Purina, Iams, there are all in it for the money and all they make is crap food.

    http://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/dog-food-industry-exposed/dogs-meat-meal/

  • Jana Maria Shaw Church

    Sorry about the dog, but how do you know it’s the pedigree causing the problem? Is there any proof?

  • Kimi_Forever

    I’m so sorry to hear about maggie.

  • Slyk Willy

    my lhasa opso maggie pictured here is 5 years old and she has been fed Pedigree Dog Food since birth, she now has a 50% chance to live and if she makes it she will have to have daily insulin injections. If you love your dog spend the money and buy the best dog food for your pet ans dont feed them this crap.

  • Cyndi

    Why do you feel the need to gloat? People on here are keeping quiet now because you’re not worth our time & we happen to enjoy helping people & we’d rather not have Dr. Mike get angry becsuse we’re here to help each other.

    If you choose to feed your dogs crap & poison, that’s your choice. Most normal people come on this site & can read the crappy ingredients for themselves or ask for help on switching to a better food. Pedigree is crappy dog “food”! Period!

    So no, you did’t make anyone “mad”. You just aren’t worth our time.

  • Kimi_Forever

    Having just been told by someone else that i do not spend enough per month on my pets that i love i can understand your feelings. My entire family feeds the same type of foods you do to their pets and has had some live to be very old. While i choose other pet foods personally, like someone else said i view myself as lucky to be able to do that. I particularly understand the expense being that you have six dogs, this reason in particular is why i choose to only have one, so i can spoil it the best i can but thats just me. I had to take my girl to the vet once every two weeks for a few months at 100 bucks a pop and just spent over 1000 dollars on surgery to fix a cats broken femur, so i understand. As someone else said at least you are feeding and loving your dogs and vetting them when need be. I think it’s good that some people gave you some other options for ‘more affordable’ premium dog foods, but understand that may not be realistic for you. There are the ones mentioned and some other more affordable ones if you ever changed your mind and were able to afford it, but i’m glad you are at least caring for the dogs as it could be much worse then pedigree dog food.

  • Jana Maria Shaw Church

    Looks like mike made some people mad. :) I guess they can’t handle being served what they dish out.

  • Jana Maria Shaw Church

    Hi Mike! Thanks! I do the best I can with the amount of money I have to spend in my dogs each month.
    I currently have a dog that has an injured leg from a snakebite that I have to take to the vet 1x a month and spend $100 each visit..
    We really can’t afford it, but she has to be seen until we can get her healed, if she can heal without an expensive surgery.
    The dog was injured when we got her, the leg wasn’t taken care of, now we are struggling to save her leg.

  • http://DogFoodAdvisor.com/ Mike Sagman

    Hey Guys,

    Everyone has a right to his or her own opinion about a particular dog food — even if that opinion doesn’t happen to agree with your own.

    Unfortunately, recent remarks here compel me to remind all involved to adhere to Our Commenting Policy which states:

    “… we delete comments that exceed the boundaries of courteous behavior. This includes remarks that are rude, profane, mean-spirited, disrespectful, lack good manners or otherwise unrelated to the topic at hand.”

    Flagged comments in violation of this rule will be removed.

    Please be more respectful of fellow contributors when posting. Thanks for your understanding.

  • aquariangt

    I assume you’re trolling here, ya? Maybe work for Pedigree? Otherwise, if you’re that hellbent on sticking with pedigree, why exactly are you on this site?

  • Jana Maria Shaw Church

    I’ve tried several kinds of dog food over the years.
    Pedigree
    Dog chow
    Dad’s
    Ol Roy
    Retriever
    Alpo
    Doggie bag
    Kibbles and bits
    Gravy train
    Twin pet
    Out of all those, my dogs, being the judges, chose pedigree. I have 3 dogs that can be picky. With the pedigree, their not picky, but excited, as are all of them.

  • Jana Maria Shaw Church

    I’m in limited income, I’m feeding 6 adult dogs. I can’t afford that high dollar stuff. Pedigree isn’t the best, I know, but it’s better than nothing, its better than what I was feeding. The dogs love it, if their happy, I’m happy.

  • Jana Maria Shaw Church

    I just fed my 6 dogs their supper of pedigree, a half scoop each, they inhaled it. :)
    They love it.

  • Shar24

    No offense, but I think that it is important to avoid being judgmental or coming across as trying to be some sort of dog food moral authority. I am passionate about feeding my pets quality food, and have also felt those urges to try to intervene but I have really had to re-consider. First of all, I have to know that I really am fortunate to be in a position to feed my cats high quality food. I spend $60 a month. I see on here a lot “for a few dollars more” when the reality for a lot of people is that every single dollar literally is precommitted to necessary costs of living… rent, food, electricity, sooo many people struggled to heat their homes this winter and many many people went without. Sure there are people that could spend more and simply choose not to, but I think that *most* people that come to this site genuinely care and want to do the best they can for their pets. The information is here for us and we all do the best we can with it. I wish I was homecooking for all of my animals to be honest with you, but that just isn’t a practical reality for me right now. Now that being said, I was JUST at Walmart 10 minutes ago and I took a swing through the dog food aisle just to look at their pricing. Pedigree at Walmart is $19.99 for a 40lb bag. Thats a big difference than what you quoted. Ol’ Roy is the same price for a 50lb bag. And Twin Pet is $5.00 for a 15lb bag. I realize that Twin Pet and Pedigree are both low quality dog food, but the reality is that Pedigree is a step up from the twin pet. Pure Balance is $16.88 for a 15lb bag. Every single day thousands of animals are euthanized in shelters, surrendered because their owners couldn’t afford to feed them, people buy puppies from pet stores that source them from puppy mills, cats are starving living on the streets by the millions because there aren’t enough homes. A good friend of mine, fellow passionate animal lover feeds a grocery store cat food not because she doesn’t know better but because she is currently feeding at least 15 cats in need, only 6 of them are her own that she rescued and she works every day to care for, rescue and help animals in need whenever the need presents itself, she is well educated, and does the best with what she can, and wishes that was more. She feeds them all canned food and dry food and vets them properly and anything you could think of that makes for a good home.

  • Beth Knuth

    Now I went on Walmart.com, Pedigree is really cheap at $19.98, BUT Rachael Ray is 28 pounds for $29.52 and Pure Balance is $31.88 for 30 pounds. You will need about $10 more a month I would think, I am no math expert, but to me it is worth it to pay a little more for better quality and in this case it is a big leap to the better quality with a minimum of expense. All up to you now.

  • Beth Knuth

    Okay, I just went to Wag.com and looked up Pedigree it is 36 pounds for $36.99, for maybe 20 to 30 cents more a pound you can get much better quality foods. On that site you can get Merrick Whole Earth Farms, 30 pounds for $37.49, Eagle Pack, Annameat, and Rachael Ray are within this price range too. You can also go to the Walmart.com site and check out there prices. You can feed better for about the same price, you just have to really want to. Do you?

  • Beth Knuth

    You and I have talked about what you feed and we know Pedigree is not good, myself and others on here have talked to you about getting a better quality food, since you say you know Pedigree is not good quality. Do you have a feed store nearby and have you checked out prices for the 4 Health brands and others that you can find listed here on the website? You need to look on line at the walmart web site and at Chewy.com and Wag.com and find the prices. You do not seem to be trying, you seem to be sticking with Pedigree and not finding better quality.

  • LabsRawesome

    Hi Jana actually Pedigree and Twin Pet have very similar ingredient lists. They are both one star foods. All the foods you listed are 1 star, and I wouldn’t say any one was better than the others. For maybe 10 or 12 dollars more (maybe less), you may be able to upgrade from a 1star to a 3 star food. What is the bag size/price you pay for Pedigree?

  • Jana Maria Shaw Church

    Just a few days ago I was feeding my 6 twin pet dog food.
    I knew I should do better for them so I threw out what was left of it and bought pedigree.
    I know it’s not the best, but it’s better than ol Roy, twin pet, old glory, doggy bag, retriever etc.
    Its what I can afford and my dogs love it.

  • Jana Maria Shaw Church

    I agree!

  • LeahA

    They don’t have to feed this. There are plenty of good quality foods for reasonable prices. But I guess they think what’s cheapest and can feed the most dogs at once is best. As for dog owners, there is no excuse for them to feed this to their loving furry family members.

  • Beth Knuth

    I know I do that too, but I have to think at least they are feeding them something, so many rescues have taken in dogs that are emaciated, that I am just glad they are getting food.

  • LeahA

    I get frustrated watching people leave costco with huge bags of this crap. I just feel bad for all those unfortunate dogs who are going to eat it. People should educate themselves on what’s really in this cheap garbage that should not be allowed to be called ‘dog food’. Dogs need meat, veggies and fruits, not genetically modified corn and chemicals.

  • Antonio Fisher

    Genetics and exercise are a huge factor it’s great that you keep your dogs active as obesity can and will shorten their lifespan prematurely. Dog food like people food has one major purpose turn calories into usable energy when heated by the body. My dogs have eaten grain free and grain inclusive no major difference just a matter of preference on which starch you as the owner prefer in your pets diet.

  • theBCnut

    Since vets don’t necessarily know anything about nutrition and food related illnesses, and the internet as we know it is relatively young, a lot of people had no way of finding out that they should try something different with their dogs. Thank goodness we now have sites like this to go to.

  • Riley Anne

    Absolute crap.
    All the dogs in my childhood were fed a mixture of Pedigree and Purina…
    They were short-lived with a list of health problems that my stupid parents didn’t care enough about to look into.
    Ear infections several times a year, yeast infections, and my god were those dogs smelly.
    Until I got dogs of my own and fed them actual food, I thought that’s just what happened when dogs aged.
    I’ve got a 10 year old chow chow mix and a 4 year old minature Australian Shepherd mix. They’re both fed a primarily raw diet with a small amount of quality dry food a few times a week.
    My 10 year old is already longer-lived than all of my childhood dogs and is my jogging buddy even at her age. She now has the oral health of a young adult and the joint health of a working dog. May I remind you once again that she is 10 years old.
    They are both bathed once a year, yet they somehow always smell like they were just bathed yesterday. And Shedding? nearly non-existent.

  • Krysha Ough-Mcmillin

    I feed 100% prey mode raw I dont feed my dogs kibble anymore. my dogs are much healthier now and I can honestly say all kibble is garbage even.top of the line ;) y’all can say what you want but do your research all dog food is filled with garbage and chemicals whether or not “all natural” is plastered on the lable.

  • Notfromthisplanet

    You sound very ignorant…..buy your business.

  • Notfromthisplanet

    Hi Hater & Molly’s Mom, I agree with you. Unfortunately I did find out that even premium food, Natural Balance, Diamond and etc….animals in the factory farms are used which contain anitibiotics, hormones, steroids and etc. I was devasted even though I paid a lot for premium food. Now I have no choice but to buy organic dog food that also contains no Gmos. That is my only safe option, unless I make it myself, which I don’t want to take that route.

  • Notfromthisplanet

    So has the cigarette industry and factory farms…..doesn’t mean that they are good.

  • Notfromthisplanet

    This food or any supermarket dog food should never be given to any loving pet……its a shame how much trash is in this food. I care a lot for my dogs to give them this poison. If you don’t feed yourself slaughterhouse poison, why give it to your best friend.

  • Notfromthisplanet

    if they are your babies, why would you feed “your babies” this nasty trashy products. Just wondering.

  • Stan Rawlinson

    Why are you talking like some little kid with the stupid street talk. If you have had dogs for 25 years you are not some little numbskull. But you are acting like one. Now either you are a Troll or you work for Pedigree. I reckon your a Troll

  • Stan Rawlinson

    I am talking about the review is factual and if you have not read the more the fool you. Pedigree is Shite