Search Results for 'hyperpigmentation'

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  • #131623

    In reply to: yeast infection

    anonymous
    Member

    https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/hyperpigmentation

    Quote “it appears to be blackish, reddish color and feels like a sticky texture”

    What you described sounds like it could be hyperpigmentation (not caused by food)
    The “sticky texture” sounds like skin infection may have set in.

    Below is an excerpt from: http://www.allergydogcentral.com/tag/hyperpigmentation/
    Some allergic dogs also have issues with dark, almost black patches appearing on their skin. This is known as hyperpigmentation, a condition in which patches of skin become darker in color than the normal surrounding skin. Hyperpigmentation is often combined with hair loss or balding.
    As with all allergy symptoms, if you see reddish discoloration or signs of hyperpigmentation, you should talk to your veterinarian. They should be able to help you to determine if your dog is indeed suffering from allergies, or if their skin condition is related to a different health issue.

    #103756
    anonymous
    Member

    Obviously your dog may have environmental allergies. Intradermal skin testing is the only accurate way to identify the allergens. I can’t believe your veterinary dermatologist hasn’t recommended this?
    Then you can identify the treatment options. Allergen specific immunotherapy (desensitization) subq or shots is the most natural treatment.
    There is no cure. Atopic dermatitis is a serious condition and requires lifelong treatment. It has nothing to do with the food.
    The skin discoloration you describe is hyperpigmentation, common in dogs with environmental allergies.

    There is no cheap way out of this, testing will run. close to $1000, maintenance will run a few hundred a year.
    There are no miracle cures for this condition.
    Use the search engine to see my posts, https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/environmental+allergies/
    Good luck

    #98118

    In reply to: New to Raw Food

    Erika I
    Member

    Thank you Anon101 for your help! I will try taking her into a veterinary dermatologist. I thought it was a major yeast infection but maybe it’s this hyperpigmentation. I was hoping the switch in foods would help but I think now it might be something she’s allergic to. Her itchiness and hair loss subsided for a month or so but now its back.

    #98117

    In reply to: New to Raw Food

    anonymous
    Member
    #98115

    In reply to: New to Raw Food

    anonymous
    Member

    It could be hyperpigmentation. A common symptom of environmental allergies which the other symptoms you mentioned in your first post indicate.
    Only further diagnostic testing, preferably by a veterinary dermatologist can answer your questions, as there are several other conditions that could cause this and should be ruled out.
    This condition went away after my dog starting allergen specific immunotherapy (desensitization). The discolored skin remains, which is normal. But, no hair loss.
    She now tolerates a variety of foods and requires no meds. The ASIT is a natural solution and lifelong treatment.

    #94792

    In reply to: Candida in dogs

    anonymous
    Member

    “Some of the skin around his tummy was all black!”

    Below is an excerpt from: http://www.allergydogcentral.com/tag/hyperpigmentation/

    Some allergic dogs also have issues with dark, almost black patches appearing on their skin.  This is known as hyperpigmentation, a condition in which patches of skin become darker in color than the normal surrounding skin. Hyperpigmentation is often combined with hair loss or balding.
    As with all allergy symptoms, if you see reddish discoloration or signs of hyperpigmentation, you should talk to your veterinarian.  They should be able to help you to determine if your dog is indeed suffering from allergies, or if their skin condition is related to a different health issue.

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