Flea & Tick Prevention

Dog Food Advisor Forums Diet and Health Flea & Tick Prevention

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  • #98385 Report Abuse

    Amanda D
    Member

    I’m taking full advantage of the “Health” portion of of this board lol Anyways I’m getting a puppy in the summer and it will be my very first dog ever. What Flea and Tick prevention products do you guys recommend. I don’t have any experience with anything on the market.

    #98408 Report Abuse

    pitluv
    Member

    Hi Amanda-

    Asking on here you are going to get a wide range of opinions that will only make your choice more difficult. Once you get the puppy and find a vet that you trust, I would recommend asking them for advice on flea and tick prevention. Especially if you live somewhere that is heavily populated with fleas, ticks, mosquitos etc. They will know the area best and the statistics on how often people are getting fleas and dogs are coming up heartworm positive or positive for lyme from ticks.

    #98418 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Home Remedies That Will Not Get Rid of Fleas and Ticks — and May Hurt Your Pet
    By Laura Cross | July 18, 2016
    Do a quick Internet search on natural ways to prevent fleas and ticks and you’ll come up with thousands of links. You could spend all day researching these home remedies. The problem: As much as we love using natural solutions when they work, many simply aren’t effective at controlling parasites. In some cases these ‘remedies’ can cause more harm than good for your pet.
    So before you add chopped up garlic to your animal’s food or bathe her in essential oils, check out our quick list of home remedies to avoid.
    Parasite Prevention and Removal Remedies That Don’t Work
    Bad Idea: Putting Garlic in Pet Food
    Even though a lot of people think this a safe and effective way to prevent fleas, there’s no scientific evidence that garlic — whether it’s fresh from the bulb, powdered or in a supplement — can keep the parasites at bay. Even worse, garlic can be toxic to pets. Garlic contains substances that damage red blood cells in dogs in cats, potentially leading to life-threatening anemia if ingested in large quantities.
    Bad Idea: Dipping Pet in Motor Oil, Bleach, Vinegar or Turpentine
    Bathing your dog or cat in motor oil, bleach or turpentine is dangerous way to attempt to get rid of fleas or ticks. Depending on the substance, it could cause serious health problems, chemical burns, even death. Vinegar, while it may seem like the safer bet, also has its problems. According to the ASPCA Poison Control Center, ingesting undiluted vinegar can lead to vomiting, diarrhea, mouth irritation and pain.
    Bad Idea: Burning a Tick off with Lit Match
    Holding a lit match next to fur to remove a tiny parasite should set off alarm bells in your head. If anything, this tick-removal technique could set your poor pet on fire. You should also avoid freezing off a tick with an aerosol-based freezing gel, as you’re more likely to hurt your pet than help him.
    Bad Idea: Using Undiluted Essential Oils Directly on Your Pet
    Some essential oils, like citronella, may help repel parasites, but that doesn’t mean you should use them on your dog or cat. Essential oils can be toxic to pets at certain concentrations, and these substances can be inhaled, absorbed through the skin or licked by your pet. Some natural flea and tick pet shampoos may contain essential oils, but because the oils are diluted with other ingredients, they are more likely to be safe if used according to label directions.
    Bad Idea: Using Nail Polish and Petroleum Jelly to Kill Ticks
    It’s an old wives’ tale that nail polish is an effective way to remove ticks. Many people think painting over a tick with varnish or smothering it in petroleum jelly will drown and kill the tick. But it could cause the tick to salivate or regurgitate into the bite wound, increasing the risk of infection. So keep nail polish on fingernails — not on your dog or cat.
    The Best Ways to Prevent Parasites
    Want to know what will work for you dog or cat? Talk with your veterinarian who can recommend safe parasite-control products that are effective for the parasites in your area. Then make sure you use them as directed.
    http://www.vetstreet.com/our-pet-experts/home-remedies-that-will-not-get-rid-of-fleas-and-ticks-and-may-hurt-your-pet

    #98451 Report Abuse

    Amanda D
    Member

    Okay maybe I should have led with what brands should I stay away from? Or maybe what method works best, pill, topical or collar… hoping you’ll say collars suck because #1 they’re hideous and #2 they stink! Lol

    • This reply was modified 2 months, 1 week ago by  Amanda D. Reason: Added Method Question
    #98454 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Again, it depends on your pet, the area you live in and the level of risk involved.
    These are things you should discuss with a veterinarian when you bring your new pup in for it’s first vet visit which is recommended within 2 weeks of bringing him home.
    You should not accept a puppy that is less than 10 weeks old. You should not apply or give a puppy any preventatives without consulting a vet first.
    Ps: Collars are effective as tick control for some dogs. Again, discuss with a veterinarian and come up with an option you are comfortable with.
    No one should recommend specific products for you. Different products are best for different dogs.

    “Want to know what will work for you dog or cat? Talk with your veterinarian who can recommend safe parasite-control products that are effective for the parasites in your area. Then make sure you use them as directed.”

    #98459 Report Abuse

    Acroyali
    Member

    Amanda, where are you purchasing your puppy from? If you’re going with a breeder, he or she might be able to help you choose a program that has worked well for their dogs until you find a vet you feel comfortable with.

    #98462 Report Abuse

    pitluv
    Member

    Yup Anon and Acroyali are correct. If you are getting from a quality breeder, they are more than happy to help you with questions about caring for a new puppy. Your vet (when you find one) and your puppies breeder (if he/she is reputable) should be your go to people for these kinds of questions.

    #98510 Report Abuse

    Amanda D
    Member

    The breeder is across the state near across from a state park, very wooded, I’mean in town. I already have a vet that I take my cats to. I was thinking of using K9 Advantix II but a friend of mine said they use it, and that you have to quarantine your dog from the cats for 24 hours every month. I called my vet because I don’t want to have to do that. I can’t remember the name of it, but they have a pill given every 3 months that is $48. I’mean going to go that route. Thank you everyone for your help!

    #98512 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Yes, some flea/tick products are toxic, lethal to cats

    Please, do not give anything to your pup until you have the dog examined by a vet.
    There is a lot of incorrect information on the internet

    Wake up. Listen to a veterinarian that has examined your dog.

    #98519 Report Abuse

    InkedMarie
    Member

    I use more natural methods: Bug Off garlic sprinkled in their food. They wear natural flea/tick collars from HoliticFamilyandPets dot com. I use Wondercide on the lawn & spray it on them if we go to areas where ticks will be. I’ve had great luck with this. Others claim natural methods don’t work but since they work for us, that is all that is important to me. Good luck!

    #98568 Report Abuse

    pitluv
    Member

    The product your vet is refering to is called Bravecto. I use it on both my dogs. I really like the product. It is one of the only ones that my pitbull who is predisposed to seizures can have that will not lower the seizure threshold.

    #98581 Report Abuse

    Amanda D
    Member

    @Anon101…. I said I spoke with my vet and that I was going to with what they have. Why are you telling me to “Wake Up?” That is kind of rude. 🙁

    @inkedmarie I want to spray my lawn with a anti-dandelion spray, you only apply it just before and dandelion season, but I need to run it by my vet, with as tiny of a lawn we do have, we get carpeted with them. I’mean taking my cats in this week for nail clippings so I’ll ask then.

    @pitluv Yup Bravecto was the one 🙂

    #98582 Report Abuse

    pitluv
    Member

    Not Marie, but we don’t treat our yard. Our dogs occasionally graze on the grass so all we use is diatomaceous earth for fleas and ticks. As far as weeds go, we just mow the grass a lot as short as we can get it. I saw a new product advertised on TV that you drop on the weeds themselves and it kills them without touching your grass. Can’t remember the name though…

    #98583 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Sorry, it was not my intention to be rude. Best of luck with your new pup. Sincerely.

    Also I find keeping the lawn mowed low (once a week) and clear of all weeds/brush helpful.
    Ticks don’t like bright sunlight. They like tall grass, shade, leaf beds/debris

    • This reply was modified 2 months, 1 week ago by  anon101.
    #98584 Report Abuse

    Amanda D
    Member

    We can mow one day and the damn things are back the next, I like them in empty fields but not on my lawn lol

    #98585 Report Abuse

    Amanda D
    Member

    @Anon101, thank you, I’m sorry if I miss interpreted your post, I mean autistic and sometimes don’t get the intended meaning behind a post.

    #98587 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Another thing I do is check the dog from head to toe at bedtime for ticks. Make it a routine. Learn how to remove a tick with tweezers when you find one.
    You may want to gently start brushing the pups teeth once a day too.
    I’m excited for you. There is nothing cuter than a puppy! Imo

    #98590 Report Abuse

    Amanda D
    Member

    I seen on Youtube something called a Tick Key that I want to check out as for teeth brushing, if I give raw meaty bones do I stil have to brush his or her teeth and you recommend a dog tooth brush or a finger brush?

    #98598 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    I use a toothbrush and Petrodex toothpaste. I get the toothpaste at chewy dot com.
    I never give my dogs bones, they don’t clean in the back where the tartar tends to build up, I don’t consider them worth the risk of broken teeth and intestinal blockage.
    Ask your vet. Hope these articles help.
    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2010/04/give-a-dog-a-bone-not-fda-warns-of-dangers-of-feeding-bones-to-dogs/comment-page-1/

    http://www.embracepetinsurance.com/blog/harmful-side-animal-sourced-dog-chews

    For tick removal I use this item, or any tweezers will do.
    https://tickease.com/

    #98599 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    It might be a good idea if you make a list of questions to present to your vet during your puppy’s first visit. I know I often forget something I wanted to ask.
    Often they will give you a new puppy kit that should have the answers to your questions.

    As Pitluv mentioned in a previous response to you, asking these type of questions on the internet will provide you with differing opinions.
    Those with homeopathic beliefs will tell you one thing. Those of us that believe in science based veterinary medicine will tell you another. Often totally different viewpoints, opinions, facts…..and yes, sometimes misinformation. Then what?

    I have found it beneficial to have one veterinary clinic where they know me and my pets.
    And I value their advice and guidance.

    #98601 Report Abuse

    pitluv
    Member

    Regarding bones: Bones alone are not enough for an effective oral hygiene regime. They clean the crowns, but can not reach the subgingival space that periodontal disease starts the way a toothbrush can. Clean crowns look pretty, but are not an indicator of oral health.

    Also small breed dogs are more notorious for bad teeth, so like Anon was saying it’s important to teach them about the brush and start them on a brushing routine early. I use a human tooth brush on my big guys. For a small dog you will probably want a baby tooth brush.

    Let me add too that I recently spent some time doing a clinical rotation through an emergency clinic for pets and after hearing the surgeons talk about all of the things they have removed from dogs stomachs, I hesitate to give my dogs much of anything to chew on. That being said, I know my dogs chewing habits well and how they will eat anything.

    #98602 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Raw carrots are good to chew on! Not the baby ones though, choking hazard if they try to swallow them whole. Make sure the puppy slowly works/nibbles on it. A cold carrot will be soothing to the gums too, as the teething process will start soon 🙂

    #98603 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    You’ve got me going now! I have to say it. Puppy proof your home, they get into everything, and I mean everything 🙁
    Be careful with those plastic toys, don’t leave a puppy alone with them, they tear them apart and try to eat them!
    Make sure you know where the nearest emergency 24/7 veterinary clinic is located and have the number on your fridg. I hope you never have to go there….but

    Ps: Forgive me if you know this already, all dogs LOVE to eat cat feces, so you may have to take a look at where litter boxes are placed.
    Have you considered pet health insurance for your pup? Might be worth looking into where this your first dog, add that to the questions for your vet.

    #98641 Report Abuse

    InkedMarie
    Member

    I agree with Anon about puppy proofing! Our youngest dog was around a year old or so when he ate a rock. Thank God, it came out but if it hadn’t, he’d have had to have surgery.

    I also agree about knowing the number of the ER vets. I was just at ours last weekend

    #98642 Report Abuse

    Acroyali
    Member

    Agreed with tooth brushing, especially on smaller dogs. Many toy and small breeds don’t possess a strong root structure so chewing alone usually doesn’t do it for them! Mine (big and small) get their teeth brushed with coconut oil because they like it so well. The little guys get their teeth done 5-6 days a week and the big guys 1-2 times a week. Like Pitlove, my big guys have human toothbrushes and my little dogs have brushes meant for young toddlers. (Small dogs are currently using a Super Mario Brothers brush, their last one was a Hello Kitty brush that lit up, LOL). It’s become second nature. It’s not a chore anymore. It’s just something we do now, and it takes minutes a day (for several dogs) and the benefits are so well worth it. I’ve used finger toothbrushes before but I didn’t feel they did as good of a job as a regular brush.

    Even having done so since babyhood one of our smaller dogs is losing his small front teeth. He has a poor bite and a poor root structure, and while the rest of his teeth appear clean and strong, those little front ones are loosening up. He’s a middle aged dog.

    Anon raises an excellent point about keeping an emergency vet number on your fridge. Or even program it into your cell. In all my years of pet ownership I’ve only had to use the emergency hospital a few times but each time I needed it I was glad it was readily available and I didn’t have to waste time locating the number, especially while in a bit of a panicked state. Better safe than sorry!

    I do give recreational raw chew bones, provided they are BIG and the dog in question cannot get his jaws around the bone part to bite down (no femurs in this house.) Some of our dogs are such aggressive chewers that I am hesitant to offer these, so they get stuffed (black) Kongs full of goodies. The dogs that settle down and chew at a slower pace are OK, but I never ever leave them unsupervised in case someone manages to break off a piece that could be swallowed or manages to chew off enough strappy stuff that they could chew the bone part enough to break teeth. I don’t care for smoked bones or any bones that come from the pet store, JMO. It really depends on your comfort level, your dogs chewing style, and your ability to keep an eye on them while they chew. Many people swear bully sticks are good for teeth, so that might be something to look into as well!

    #98644 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    @ Inked Marie
    “I also agree about knowing the number of the ER vets. I was just at ours last weekend”

    What happened? This stuff always happens on the weekend, in the middle of the night, or on holidays.
    Hope your dogs are okay.

    #98646 Report Abuse

    InkedMarie
    Member

    It was Boone…my oldest (11) and my avatar pic. Thursday night, I noticed him limping. Left a note for my husband who was at work thst night but off Friday. Still a limp Friday but not that bad. Saturday he was really limping and when I touched his left front paw, he yelped. Our vet was open til 4pm but was booked until tonight! Took him to the ER vets. She didn’t feel a break so didnt x-ray. Thought soft tissue, did bloodwork (said you’d never know he was 11!), sent him home with an NSAID & Rimadyl. By Monday morning, he was back to his usual self!

    He & Ginger go to the vets tomorrow for exams etc and I’m glad he’s normal. Well, as normal as a pbgv can be LOL. Thanks for asking!

    #98647 Report Abuse

    Amanda D
    Member

    @Anon101 Do I need to use puppy formula for the toothpaste or can I use the regular formula? I’ll start a questions list on my Evernote. We’ve always got large carrots in the house so I’ve got that covered, but Im glad you mentioned avoiding baby carrots because that was what I was originally planned on giving as a healthy treat.

    Oh I know all about puppy proofing, I babysit for a family that has a 2 yr old German Short-haired Pointer, they always leave crap out and then I have to chase Cinnamon down to get stuff away from her. Going through Cinnamons
    puppy stage has made we know everything I want to avoid and do right lol

    I’ve got a play yard that will let me cordon off an area in our living room with the crate so the puppy has a safe place to have independent play time. I’ll keep that up for a while until I feel confident thathat puppy will be safe in the larger area that will still have a couple baby gates up to keep puppy from the kitchen and my room that leads into my bathroom where the litter box is.

    What plastic toys are you talking about, Nylabones? So fare I’ve only bout Stuffies/Luvies, rope toys and the Nylabone Puppy kit that includes 3 bones for different puppy stages. Puppy will only get the Stuffies when I have eyes on him/her, my friends border collie thinks it’s great fun to pull the stuffing out of them, she doesn’t eat it, just leave stuffing guts all over! Lol

    We have an Animal ER that opens just after my vet closes that is open until noon Ishave the next morning. So I have that covered.

    I am planning on getting insurance, I’m just not sure which one to go with, I need to compare companies and plans still.

    @acroyali the only bones I was planning on giving it giving are poultry necks, backs, feet, and maybe legs, but no turkey legs. I would never leave puppy alone with raw bones or meat, I’mean planning on crating to help with easy supervision and it’ll be more sanitary and easier to wipe down the crate pan then maybe having puppy drag raw meat ND bone around my living room! Lol

    For the clean up would Clorox wipes be safe as long as puppy is out of the crate until the Clorox evaporates?

    • This reply was modified 2 months, 1 week ago by  Amanda D.
    #98650 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    @Inked Marie
    Glad he is okay.

    My little one had a dental extraction a few days ago, one bad tooth way in the back. Due to the daily brushings I do, a full dental cleaning was not indicated.
    However, next time I will ask for x-rays, as periodontal disease can show up at any time, especially with a senior.
    She’s on antibiotics for a few days, prn rimadyl for 3 days. So far so good.

    #98651 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    I think regular dog toothpaste would be okay, you only need to use a small amount.
    Regarding the toys, I am thinking of those things with stuffing and metal squeakers etc.
    Just saying, be careful, some dogs consume this stuff and that could cause an intestinal blockage.
    Rope toys included. They shred the material and swallow it.
    Ps: the initial dental brushings are just to get the pup comfortable with it, the baby teeth are going to fall out in a few months and be replaced with adult teeth.

    #98656 Report Abuse

    pitluv
    Member

    Marie-

    Glad to hear Boone is ok! Max is my first “senior” that I’ve been responsible for the care of, so I’m learning a lot from him. Boone is lucky to have such observant parents!

    #98658 Report Abuse

    InkedMarie
    Member

    Anon: glad your pup is ok after the extraction. Ginger had one extracted last year.

    Boone has horrible teeth. he hates brushing but we try. Bones don’t so much for him. He’s going to need a dental but X-rays are always done as well as bloodwork.

    #98659 Report Abuse

    InkedMarie
    Member

    Pitluv: Fortunately, I suppose, I have too much experience with senior dogs! Boone’s the oldest we’ve had from puppyhood….little poophead that I want for another four healthy years.

    I’m way too observant. Steve knows if i say something is wrong, it usually is. Gove max a smooch!

    #98660 Report Abuse

    pitluv
    Member

    Thankfully Max is pretty easy as it goes health wise. Aside from the 5lbs he needs to lose and possible arthritis on his spine he is healthy as an ox. I’m scared for Bentley as a senior. He’s already had such a rough (almost) 3 years. Dani, my cat, is a dream. Once we realized she couldn’t eat beef it was easy going.

    Hope Boone and Ginger have good checkups tomorrow!

    #98661 Report Abuse

    InkedMarie
    Member

    Thanks, PitLuv. Outside of Boone’s allergies, he’s been pretty easy & healthy. Ginger will be 7 in July and she’s easy too.

    #99569 Report Abuse

    Michael M
    Member

    I’m a big proponent of diatomaceous earth since it’s nontoxic. Also, if you live in a humid area (like I do) then a dehumidifier is a great purchase because fleas require a certain amount of humidity to live and actually hatch from eggs. A dehumidifier is just good in general if you live in a humid area, so it’s a double win!

    This article goes into some other interesting options like pennyroyal plants as a sort of flea repellant. It lso suggests trimming outside areas that could foster fleas. https://happypetlabs.com/blogs/happy-pet-tips/how-to-get-rid-of-fleas-on-a-dog-fast

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