Retriever Dog Food (Dry)

Share

Rating: ★☆☆☆☆

Retriever Dog Food receives the Advisor’s lowest rating of 1 star.

The Retriever product line includes five dry dog foods. However, since we’re unable to locate AAFCO nutritional adequacy statements for these dog foods on the product’s web page, it’s impossible for us to report specific life stage recommendations for these recipes.

The following is a list of recipes available at the time of this review.

  • Retriever Hi Protein
  • Retriever Mini Chunk
  • Retriever Gravy Blend
  • Retriever Puppy Blend
  • Retriever Bites and Bones

Retriever Hi Protein was selected to represent the other products in the line for this review.

Retriever Hi Protein

Dry Dog Food

Estimated Dry Matter Nutrient Content

Protein = 31% | Fat = 17% | Carbs = 44%

Ingredients: Meat and bone meal, ground yellow corn, wheat middlings, ground wheat, soybean meal, animal fat (preserved with BHA and citric acid), corn gluten meal, animal digest, salt, potassium chloride, choline chloride, zinc sulfate, vitamin E supplement, ferrous sulfate, color added (red #40, yellow #5, blue #2), l-lysine, zinc oxide, niacin, copper sulfate, vitamin A supplement, biotin, manganous oxide, calcium pantothenate, vitamin B12 supplement, thiamine mononitrate, pyridoxine hydrochloride, menadione sodium bisulfite complex (source of vitamin K activity), riboflavin supplement, sodium selenite, calcium iodate, folic acid, vitamin D3 supplement, cobalt carbonate

Fiber (estimated dry matter content) = 4.5%

Red items when present indicate controversial ingredients

Estimated Nutrient Content
MethodProteinFatCarbs
Guaranteed Analysis27%15%NA
Dry Matter Basis31%17%44%
Calorie Weighted Basis26%36%38%

The first ingredient in this dog food is meat and bone meal, a dry “rendered product from mammal tissues, including bone, exclusive of blood, hair, hoof, horn, hide trimmings, manure, stomach and rumen contents”.1

Meat and bone meal can have a lower digestibility than most other meat meals.

Scientists believe this decreased absorption may be due to the ingredient’s higher ash and lower essential amino acid content.2

What’s worse, this particular item is anonymous. It doesn’t even specify the source animal.

Even though meat and bone meals are still considered protein-rich meat concentrates, we do not consider a generic ingredient like this a quality item.

The second ingredient is corn. Corn is an inexpensive and controversial cereal grain. And aside from its energy content, this grain is of only modest nutritional value to a dog.

For this reason, we do not consider corn a preferred component in any dog food.

The third ingredient is wheat middlings, commonly known as “wheat mill run”. Though it may sound wholesome, wheat mill run is actually an inexpensive by-product of cereal grain processing.

In reality, wheat middlings are nothing more than milling dust and floor sweepings — and an ingredient more typically found in the lower quality pet foods.

The fourth ingredient is wheat. Wheat is another cereal grain and subject to the same issues as corn (previously discussed).

The fifth ingredient is soybean meal. Soybean meal is relatively useful by-product — what remains of soybeans after all the oil has been removed.

Although soybean meal contains 48% protein, this ingredient would be expected to have a lower biological value than meat.

And less costly plant-based products like this can notably boost the total protein reported on the label — a factor that must be considered when judging the actual meat content of this dog food.

The sixth ingredient includes animal fat. Animal fat is a generic by-product of rendering, the same high-temperature process used to make meat meals.

Since there’s no mention of a specific animal, this item could come from almost anywhere: restaurant grease, slaughterhouse waste, diseased cattle — even (although unlikely) euthanized pets.

We do not consider generic animal fat a quality ingredient.

What’s worse, this fat is preserved with BHA, a suspected cancer-causing agent.

The seventh ingredient is corn gluten meal. Gluten is the rubbery residue remaining once corn has had most of its starchy carbohydrate washed out of it.

Although corn gluten meal contains 60% protein, this ingredient would be expected to have a lower biological value than meat.

And less costly plant-based products like this can notably boost the total protein reported on the label — a factor that must be considered when judging the actual meat content of this dog food.

The eighth ingredient is animal digest. Animal digest is a chemically hydrolyzed mixture of animal by-products that is usually sprayed onto the surface of a dry kibble to improve its taste.

From here, the list goes on to include a number of other items.

But to be realistic, ingredients located this far down the list (other than nutritional supplements) are not likely to affect the overall rating of this product.

With four notable exceptions

First, we’re always disappointed to find artificial coloring in any pet food. That’s because coloring is used to make the product more appealing to humans — not your dog. After all, do you really think your dog cares what color his kibble is?

Next, we find no mention of probiotics, friendly bacteria applied to the surface of the kibble after processing to help with digestion.

In addition, the minerals listed here do not appear to be chelated. And that can make them more difficult to absorb. Non-chelated minerals are usually associated with lower quality dog foods.

And lastly, this food contains menadione, a controversial form of vitamin K linked to liver toxicity, allergies and the abnormal break-down of red blood cells.

Since vitamin K isn’t required by AAFCO in either of its dog food nutrient profiles, we question the use of this substance in any canine formulation.

Retriever Dog Food
The Bottom Line

Judging by its ingredients alone, Retriever Dog Food looks like a below-average dry product.

But ingredient quality by itself cannot tell the whole story. We still need to estimate the product’s meat content before determining a final rating.

The dashboard displays a dry matter protein reading of 31%, a fat level of 17% and estimated carbohydrates of about 44%.

As a group, the brand features an average protein content of 27% and a mean fat level of 12%. Together, these figures suggest a carbohydrate content of 53% for the overall product line.

And a fat-to-protein ratio of about 46%.

Near-average protein. Below-average fat. And above-average carbs when compared to a typical dry dog food.

When you consider the protein-boosting effect of the soybean and corn gluten meals, this looks like the profile of a kibble containing a modest amount of meat.

Bottom line?

Retriever Dog Food is a plant-based kibble using a modest amount of chicken by-product or meat and bone meals as its main sources of animal protein, thus earning the brand 1 star.

Not recommended.

Special Alert

Rice ingredients can sometimes contain arsenic. Until the US FDA establishes safe upper levels for arsenic content, pet owners may wish to limit the total amount of rice fed in a dog's daily diet.

A Final Word

The descriptions and analyses expressed in this and every article on this website represent the views and opinions of the author.

Although it's our goal to ensure all the information on this website is correct, we cannot guarantee its completeness or its accuracy; nor can we commit to ensuring all the material is kept up-to-date on a daily basis.

Each review is offered in good faith and has been designed to help you make a more informed decision when buying dog food.

However, due to the biological uniqueness of every animal, none of our ratings are intended to suggest feeding a particular product will result in a specific dietary response or health benefit for your pet.

For a better understanding of how we analyze each product, please read our article, "The Problem with Dog Food Reviews".

Remember, no dog food can possibly be appropriate for every life stage, lifestyle or health condition. So, choose wisely. And when in doubt, consult a qualified veterinary professional for help.

In closing, we do not accept money, gifts or samples from pet food companies in exchange for special consideration in the preparation of our reviews or ratings.

To learn how we support the cost of operating this website, please visit our public Disclosure and Disclaimer page.

Have an opinion about this dog food? Or maybe the review itself? Please know we welcome your comments.

Notes and Updates

06/28/2014 Last Update

  1. Association of American Feed Control Officials, 2008 Edition
  2. Shirley RB and Parsons CM, Effect of Ash Content on Protein Quality of Meat and Bone Meal, Department of Animal Sciences, University of Illinois, Poultry Science, 2001 80: 626-632
  • Donna

    I have 2 puppies eating these dog biscuits and they are itching like crazy. The vet cannot find anything wrong. They do not have fleas, they have been on an antibiotic and have been treated for both kinds of mites even though the scrapings did not show any. It may be these dog biscuits. How do you know the formula has changed?

  • Katie

    Ugh, when my mother told my vet that this is what she feeds her dogs (I feed my pup separately) he said “oh thats the good stuff” and no matter what I say, she remains convinced that this food is really good. It helps, I’m sure, that it is so cheap ~$20 for a 50 pound bag.

  • LabsRawesome

    No it’s not. Check the ingredients.

  • kfoste

    Yes and most of the others they all start with corn!

  • Jana Maria Shaw Church

    Its better than ol Roy!

  • LabsRawesome

    Hi kfoster. Yes I know that kibbles & bits is a horrible food. My dogs eat Victor grain free kibble, 5 star canned foods, fresh meat, eggs, and some veggies..

  • kfoste

    Don’t listen to this crap you are doing the best you can…Some people dump them or kill them or just abuse them. You are going fine if you can just add a cooked egg or a bit of pre seasoned meat or fish oil that issssss good and not toxic when you can and be happy with your dogs.

  • kfoste

    None of your business is it I am sure the dogs would like to live.

  • kfoste

    Kibbles and bits are not a good food either.

  • kfoste

    Not as low as some of the more expensive dog foods you get at walmart and other places.

  • kfoste

    Cooked eggs and unseasoned meats wild game is best if you get a deer ect use all of the leftover on your dogs.

  • kfoste

    We have had a 10 year old border collie on h pro all his life he is still in good shape but we ad a little meat on top 3 times a week before it is seasoned

  • kfoste

    all we have to do is read the bag

  • Michael Mantion

    I am well versed in Psoriatic Arthritis. “chemicals or preservative” are not the cause. Carry on..

  • Shawna

    Rheumatoid arthritis has been linked, in some, to lectin protein in nightshade plants and gluten grains. This research article did find some correlation between wheat and psoriatic arthritis. “IgA antibodies to gliadin and coeliac disease in psoriatic arthritis” http://rheumatology.oxfordjournals.org/content/41/1/31.full

  • Michael Mantion

    Hi Kathy I have never heard of traditional border collies having an 18-20 year life span. also Psoriatic Arthritis is believed to be caused by rashes which are not related to “chemicals or preservatives” You may want to find a better source of information. Its heart breaking to see a dog in pain and unable to move. Your pup is very smart and will easily be able to learn how to use a scooter. Your best bet is just to get her up and moving and to treat the pain as best you can.

  • rebecmort

    My dogs are sensitive to dyes, preservative and fillers
    …I have used Retriever Dog Biscuits (the previous recipe) the past 2 years BUT …There has been a recent change in the Biscuit formula … I will no longer buy this product. All my dogs are itching from whatever it has in it now !

  • BoxerChick

    Mini Chunks at my local store is 21.99 for 50 lb bag .. the bites and bones and hi protein are about the same price ..

  • BoxerChick

    Funny .. I work for TSC .. and this Retriever Mini Chunks is our biggest seller .. I was told by a customer the other day that this dog food was a 4 star food , “Really , how can that be when it is full of corn and fillers, no nutritional value at all ?” I asked her .. LOL

  • InkedMarie

    Wow, that has to be the cheapest food I’ve heard of

  • Pattyvaughn

    You definitely can’t expect to get good anything for 30 cents a pound. I hope that’s a typo, not that paying more would make this food good, but YIKES! that’s bad.

  • Annie

    Retriever dog food is $9.99 for 31.1 lbs at tsc. I was just looking online at their foods.

  • Hound Dog Mom

    Sorry for your loss. Milo’s chicken jerky treats were recalled earlier this year for containing illegal antibiotic residue. Not sure if there would be any connection.

  • Cyndi

    So very sorry for your loss! Her cause of death could very well have been from Beneful. You should post your story on the Beneful review page also.

  • abbypatch

    We just lost our black lab baby, Abby, last week, age 7 years, because of “acute” kidney failure. I doubt it was acute as she seemed to drink too much water and urinate too much (not often). In hindsight, she would greet us if we went somewhere without her and be happy to see us, but in the past 2 months, she didn’t. She just laid on her bed and got up only when we came in the house.

    Her diet was dry food (usually Beneful) with a half cup of wet (a yellow can-can’t remember brand), and half cup of human veggies. In the morning and after the evening meal, she would get a Retriever biscuit.

    We noted, too late now, that none of the foods we fed her do not tell you WHERE the food was made; just stating “Product of….” with the exception of Milo’s Dog Treats which state “Made in USA.” Milo’s was a special treat we gave her when we had to leave the house for a few hours.

    We are devastated over the loss of our baby but want to know if we can find out where all these products are made. If not, I want to fight to make this info known so no one else has to go through this heartbreak. We feel that some of these products are made in China and if so, needs to be known so people can decide what they want to feed their pets. Anyone know where we can get that info?

  • Shawna

    You bet :)

    I found some info on what I was talking about with glucosamine and lectins on Green Med Info .com website.. I REALLY do think it will help even if it is not the direct cause.

    “One way to gauge just how pervasive the adverse effects of these foods are among Western populations is the popularity of the dietary supplement glucosamine. In the USA, a quarter billion dollars’ worth of glucosamine is sold annually. The main source of glucosamine on the market is from the N-Acetylglucosamine rich chitin exoskelotons of crustaceans, like shrimp and crab. Glucosamine is used for reducing pain and inflammation. We do not have a dietary deficiency of the pulverized shells of dead sea critters, just as our use of NSAIDs is not caused by a deficiency of these synthetic chemicals in our diet. When we consume glucosamine supplements, the chitin-binding lectins in our foods, instead of binding to our tissues, bind to the pulverized chitin in the glucosamine supplements, sparing us from their full impact. Many millions of Americans who have greatly reduced their pain and suffering by ingesting glucosamine and NSAIDs may be better served by removing chitin-binding lectin containing foods (the underlying cause of their malaise) from their diets. This would result in even greater relief from pain and inflammation along with far less dependency on palliative supplements and medicines alike.”
    http://www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/rice-potato-tomato-may-be-inflammatory-wheat

  • Pattyvaughn

    Small fish are the way to go. They have shorter lives and don’t have as much time to build up toxins in their bodies. And they haven’t been eating the already toxic other fish.

  • Kathy Kruch

    I think I would believe that. I have an allergy to MSG and I know its there when I eat something within 10 minutes. Our Food and Drug administration…. sucks!

  • Kathy Kruch

    Thank You Shawna,
    I just fed her the 4-Health dog food and mix a little of the old food with it. She picked out the new food and left the old. Border Collies are so smart. I have used Glucosamine before with an older dog I had several years ago…It was a miracle worker. Thanks for all the info.
    Kathy

  • Pattyvaughn

    Dry dog food is very processed and processed foods aren’t healthy. The trick is finding the least processed that works for your dog. And you wouldn’t believe how many ways MSG can be hidden in dog food.

  • Shawna

    They actually put products with hidden MSG in dog foods as well — ingredients like “natural and/or artificial flavoring and animal digest” are two examples of ingredients with hidden MSG.. :(

  • Shawna

    No, tuna is high in mercury unless buying certified mercury free — which is VERY pricey… :(

    Sardines are at the bottom of the food chain and as such do not accumulate mercury like larger, longer living fish do.

  • Kathy Kruch

    Now I am wondering how safe canned fish is? Would tuna work? Maybe its time to get the ol’ fishing pole out. :P

  • Shawna

    Hi Kathy – Sammie is beautiful!!

    Like some of the others said, I too would at least temporarily avoid foods with grains and potato. Potato, a “nightshade plant”, is known to exacerbate (and even cause) arthritis in susceptible individuals. There is a protein in nightshade plants, called a lectin, that binds with sugars in the body, like glucosamine, and prevent them from being used by the body. Glucosamine is important for joint health.. Google nightshade plants arthritis for more info if interested.

    Food intolerances can also trigger arthritic flare ups. Wheat, soy, corn and some others are ones to watch for. I am intolerant of dairy and had migrating joint issues as well as was diagnosed with carpel tunnel and tendonitis when in fact the inflammation and pain was due to the dairy intolerance. It may not be a cause of Sammie’s arthritis but it could very likely be a contributing factor.

    High quality, organic eggs from free ranging chickens are another good source of omega 3 fatty acids. Sammie may like those better than the fish oil? The whites can be lightly cooked but the yolk must be fed raw as heat damages the omega 3 fat. Tinned sardines are another good source and may be more palatable than the fish oil supplement.

    In addition to what ever pain/arthritis meds Sammie is on, you might want to consider (or research) using anti-inflammatory supplements/foods. Bromelain, as an example, is a digestive enzyme that is found in fresh unprocessed pineapple and in supplement form. Fed away from meals or the fruit, bromelain gets into the system and helps with inflammation. Turmeric, the spice found in every grocery store, is also very anti-inflammatory. It is best to always buy organic spices as non-organic can be irradiated which kills all the benefits of the product.

    Black cherry juice is well known for helping with arthritis pain. Research has demonstrated that it can be more effective than certain medications in fact. Not sure how easy it would be to get Sammie to consume black cherry juice but eating the cherry should have some benefit, if she will??

    Best of luck in finding something that brings her relief!!!! I think your headed in the right direction with the food change etc!!!!

  • Kathy Kruch

    I believe its the same for people food. We should always check ingredients. Things like chemical preservatives and MSG…what is that all about

  • Pattyvaughn

    That is exactly where we all started. Dog food companies lie and tell you how great their food is and we believe them, until something happens.

  • Pattyvaughn

    Sadines come in smaller cans. Or you can feed a whole meal of oily fish once a week.

  • Kathy Kruch

    I will look it up, I bought a bag of 4 health to try I have to see what would be the best for her Sammie is a special dog. She works with children and seniors…I am just so upset that I stayed in the dark about dog food so long. :(

  • Kathy Kruch

    Thank you I will research it.

  • Kathy Kruch

    She has an omega 3 chewable supplement…but does not like it. I bought a small bag of 4health to try out. Right now I am looking at a number of brands. When I had huskies I would feed them canned salmon or mackerel and mix it with their food. but now I only have Sammie who doesn’t eat as much and the fish would spoil.

  • InkedMarie

    oh and please stick around!

  • InkedMarie

    What a beautiful girl! I suggest a grainfree food for sure. Ive never priced Retriever dog food, I’m assuming it’s pretty cheap so I won’t recommend the usual foods but agree with the NutriSource recommendation. Good food at a good price.

    I actually think a grain and white potato free food would be better. I have arthritis and have been recommended to cut out white potatoes whenever possible. If you go to our forums, go to Dog Food Ingredients and look at the stickie of those foods. There are a couple that aren’t break the bank foods.

    Are you giving her any fish oil? I do suggest that. I also suggest a good supplement. Look at www dot Swanson Vitamins dot com. Type in Mobility Essentials. It’s a human supplement, very good. Hound Dog Mom can help with dosing of that.

  • Betsy Greer

    Aww, Kathy. I’m sorry about Sammie also. Those are some soulful eyes she has. : )

    I would totally second Patty’s recommendation for the NutriSource adult chicken & rice as a stepping stone. It’s usually very well tolerated and would be a real step up in quality for her. It’s a good brand that you can trust. I’m on a rotation of NutriSource myself right now.

  • Pattyvaughn

    Oh, Sammie is beautiful. Poor Baby!! Do you have any ideas as to what you want to change her to? My suggestion would be to go grain and white potato free as these foods can be inflamatory. However, that would be a huge change for her, so you may want to change in stages. NutriSource has foods that are usually pretty easy to change to. Try something like their chicken and rice, then switch to their grain free, then look around for some other grain frees to try.

  • Kathy Kruch

    Hello, I have an 8 year old Traditional Border Collie, life expectancy is 18-20 years of age. I have been feeding her Retriever brand dry dog food since she was a pup. She was recently diagnosed with Psoriatic Arthritis which is caused from poor quality dog food laced with chemicals and preservatives. I am changing her dog food….just wish I would have checked it out before. Don’t be fooled research and check out these products.
    Kathy

  • KSRetrievers

    We have tried various feeds over times trying to find something suitable for both our Golden Retriever working dogs and our Standard Poodles which are more house dogs than field dogs. Tried a couple very expensive “natural” ” whole dog food brands for several months only to find them losing weight, having bad coats and constantly shedding and really bad gas. We switched to Purina One on the advice of our vet and then to after our dogs were becoming more and more picky about it, we switched to the hi protein Retriever brand. We have beautiful coats now, very energetic and all around what I feel are much healthier dogs. We are quite happy with what we feed now, and even raised a litter on Retriever puppy, supplementing with goats and cow milk to moisten the feed and have beautiful puppies that have grown in to really nice looking adults with no issues. Your review sounds biased to me.

  • disqus_geP2WUXiKs

    Right now any dog food is better than a recalled food whether its meat or corn

  • LabsRawesome

    Well she did say that they were being “spoiled” with Kibbles and Bits. Maybe she just doesn’t know any better? And with 7 she can’t afford K&B anymore. I agree, she should find homes for the pups, and get her adults fixed, there are organizations that offer free or reduced cost spay/neuter to people that are low income.

  • Kate

    Same here, I fed crap for years before I came on this site and learned better. She never said “I love them like crazy but this is the best I can do” or even “can someone suggest ways I can improve their diet on a budget?” That’s my problem. And I wish she’d seek help getting them all fixed so it doesn’t happen again.

  • LabsRawesome

    I can’t bash someone for doing the best they can. Growing up all of our dogs got fed low quality foods. We just didn’t know any better. They all lived to be pretty old, and they were loved, played with, and had a good life and home. Now that I know better, my dogs eat 5 star canned, fresh foods, and 4 star kibble. If something catastrophic happened and I couldn’t afford good food anymore, I would still keep my 2 dogs, and just do the best I could.

  • Kate

    Agree wholeheartedly except a) it sounds like she bred them and b) at least be honest with yourself that you’re feeding a LOW quality food.

  • LabsRawesome

    If this is all someone can afford, I would rather see a dog eat this, instead of giving them to a shelter. Most dogs in shelters, especially Pitbulls are put to sleep simply because no one wants them. If you can afford to, I would add some eggs and cheap meats to this dog food tho.

  • Pattyvaughn

    Consider owning less dogs so you can actually feed them something resembling food. I’m relatively certain you would not feed your family this poorly.

  • lilo’smom

    Look at the food you buy. The cheap stuff you buy (Fast Food) is very unhealthy for you. You should feed your dogs as good as you eat if not better. My thinking is, you can make informed decisions on what you eat. your dogs cannot. And i would think you would be smart enough to not eat fast food everyday.

  • InkedMarie

    Wow, from one poor food to another

  • Kate

    Or* !

  • Kate

    Joke of not, it makes me sick :(

  • JellyCat

    I hope this post is bad joke.

  • Megan

    I have 7 pitbulls who are alll family. I have fed this to the adults for over a year and they LOVE IT. They didn’t like it at first because they were being spoiled with Kibble’s and Bits with chunks of steak in it..but as the dog family grew bigger, we couldn’t afford it anymore. When the pups were born, it only took a month or so and they were into the big dogs Retriever Hi-proitien food. They didn’t want their Puppy Chow I was spending an arm and leg on. So we stopped buying it, and they’ve been on the Hi Protien food ever since.
    We have an acre backyard so they get to run off their energy all day after eating that food.
    It is about $23 for a 50 lb bag of Retriever Brand Hi-Protien where I live and that lasts about a week.

  • David

    I’ve tried all the “natural” brands and my Chocolate Lab would cut right through it with weight loss and a not so fabulous coat. Yes my pup is an amazing gun dog but also my companion. Reading this really upsets me as this is the only brand that works for her. I do use the Retriever Brand wet food as a supper meal and she grazes on the dry food as she pleases (bowl always full).

    I don’t know, I’m pretty sure I’ll continue with this and will continue to recommend it as its helped several friends pups after my recommendation.

  • Hound Dog Mom

    Hi Amy – I’m glad to hear your dogs are doing well on this food. Have you thought about trying 4Health? It’s also a Tractor Supply brand. It’s very reasonably priced considering the ingredients, they even have some new grain-free offerings. It might be worth a try. You may find that your dogs do even better.

  • beaglemom

    How can you possibly ignore the terrible ingredients??

  • Pattyvaughn

    If you’re talking about Purina, Pedigree, Ol Roy, Iams, and several others I could name, you are trading junk for junk.

  • Amy

    I was using other brands until speaking with someone about this line who was highly educated on Dog Food manufacturer and what products they equated this too. My 2 dogs are doing MUCH better after a month on this product, than they were on a few other national name brands. Happy Buyer

  • beaglemom

    have you read the ingredients?

  • jane

    I’ve fed my animals this food for about 9 years along with a raw diet when possible and they have not only thrived but are healthier then when on more expensive brands of foods. I also recommend it to puppy buyers as an affordable adult dog food.

  • lynn

    No matter the *ratings*, the INGREDIENTS DON’T LIE. “Garbage IN, Garbage OUT”…..eventually. Would you eat this stuff? Do the BEST for your pets and feed them a wholesome and human-grade food. Do your research.

  • judy

    I don’t get it ether….

  • judy

    there must be something in it to make our dogs do so good!

  • judy

    boy am I disappointed I recommend this to all my puppy buyers and have raised so many dogs on this with great digestibility…weight levels and over all good condition….wow, now what!,..The price even went up $3.00 for a 50 lb. bag.I usually get 3 every 2 weeks…..

  • http://www.facebook.com/bradley.duhon.7 Bradley Duhon

    I fed My Doberman (Blue> Known for skin Issues) Eukanuba north Atlantic and she was having problems with her coat on a budget we tried the retriever brand puppy food. and her health has never been better. We tried other brands that friends feed their Dobes but was still having problems. this is great dog food. and your ratings are off.

  • Nutlug88

    Your findings must be wrong, I have fed both my animals this brand for several years now, both are way healthier than they were on diamond. Their coats shine ( More protien ) I think you need some help in the review department