Fromm Gold Nutritionals (Dry)

Share

Rating: ★★★★☆

Fromm Gold Nutritionals Dog Food receives the Advisor’s second-highest tier rating of 4 stars.

The Fromm Gold Nutritionals product line includes seven dry dog foods, four claimed to meet AAFCO nutrient profiles for all life stages, one recipe for growth (Large Breed Puppy), and two recipes for adult maintenance.

The following is a list of recipes available at the time of this review.

  • Fromm Gold Nutritionals Adult
  • Fromm Gold Nutritionals Puppy (4.5 stars)
  • Fromm Gold Nutritionals Weight Management
  • Fromm Gold Nutritionals Small Breed Adult (4.5 stars)
  • Fromm Gold Nutritionals Large Breed Adult (3.5 stars)
  • Fromm Gold Nutritionals Large Breed Puppy (4.5 stars)
  • Fromm Gold Nutritionals Reduced Activity and Senior (3.5 stars)

Fromm Gold Nutritionals Adult was selected to represent the other products in the line for this review.

Fromm Gold Adult

Dry Dog Food

Estimated Dry Matter Nutrient Content

Protein = 27% | Fat = 18% | Carbs = 48%

Ingredients: Duck, chicken meal, chicken, brown rice, pearled barley, oatmeal, menhaden fish meal, chicken fat, lamb, russet potatoes, dried tomato pomace, whole egg, salmon oil, wisconsin cheese, flaxseed, brewers dried yeast, alfalfa meal, carrots, lettuce, celery, chicken cartilage, monocalcium phosphate, salt, potassium chloride, dl-methionine, chicory root extract, calcium sulfate, Yucca schidigera extract, sodium selenite, vitamin A acetate, vitamin D3 supplement, vitamin E supplement, vitamin B12 supplement, choline bitartrate, niacin supplement, d-calcium pantothenate, l-ascorbyl-2-polyphosphate, riboflavin supplement, thiamine mononitrate, pyridoxine hydrochloride, folic acid, biotin, zinc sulfate, ferrous sulfate, manganous sulfate, magnesium sulfate, copper sulfate, cobalt carbonate, calcium iodate, sorbic acid (preservative), ferrous proteinate, zinc proteinate, copper proteinate, manganese proteinate, magnesium proteinate, cobalt proteinate, dried Lactobacillus acidophilus fermentation product, dried Bifidobacterium longum fermentation product, dried Lactobacillus plantarum fermentation product, dried Enterococcus faecium fermentation product

Fiber (estimated dry matter content) = 3.9%

Red items when present indicate controversial ingredients

Estimated Nutrient Content
MethodProteinFatCarbs
Guaranteed Analysis24%16%NA
Dry Matter Basis27%18%48%
Calorie Weighted Basis23%37%41%

The first ingredient in this dog food is duck. Although it is a quality item, raw duck contains about 80% water. After cooking, most of that moisture is lost, reducing the meat content to just a fraction of its original weight.

After processing, this item would probably account for a smaller part of the total content of the finished product.

The second ingredient is chicken meal. Chicken meal is considered a meat concentrate and contains nearly 300% more protein than fresh chicken.

The third ingredient is chicken, another quality raw item.

The fourth ingredient is brown rice, a complex carbohydrate that (once cooked) can be fairly easy to digest. However, aside from its natural energy content, rice is of only modest nutritional value to a dog.

The fifth ingredient is pearled barley. Barley is a starchy carbohydrate supplying fiber and other healthy nutrients. The term “pearled” means the grain has been processed to remove its outer hull and bran, unlike whole barley. However, aside from its energy content, this cereal grain is of only modest nutritional value to a dog.

The sixth ingredient is oatmeal, a whole-grain product made from coarsely ground oats. Oatmeal is naturally rich in B-vitamins, dietary fiber and can be (depending upon its level of purity) gluten-free.

The seventh ingredient is menhaden fish meal, another protein-rich meat concentrate.

Menhaden are small ocean fish related to herring. They’re rich in protein and omega-3 fatty acids. What’s more, in their mid-depth habitat, menhaden are not exposed to mercury contamination as can be typical with deep water species.

Fish meal is typically obtained from the “clean, dried, ground tissue of undecomposed whole fish and fish cuttings” of commercial fish operations.1

We are pleased to note that, unlike many fish meals, this particular item appears2 to be ethoxyquin-free.

The eighth ingredient is chicken fat. Chicken fat is obtained from rendering chicken, a process similar to making soup in which the fat itself is skimmed from the surface of the liquid.

Chicken fat is high in linoleic acid, an omega-6 fatty acid essential for life. Although it doesn’t sound very appetizing, chicken fat is actually a quality ingredient.

The ninth ingredient is lamb, another quality raw item.

The next ingredient is potato. Potatoes can be considered a gluten-free source of digestible carbohydrates. Yet with the exception of perhaps their caloric content, potatoes are of only modest nutritional value to a dog.

Next, we find tomato pomace. Tomato pomace is a controversial ingredient, a by-product remaining after processing tomatoes into juice, soup and ketchup.

Many praise tomato pomace for its high fiber and nutrient content, while others scorn it as an inexpensive pet food filler.

Just the same, there’s probably not enough tomato pomace here to make much of a difference.

From here, the list goes on to include a number of other items.

But to be realistic, ingredients located this far down the list (other than nutritional supplements) are not likely to affect the overall rating of this product.

With five notable exceptions

First, flaxseed is one of the best plant sources of healthy omega-3 fatty acids. Provided they’ve first been ground into a meal, flax seeds are also rich in soluble fiber.

However, flaxseed contains about 19% protein, a factor that must be considered when judging the actual meat content of this dog food.

Next, brewers yeast can be a controversial item. Although it’s a by-product of the beer making process, this ingredient is rich in minerals and other healthy nutrients.

Fans believe yeast repels fleas and supports the immune system.

Critics argue yeast ingredients can be linked to allergies. This may be true, but (like all allergies) only if your particular dog is allergic to the yeast itself.

In addition, a vocal minority insists yeast can increase the risk of developing the life-threatening condition known as bloat. However, this is a claim we’ve not been able to scientifically verify.

In any case, unless your dog is specifically allergic to it, yeast can still be considered a nutritious additive.

What’s more noteworthy here is that brewers yeast contains about 48% protein, a factor that must be considered when judging the actual meat content of this dog food.

In addition, alfalfa meal is high in plant protein (about 18%) and fiber (25%), this hay-family item is more commonly associated with horse feeds.

Next, chicory root is rich in inulin, a starch-like compound made up of repeating units of carbohydrates and found in certain roots and tubers.

Not only is inulin a natural source of soluble dietary fiber, it’s also a prebiotic used to promote the growth of healthy bacteria in a dog’s digestive tract.

And lastly, this food also contains chelated minerals, minerals that have been chemically attached to protein. This makes them easier to absorb. Chelated minerals are usually found in better dog foods.

Fromm Gold Nutritionals Dog Food
The Bottom Line

Judging by its ingredients alone, Fromm Gold Nutritionals looks like an above-average dry dog food.

But ingredient quality by itself cannot tell the whole story. We still need to estimate the product’s meat content before determining a final rating.

The dashboard displays a dry matter protein reading of 27%, a fat level of 18% and estimated carbohydrates of about 48%.

As a group, the brand features an average protein content of 28% and a mean fat level of 16%. Together, these figures suggest a carbohydrate content of 48% for the overall product line.

And a fat-to-protein ratio of about 59%.

Near-average protein. Near-average fat. And near-average carbs when compared to a typical dry dog food.

Even when you consider the protein-boosting effect of the flaxseed, brewers yeast and alfalfa meal, this looks like the profile of a kibble containing a moderate amount of meat.

Bottom line?

Fromm Gold Nutritionals is a plant-based dry dog food using a moderate amount of duck and chicken meal as its main sources of animal protein, thus earning the brand 4 stars.

Highly recommended.

Please note certain recipes are sometimes given a higher or lower rating based upon our estimate of their total meat content.

Those looking for a nice wet food to go with this kibble may wish to visit our review of Fromm Gold Nutritionals canned dog food.

Special Alert

Rice ingredients can sometimes contain arsenic. Until the US FDA establishes safe upper levels for arsenic content, pet owners may wish to limit the total amount of rice fed in a dog's daily diet.

A Final Word

The descriptions and analyses expressed in this and every article on this website represent the views and opinions of the author.

Although it's our goal to ensure all the information on this website is correct, we cannot guarantee its completeness or its accuracy; nor can we commit to ensuring all the material is kept up-to-date on a daily basis.

Each review is offered in good faith and has been designed to help you make a more informed decision when buying dog food.

However, our rating system is not intended to suggest feeding a particular product will result in specific health benefits for your pet.

For a better understanding of how we analyze each product, please read our article, "The Problem with Dog Food Reviews".

Remember, no dog food can possibly be appropriate for every life stage, lifestyle or health condition. So, choose wisely. And when in doubt, consult a qualified veterinary professional for help.

In closing, we do not accept money, gifts or samples from pet food companies in exchange for special consideration in the preparation of our reviews or ratings.

To learn how we support the cost of operating this website, please visit our public Disclosure and Disclaimer page.

Have an opinion about this dog food? Or maybe the review itself? Please know we welcome your comments.

Other spellings: Fromms

Notes and Updates

02/28/2010 Original review
10/01/2010 Review updated
06/25/2012 Review updated
01/21/2014 Last Update

  1. Association of American Feed Control Officials
  2. Fromm, 2/28/2010
  • theBCnut

    Then Fromm ought to be a good choice.

  • Boxer mom

    Vet suggested low protein. I choose the duck n sweet potato because vet said could also be allergic to chicken. Plus they don’t do good on with potatoes.

  • theBCnut

    Does your dog need low protein? One of my critetia for food is that the protein is over 30% and almost all of the foods I use have a protein over 35%. Even then, I add meat toppers, fish, eggs, etc. Fromm is a good food from a good company, but I would rather have more meat in a kibble, especially long term.

  • Boxer mom

    I got Fromm duck n sweet potato. I hope it’s ok. Has low protein and no yeast in it.

  • theBCnut

    One of the foods that I really like for dogs with sensitive stomachs is NutriSource. It is generally well tolerated and pretty easy to transition to.

  • Boxer mom

    Would really appreciate some suggestions. My youngest has had repeated ear/skin infections from yeast. Vet says could be environmental. I’m convinced it’s from the food because all three of them have recently refused to stop eating. Vet suggested science diet sensitive stomach. They wouldn’t touch it. I’m ok they didn’t because that is not a brand I prefer to use. Please help!

  • Crazy4cats

    Fromm is definitely a great company. However, It is recommended to switch brands every now and then anyway. The diet rotation is talked about in the FAQ tab up above. The hard part of buying large breed dog food is that different companies have different philosophies on what is best for large breeds. Some companies large breed food will be high in protein and low in fat, while others will agree with the vet and their recipes will be lower protein for their large breed food. You will have to do some research and figure out what you are going to look for and always check the ingredients and guaranteed analysis panels. I finally figured out you can’t just look at the packaging and marketing of the food. Good luck!

  • Judy C

    Thank you….he’s lots of fun. Didn’t mean to put up the large pic. Never posted before and thought I was doing the icon. I did try samples of Orijen and Acana, but he turned his nose up at them….sigh. My vet said to stick to a large breed food which really limits choices in the grain free foods…so confused. Guess I have more studying to do. I’d rather stick with someone who makes and packages their own food.

  • Crazy4cats

    Oh man, what a beautiful dog! I am going to make an educated guess that it is rated lower due to a lower protein percentage. Take a look at how the food is rated in the FAQ (frequently asked questions) tab. The rating system is explained there. There are some groups of people that believe large breed dogs should have lower amounts of protein. However, many posters on this site do not agree with that theory and think that they should be on high protein and low carb diets.

  • Judy C

    I too would like to know why Fromm Large Breed is rated with only 3.5
    stars. My collie is about ready to go to an adult food. I’ve been
    feeding him the Large Breed Puppy. I really just planned on moving to
    the Large Breed Adult, but now I’m not so sure. Why the low rating???

  • Boxer mom

    My dogs are currently eating royal canin and I would like to switch them to this. They have sensitive stomached is there a certain formula of Fromm you would suggest?

  • Mike D’Innocenzio

    Why is the Large Breed Adult rated at a lower 3.5? Also, is the ash content taken into consideration when rating? I know of a couple of 5 stars that don’t disclose their ash content. Just for that alone they should be knocked down regardless of their ingredients.

  • glock22

    Switched from Blue Buffalo to Fromm two weeks ago. My Lab seems much more energetic and goes crazy for this food. Blue is a great food, but this one seems even better for the same amount of money per bag.

  • glock22

    My lab has never had any problems switching foods. I changed his food cold turkey from Blue Buffalo to Fromm and he was fine. He seems to be more energetic on the grain free food.

  • aimee

    Of course overall health plays a role in arsenic toxicosis in dogs. When ingesting levels in the mg/kg range dogs with debilitation or dehydration will be more susceptible than their healthy counterparts.

    However the levels in rice, for this species, are so teeny tiny I can’t see this as anything but a non issue.

    I’ve always said eating is risky business and if you feel uncomfortable with rice than by all means don’t feed it!

    I didn’t comment on the digestive issue, but when the OP wrote green smoke I assumed he meant smelly gas not diarrhea… shrug

  • dchassett

    Aimee. I think one would have to take into consideration the health of the dog, any underlying conditions and the longevity of the dogs life. Is there really a legitimate reason for feeding a dog rice every single day (twice a day if you divide their food) day in day out for the rest of their lives just to deal with diarrhea issues when there are so many others ways that this issue can be dealt with. Anyway, I just wouldn’t chance it. I’m not saying everybody should avoid rice, it’s just my opinion. One time they say something and then assure you of there test results and a few years later they say “Oops! Never Mind”. Let’s not forget how they scared everyone about the evils of eggs and then did a 180.

  • dchassett

    Absolutely!

  • LabsRawesome

    Hi Michael, for digestion problems, I would recommend digestive enzymes and probiotics. Not rice.

  • aimee

    Hi Michael,
    In regards to arsenic in rice, yes it was found in rice for human consumption. Is it a problem for dogs? No, I’d say it is not.

    The problems found in humans with long term low level exposure have not been replicated in dogs. And as a one time toxic exposure a 20 lb dog would need to eat 5000 cups cooked rice at one time.

    Different things have different toxicity levels in different species.

    I would caution you though,when feeding a pup not to have more than 10% of the calories come from an unbalanced source such as rice.

  • LabsRawesome

    Yes, it is. Instead of rice try digestive enzymes, and Probiotics.

  • Michael Farmer

    Michael Farmer
    re: the arsenic content of rice. We started adding cooked long grain rice to our puppy’s Fromm’s Gold Large Breed dry food to reduce digestion problems (aka, green smoke). Is arsenic content a concern using rice sold for human consumption?

  • InkedMarie

    I just had a flashback to when we bought a failed show prospect fox terrier. I had no idea what the food was she gave us but it was in a paper bag and the outside of the bag was greasy. I threw it out and she went on Eukanuba with no upset at all. This was the 90;s and Euk was a high quality food back then.

  • losul

    If it’s any further consolation to you, when we first got our dog, we didn’t know what he had been used to eating, so no transition period. So we started with a 4 star kibble, and after about 4 weeks, then transitioned to 1/2 raw, and 1/2 the same kibble. He had gas that would knock a buzzard off of a gut wagon, that lasted the entire first 8 weeks or so we had him, before it finally began subsiding. After maybe 12 weeks total, the gas had completely or near completely stopped. The entire time he showed no obvious signs of discomfort, although we always wondered. The farting was the only issue we had other than some initial eye buggering after we began raw. After about 6 weeks, no more eye buggars either.

    Fast forward to today, we feed him about 50% homemade raw of a wide variety of ingredients, about 15% various canned foods, and about 33% various kibbles. Seldom now, I think I have detected a faint fart odor when he is laying within a couple of feet, but nothing at all like those first weeks.

    So just saying, as long as she’s not having other issues and she’s not showing signs of obvious discomfort, poop is O.K., no vomiting, etc.. the passage of time just might ease the passage of gas.

  • Michelle Jones-Smith

    Thank you everyone, I feel a lot better after hearing your comments!

  • Crazy4cats

    Hi Michelle-
    I agree with the others. You’ve made a big switch and it might take a little more time for your dog’s system to get used to it. Mean while, have you tried to add any digestive enzymes to the food? I notice that it makes a big difference in my dogs’ gas when I remember to add it. Especially when switching foods. I’m not at home and I do not remember the name of the one I’ve used. But there are many good ones. Also Honest Kitchen makes a supplement called Perfect Form that contains some enzymes as well as other ingredients that help to transition to a new food. Another thing is you might try adding a topper to make the new food more appealing. I have labs and they love everything so I have not experienced them not being excited to eat! But, have definitely experienced the gas. lol! Good luck.

  • Pattyvaughn

    That’s a huge step up in quality and it may take a while for her body to adjust to having that much protein. Digestive enzymes and probiotics help speed up the process.

  • dchassett

    Hi Michelle, IMO you need to give it more time. Barring any actual allergies to an ingredient in the food, you are probably dealing with gas and may even experience other things going on with your dog as she detoxes from the inferior much lower protein she was on before but two weeks is way to soon to assume that the food is not good for her. I agree with losul about why she doesn’t seem as excited about her food. Most of the lower end foods as you were feeding are chock full of carbs and ingredients to entice the dog to eat that food so that you will feel they are really loving it and you will continue to buy it. Give it some time before you decide it’s not good for her. It may be something in the food but too soon to tell. Give her gut a while to adjust. Anyway that’s been my experience through the years for what its worth.

  • Michelle Jones-Smith

    Thank you!

  • losul

    It’s possible there’s something in the food that is just not going to agree with her, but IMO, you should give it some more time, another 4 to 6 weeks or so as long as there aren’t any other issues happening, the food is fresh, and she is not eating too fast, and/or too much, or losing too much weight. Hopefully the gas will begin to subside as her systems adjust., if not then it might be time to look for another selection. There’s quite a bit of difference ingredient wise between a dog food such as pedigree and one such as Fromm. So quite a jump. It might have been better to not make such a drastic jump to start with, but since you already have, I would give it some more time.

    As to not being as excited about eating the new food, keep in mind that many of the lowly foods have various palatibility enhancers included in the meals to entice a dog to eat them. These won’t be included in the manufacturers ingredient panel when they are added to meals by a supplier. These palatibility enhancers may even be addictive?

  • Michelle Jones-Smith

    I just switched my lab a couple weeks ago from Pedigree to FROMM because I wanted her to have a better quality food but ever since we switched her she’s had really bad gas and doesn’t get as excited to eat as she used to. We switched her over slowly and it has been a couple of weeks now of eating only FROMM. I know that switching from a poor quality food to a better quality will effect her but should it take this long or does it sound like there may be something in the food that doesn’t agree with her?

  • PuppyLover12

    Did you talk to the vet? Sometimes an ingredient in the food may react to an unnoticed health issue. It happened once with a food with potatoes in it. The dog had a certain kind of cancer that the potatoes made worse. I hope your puppy is ok!

  • Tony Sobczak

    The best thing about Fromms is that I have been able to switch varieties without the normal transition. My Doxy gets a nice variety and so far likes each of the ones I’ve tried. None have posed any problems. She maintains a healthy weight nice shiney coat and good digestion.

  • Tony Sobczak

    You usually get what you pay for. For the quality of the food I think the price for Fromms is quite reasonable, and my Doxy has done really well with it.

  • Jan_Mom2Cavs

    I have used the Fromm Gold Senior recently and it is definitely smaller than Acana’s kibble. Of course their Small Breed version is, well, small lol. I used their Gold Adult quite awhile ago and I don’t remember it being as large as Acana, but it could’ve changed since I used it last.

  • Jan_Mom2Cavs

    I actually think sandy was just making an observation about Wellness Core’s new formula….but I’m sure she will speak for herself soon. :)

  • Patty

    I think you are mixing this up with Wellness Core. Fromm does’t have a food called Core.