Stones and Sediment – need advice

Dog Food Advisor Forums Diet and Health Stones and Sediment – need advice

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  • #94402 Report Abuse

    m r
    Member

    Our 5 pound, 10 year old Papillon had 3 bladder stones removed last month. The analysis showed that they were Calcium Phosphate Carbonate. I was only able to find limited research matching the specificity of her condition, and have lots of questions. I would love guidance from someone who has experience with this specific type of stone? What have you done that’s worked? Our Vet told us there’s a 50/50 chance of recurrence, and even after surgery, there is still blood in her urine.

    She goes on a wee wee pad – so can urinate freely, which she does, . . . frequently! The blood in her urine appears pinkish/red. She was on Carprofen immediately following surgery – but bloody urine persisted, so Vet switched her to a different anti-inflammatory – Meloxidyl. This seemed to work because we weren’t noticing blood in her urine 10 days after we started Meloxidyl, so we were told to stop. But shortly after stopping Meloxidyl, we noticed the blood in her urine resumed. The Vet took some additional X-Rays and did a Sonogram, and told us that she still has some clotting and debris from either the surgery or from ongoing cystitis (bladder inflammation); and that while she still may be creating some sediment, thankfully stones have not developed over the last 3+/- weeks since surgery. How long does it take for the sediment to form? Is it possible for sediment to form merely weeks after surgery?

    Our Vet prescribed Hill’s C/D (stating she needs a diet lower in protein, phosphorus, and calcium). She was on a diet of Natural Balance – variety of flavors since we got her (only weeks old). We’ve been feeding her the Hill’s C/D food for one week now (she wouldn’t eat the canned, so we feed dry soaked in water . . . soupy consistency). Vet did a unrinalysis yesterday, which showed pH of 8.5. How long should it take for the food to alter her pH? He suggested we use a dipstick (which he said we can purchase online and touch it to the urine on the wee wee pad) to test her urine daily. But, if we determine that her pH is not where is should be, what else are we supposed to feed her to help manage the pH to around 6.5/7 (where the Vet would like it to be)?

    Urine culture results are not yet back, but last time they didn’t show anything out of the ordinary.

    In addition to suggesting Hill’s C/D prescription diet, and monitoring the urine pH at home daily, the Vet also recommends diagnostic testing at his office including urinalysis ( every 3 months), urine culture( every 3 months), radiographs/x-rays (every 6 months). We still aren’t clear what to do if pH doesn’t go down? i.e. how do we get it to decrease? I read somewhere that we’re supposed to be feeding a diet rich in animal-based protein to help increase acidic pH vs. alkaline, but based on the type of stones she had (CALCIUM PHOSPHATE CARBONATE UROLITHS), we’re supposed to feed her a diet low in animal protein. So what to do?

    Also, how do we get her to drink more water? We already soak the dry kibble in hot water an hour +/- before serving. We also refresh her water throughout the day and night. I don’t want to add sodium to her diet, because I read somewhere that dogs with her type of stones are also supposed to stay away from salt.

    Thank you in advance for any guidance you can provide!

    #94403 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Check the search engine, example: https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/calcium+oxalate/

    Excerpts from previous posts:
    As your vet will confirm, dogs that have a tendency to make bladder stones have to be on a special diet the rest of their lives, this is a serious condition and it just doesn’t go away.
    I would comply with the prescription food for now.
    And don’t forget, water, water, and more water added to the diet. Ask the vet ….but I believe this helps big time. And frequent bathroom breaks, opportunities to urinate.
    “My dog had both (struvite and calcium oxalate), no symptoms till the age of 11, started with UTIs. He has had no recurrences in 4 years since his emergency surgery.
    “There is a genetic component and some breeds are more prone to bladder stones”.
    “Anyway, if you do nothing else, add water and take her out to urinate frequently”.
    PS: Soak the kibble, even the prescription food in water overnight in the fridg, add more water prior to serving. Keep the bladder flushed. Maybe add a little canned prescription food as a topper.
    Don’t add supplements unless recommended by a veterinarian that has examined the dog.
    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/?s=cranberry

    #94404 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Did you check the search engine ? https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/calcium+oxalate/
    I imagine your dog will have to be on a special diet for the rest of his life, I would go by whatever food your vet is recommending. I have used the Royal Canin SO in the past with good results.
    Increasing water intake helps with all types of bladder stones, frequent bathroom breaks, opportunities to urinate. Keep the bladder flushed. Stagnant conditions in the bladder are conducive to stone formation.
    Maybe 3 small meals per day with water added, they just lap it up to get to the food. In fact, I would also pre-soak the kibble overnight in the fridg.
    Increase activity, walks, reduce weight (if overweight).
    For stubborn cases like your dogs, there are prescription medications the vet may recommend. I might consider consulting a Veterinary Internal Medicine Specialist.

    #94405 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/calcium+oxalate/
    From a previous post:
    Increasing water intake helps with all types of bladder stones, frequent bathroom breaks, opportunities to urinate. Keep the bladder flushed. Stagnant conditions in the bladder are conducive to stone formation.
    Maybe 3 small meals per day with water added, they just lap it up to get to the food. In fact, I would also pre-soak the kibble overnight in the fridg.
    Increase activity, walks, reduce weight (if overweight).
    For stubborn cases like your dogs, there are prescription medications the vet may recommend.

    #94406 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Try the search engine here, under sign in, upper right, type in “calcium oxalate” or bladder stones”
    From a previous post:
    Increasing water intake helps with all types of bladder stones, frequent bathroom breaks, opportunities to urinate. Keep the bladder flushed. Stagnant conditions in the bladder are conducive to stone formation.
    Maybe 3 small meals per day with water added, they just lap it up to get to the food. In fact, I would also pre-soak the kibble overnight in the fridg.
    Increase activity, walks, reduce weight (if overweight).
    For stubborn cases like your dogs, there are prescription medications the vet may recommend. I might consider consulting a Veterinary Internal Medicine Specialist.

    #94407 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member
    #94409 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Have you tried the search engine? Example: https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/calcium+oxalate+bladder+stones/

    https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/bladder+stones/

    I would refer to your vet, but, ph fluctuates, I found it to be more accurate to have it checked at the vets office every few months. I add water to the presoaked kibble, but be prepared to offer the dog frequent bathroom breaks. Three small meals per day. Work with your vet, sounds like she may need prescription meds to get this under control. Once she’s stable I don’t think you will need to do the x-rays and all the testing so often. It appears you have a good vet that’s following him.

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