Retractable Leashes

Dog Food Advisor Forums Off Topic Forum Retractable Leashes

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  • #41515 Report Abuse

    crazy4cats
    Member

    Hi-
    Has anyone had any luck with a retractable leash for a big (80+lbs) dog? I would like to try them out with my dogs. I need a very sturdy reliable brand. Any ideas?

    #41519 Report Abuse

    Mom2Cavs
    Member

    Maybe others on here will be of help but I’m sorry I can’t in all good faith recommend a retractable leash, especially to a larger dog like yours. I feel they can be a danger to the owner and dog. One just does not have the control over the dog with these kinds of leashes. Better control is achieved with regular leather 6ft. leashes, imho. Good luck to you, but I just feel this is a bad idea and an accident waiting to happen.

    #41520 Report Abuse

    Akari_32
    Member

    It takes a very special dog and handler to be able safely use a retractable leash. I use one for my oldest dog, but she doesn’t react to people and dogs passing by and needs only a quiet verbal command to listen. I even go so far to use a cheap off brand one. With out seeig the dog in action, I can’t reccomend a retranle leash to just anyone, either.

    #41521 Report Abuse

    crazy4cats
    Member

    Thanks, guys, I do understand the concerns. I’ve been reading up on them. I would never use them with our daily neighborhood walks. But thought on a beach, I could give them a little more freedom. I am worried they would take off running and break them though. Thanks for your input.

    #41522 Report Abuse

    DogFoodie
    Member

    I’ve heard a lot of folks say the same thing, Jan. I have a good leather 6′ leash also, but tend not to use it as often as I used to.

    I have a Flexi, that I use pretty regularly with Sam, my Golden; but if I give him too much lead, his momentum can make it tricky to keep up with him and before you know it he’s in a full on gallop. I also have one for Bella, my Cavalier, but she’s easy to walk in the first place.

    One thing I use that has made a HUGE difference, because Sam is an eager walker who pulls like crazy, is a Gentle Leader.

    For us, the Gentle Leader headcollar has been amazing; even my dad, who is in his 80’s, enjoys taking Sam for a walk when he’s wearing the Gentle Leader.

    Basically, when a dog is wearing the GL, if he pulls, his head will turn to the side. He doesn’t like being pulled around and he quickly realizes that if he doesn’t pull, he can walk straight ahead without being turned around.

    http://www.amazon.com/PetSafe-Gentle-Leader-Headcollar-Large/dp/B00074L4W2/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1400001782&sr=8-1&keywords=gentle+leader

    #41523 Report Abuse

    Akari_32
    Member

    I also forgot to say that I also use undersized ones for Haley. She’s 60 pounds. I use the 16ft leashes for her. Those are typically used for small dogs up to like 20 pounds or something. Like I said, she’s extremely well behaved, and mindful of commands.

    I would try a 6ft flexi city leash first, and see how they do on those first. Maybe use easy walk harnesses if any of your guys are a little stubborn, and bring back up leashes just in case.

    #41541 Report Abuse

    aquariangt
    Member

    If you’re going to the beach, there are long lead lines you can get that would still give you more control than a flexi leash

    But, overall, I never recommend them, kinda hate em to be honest

    • This reply was modified 4 years, 11 months ago by  aquariangt.
    #41543 Report Abuse

    Not something I would ever consider using for my 80 lb Greyhound. He is perfection on a leash due to his racing training but I still wouldn’t use a Flexi. I’m not a fan period. 5 ft leather leash w/ a martingale collar used here. 🙂

    #41547 Report Abuse

    Bobby dog
    Member

    Hi C4c:
    I used to use one on my friends Lab when I walked her at my house. She was a little unruley on or off the leash. Walking her in an area without any other dogs or people, it was fine. I never used it on her in a busy area and in my neighborhood no one ever walks their dog. I never had one break on me.

    I agree with both arguments on the retractable leash. I also have a Flexi leash for Bobby, he only weighs about 44 lbs. I would never use it in the city or any busy place.

    The two parks I take Bobby to by my house never have dogs or people there when I go. There is another park with a fenced area that most people with dogs go to. I prefer the parks with no people. lol But, just in case there are other dogs or alot of people at the park when we go I keep a regular leash with me.

    #41748 Report Abuse

    Robert R
    Member

    Let me second the recommendation for the Gentle Leader. I used them for both my 5-lb toy poodle and my 20-lb mini poodle when we first got them. After about a month we no longer needed them because they were walking with a slack leash. I still use them because when I take them off the hook, both dogs know we’re going for a walk and eagerly wait
    until I put them on.

    #41751 Report Abuse

    Shasta220
    Member

    If you want to be a kite to your dog, go for it….. I say big no nos to them though.

    I always always teach my dogs to heel when walking, so I prefer the classic 6′ leather or nylon lead (material doesn’t matter at all, really). But since my dogs never move out of heel position on walks (except at potty breaks), I sometimes get the 3-4ft ones…

    You really should teach your dog good leash manners. Start with a regular lead, holding just the handle. Walk forward, and the INSTANT there is any tension on the leash, turn and walk the opposite direction. He will probably turn and run back ahead of you, so be prepared to turn around again as soon as there’s tension. Continue doing this (when I first taught my rescue dog w this method, I literally took one step, turned around, took one step, turned around.). It’ll seem like there’s no progress, and then one minute SNAP! He realizes “oh…pulling isn’t getting me anywhere….let’s try NOT pulling!” If you’re content with a dog infront of you, then leave it as is. If you want him closer to you, shorten the leash a foot or two and restart the process.

    And with collars vs head collars vs harnesses: I’ve said before – I’m not opposed to about any tool as long as it’s used properly. I know everyone has their own opinions about equipment, but I’ve used it all – every dog is different, and sometimes changing stuff can work too (I am babysitting a dog who is an extreme puller. She usually wears just a buckle collar. I popped a pinch on her just to see where things would go, and she didn’t pull ONE single time! I barely even touched it! She was a perfect Heeler from that moment on lol)

    Okay, back to retractable leashes: I highly advise you do not get one for walks. They are prone to breaking, give you little control, and absolutely worthless when wanting a dog to heel. They ENCOURAGE pulling as well since there is always a tiiiiiny bit of tension on them. I do have one that I use though. Shasta is a very well trained and obedient dog, but he is part hound. If the leash goes off, he goes off and forgets what “come” means. (Loki is opposite – he’s not top-notch in training, but he always stays nearby). So if we are at the beach/lake, then I put Shasta’s harness on and the retractable leash (he knows harness=leash freedom. Collar=stay nearby)

    #41752 Report Abuse

    Shasta220
    Member

    But I will add ^ even when Shasta has the harness and retractable leash on, he knows to stop pulling the instant he feels tension(he’s only 50lb)…..a harness+retractable leash might spell disaster for a big dog (I used to have a 90lb solid-muscle APBT mix. He was thoroughly leash trained, but I’d NEVER put the retract on him! I’d buy him a long lead if I wanted to work long distance or something)

    #41759 Report Abuse

    crazy4cats
    Member

    Thanks for everyone’s concerns. We walk our dogs just about every day on a 6 foot leash with a prong collar. They still pull, especially if they see a cat or something! I was planning on using the retractable only when at the ocean where there are not many people. I do have long leads, but they are not automatic recoil. It’s funny how the people on the forum are answering differently than on the review side. LOL!

    #41782 Report Abuse

    Naturella
    Member

    I just tried Bruno on a normal leash with a normal collar for the first time. He did not like it at first and kept trying to get out of it but finally came to terms with it and was barely pulling! The leash was dangly (no tension) about 85-90% of the time which I think is great for a first-time usual puller. Small corrections and the “Ah-ah” were enough to reel him in. What do you know – Bruno may learn to heel soon! 😀

    P.S. Thanks a TON Shasta for all the amazing tips! 😀

    #41798 Report Abuse

    Shasta220
    Member

    Awesome job!!!!! *high fives* often a new accessory/pressure point will be enough to catch a dog “off guard” so you can start things from scratch. Glad he’s making progress so far!

    #41799 Report Abuse

    Naturella
    Member

    Thank you! I took him out again tonight and he seemed more used to the leash and collar – still almost no pulling but I fear that the more used to it he gets, the more he may decide to pull again. But I will just have to catch it and correct it. Apparently he doesn’t care for treats when he’s “stressed” (like having his nails done or having a collar on for the first time), so it will just have to be corrections and verbal and tactile praise. But I think he’ll get it! 🙂

    #41800 Report Abuse

    Shasta220
    Member

    Great job on catching him, staying on top of it 🙂 I know what you mean about the treats. I had a trainer advise using treats to try distracting Loki whenever he saw another dog. I shoved it right by his nose and he had NO desire to move his focus away from the other dog lol! (And they were the super yummy stinky ones!)

    #41801 Report Abuse

    Naturella
    Member

    I used one of his kibble samples, NutriSource Grain Free Salmon (or Seafood – something like that) and even shoved one in his mouth but he spit it out when usually he loves it. I guess he just doesn’t eat when in a stressful situation.

    But yeah, I have to stay on top of his pulling, and I will! 🙂

    #41802 Report Abuse

    Susan
    Member

    I dont understand why everyone has problems with a retractable lead, if a dog is taught how to walk properly on a lead they should not pull or chase cats..In Australia everyone seems to use them here on big or small dogs with no problems.. I use one on my real strong staffy.. When I first rescued him I could not use a retactable lead as no one must of walked him or taught him how to walk on any type of lead, 2 weeks of training & Patch walks perfect now also I use a Harness this made things alot easier if they go to pull u have more control.. I use a Felxi City 2 metre lead, you can also press the button & shorten the lead…

    #41834 Report Abuse

    InkedMarie
    Member

    For the most part, I hate retractables. If your dogs don’t pull, they may be fine in certain situations. Yours pulls; have you looked at the sense-ation or sense-ible harnesses from Soft Touch Concepts? They work the best for my pullers.

    I mentioned Flexi’s in certain situation. I absolutely seethe when I see people using them in pet stores. I’ve seen the humans in one aisle & the dogs in another. They should never be used at vets offices. Most owners who use these seem to lack common sense when it comes to them.

    #41836 Report Abuse

    Susan
    Member

    I use a retactable lead as I find with the shorter 1 metre lead my boy will pull.. I have a bad back & bad arthritis in both knees & the retractable 2 metre works excellent when walking for ME & Patch.. If Patch wants to sniff a tree or pole by the time he has sniffed Im walking next to him , I walk slow.. My retractable lead is just under 2 metres that’s just 2 normal short leads, it just gives enough give when walkin, also when I go to a vet or public places I use Patches short 1 metre lead that stays in the car for those type of places..
    I dont lack common sense Marie u always have to be SARCASTIC to any comments I make & dont bother telling me to tuffen up, there was no need to add the last line in ur post…

    #41871 Report Abuse

    Zanes Mom
    Member

    As a rule I don’t like retractable leashes and hate to see someone coming toward me using one when we are out walking. I have a 150lb pup and I am amazed at the number of people that allow their dogs to run to the end of the lead toward my dog. Now, he loves everyone and everything but they don’t know that when their dog is flinging itself in the air at him. Is that a failure of the owner ? Yes, of course, but it is more the rule than the exception. We were at a farmer’s market yesterday without our boy and saw everything from a bichon to lab to standard poodles bouncing and tangling with people. I noticed that Sue uses hers with a harness which makes more sense but I usually see them attached to a collar and then you have the issue of possible injury to the dog too.

    #41883 Report Abuse

    Suburban Gal
    Member

    “…but I’m sorry I can’t in all good faith recommend a retractable leash, especially to a larger dog like yours. I feel they can be a danger to the owner and dog. One just does not have the control over the dog with these kinds of leashes. Better control is achieved with regular leather 6ft. leashes, imho.” – Mom2Cavs

    I’m sorry you feel this way.

    While a regular 6 FT leash always does offer the best control, there’s no reason why one can’t have really good control of their dog, regardless of size, on a retractable leash.

    I’ve walked German Shepherds on retractables and have never had any problems using them on German Shepherds and, as you know, German Shepherds are 80+ LB dogs.

    I’ve also used them on my Keeshonden, a medium-sized spitz breed from Holland that weighs between 30 and 60 LBS, and I’ve never had any problems using them on my Keeshonden, especially White Paw as he was a very well-trained dog that knew how to listen and always do what he was told when he was told to do it.

    If you have a dog like White Paw that’s exceptionally trained via formal training or a dog like Lexi, my last German Shepherd, that acts well enough without all the formal training, then there should never be any concern over using a retractable leash.

    It’s all about how well your dogs behave on a leash or how well you make your dogs behave on a leash, as is currently the case with Gizmo who’s NEVER really been on a leash prior to his adoption.

    #41884 Report Abuse

    Suburban Gal
    Member

    “I dont understand why everyone has problems with a retractable lead, if a dog is taught how to walk properly on a lead they should not pull or chase cats..In Australia everyone seems to use them here on big or small dogs with no problems..” sue66b

    As I said, if you have a dog like White Paw that’s exceptionally trained via formal training or a dog like Lexi, my last German Shepherd, that acts well enough without all the formal training, then there should never be any concern over using a retractable leash.

    It’s all about how well your dogs behave on a leash or how well you make your dogs behave on a leash, as is currently the case with Gizmo who’s NEVER really been on a leash prior to his adoption.

    “I use one on my real strong staffy.. When I first rescued him I could not use a retactable lead as no one must of walked him or taught him how to walk on any type of lead, 2 weeks of training & Patch walks perfect now..” sue66b

    This sounds a lot like my Gizmo.

    When we adopted his a little over 3 months ago and walked him on a 4 FT nylon leash we bought for him just prior to adoption, it’s like he had never been on a leash before. We experienced the same result when we used the retractable and a 6 FT leather leash bought for training purposes. It’s like he didn’t know what a leash was and how to properly make use of it. In the beginning, it was quite awkward walking him on any leash. It took some work, but in the end we got him walking properly on ALL of his leashes. He tends to behave more on the 4 FT nylon and 6 FT leather leash because he knows he can get quick pops (collar corrections) on those when he does something he’s not supposed to do, but overall, we generally don’t have a whole lot of problems, let alone serious ones, when he’s on the retractable.

    I don’t understand why people think they can’t have control of their dog on a retractable because people like us are proof they can. It’s all about how you, the owner, approach and deal with a dog on a retractable leash.

    IMHO, it shouldn’t matter what leash your dog is on. You should ALWAYS have control and make your dog behave or tow the line. Any decent or responsible owner would.

    #41885 Report Abuse

    Suburban Gal
    Member

    “They are prone to breaking, give you little control, and absolutely worthless when wanting a dog to heel.” -Shasta220

    I’ve never really had to worry about them breaking because they never did. If anything, I used the hell out of them until I couldn’t really use them anymore and then had to replace them with a new retractable.

    As for a lack of control, if you have a dog like White Paw that’s exceptionally trained via formal training or a dog like Lexi, my last German Shepherd, that acts well enough without all the formal training, then there should never be any concern over using a retractable leash.

    It’s all about how well your dogs behave on a leash or how well you make your dogs behave on a leash.

    IMHO, it shouldn’t matter what leash your dog is on. You should ALWAYS have control and make your dog behave or tow the line. Any decent or responsible owner would.

    “They ENCOURAGE pulling as well since there is always a tiiiiiny bit of tension on them.” -Shasta220

    In Gizmo’s case, any leash encouraged pulling since he had never really been on one before. The same goes for others like Gizmo, like sue66b’s Patch.

    But that aside, retractables encourage pulling if you, the owner, allow them to encourage pulling.

    #41887 Report Abuse

    aquariangt
    Member

    for some reason i figured suburban gal would pop into this thread, and i also figured she’d disagree with everything anyone else said.

    I would like to add one note-it doesn’t matter AT ALL how well trained your dog is. There is always, always, always a chance for a dog to be spooked, interested, or other reason for him to take off. Part of the reason I don’t use retractable. You never know. There is never a guarantee your dog won’t run, anyone who tells you otherwise is lying/inexperienced.

    #41911 Report Abuse

    Mom2Cavs
    Member

    Suburban Gal….in my experience you and your dogs are the exception rather than the rule. I could use a retractable leash with my 4 and it would be okay but I find the handle to be too unwieldy. I will admit before I knew anything about dogs and we adopted Lucy and Desi I did use retractables…..I did drop them a few times and did have some tangled up experiences. After I started doing obedience training and began using a standard 6 ft. leash, I realized how much more control I had and I really liked the regular leashes so much better. I actually use 4 ft. regular leashes when I am doing therapy dog work. Some of the experiences I’ve had with retractables occurred when I worked at a pet specialty store. We would have customers come in with all kinds/sizes of dogs using a retractable leash. More often than not, they would not be paying the least bit of attention to their dogs and they’d let their dogs go too far on the leash. We had dogs knock stuff off shelves, go around the corner from their owners and “do their business” (which of course the owner denied it was their dog because they didn’t see them do it lol), go around into another aisle and harass other customers and/or dogs. We actually had a customer get tangled up in her own retractable with her dog and almost cut her finger badly! I decided then and there I would never in good conscience recommend them. Sorry, if you disagree Suburban Gal. That is your right and I’m sure you and your dogs are perfect when using them….just wish everyone could be like you.

    #41941 Report Abuse

    Suburban Gal
    Member

    “for some reason i figured suburban gal would pop into this thread, and i also figured she’d disagree with everything anyone else said.” -aquariangt

    I’m a very opinionated person. When I have something to say, I say it even if I disagree, which is my prerogative to do so.

    “Some of the experiences I’ve had with retractables occurred when I worked at a pet specialty store. We would have customers come in with all kinds/sizes of dogs using a retractable leash. More often than not, they would not be paying the least bit of attention to their dogs and they’d let their dogs go too far on the leash. We had dogs knock stuff off shelves, go around the corner from their owners and “do their business” (which of course the owner denied it was their dog because they didn’t see them do it lol), go around into another aisle and harass other customers and/or dogs.” -Mom2Cavs

    I generally use his nylon or leather leash when we go into a pet store versus the retractable one because it just works out better all around. I think pet stores should only allow dogs in on a regular nylon or leather leash.

    “We actually had a customer get tangled up in her own retractable with her dog and almost cut her finger badly!” -Mom2Cavs

    Either the owner didn’t really know how to use the retractable the right way or the dog had no business being on a retractable to begin with because it couldn’t even be on a regular leash without being well-behaved. Maybe it was a combination of both.

    Retractable leashes are only good in the right hands and with the right dog.

    • This reply was modified 4 years, 11 months ago by  Suburban Gal.
    #41942 Report Abuse

    Suburban Gal
    Member

    “…absolutely worthless when wanting a dog to heel.” -Shasta220

    I don’t care if my dogs are heeling on their walk.

    A walk is a walk for God’s sake. It’s the one time a dog can be a dog.

    #41949 Report Abuse

    crazy4cats
    Member

    Since, I have never used a retractable leash, please explain this. Can’t you lock it in place, so they can’t run off unless you let them. Don’t you have to push a button or something to give them free rein?

    #41956 Report Abuse

    aquariangt
    Member

    I don’t make my dogs heal on walks either but I do expect them to walk with a loose leash

    #41959 Report Abuse

    Shasta220
    Member

    Hmmm…..what started out as a question ended in quotations and disagreements lol!

    Every tool has it’s own place. A retractable lead does has it’s place – with a well trained non-pulling dog in a wide open area (such as a beach). Sue had mentioned a smaller retractable lead that she uses. If you feel you have control over the dog, then there is absolutely nothing wrong with it.

    I always teach my dogs proper heeling and leash manners. A retractable lead is very awkward to hold for a heeling dog, to say the least.

    But I think I’ve said my opinion enough already and the majority agrees w me…saying it again prob isn’t gonna change anyone’s mind.

    I would never ever use one on a 80+ lb puller though. That’s a job for a 6ft (or 10ft) lead and lots of training.

    I do agree with some of the other comments – I HATE seeing people w their little (or big) dogs on retractables, zinging out wherever they wanna go. I don’t care of the owner says “Fifi is nice, don’t worry!”. Guess what?!? My dog might not be nice!!!! He might have a space-bubble and will react horribly if it’s popped! I know the leashes have those locks on them, but I’ve had so many times where the lock snapped – just imagine if that happened while the dog was trying to run infront of a car out of fear, or run away/towards an angry dog!

    Okay…..vent over lol, I’ve pretty much repeated what others have said.

    Training equipment is such a hot topic, eh?

    #41960 Report Abuse

    Shasta220
    Member

    Suburban Gal – that is not true about any leash causing tension like retractables do. A ret leash is constantly trying to pull itself back (even though it is just a /tiny/ bit of pressure). The only way this can be prevented is to leave it in a lock until there’s slack, which I have never in my life seen a ret leash where the owner trained the dog to leave slack.

    A normal leash will only have tension when the dog pulls, instead of all the time.

    When I was younger, I realized that constant tension only makes matters way worse (found this out when walking a neighbors dog. They had it on a choker, and all it did was make her pull harder). However, a properly-timed quick tug will not encourage pulling. It discourages it.

    And dogs who are used to slight tension will get used to that, and will always be pullers. They think a walk means “keep at the end of the leash” as opposed to “stay near mom and enjoy myself.”

    I’ll stop on my vent though, because I know it does absolutely nothing of benefit.

    The issue of heeling. I know you don’t care, but I do. If my Loki is anywhere out of a heeling position, he is immediately noticeably insecure and realizes that he’s taken over the leading. He gets tense, holds his tail straight, starts prancing, and keeps his ears high up. If I tell him to heel though, he lowers his tail/head and lays his ears back – which is VERY important as he’s a highly reactive dog.

    My other dog, Shasta, isn’t very reactive (he’s just an emotional grump lol)…. I /could/ walk him on just a loose lead, but having him be at my side/behind me keeps him happier as well. I know most people think a walk is a walk, but I find it to be a source of infinite training, bonding, knowledge, and communication IF it’s executed correctly.

    Sure, there’s plenty of free time for sniffing, rolling, and being goofy….but it’s always on my mark. They aren’t allowed to pull over for a sniff unless I give the okay. (Because I’ve walked dogs who are allowed to sniff wherever. Not fun at all, especially if they’re 120lb rotties LOL)

    #41961 Report Abuse

    Shasta220
    Member

    C4C, yes, ret leashes usually have a couple buttons/switches push the first one down to lock, and the second one to keep it in that position. I’ve had really bad experiences with the locks though…

    #41962 Report Abuse

    aquariangt
    Member

    I like what you said about your dog maybe not being friendly. That’s a bit pet peeve of mine and people calling out “he’s friendly” usually means A. that he has no manners (as their lab just jumped into the face of one of my herding or terriers who do not find amusement in being mauled down) or B. Their dog hasn’t been snapped at or corrected for improper manners. They then will blame the person (whose dog would have normally greeted them acceptably) for not having a friendly dog, when mine is on a leash that I have control on.

    This is a huge point of irritation in my life

    edit: clarity

    • This reply was modified 4 years, 11 months ago by  aquariangt.
    #41965 Report Abuse

    jakes mom
    Member

    I’ll just throw my 2 cents in here. I had a retractable leash years ago with my little yorkie mix and never had any problems with it except I didn’t think it was very comfortable to hold. When I take my beagle mix out these days, he’s on a basic 4 foot nylon leash if we’re walking the sidewalk and I use a long training lead (15 ft) when we’re in the woods. That way he can poke his nose into all the weeds and bushes he wants to and I can stay on the path!

    #42108 Report Abuse

    InkedMarie
    Member

    C4C: yes, they lock but the person with the handle has to be bright enough to do so. I’ve seen pictures of someone’s ankle after a retractable got wrapped around it. Wasn’t pretty.

    #42117 Report Abuse

    InkedMarie
    Member

    Sue, I wasn’t talking about you. To be honest, I generally pass by your posts. I read via email, don’t come here unless I want to respond and in email, there are a lot of “ur”, “u” and “and amp” which makes it hard for me to read. Anyone who’s posts look like this in my email don’t get read, especially the last week, I’m recuperating from surgery.

    Sorry you found my comment sarcastic but that’s my opinions of most retractable leash owners I see.

    #42118 Report Abuse

    InkedMarie
    Member

    SuburbanGal: people can have control with retractables but unfortunately, a lot of see owners who don’t have control. We have a local Bow Wow Fest & they banned them. People were too busy socializing band not paying attention to where their dogs are.

    #43597 Report Abuse

    Linda G
    Member

    I love them. I have two Dobies. One is 65 lbs and the other is a puppy at about 68 lbs- high energy and very strong. I trained, with a trainer, on walking them with a prong collar which I understand people have strong feelings about. As a matter of fact, I never wanted to use them b/c they look horrible but properly used they provide control without Any pain. So when I want to take my guys on a nice walk where they have more room to roam, I use the Flexi retractable lease for Large dogs (can be found on Amazon or Walmart). My dogs run up to me and jump up tails wagging when they see take out the prong collar and retractable leash.

    #43633 Report Abuse

    Harpers Mom
    Member

    I’m not a fan of retractable leashes. I’ve had too many people with their dog on a retractable leash just run up to me and Harper on a walk and just think it’s perfectly okay. Harper isn’t a fan of dogs she doesn’t know in her face. But if you can comfortably walk your dog on a retractor go for it. To train a dog to loosely walk on a leash I would never use a retractable leash.

    Harper walks In a martingale or prong collar (depending on if she feels like behaving) and a 6ft leather leash- just because I feel a good leather leash is much not comfortable to hold than a nylon. But that’s just my preference.

    #44969 Report Abuse

    Paula D
    Member

    For the beach,,why not a 50 foot line–more freedom for pup, more control for you! Can find them (usually nylon) at any Petsmart,or similar store,

    #44981 Report Abuse

    crazy4cats
    Member

    Hi Paula-
    That is exactly what we did! They worked out fine because there was hardly anyone on the beach. So, we did not “clothes line” anyone! You just have to manually pull them in if you need to.

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