Nonprescription hydrolyzed protein dog food?

Dog Food Advisor Forums Canine Nutrition Nonprescription hydrolyzed protein dog food?

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  • #113955 Report Abuse
    Joshua W
    Member

    I searched and could not find anything on this topic, so apologies if it’s already on here.

    Prescription dog food is great for dogs with diabetes, kidney issues, etc. There is NO reason that hydrolyzed protein food should require a trip to the vet, and there is no government regulation of this food (that I know of). I have heard that smaller dog food manufacturers (not royal canin, purina, etc) create hydrolyzed protein food and sell it direct. Does anyone know of these manufacturers? Basically, making hydrolyzed food prescription is a racket and I do not want to buy into it.
    Thanks!

    #113956 Report Abuse
    anonymous
    Member

    No.
    Only prescription/therapeutic dog food is hydrolyzed, it is a complicated process, hence the increased cost.

    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/?s=hydrolyzed+dog+food

    PS: All other commercial foods are at risk for cross contamination, so whatever ingredients you are trying to avoid, it won’t happen.

    #113961 Report Abuse
    haleycookie
    Member

    Whole hearted has a hydrolyzed salmon formula. It’s a skin and coat formula. It’s only available at Petco but if you read the reviews on the website there are others who were in the same situation as you and found this to be a great alternative. It is the only hydrolyzed non prescription food I’ve heard of. And it’s reasonably priced.
    Ingredients
    Peas, pea flour, hydrolyzed salmon, sunflower oil (preserved with mixed tocopherols), flaxseed, natural salmon flavor, tomato pomace, salmon oil (a source of omega-3 fatty acids), dicalcium phosphate, calcium carbonate, choline chloride, taurine, dried Lactobacillus acidophilus fermentation product, dried Bifidobacterium animalis fermentation product, dried Lactobacillus reuteri fermentation product, vitamin E supplement, iron proteinate, zinc proteinate, copper proteinate, ferrous sulfate, zinc sulfate, copper sulfate, potassium iodide, thiamine mononitrate (source of vitamin B1), manganese proteinate, manganous oxide, ascorbic acid (preservative), vitamin A supplement, biotin, niacin, calcium pantothenate, manganese sulfate, sodium selenite, pyridoxine hydrochloride (source of vitamin B6), , vitamin B12 supplement, riboflavin (vitamin B2), vitamin D3 supplement, folic acid.

    #113963 Report Abuse
    anonymous
    Member

    Where does it say it is hydrolyzed? Nowhere, from what I can see. It might be a good food but in no way does it compare to a prescription food.

    https://www.petco.com/shop/en/petcostore/product/wholehearted-grain-free-lid-salmon-adult-dog-food

    #113964 Report Abuse
    #113965 Report Abuse
    anonymous
    Member

    Yep, one ingredient is hydrolyzed. That’s nice, still no comparison to prescription /therapeutic food
    Marketing.
    Like “all natural” LOL

    #113966 Report Abuse
    haleycookie
    Member

    Haha anon I take it you’ve never looked at a prescription hydrolyzed diet. They consist of a SINGLE hydrolyzed protein (in Royal Canin it’s soy so not even a meat) this food is limited ingredient, grain free and has a SINGLE hydrolyzed protein. Try again buddy. 😉

    #113967 Report Abuse
    anonymous
    Member

    I have used prescription/therapeutic dog foods with good effect.
    Commercial dog foods do not compare.
    Please speak to a veterinary healthcare professional, preferably a veterinarian that has examined your dog for more details.
    Good luck.

    #113968 Report Abuse

    The wholehearted reads very similar to the blue buffalo prescription diets (who knew those existed?) again, it goes back to answering the posters question, not harassing them until they leave because they never got a straight answer. I’m glad to know wholehearted exists

    #113969 Report Abuse
    anonymous
    Member

    “it goes back to answering the posters question, not harassing them until they leave because they never got a straight answer”

    Any veterinary healthcare professional knows you do not give specific advice (medical or diet) unless you have actually examined the dog and reviewed it’s history.

    I would appreciate it if you would stop harassing me.
    Thanks

    #113971 Report Abuse

    He wasn’t asking for specific advice. He was asking if there was a non prescription option for Hydrolyzed foods. Turns out, there is! Therefore, haleycookie answered the question, and you’ve since blown things out of proportion. We all know vets are a wonderful thing, but I don’t call my doctor every time I have a question regarding my diet or a scratch. Your vet must love you.

    Please look up the definition of harassment, as many of your posts would fall into that category. Again, answer the question.

    #113977 Report Abuse

    But that’s false because there IS a food that is Hydrolyzed that is not prescription. No one was saying that it compares. To flat out say no is wrong information and misleading. It’s HIS decision to make what he feeds his dog based on the information he has available. It would be wrong to mislead a poster.

    #113979 Report Abuse
    anonymous
    Member

    You voice your opinion. I voice my opinion.
    Only one ingredient in the non prescription food is hydrolyzed.
    I don’t think you understand marketing techniques. Whatever.
    Later, Z

    #113981 Report Abuse

    In every prescription food that is marketed as Hydrolyzed, only one ingredient is hydrolyzed. So that’s marketing, too?

    #113986 Report Abuse
    Joshua W
    Member

    anon101, I’m curious if you have an agenda such as being a prescription/therapeutic dog food rep or a vet who often writes these prescriptions? Or maybe you just place a ton of confidence in your vet and very little in people’s abilities to think critically. I wouldn’t blame you for either, people generally suck at critical thinking.

    To everyone else – thank you! Clearly the protein is what you want to hydrolyze since it’s what’s causing the reaction, and looking at royal canin’s HP https://www.chewy.com/royal-canin-veterinary-diet/dp/35621 the protein there is the only hydrolyzed ingredient and as haleycookie said, it’s soy.

    I hope people here don’t put so much faith in their vet that they don’t ask questions or use their own critical thinking. Experiencing malpractice will make you realize very quickly that your doc or vet is just like your mechanic. They work on stuff for YOU. The fact that it’s very important stuff means you need to understand more, not less. Of course that doesn’t mean go on WebMD and self-diagnose all the time, that’ll just piss em off : )

    I’ll definitely look into Whole Hearted!

    #113995 Report Abuse

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