Milk Thistle for Humans

Dog Food Advisor Forums Diet and Health Milk Thistle for Humans

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  • #79463 Report Abuse

    Susie
    Member

    Please advise a good milk thistle for a 10 lb dog. I see some have alcohol in them. I need to protect my dog’s liver after having him vomit with peroxide, after eating a plastic ball. 🙁 Any other things I can do to protect him? He ate pumpkin, chicken and rice with a ton of added water, shortly after he hurled and seems to be doing well but I feel bad for him. His vet has sucraflate for me to pick up but I am unsure if he needs more chemicals in his little body.

    #79490 Report Abuse

    Anonymous
    Member

    Please communicate with your vet as to how to proceed with the treatment of your pet.
    Prescribed medications are often an important part of treatment, some supplements can cause even more damage. http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2015/10/unregulated-herbal-products-and-supplements-send-23000-people-to-the-emergency-room-annually-in-the-u-s/
    PS: Call the vet’s office and leave a message for him to call you back when he has a minute. Best of luck.

    #79491 Report Abuse

    C4D
    Member

    Did you contact your vet for the initial correct dosage of peroxide to use? If you did, it’s common for dogs to vomit for a short time after. Did you feed him immediately after the first vomiting?

    #79492 Report Abuse

    Susie
    Member

    Yea I called his vet first. I gave him less than she said because it worked before with a lesser dose when our other dog drank coffee. Once I was sure he was finished vomiting I did feed him. Is that ok? He didn’t vinit after he ate.

    #79493 Report Abuse

    Anonymous
    Member

    Has the dog been examined by the vet? He may need an x-ray to rule out a blockage.
    Especially if symptoms of distress have continued beyond 72 hours.
    The sucraflate might be a good idea, discuss with your vet.

    #79494 Report Abuse

    Susie
    Member

    There’s no blockage. He vomited the tiny piece he chewed. He’s fine. I just want to be proactive and help him out just in case the peroxide damaged him internally.

    #79495 Report Abuse

    Susie
    Member

    He’s going in for a checkup which will include labs etc so that will give me peace of mind. If I really thought he was sick he’d be at the vet right now. He’s eating, playing and happy. I am a holistic approach person and want to counteract the peroxide.

    #79496 Report Abuse

    Anonymous
    Member

    Less is better, make sure he is getting adequate fluids and bland meals. If I were you, I would go pick up the sucraflate and start right away as prescribed. Don’t be afraid to ask for more information about this medication from your veterinarian.

    PS: The peroxide can burn the stomach, sucraflate can coat the stomach and is soothing….if I remember correctly.

    #79497 Report Abuse

    C4D
    Member

    I’ve had to make fosters that have eaten strange things vomit using peroxide per vets instructions. You should have fasted him. He probably vomited because his stomach was still upset. Check with your vet to make sure all is well. You wouldn’t use milk thistle for this. Good luck!

    • This reply was modified 4 years ago by  C4D.
    #79500 Report Abuse

    Susie
    Member

    you are misunderstanding me. My dog only threw up once, which was right after I gave him peroxide. He got rid of the plastic. 10 min later I gave him bland chicken rice pumpkin and water. He ate it. Has not vomited again. I had to ask vet if there was anything To soothe his tummy. She didn’t volunteer any coating medication. FYI milk histle is a liver cleanse. Has nothing to do with his vomiting. I wanted to cleanse the poor baby after ingesting peroxide.

    #79501 Report Abuse

    Anonymous
    Member

    “His vet has sucraflate for me to pick up but I am unsure if he needs more chemicals in his little body”.

    Sucraflate is an anti ulcer med, therefore, it would be soothing to a irritated stomach.

    Milk thistle is a food supplement…..

    Ps: There is no reason to suspect liver damage/ irritation unless your vet suggests differently, after examination and testing..

    #79502 Report Abuse

    C4D
    Member

    Hi Jennifer D,

    Sorry if I misunderstood your post about the vomiting. I thought he threw up after he ate. If you reread it and see the punctuation, you might see why I misread it.

    Anyway, I absolutely understand the purpose of milk thistle and have used it successfully for dogs with serious liver issues. I’m aware of its liver cleansing properties as well. The peroxide generally doesn’t make it into the system since it’s vomited out and the dosage, if done correctly is minimal. There should be no need for milk thistle as a liver cleanse.

    #79503 Report Abuse

    Susie
    Member

    Thanks. I can see why you could perhaps read it that way. I just had a other dog under anesthesia for dental extractions. He could maybe benefit from milk thistle. What’s your opinion? I have heard so many saying yes, and so many saying no. Back to Tucker and the peroxide, I think I will pass on the rx from the vet. My luck he would be allergic to it and make things worse.

    #79504 Report Abuse

    C4D
    Member

    Dogs Naturally & Whole Dog Journal have some information on usage. I generally only give it after vaccines in my normal liver value dogs. Mine are large. If you use the liquid, don’t use the alcohol based one. I got a vegetable glycerin based one from the vitamin shoppe.

    #79506 Report Abuse

    Anonymous
    Member

    Found some information on Milk Thistle here, if anyone is interested. You may find the comments to the article helpful as well. Excerpt from article below http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2011/04/milk-thistle-in-dogs-and-cats/

    As far as risks, there appear to be few. Nausea, diarrhea, and other gastrointestinal effects are sometimes seen, and allergic reactions have been reported in humans.

    So overall, the in vitro and laboratory animal evidence indicates it is plausible that milk thistle extract might have beneficial effects, though harmful effects in some situations could be expected as well. In humans, the clinical trials show weak evidence for benefit in diabetics and inconsistent but generally negative evidence for benefit in alcoholic or hepatitis-associated liver disease. Very little experimental, and apparently no high quality or controlled clinical research exists in dogs and cats. What there is suggests a benefit is possible. But we must bear in mind that preliminary, low-quality trials of milk thistle in humans looked promising but were not supported by subsequent better quality trials.

    #79508 Report Abuse

    Anonymous
    Member

    “Sucralfate is an antiulcer medication. It coats ulcers in the digestive system and protects them from further damage from stomach acid. It is used in the treatment of ulcers of the esophagus, stomach, or small intestine of dogs, cats, and other pets. It may prevent ulcers in animals taking aspirin or other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Sucralfate can affect the absorption of many other medications. Do not give any medications within 2 hours of giving sucralfate. Side effects are rare. Contact your veterinarian if your pet experiences constipation while being treated with sucralfate. With long-term use, the aluminum in sucralfate may accumulate in the brain, or in the bones, causing the bones to weaken”.
    Excerpt from article at Doctors Foster and Smith Pet Education . com

    #79509 Report Abuse

    C4D
    Member

    Red,

    Are you familiar with liver disease in dogs, including high ALT? Are you familiar with Denamarin? It is a PRESCRIPTION medication given by vets to support liver function. Do you know what the ingredients are in Denamarin? They are Sam-e and MILK THISTLE. I have actually reduced high ALT from well over 300 to the completely normal (actually on the low side of normal) on a dog diagnosed with chronic hepatitis using a combination of Sam-e and MILK THISTLE (the vet verified that this could be used in place of the prescription). I use vets and Lab tests, so this is not guessing, Voodoo or witchcraft. I also know many people who have done the same that are knowledgable people in the dog world who also used vets to diagnose, etc. that have successfully used this therapy.

    Here are some links to studies or research done:

    http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1939-1676.2011.0743.x/full

    http://www.fvmace.org/FVMA%2082nd%20Annual%20Conference/Proceedings/Update%20On%20Management%20of%20Liver%20Disease%20in%20Dogs.pdf

    This is for humans, and it includes many diseases unrelated to the liver, but it does suggest that there is efficacy in milk thistle use:

    http://www.mayoclinic.org/drugs-supplements/milk-thistle/evidence/hrb-20059806

    You might want to consider reading other sources besides skeptvet.

    #79510 Report Abuse

    Anonymous
    Member

    LOL! I am a licensed healthcare professional (not animals, humans) so, yes I am familiar with various medications and such.
    Why are you folks so angry? If you don’t agree with anything you see posted, just say so and post your opinion and rationale why. No need to make it personal. Easy-peasy 🙂

    PS: A doctor I worked with once told me that many of the homeopathic supplements are in fact effective, however it is impossible to get the dosage correct, therefore making them unreliable. I have admitted people to the hospital from an ER setting carrying paper bags full of supplements that had to be discarded. So, I have formed my own opinion.

    #79511 Report Abuse

    C4D
    Member

    Um, I don’t post complaints about Trolls to the forum if my comments aren’t accepted or agreed with and I post links that include both traditional and alternative methods that have a bearing on the issue and only when I have experience concerning the topic. 😉

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