Heart Murmur in 4 month old puppy

Dog Food Advisor Forums Diet and Health Heart Murmur in 4 month old puppy

Viewing 11 posts - 1 through 11 (of 11 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #129616 Report Abuse

    Tami M
    Member

    Our puppy has a Grade V-VI continuous machinery heart murmur. It is very significant and can be felt when you place your hand on her chest. I want to make sure she has the absolute best life possible so I am putting money aside to take her and have ultrasounds done on her heart. The Vet has told us what to watch for and instructed us to keep a good eye on her. In the meantime I am trying to find the best food possible for her condition and size. She is a 4 month old Chihuahua/Beagle mix. The Vet told us that she needs a high protein food and will need to eat more than she would if she wasn’t affected by a heart murmur. She has recommended Hills Science Diet Healthy Advantage for small breed puppies, but I have never been a fan of Science Diet and it seems like most of the Vets in our area really seem to push that brand. Can anyone suggest a good quality food for our baby? I have noticed that some foods will make her regurgitate a little even hours after she has eaten. Thank you all for any suggestions and information you can share.

    #129621 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    The food your veterinarian recommended is a prescription food and appears to be the best option for your dog.
    I notice that it comes in canned, maybe she would do better with soft food.
    https://www.hillspet.com/dog-food/ha-puppy-dry

    Lot’s of misinformation out there. I would continue work closely with your vet for the best possible outcome.
    Science based information here: http://skeptvet.com/Blog/category/nutrition/

    #129623 Report Abuse

    crazy4cats
    Member

    Hi Tami-
    I agree with Anon. A prescription diet from Royal Canin, Hills or Purina is the absolute best way to go! They have years of research and testing behind them. Do not listen to the internet grain free boutique hype. Those foods are having very negative effects on our dogs!

    Good luck with your puppy. In hope he grows out of it.

    #129624 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    I forgot to mention, you probably know, it may be best to feed several small meals throughout the day instead of one or two big meals. Divide up the same total amount.

    #129627 Report Abuse

    Sanne
    Member

    Completely agree with the others here. Please listen to your vet and keep her on the prescription food if that is what they are recommending. I wouldn’t mess around with a pup with a heart murmur that young.

    I know the ingredients do not look the best but it’s not just about ingredients. It’s about how those ingredients come together and work in the end product, especially when your dog already has a health issue. Science Diet (along with Royal Canin) have a long history of proven success with their prescription foods.

    #129641 Report Abuse

    joanne l
    Member

    If you don’t like science diet ask your vet about Royal Canine. Also cook some chicken breast for her. Boil it and cut it up and store it in a container and give her some with the dry food. That is good quality protein. Like others have said Rx diet is best because with this condition you need to be careful. But I feel fresh cooked chicken is best to give with the dry food. Since the vet said she needs more protein. If you do give her fresh chicken cut a little back on the dry food. Also, tell your vet what you are doing so they know. Best of luck to you. I hope she will be okay. Oh one more thing when you boil the chicken put a carrot in there and boil together and mash the carrot into the chicken, It can store in the refrigerator for 4 days. Fresh is always best.

    #129642 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Chicken is naturally high in sodium.

    Check with your vet first, usually cardiac diets are low sodium.

    Adding anything other than water to a prescription food defeats the purpose.

    #129643 Report Abuse

    Sanne
    Member

    I wouldn’t say chicken is naturally high in sodium. A lot of meats have added salt sure, so that is something to look out for. But just by looking at the Mg of sodium per serving you can easily pick out which ones have salt added.

    I used to homecook for my past dog with cardiac issues with the go ahead from my vet. The food was where it needed to be in sodium, regardless of the type of protein I used (beef, chicken, goat, venison). Use common sense when buying meat for the dogs and pass it by your vet.

    #129644 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Quote “I used to homecook for my past dog with cardiac issues with the go ahead from my vet.”
    But, this is a different dog with a very serious cardiac condition.

    Quote “Our puppy has a Grade V-VI continuous machinery heart murmur”.
    Sounds like you need a veterinary cardiology consult, stat.

    #129645 Report Abuse

    Sanne
    Member

    Indeed. That is why I made the point to get the go ahead from their vet before attempting to alter food

    #129646 Report Abuse

    joanne l
    Member

    I also stated to let the vet know. With any serious condition you should ask the vet, that goes without saying. Fresh chicken breast has minimal sodium, plus when boiling it can reduce it as well. You drain it before serving.

    • This reply was modified 5 months, 1 week ago by  joanne l.
Viewing 11 posts - 1 through 11 (of 11 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.