Tripett Dog Food (Canned)

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Rating: ★★★★★

Tripett Dog Food receives the Advisor’s top rating of 5 stars.

The Tripett product line includes five canned dog foods, intended for AAFCO nutrient profiles supplemental feeding only.

The following is a list of recipes available at the time of this review.

  • Tripett Green Bison Tripe
  • Tripett Original Green Beef Tripe
  • Tripett Green Beef Tripe and Venison
  • Tripett New Zealand Green Lamb Tripe
  • Tripett Green Beef Tripe, Duck and Salmon

Tripett New Zealand Green Lamb Tripe was selected to represent the other products in the line for this review.

Tripett New Zealand Green Lamb Tripe

Canned Dog Food

Estimated Dry Matter Nutrient Content

Protein = 55% | Fat = 35% | Carbs = 3%

Ingredients: New Zealand lamb tripe, water, garlic, carrageenan gum

Fiber (estimated dry matter content) = 2.5%

Red items when present indicate controversial ingredients

Estimated Nutrient Content
MethodProteinFatCarbs
Guaranteed Analysis11%7%NA
Dry Matter Basis55%35%3%
Calorie Weighted Basis39%60%2%

The first ingredient in this dog food is lamb tripe. Tripe usually consists of the first three chambers of a cud-chewing animal’s stomach. As unappetizing as it may seem to us humans, tripe is favored by dogs and sometimes even includes the stomach’s contents, too.

The second ingredient is water, which adds nothing but moisture to this food. Water is a routine finding in most canned dog foods.

The third ingredient is garlic which can be a controversial item. Although most experts favor the ingredient for its numerous health benefits, garlic (in rare cases) has been linked to Heinz body anemia in dogs.1

However, the limited professional literature we surveyed provided no definitive warnings regarding the use of garlic — especially when used in small amounts (as it likely is here).

The fourth ingredient is carrageenan gum, a gelatin-like thickening agent extracted from seaweed. Although carrageenan has been used as a food additive for hundreds of years, there appears to be some recent controversy regarding its long term biological safety.

We find no added vitamins or minerals on the ingredients list. We would assume these essential nutrients are provided by the food ingredients in the recipe.

Tripett Dog Food
The Bottom Line

Like similar designs, this Tripett dog food is unique in its simplicity.

But being 100% meat, the product was never intended to be fed as a complete and balanced canine diet.

Tripett is a supplement — and a supplement only.

Because they probably lack some essential nutrients, supplemental dog foods should not be fed continuously as the sole item in a dog’s diet.

We prefer to use a product like this as a special treat. Or as an appetizing topper to be served over a dry kibble.

With that in mind…

Judging by its ingredients alone, Tripett looks like an above-average wet product.

But ingredient quality by itself cannot tell the whole story. We still need to estimate the product’s meat content before determining a final rating.

The dashboard displays a dry matter protein reading of 55%, a fat level of 35% and estimated carbohydrates of about 3%.

As a group, the brand features an average protein content of 52% and a mean fat level of 30%. Together, these figures suggest a carbohydrate content of 10% for the overall product line.

And a fat-to-protein ratio of about 58%.

Above-average protein. Above-average fat. And below-average carbs when compared to a typical wet dog food.

Free of any plant-based protein boosters, this looks like the profile of a wet product containing an abundance of meat.

Bottom line?

Tripett is a meat-based canned product using a significant amount of tripe from various species as its main source of animal protein, thus earning the brand 5 stars.

Enthusiastically recommended for supplemental feeding only.

Special Alert

Rice ingredients can sometimes contain arsenic. Until the US FDA establishes safe upper levels for arsenic content, pet owners may wish to limit the total amount of rice fed in a dog's daily diet.

A Final Word

The descriptions and analyses expressed in this and every article on this website represent the views and opinions of the author.

Although it's our goal to ensure all the information on this website is correct, we cannot guarantee its completeness or its accuracy; nor can we commit to ensuring all the material is kept up-to-date on a daily basis.

Each review is offered in good faith and has been designed to help you make a more informed decision when buying dog food.

However, our rating system is not intended to suggest feeding a particular product will result in specific health benefits for your pet.

For a better understanding of how we analyze each product, please read our article, "The Problem with Dog Food Reviews".

Remember, no dog food can possibly be appropriate for every life stage, lifestyle or health condition. So, choose wisely. And when in doubt, consult a qualified veterinary professional for help.

In closing, we do not accept money, gifts or samples from pet food companies in exchange for special consideration in the preparation of our reviews or ratings.

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Have an opinion about this dog food? Or maybe the review itself? Please know we welcome your comments.

Notes and Updates

12/26/2010 Original review
04/19/2014 Last Update

  1. Yamato et al, Heinz Body hemolytic anemia with eccentrocytosis from ingestion of Chinese chive (Allium tuberosum) and garlic (Allium sativum) in a dog, Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association 41:68-73 (2005)
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  • Pattyvaughn

    Good info!!

  • charlie

    I’m not an expert but here is an article written by an expert on the dangers of carageenan.

    I doubt if there is any substance that everyone agrees is harmless. This article will add to your knowledge on carageenan and may help you make a decision. Good Luck!

    http://www.drweil.com/drw/u/QAA401181/Is-Carrageenan-Safe.html

  • Pattyvaughn

    I have no idea if the stuff is really harmful or not and I’m sure that small exposures are ok, but I can tell you that for my dogs, I won’t feed something with caregeenan in it every day. I rotate. I might feed something with it for a few days and then I move on to something that doesn’t have it for a few days, just in case. I wouldn’t toss it.