Royal Canin Medium (Dry)

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Rating: ★★½☆☆

Royal Canin Medium Dog Food receives the Advisor’s second lowest tier rating of 2.5 stars.

The Royal Canin Medium Dog Food product line includes eight dry recipes, six claimed to meet AAFCO nutrient profiles for adult maintenance and two for growth (Puppy).

The following is a list of recipes available at the time of this review.

  • Royal Canin Medium Adult
  • Royal Canin Medium Puppy
  • Royal Canin Medium Adult 7+
  • Royal Canin Medium Adult 10+
  • Royal Canin Medium Spayed/Neutered
  • Royal Canin Medium Starter (3.5 stars)
  • Royal Canin Medium Sensitive Digestion
  • Royal Canin Medium Weight Care (3 stars)

Royal Canin Medium Adult was selected to represent the other products in the line for this review.

Royal Canin Medium Adult

Dry Dog Food

Estimated Dry Matter Nutrient Content

Protein = 26% | Fat = 13% | Carbs = 53%

Ingredients: Brewers rice, chicken by-product meal, wheat, corn gluten meal, oat groats, chicken fat, natural flavors, dried beet pulp, fish oil, calcium carbonate, grain distillers dried yeast, vegetable oil, potassium chloride, monocalcium phosphate, salt, hydrolyzed yeast, l-lysine, choline chloride, vitamins [dl-alpha tocopherol (source of vitamin E), l-ascorbyl-2-polyphosphate (source of vitamin C), biotin, d-calcium pantothenate, vitamin A acetate, niacin, pyridoxine hydrochloride (vitamin B6), thiamine mononitrate (vitamin B1), vitamin B12 supplement, riboflavin (vitamin B2), folic acid, vitamin D3 supplement], trace minerals (zinc proteinate, zinc oxide, ferrous sulfate, manganese proteinate, manganous oxide, copper sulfate, calcium iodate, sodium selenite, copper proteinate), rosemary extract, preserved with natural mixed tocopherols and citric acid

Fiber (estimated dry matter content) = 3.4%

Red items when present indicate controversial ingredients

Estimated Nutrient Content
MethodProteinFatCarbs
Guaranteed Analysis23%12%NA
Dry Matter Basis26%13%53%
Calorie Weighted Basis23%29%48%

The first ingredient in this dog food is brewers rice. Brewers rice is a cereal grain by-product consisting of the small fragments left over after milling whole rice. Aside from the caloric energy it contains, this item is of only modest nutritional value to a dog.

The second ingredient is chicken by-product meal, a dry rendered product of slaughterhouse waste. It’s made from what’s left of a slaughtered chicken after all the prime cuts have been removed.

In addition to organs (the nourishing part), this stuff can contain almost anything — feet, beaks, undeveloped eggs — anything except quality skeletal muscle (conventional meat).

On the brighter side, by-product meals are meat concentrates and contain nearly 300% more protein than fresh chicken.

In any case, although this item contains all the amino acids a dog needs, we consider chicken by-products an inexpensive, lower quality ingredient.

The third ingredient is wheat. Like corn, wheat is an inexpensive and controversial cereal grain of only modest nutritional value to a dog.

For this reason, we do not consider wheat a preferred component in any dog food.

The fourth ingredient is corn gluten meal. Gluten is the rubbery residue remaining once corn has had most of its starchy carbohydrate washed out of it.

Compared to meat, glutens are inferior grain-based proteins lower in some of the essential amino acids dogs need for life.

This inexpensive plant-based ingredient can significantly boost the total protein reported on the label — a factor that must be considered when judging the actual meat content of this dog food.

The fifth ingredient is oat groats, a whole grain, minimally processed form of oats. With the exception of their caloric content and the fact they’re also gluten free, oat groats can be considered average in nutritional value.

The sixth ingredient is chicken fat. Chicken fat is obtained from rendering chicken, a process similar to making soup in which the fat itself is skimmed from the surface of the liquid.

Chicken fat is high in linoleic acid, an omega-6 fatty acid essential for life. Although it doesn’t sound very appetizing, chicken fat is actually a quality ingredient.

After the natural flavor, we find beet pulp. Beet pulp is a controversial ingredient, a high fiber by-product of sugar beet processing.

Some denounce beet pulp as an inexpensive filler while others cite its outstanding intestinal health and blood sugar benefits.

We only call your attention here to the controversy and believe the inclusion of beet pulp in reasonable amounts in most dog foods is entirely acceptable.

The ninth ingredient is fish oil. Fish oil is naturally rich in the prized EPA and DHA type of omega-3 fatty acids. These two high quality fats boast the highest bio-availability to dogs and humans.

Depending on its level of freshness and purity, fish oil should be considered a commendable addition.

From here, the list goes on to include a number of other items.

But to be realistic, ingredients located this far down the list (other than nutritional supplements) are not likely to affect the overall rating of this product.

With three notable exceptions

First, vegetable oil is a generic oil of unknown origin. The ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 fats in any oil is nutritionally critical and can vary significantly (depending on the source).

Without knowing more, it’s impossible to judge the quality of an item so vaguely described. However, compared to a named animal fat, a generic vegetable oil cannot be considered a quality ingredient.

Next, we find no mention of probiotics, friendly bacteria applied to the surface of the kibble after processing to help with digestion.

And lastly, this food also contains chelated minerals, minerals that have been chemically attached to protein. This makes them easier to absorb. Chelated minerals are usually found in better dog foods.

Royal Canin Medium Dog Food
The Bottom Line

Judging by its ingredients alone, Royal Canin Medium Dog Food looks like a below average dry product.

But ingredient quality by itself cannot tell the whole story. We still need to estimate the product’s meat content before determining a final rating.

The dashboard displays a dry matter protein reading of 26%, a fat level of 13% and estimated carbohydrates of about 53%.

As a group, the brand features an average protein content of 28% and a mean fat level of 16%. Together, these figures suggest a carbohydrate content of 48% for the overall product line.

And a fat-to-protein ratio of about 56%.

Near-average protein. Near-average fat. And near-average carbs when compared to a typical dry dog food.

When you consider the protein-boosting effects of the corn gluten meal and the wheat gluten contained in other recipes, this looks like the profile of a kibble containing a moderate amount of meat.

Bottom line?

Royal Canin Medium is a plant-based dry dog food using a moderate amount of chicken by-product or chicken meals as its main sources of animal protein, thus earning the brand 2.5 stars.

Not recommended.

Please note certain recipes are sometimes given a higher or lower rating based upon our estimate of their total meat content.

Special Alert

Rice ingredients can sometimes contain arsenic. Until the US FDA establishes safe upper levels for arsenic content, pet owners may wish to limit the total amount of rice fed in a dog's daily diet.

A Final Word

The descriptions and analyses expressed in this and every article on this website represent the views and opinions of the author.

Although it's our goal to ensure all the information on this website is correct, we cannot guarantee its completeness or its accuracy; nor can we commit to ensuring all the material is kept up-to-date on a daily basis.

Each review is offered in good faith and has been designed to help you make a more informed decision when buying dog food.

However, due to the biological uniqueness of every animal, none of our ratings are intended to suggest feeding a particular product will result in a specific dietary response or health benefit for your pet.

For a better understanding of how we analyze each product, please read our article, "The Problem with Dog Food Reviews".

Remember, no dog food can possibly be appropriate for every life stage, lifestyle or health condition. So, choose wisely. And when in doubt, consult a qualified veterinary professional for help.

In closing, we do not accept money, gifts or samples from pet food companies in exchange for special consideration in the preparation of our reviews or ratings.

To learn how we support the cost of operating this website, please visit our public Disclosure and Disclaimer page.

Have an opinion about this dog food? Or maybe the review itself? Please know we welcome your comments.

Notes and Updates

01/20/2010 Original review
08/22/2010 Review updated
03/12/2012 Review updated
09/24/2013 Review updated
09/24/2013 Last Update

  • Shinji’s Soul Reaver

    “negative facts” Yeah you are a real brainiac. Let’s ignore this respected website and listen to a backyard breeder who contributes to the dog overpopulation problem and feeds crap.

  • guest

    Nothing wrong with this food whatsoever! I have a Yorkie and an Imperial Shih-tzu who have been on RC since they were puppies. Healthy, happy, shiny coats, never been sick! I also am a Breeder and my litter as well as mom was on the RC Birth Programme and thrived on it! Seriously some people need to back up their negative facts here!

  • Shawna

    I have a dog that was born with kidney disease and I can tell you that the diets backed by “research” such as Science Diet are completely inappropriate for her. In fact, vets are prescribing kidney diets long before they are necessary and this can cause more harm than good. NEW research has demonstrated this over and over again but Science Diet and the likes want to continue basing their diets on the old research —– the research that was done on rats not dogs. It’s quite sad really!!!!!

    Here’s some data on it by one such researcher and vet Dr. Kenneth Bovee. Bolded emphasis mine

    “Evidence that high protein diets enhance
    renal function in normal dogs has led to confusion among veterinarians who have been told for decades that low protein diets may be beneficial for kidney function…..

    Why Have We Chosen to Keep the Reduced Protein Myth?

    The myth has been maintained even in the past decade despite negative scientific evidence because the dogma has persisted about its value for the past 40 years. If we as professionals are uncertain about the facts concerning a controversy, we are likely to put ourselves in someone else’s hands who appears to have authority. Power to command this authority is in the hands of commercial advertisements that promote these special products with misleading messages. Marketing is aggressively aimed at veterinarians and owners alike. There is a profit motive for veterinarians to sell these diets….

    In conclusion, the continued existence of this false myth about dietary protein is an uncomfortable reminder of the lack of sophistication, lack of critical thought, and reliance on oversimplified and attractive dogma that persists in our profession. This is only one example of many false myths,
    misinformation, and partial truths that are repeated from decade to decade.” http://www.dogaware.com/files/bovee.pdf

  • theBCnut

    Meghan, the people on this site are not “gung-ho” about feeding dogs “veggies and potatos,” We are all about feeding dogs meat. You favor foods that have a whole lot of science behind them so they can figure out how to use cheap, poor ingredients and turn them into something that dogs can live on. We favor feeding dogs what they were meant to eat in the first place, meat. Carbs are a necessary evil for a binder in kibble. Dogs don’t need them. They are much more efficient at converting fat into usable energy than people are and the were made to do just that. Dogs get all the amino acids they need from meat and in balanced ratios too. Yes, science has helped to make better processed food, but scientists have found that you absorb nutrients better when they are in a natural form rather than processed or synthetic. Dogs don’t get much of anything at all from plants that aren’t processed, since they have very little ability to deal with cell walls at all. So how does it make sense to feed even more of something they weren’t designed to eat?

    And why are you posting under 2 different identities?

  • Guest

    A lot of low quality food is high in sodium…making your pet drink more…hence pee more. I agreed with your choice of food! It is upsetting when people give it a bad rep. But on this site I think vet prescribed food is the minority, everyone is so gung-ho about the “holistic” lifestyle they haven’t stopped to think “is this what my pet really needs? veggies and potatoes?” Food based on science and clinical studies is far better than just looks if you ask me ;)

  • shayvoe

    I am very aware of the how to determine the quality of dog food by the label. I have Cavalier King Charles Spaniels, and do not feed the breed specific, but the kibble for small dogs. I started them on this food because most of the English owners of the breed, where the breed originated, use this food, and it was recommended to me by an English breeder, and many of the show breeders use it as well. I have tried Wellness, and many of the other higher rated brands. Cost was not an issue, because RC is as expensive as the other top rated brands. My dogs never did well on those foods….they had diarrhea with most of them….they seemed to be too rich for them. I always went back to RC. If a dog is healthy, has a good coat, loves the food, why change? I think it is outrageous to call a food dangerous, because it is not considered a top brand. A dangerous food is one that has melamine, or salmonella.

  • VideoboyMatt

    What many people don’t know is that there are many brands of dog food who cost the same and are quite a bit better. The first ingredient should be an identifiable meat..such as Chicken, Duck, Salmon, etc. A good dog food should not have corn as it is hard for them to digest. People who buy into the “breed” specific crap are victims of a marketing ploy. One breed does not have different dietary needs than another. While Royal Canine isn’t the worlds worst food..like Walmart Brand stuff, or Kibbles and Bits, it is by no means near the best dog foods.

  • BajaDogs LaPaz

    I’ve been giving RC puppy then Dachshund formula to my 2 dachshunds since they were 8 weeks old. my 14.5 year old long haired dachsie is gorgeous and still bounces around like a puppy. my 11 year old short haired is just as energetic and healthy, just not a bouncy type dog. I would recommend RC to anyone.

  • Nancy Ferrero

    All I know about this brand is that my diabetic yellow lab would eat Anything. Always hungry never satisfied, Loved all food until we were prescribed this brand by our vet for his diabetes and he HATED it. He Gagged every time he ate. I regret that I listened to my vet and did not get a second opinion. The lastyear of his life he ate this horrible tasting dog food.

  • Sara

    I had my dog on this food for a year and noticed her stool was solid for the first bit, then turned into diarrhea in the last bit. I changed her diet to homemade food and her stool is nice and solid now. The vet said the diarrhea was due to parasites, but now that is fixed just by changing diet I am happy that I saved the money i would have paid for unnecessary drug.

  • InkedMarie

    Kay, does your last name begin with a G & have “by” at the end? If yes, we’re on the same list. I don’t post much but I’m Marie with Boone

  • Kay

    I changed my Petit Basset Griffon Vendeen (PBGV) over to this food several months ago because he was having accidents overnight on his previous food. I have been very satisfied with this food for him and he no longer has any problems overnight. I am sorry to read your review as now I feel guilty about feeding him this food, but it has worked wonders for him. I will keep him on it. It is expensive and it’s upsetting to read that it appears to be inadequate.

  • shayvoe

    Dangerous?! I have a 7 year old and a 10 year old who have been on this food since puppies. They are healthy, have beautiful coats, potty once a day with perfectly formed stool, never have stomach upsets, and are a perfect weight for their breed. What is dangerous is to call a dog food dangerous with no facts to back it up.

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  • Pattyvaughn

    It’s due for updating next month. With over 3000 different dog foods to look at Dr. Mike cannot be on top of every little change the moment it happens. But he does appreciate when people notice a change, posting about it to let him know. If it’s a big change, he will move up the planned date for updating that formula, otherwise expect to see an update around 9/12/13.

  • Goo

    This review is weong. RC reformulated to chicken by-product meal in lieu of chicken meal months ago. If you are going to it information out there for people please make sure it is actually accurate and you are staying up on the changes.

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  • dwreck2you

    full of fillers and gmo cornmeal –stay away from this dangerous overly priced food for your pets

  • Bart Noll

    something must have changed. My yorkie has been on royal canin for 9 yrs and just in the past few months has starting itching badly.

  • Pattyvaughn

    How long has she been eating the same food? I have a dog that used to do that all the time, until I read up on rotating diet and decided that it made sense. Now, he can’t wait for me to put his food down, and he eats whatever I give him every time.

  • http://www.facebook.com/tiana.d.fernandes Tiana De Senna Fernandes

    Hi my 9 year old rotty is refusing to eat her RC. Going 24, 36 & longer without any food. Just sniffs and walks away. I get desperate and cook rice or pasta which she happily eats. Has the RC formula changed? Is she trying to tell me there is something wrong with it?

  • Meganhunt

    Really $16 is nothing compared to a high quality food

  • JellyCat

     I would definitely stop feeding this food after such findings. However, I would not blame the food instantaneously. I would switch her on similar food like Natural Balance Venison&Potato and repeat her blood work in a couple of weeks.

  • JellyCat

     Your vet probably also sells it in his office.

  • JellyCat

    Of course they do have plenty of nutritionists and researchers. They must ensure the best results with least spending on ingredients.
    Judging by a quality of ingredients that they use in their formulas, they are shamelessly ripping you off, because this food is not cheap.

  • Nchang84

    I think when there is any questions about the pet food that you are feeding your dog, better to contact the company directly, I know RC has a team of vets and nutritionist that can respond to some of your concerns.

  • CarolAnn14

    Since they eliminated the Beauty Care 26 my black and white Paps are going gray and no other product comes close to the 26. They are losing weight and scratching. @$16 a bag it’s hard to keep changing to find something that works

  • Pavle Barta

    I tested lots of super premium dog foods. In the end, we were back to Royal Canin. As I have show dogs, it is very important to me that they look healthy and strong. Their hair looked best when I fed them RC. I tried better rated dry foods but the results were unsatisfying. I have wire hair fox terriers. So, it does not mean that RC will suit best all dogs, but it has proved to be the best for my dogs. One more thing – since I live in Europe, the ingredients differ a little bit comparing to RC Medium Adult you can buy here. 

  • http://www.dfwpugs.com/ sandy

    Ooops!  It also say’s “soil oil” instead of “soya oil”.

  • Shawna

    Hey Dr. Mike ~~

    I just noticed your comments on “yeast extract” and glutamic adic/MSG…  THANK YOU :)

  • Kelly

    AG, I had exactly the same problem with my sheltie while she was on royal canin (she was on the satiety support vet formula). I switched to a 5 star food (brothers complete), and I need to brush her teeth and then see what happens.

  • AG

    i have an 8 month old yorkie and have been feeding her royal canin for the past 6 months. i had to take her to the vet to get her teeth cleaned (they were completely brown…). 5 days later, her teeth have brown spots again… do you know of any similar problems? i’m starting to believe it’s the food… thanks, A 

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  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1533660795 Jack Parker

    http://www.zooplus.co.uk/shop/dogs/dry_dog_food/royal_canin_size/medium/13570

    this has recently changed the packaging and ingredients this is new one that has 21 instead of 18 days in the top right corner of the pack.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1533660795 Jack Parker

    the packaging has recently been changed on this and I have heard the ingredients have been adjusted too The old RC sensible medium had 18 days in the top front right hand corner the new one has 21

  • John
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  • Jdslowline

    Did the quality of royal canin dog food change in the last 6 months. We have been feeding our 6 year old Lab the royal canin lab food and in the last 6 months she is starving all the time. Her activity is the same and nothing has changed. Wondering if the quality is no good since it is owned by the same company that owns old Roy?

  • madhu

    good review but in India customers thinks it is a excellent food.
    based on the actual condition of dog.what ever article says is right.

  • aimee

    Cassandra,

    Sounds like a good plan for the Ca.
    I agree the spelling isn’t as common but I like it! 

  • Cassandra Chambers

    Oh, and I forgot to mention my daughter’s name is Aimee as well…it’s not a common way to spell it. Love it!

  • Cassandra Chambers

    No, I haven’t called the company yet, but intend to do that.  No, the CA was high normal, and is not being treated for it presently. She will have another blood test next month.  Thanks for the info about Vit D. And you may be right – it may just be a batch that has much “potatoage.” Thanks for your interest.

  • aimee

    Hi Cassandra092315,

    My own dog is also on RC Potato and Venison for GI problems and also doing very well. I use both the canned and dry and haven’t noted any changes in the food. As far as I know the potato level wasn’t increased in the food so maybe some processing fault led to the larger pieces.

    The Ca level in concerning. How high was it and was it repeatable?  Too high of a Vit D level from food or other sources is one cause of high Ca.

    Have you called the company to report your findings?? 

  • Cassandra092315

    My 12 year old Chih-Tzu was having extreme gastro-intestinal problems and was prescribed the Royal Canin Adult Hypoallergenic selected protein canned and dry food – Venison & Potato.  Her problems stopped only after a few days on this diet. It was great.  Now this last batch I ordered from the Vet has a lot more and larger potato bits than before.  I measured one today – it was 1″x1/2″.  I know the economy is suffering and sometimes forces companies to cut corners.  But this is my dog’s health.  Her blood work 2 weeks ago came back indicating that she is getting too much calcium.  We don’t know where it’s originating – it could be something else entirely, but it might be the added potato – potatoes are rich in calcium. Not only does this affect the health of my dog, but considerably affects the integrity of the product and Royal Canin in general. I find myself picking potatos out of the canned food.  There’s little I can do about the dry except cut down on the amount I’m feeding.  Has anyone else noticed this?

  • Ginger’s mom

    PF my puppy a boxer was sent home with the medium puppy…she has done great on this food…..i am pleased…so far…she is now 10 months…so don’t go by everything you read…give it a try if you don’t like it then switch…..i am looking to put her on adult food at this point..but the medium puppy was fine…

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  • schmeeds

    Any word on the rc urinary so?  Couldn’t find it on the site.  I have one of my babies on the hills c/d, and would love to switch to a higher rated urinary food.

  • courtney

    my vetenarian actually recommended this brand for my dogs allergies to food.

  • sandy

    PF,

    Avoid corn, wheat, glutens (wheat, oatmeal, barley, rye) altogether. And if possible avoid rice. They are not completely digestible nor are they species appropriate and at a microscopic level they can harm intestinal villi leading to malabsorption of proper nutrients. Look for someting grain free and above average in protein. Alot of foods have probiotics. You just have to read the ingredient list. If possible incorporate a complete and balanced raw diet as well. You can also purchase probiotics and enzymes to add to the food to help with your dog’s overall health, especially if feeding kibble. Kibble is an unnatural, dead food lacking in living enzymes. Watch the video “Best and Worst Foods for your Pet” to start with. http://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/videos.aspx

    Good luck.

  • http://DogFoodAdvisor.com Mike Sagman

    Hi PF… Although corn and wheat aren’t exactly my favorite dog food ingredients, they can frequently be blamed for more than most other items. Unfortunately, due to the biological uniqueness of each pet, it would bne misleading for me to provide specific health advice for your puppies. Please be sure to check back for a possible response from one of our other readers. Wish I could be more help.

  • PF

    My 3 month old Lab-collie mix puppy used to poop 5-6 times a day , had hot spots and developed some skin rash, threw up etc. He was on Kirkland’s puppy food. The vet has put him on royal canin prescription diet for 2 – 3 days and asked us to switch to Royal Canin puppy (medium) It says on the front – prebiotics, digestive heath etc. The ingredients label says chickenmeal, brewers rice, corn gluten meal, chicken fat, CORN, wheat gluten, DRIED beet puplp and so on … Wouldn’t CORN affect my puppies already sensitive stomach ?

    What’s your review on this ?

    Thanks

  • Robert

    I think Royal Canin’s prescription approach to dog food is a scam! It seems to be another way for a vet to obtain another source of revenue as do physicians. After using the venison and potato formula for well over a year ($64/17 lb bag), our dog’s skin allergy never cleared up. We switched to Blue Buffalo on the recommendation of our dog groomer and within 2 weeks his skin improved 100%. Potatoes and venison are two of most inexpensive food sources around, but with this stuff you have to pay a premium…

  • Stacey

    I think the royal canin bulldog formula might be wrong. I was told never give my bulldog anything with soy in it. Yet in the royal canin bulldog formula ity states soy. Whenever you read anything regarding bulldogs it clearly states no soy. So was just wondering about that is all.

  • Jonathan

    Oh my, good info Jenny. That would definitely make RC a no-go in Europe. This is why, not just reading the reviews, but learning how to read the label is so important.

  • http://blackvanillas.se Jenny

    In sweden, the RC kibbles are preserved by Propylgallate & BHA… Probably in a big part of Europe aswell then, since the swedist bags are made in different countries in Europe… Good to know for european RC-feeders..

  • Bob K

    Aaron – RC is s decent food that is WAY overpriced. You can get many other 4 star and 5 star foods for less money that provide better nutrition for your dog. That means a better food for your dog and more money in your pocket, a win for both you and your dog.

  • Aaron

    A good overall look at this specific diet. RC foods as you said have many blends to cover the many nutritional needs of Dogs and Cats. Each one will have a different ingredient ratio according to the desired blend. I say to all that read, know your ingredients. Dont believe the hype on whats good and bad.

  • Jonathan

    Derek, on what basis do you criticize Dr Sagman’s work? I think his “positive” assessment on this food is more than fair, particularly in light of the fact that it is one of the more expensive foods, per pound, despite containing junky, cheap ingredients like corn gluten and wheat gluten meal. In what way does this food deserve to be more recommended? It’s really a completely average dog food. average meat. average fat. average carbs. A few above average ingredients, a few below average ingredients. If you need a more specific reason why this food only receives 3-stars, look at it side-by-side with Blue Buffalo Wilderness (a 5-star food) Wellness Supermix5 (a 4-star food) and then you may get a better idea of what makes a dog food exceptional.

  • http://DogFoodAdvisor.com Mike Sagman

    Hi Derek… Sorry you feel my “conclusions seem off”. However, your criticism seems a bit vague, don’t you think? It would certainly have been more helpful to know exactly what scientific criteria you’re using to justify such a statement. In any case, it just goes to show you… anyone can criticize anything they want on the Internet.

  • derek

    Mike, although i respect your opinions, most of your conclusions seem off. not just on this royal canin diet but other foods as well. It just goes to show you that anyone can publish anything on the internet.

  • http://DogFoodAdvisor.com Mike Sagman

    Hi Cindy… Funny you should ask. We’ve just started reviewing the Royal Canin Veterinary Diets in the past few days. We’re not planning to cover all of them at this time but we are hoping to tackle the the L.I.D. foods (as a group) some time this coming week. So, check be sure to check back then. By the way, once you read the review you should be able to call the better of the two (Royal Cain versus Natural Balance) yourself. Hope this helps.

  • Cindy

    My dog has been put on Royal Canin Limited Ingredient Diet – venison or duck and potato. Do you have any information on this diet? Natural Balance makes the same thing and wondered which would be better.

  • http://DogFoodAdvisor.com Mike Sagman

    Hi Janet… I’m not aware of a dog food called Royal Canin Sensible Choice. I looked all over the RC website and can’t find any reference to it. If you do find this food on the web, please send me a link. Thanks for the suggestion.

  • Janet

    I love your website and all of this great information so Thanks a bunch!! Also I have 24 rescued dogs and am searching for a quality dog food that I can afford for this many. Could you review Royal Canine Sensible Choice dog food? THANKS!!

  • http://DogFoodAdvisor.com Mike Sagman

    Hi Michelle… OK, no problem. I’ve added Royal Canin LF-20 to my To Do list. But unfortunately it could be a good while until I get to that product. Thanks for the suggestion.

  • Michelle Miller

    Any chance of reviewing Royan Canin LF 20? I want to compare to Kirkland Signature Adult Weight Control Low Fat formula. Tnx. M.