Halo Vegan Garden Medley Dog Food (Dry)

Share

Rating: ★★½☆☆

Halo Vegan Garden Medley Dog Food receives the Advisor’s second-lowest tier rating of 2.5 stars.

The Halo product line includes one vegan dog food, a recipe claimed to meet AAFCO nutrient guidelines for adult maintenance .

Halo Vegan Garden Medley

Dry Dog Food

Estimated Dry Matter Nutrient Content

Protein = 22% | Fat = 11% | Carbs = 59%

Ingredients: Green peas, chickpeas, pearled barley, oat groats, pea protein, whole flaxseed, sunflower oil, dried plain beet pulp, potato, sweet potato, alfalfa meal, carrot, celery, beet, parsley, lettuce, watercress, spinach, canola oil (preserved with mixed tocopherols), dicalcium phosphate, monocalcium phosphate, dried kelp, natural vegetable flavors, flaxseed oil, carrots, dried apple, dried blueberry, dried cranberry, chicory root, taurine, rosemary extract, l-carnitine, potassium chloride, dl methionine, salt, calcium carbonate, choline chloride, vitamins (vitamin B12 supplement, niacin, vitamin A supplement, calcium pantothenate, riboflavin supplement, vitamin D2 supplement, thiamine mononitrate, pyridoxine hydrochloride, biotin, folic acid), minerals (zinc proteinate, iron proteinate, zinc sulfate, iron sulfate, manganese proteinate, manganese sulfate, cobalt proteinate, copper proteinate, copper sulfate, ethylenediamine dihydriodide, sodium selenite)

Fiber (estimated dry matter content) = 9.4%

Red items indicate controversial ingredients

Estimated Nutrient Content
MethodProteinFatCarbs
Guaranteed Analysis20%10%NA
Dry Matter Basis22%11%59%
Calorie Weighted Basis21%25%54%
Protein = 21% | Fat = 25% | Carbs = 54%

The first ingredient in this dog food includes peas. Peas are a quality source of carbohydrates. And like all legumes, they’re rich in natural fiber.

However, peas contain about 25% protein, a factor that must be considered when judging the meat content of this dog food.

The second ingredient includes chickpeas, also known as garbanzo beans. Like peas, bean and lentils, the chickpea is a nutritious member of the fiber-rich legume (or pulse) family of vegetables.

However, chickpeas contain about 22% protein, a factor that must be considered when judging the actual meat content of this dog food.

The third ingredient is barley. Barley is a starchy carbohydrate supplying fiber and other healthy nutrients. However, aside from its energy content, this cereal grain is of only modest nutritional value to a dog.

The fourth ingredient lists oat groats, a whole grain, minimally processed form of oats. With the exception of their caloric content and the fact they’re also gluten free, oat groats can be considered average in nutritional value.

The fifth ingredient is pea protein, what remains of a pea after removing the starchy part of the vegetable.

Even though it contains over 80% protein, this ingredient would be expected to have a lower biological value than meat.

And less costly plant-based products like this can notably boost the total protein reported on the label — a factor that must be considered when judging the meat content of this dog food.

The sixth ingredient is flaxseed, one of the best plant sources of healthy omega-3 fatty acids. Provided they’ve first been ground into a meal, flax seeds are also rich in soluble fiber.

However, flaxseed contains about 19% protein, a factor that must be considered when judging the actual meat content of this dog food.

The seventh ingredient is sunflower oil. Sunflower oil is nutritionally similar to safflower oil. Since these oils are high in omega-6 fatty acids and contain no omega-3’s, they’re considered less nutritious than canola or flaxseed oils.

Sunflower oil is notable for its resistance to heat damage during cooking.

There are several different types of sunflower oil, some better than others. Without knowing more, it’s impossible to judge the quality of this ingredient.

The eighth ingredient is beet pulp. Beet pulp is a controversial ingredient, a high fiber by-product of sugar beet processing.

Some denounce beet pulp as an inexpensive filler while others cite its outstanding intestinal health and blood sugar benefits.

We only call your attention here to the controversy and believe the inclusion of beet pulp in reasonable amounts in most dog foods is entirely acceptable.

The ninth ingredient is potato. Potatoes can be considered a gluten-free source of digestible carbohydrates. Yet with the exception of perhaps their caloric content, potatoes are of only modest nutritional value to a dog.

From here, the list goes on to include a number of other items.

But to be realistic, ingredients located this far down the list (other than nutritional supplements) are not likely to affect the overall rating of this product.

With five notable exceptions

First, although alfalfa meal is high in plant protein (about 18%) and fiber (25%), this hay-family item is more commonly associated with horse feeds.

Next, we find canola oil. Unfortunately, canola can be a controversial item. That’s because it can sometimes (but not always) be derived from genetically modified rapeseed.

Yet others cite the fact canola oil can be a significant source of essential omega-3 fatty acids.

In any case, plant-based oils like canola are less biologically available to a dog than fish oil as a source of quality omega-3 fats.

In addition, flaxseed oil is one of the best non-fish sources of omega-3 fatty acids — essential to a dog’s health.

Next, chicory root is rich in inulin, a starch-like compound made up of repeating units of carbohydrates and found in certain roots and tubers.

Not only is inulin a natural source of soluble dietary fiber, it’s also a prebiotic used to promote the growth of healthy bacteria in a dog’s digestive tract.

And lastly, this food contains chelated minerals, minerals that have been chemically attached to protein. This makes them easier to absorb. Chelated minerals are usually found in better dog foods.

Halo Vegan Garden Medley Dog Food
The Bottom Line

Halo Vegan Garden Medley is by design a meatless product.

So, although we recognize the need for some dog owners to feed a meat-free diet, we also respect a dog’s natural carnivorous bias.

That said, and before we assign our final rating, it’s still important to compare the amount of plant-based protein present with other dog foods.

The dashboard displays a dry matter protein reading of 22%, a fat level of 11% and estimated carbohydrates of about 59%.

And a fat-to-protein ratio of about 50%.

Below-average protein. Below-average fat. And above-average carbs when compared to a typical dry dog food.

As we’d expect, this looks like the profile of a meatless kibble.

Bottom line?

Halo Vegan Garden Medley is a plant-based dry dog food that uses legumes, grains and pea protein as its main sources of protein, thus earning the brand 2.5 stars.

Not recommended.

Please note certain recipes are sometimes given a higher or lower rating based upon our estimate of their total meat content and (when appropriate) their fat-to-protein ratios.

Halo Dog Food
Recall History

The following list (if present) includes all dog food recalls since 2009 directly related to this product line. If there are no recalls listed in this section, we have not yet reported any events.

You can view a complete list of all dog food recalls sorted by date. Or view the same list sorted alphabetically by brand.

To learn why our ratings have nothing to do with a product’s recall history, please visit our Dog Food Recalls FAQ page.

Get free dog food recall alerts sent to you by email. Subscribe to The Advisor’s recall notification list.

Dog Food Coupons
and Discounts

Readers are invited to check for coupons and discounts shared by others in our Dog Food Coupons Forum.

Or click the buying tip below. Please be advised we receive a fee for referrals made to the following online store.

A Final Word

The descriptions and analyses expressed in this and every article on this website represent the views and opinions of the author.

The Dog Food Advisor does not test dog food products.

We rely entirely on the integrity of the information provided by each company. As such, the accuracy of every review is directly dependent upon the specific data a company chooses to share.

Although it's our goal to ensure all the information on this website is correct, we cannot guarantee its completeness or its accuracy; nor can we commit to ensuring all the material is kept up-to-date on a daily basis.

We rely on tips from readers. To report a product change or request an update of any review, please contact us using this form.

Each review is offered in good faith and has been designed to help you make a more informed decision when buying dog food.

However, due to the biological uniqueness of every animal, none of our ratings are intended to suggest feeding a particular product will result in a specific dietary response or health benefit for your pet.

For a better understanding of how we analyze each product, please read our article, "The Problem with Dog Food Reviews".

Remember, no dog food can possibly be appropriate for every life stage, lifestyle or health condition. So, choose wisely. And when in doubt, consult a qualified veterinary professional for help.

In closing, we do not accept money, gifts or samples from pet food companies in exchange for special consideration in the preparation of our reviews or ratings.

However, we do receive a fee from Chewy.com for each purchase made as a direct result of a referral from our website. This fee is a fixed dollar amount and has nothing to do with the size of an order or the brand selected for purchase.

Have an opinion about this dog food? Or maybe the review itself? Please know we welcome your comments.

Notes and Updates

02/05/2017 Last Update

  • Emily

    acquaint yourself with lymphangiectasia. auto-immune diseases don’t follow your “logic” – just because you have a hard time believing it doesn’t mean it’s untrue.

  • InkedMarie

    You could do allergy testing but results are mixed. I have a now almost 10yr old dog who had ear infections over and over. My holistic vet told me to be careful with the food as some have ingredients that feed yeast (his were yeast ear infections). I put him on ground raw, no produce and it’s been going on year 3 with no infections.

  • LeftCenterRight

    I agree 100%. Should I put him through multiple ear infections to weed out the cause? I do not support anything other than a carnivore diet for a doggie, however, as he is healthy, coat is great, and no ear infections I will stick with it rather than experiment with a being that can’t communicate back. Your point is valid in that he only had beef, fish and chicken protein prior to know.

  • InkedMarie

    lergy to what proteins? I have a hard time believing that your dog is allergic to *all* pproteins. For dry foods, there are many proteins: chicken, turkey, fish, bison, beef, lamb, rabbit, kangaroo & others. There are those plus goat in a freeze dried (Grandma Lucy’s). for raw, there are all of those plus emu, llama and many more.

  • LeftCenterRight

    My Morkie was getting ear infections. Two vets thought that it might be a protein allergy. Reluctantly recommended a vegetarian diet. I have tried this and after four months it seems fine. No ear infections. Coat looks great. Poop is better than ever. It might have been bad because of the protein allergies. I am not a vegetarian myself and would not feed him this except he had an ear infection every few months and nothing else in common to cause it. If you NEED to go vegetarian this seems fine. Doggie is happy. Looks great.

  • Ray

    The world’s oldest living dog is completely vegan.
    You don’t have to feed them meat.
    There are other, better options.

    http://www.vegepet.com/vegetarian_dogs.html

  • Dog Food Ninja

    I apologize if my statement came across as more inflammatory then I intended. I meant it comically, sort of tongue in cheek, but reading it again, it certainly seems a little crass. But my main point was that meat eating and animal welfare are not mutually exclusive. In fact, the best group of people to get on board with humane animal farming practices are the meat eaters. I will always consume meat because it is an evolutionary imperative for proper health, and even more so for dogs. But consumption of animal products should not include animal abuse. There is no excuse (other than greed and profit motivation) for food animals to live a poor life and be slaughtered in cruel ways. Factory farms are repulsive and I understand why vegetarians wouldn’t want to consume those animals! And as far as vegetarianism goes, what you say you are doing is the best approach. Organic dairy, free range eggs, and sea food can provide adaquate calories from fat and protein without needing to include processed grains and soy garbage to your diet. That’s awsome.

  • smitty

    Even though I am critical of your stance on what dogs should eat I applaud you for your personal choice to be a vegetarian

  • Beth Peterson

    Many slaughterhouse animals do not die quickly and painlessly, especially chickens. They also have to suffer the stress of transport and the wait at the slaughterhouse. I do believe that animal protein is a natural and necessary part of a healthy diet, which is why I eat humane eggs and invertebrate seafood. But a judgemental post telling people who make the moral choice not to eat meat that they are misguided hippies is insulting.

    But I do feed my pets meat, because they really need it for optimum health.

  • smitty

    Nor do they eat kibble.

    And in case you haven’t noticed, the dog sitting in your living room and sleeping in his bed is not in the wild.

  • smitty

    I’m sorry to let you know that the Orijen/acana ultra processed pelleted extruded dry food in a bag you feed your carnivore friends is far removed from any semblance of a natural diet.

  • Beth Peterson

    I choose Orijen/acana primarily because of their transparency about meat sources and the welfare of the animals used in their foods. I can be a healthy vegetarian, but my carnivore friends deserve to eat a natural diet from humane and sustainable sources.

  • In many ways I agree with you, Smitty. Some of the replies and opinions expressed here certainly border on the edge of discourtesy. And for that I apologize and remind all to be respectful at all times.

    Stating an opinion with passion is one thing and must be tolerated. You were permitted to state your opinion many times and with passion. And for this, I commend you.

    However, harassment and the use of fake identities is a completely different issue and will never be tolerated.

    The comment deleted above was posted by an individual who has harassed every member of this community for months and has posted over 500 intentionally harassing and deceptive comments this week alone.

  • smitty

    Dr Mike

    Are you OK with the harassment and name calling that anyone who has a positive review of a Vegan dog food receives on The Dog Food Advisor?

    As soon as you published this review hound dog mom issued a warning.

    “Anyone considering feeding this food please read this:”

    Then the harassment and name calling began.

    “If you want an herbivore for a pet, get an herbivore.”

    “A few misguided hippies buying a horribly unhealthful vegan dog food…”

    “Wow I feel bad for any dogs with spoiled brat owners that actually force this food onto them. The dogs should be given a chance to find a new home!”

    Even from your co-worker Hound dog mom.

    “And a vegan food? That’s just despicable.”

    In such an unfriendly environment the bulk of Vegans and Vegetarians are not going to subject themselves to the harassment they will endure for posting their feelings and experiences with these foods.

  • Cinthia Gordon, Susan Dreschler, Cavalier Mom, Tinky’s Mom, Sugar, Charlie, Sue and Mike, Shawnana, Molly Henderson, Tiki, David Levine, Peter Levine, etc.

    Your continued use of multiple fake identities to deceive members of this community will never be welcome here. Do not post any further comments on this website.

  • Pattyvaughn

    As has been pointed out many times before, most vegetarians and vegans understand that processed foods are unhealthy and try to eat as close to a natural diet as possible. Dogs can not handle a natual unprocessed vegan diet because the nutrients are not available to them in that form. But they can handle a natural unprocessed carnivorous diet. I want to best for my dog, not processed garbage that might not kill them. BTW, I’m from California too, and I’m tolerant and open minded, but not so far that it falls out. If you want an herbivore for a pet, get an herbivore. Feed a dog as nature intended.

  • Cinthia Gordon

    I normally don’t post here but I must say something. I don’t understand how you can be so forcefully pursuing your inaccurate claims about vegetarian dogs. My dogs are so much healthier since I give them less meat and more plant-based protein. The same amino acids in meat are in plants too. Since it is scientifically proven for a very long time that vegetarian dogs do very well and live very long while you don’t have to kill animals it is a positive thing to feed a dog a vegetarin diet with many health benefits.
    I’m not getting into arguing. I don’t know where you live but I’m in California and people here are very tolerant and open-minded.

  • Pattyvaughn

    What!?! You get to sleep? I need a new contract. Nobody lets me sleep.

  • InkedMarie

    So, life gets in the way, eh?

  • Shawna

    Nice to see you back Ninja!!

    I agree with the others, excellent post! I’ve always thoroughly enjoyed your writing style and frankness!

    Hope all is well with you and the family!

  • Dog Food Ninja

    Running a store, raising 3 kids and two dogs, and occasionally sleeping. Lol

  • InkedMarie

    Great post and where have you been?

  • Hound Dog Mom

    Well put. 🙂

  • Pattyvaughn

    You could check in every once in a while…Oh wait, you just did!

  • Dog Food Ninja

    Hi patty! I know I never seem to be around anymore, but I swear I check the updates weekly. 😉

  • Pattyvaughn

    Hi DFN
    Nice post!

  • Dog Food Ninja

    A few misguided hippies buying a horribly unhealthful vegan dog food is not going to help end the suffering of factory farmed animals. Its just going to create suffering… for the carnivorous animal you are forcing your anti scientific ideas on. The best thing you can do as someone who cares about animal wellbeing is buy meat products from humane, responsible producers. Its better for the animals and the eater, as pasture raised, hormone free meats generally have a better fatty acid profile than corn and soy forced feed lot animals do. Its a win-win. But if you are one of these radicals that even thinks humane practices are wrong because the animal still has to die… well, you have a very unrealistic understanding of nature. I would rather be a happy grass fed cow that one day gets quickly and painlessly killed as opposed to an antelop who one day gets pounced on and painfully ripped apart while still alive by a pride of lions. Meat is what dogs eat, period. And for people, meat was a fundamental part of our evolution. I have been eating a paleo/primal diet for 2 years, and I have lost over 100 pounds as well as eliminating the need for several medications I was on. Eating vegetarian (which I tried before learning about the evolutionary facts) didn’t help my stomach problems at all, nor help me lose weight. As much as the vegans resist, the fact is, there is nothing natural about deriving the majority of your calories from processed grass seeds and hydrolized soy protein. But eating an animal is completely and fundamentally natural. Particularly for dogs.

  • sdus

    adfaThis site is highly nmanipulatedb.When you say someting against their favorate companies for instance Nature Logic or orijin then you find yoru posts eather

    officially deletedn or magically dissappeared a few days later. Only the devotees posts will remain.When you say someting about

    their nheigh proteinn diets who are proven nwrong then they will bullyn,flag,nblock and ndelete you in order to

    promote their subversivenn angenda.i have to write this way otherwise I end up in nspamn.They misrepresentedb the bstudies

    and then when you point out the ndangers their own nstudies have shown they will delete your posts making up stories.

    They construe textbooks for instance claiming the textbooks state you can give 40 or 50% knprotein to a senior dog

    while they say 28% max. then they use nstudies sponsored by pharmacytical companies or purina to falsely substantiate their claims.

    when you point out the flawsn then your posts will dissappearn. Nshawnna will lie pretty much about anything to

    promote her 50% nprotein dietnn. For instance falsely claiming her dog is not on medication or those dogs would not live very long

    while it would not be unusual if the dog is still alive. Then she keeps contradicting herself how much knprotein she feeds

    depending on the arguments.check out the web under nscammn about more information.

    100s of people have been nbulliedn and blockedn on here. Vetsn get regularly blockedn and their posts deletedn. Mnike the ndentist

    is not an expert yet him among the devoteesnn without any credentials make so many false claims but think they know it all.

    Please don’t buy into their highnnnproteinn meatmnn based dietn it is all not nessessarly superior, also don’t believe their

    exchagerated claims on lentils,ngluten,nntomatoes,nraw food etc.

    Buyer Beware!dfd

  • adf

    mikeeee the nhdentist acts like an hhaprentice

    This site is highly nmanipulatedb.When you say someting against their favorate companies for instance Nature Logic or orijin then you find yoru posts eather

    officially deletedn or magically dissappeared a few days later. Only the devotees posts will remain.When you say someting about

    their nheigh proteinn diets who are proven nwrong then they will bullyn,flag,nblock and ndelete you in order to

    promote their subversivenn angenda.i have to write this way otherwise I end up in nspamn.They misrepresentedb the bstudies

    and then when you point out the ndangers their own nstudies have shown they will delete your posts making up stories.

    They construe textbooks for instance claiming the textbooks state you can give 40 or 50% knprotein to a senior dog

    while they say 28% max. then they use nstudies sponsored by pharmacytical companies or purina to falsely substantiate their claims.

    when you point out the flawsn then your posts will dissappearn. Nshawnna will lie pretty much about anything to

    promote her 50% nprotein dietnn. For instance falsely claiming her dog is not on medication or those dogs would not live very long

    while it would not be unusual if the dog is still alive. Then she keeps contradicting herself how much knprotein she feeds

    depending on the arguments.check out the web under nscammn about more information.

    100s of people have been nbulliedn and blockedn on here. Vetsn get regularly blockedn and their posts deletedn. Mnike the ndentist

    is not an expert yet him among the devoteesnn without any credentials make so many false claims but think they know it all.

    Please don’t buy into their highnnnproteinn meatmnn based dietn it is all not nessessarly superior, also don’t believe their

    exchagerated claims on lentils,ngluten,nntomatoes,nraw food etc.

    Buyer Beware!

  • Ytg

    Mike5 is a brick who plays a trick

  • Ytg

    They should be quiet with thei high protein diet

  • Ytg

    They delete and mistreat

  • Ytg

    We dont want the attentoon bit the truth to be mentioned

  • Ytg

    He blocked the vet who made him sweat

  • Ytg

    I wonder why I did not lie

  • Ytg

    He is a scam he put me in spam

  • Ytg

    They lie about the studies and act like buddies

  • Ytg

    They mock and block around the clock

  • Ytg

    Hondog is mean not keen

  • Ytg

    Hondog kills rabbits thats bad habits

  • Ytg

    Hondog is so ypung with a sharp tong

  • Hound Dog Mom

    Great post! It’s wonderful that you’re willing to put your dog’s needs before your personal beliefs toward meat.

    I do think it’s admirable that some are concerned for “the greater good” and avoid meat products for this reason, but let’s be real here buying your dog a vegan food is not going to get anyone else to stop eating meat and it’s not going to change the conditions many food animals are raised in. All it’s going to do is make your dog’s health suffer, so it’s a lose-lose. And a vegan food? That’s just despicable. If someone is going to deny their dog meat, the least they could do is include eggs and dairy.

  • shannoncookie

    It makes me sad too but I still feed my dog meat based food

  • shannoncookie

    Consider nature maybe? Dogs dont eat vegetarian in the wild…

  • smitty

    It is a noble thing to put the well being of all creatures above the well being of a few.

  • smitty

    I feel sadness for the billions of food animals that lived their whole lives in misery for our pleasure.

  • shannoncookie

    I agree with gound dog mom although I choose to be vegetarian myself i know its not appropriate for my dog. Please consider the right nutrition for your dog if youre thinking about a meat free diet for your pup. Dont feel guilty please – from a vegetarian for over 20 years whos pup loves meat!

  • John Mips

    Wow I feel bad for any dogs with spoiled brat owners that actually force this food onto them. The dogs should be given a chance to find a new home!

  • Hound Dog Mom

    Anyone considering feeding this food please read this:

    The Alarming New Vegan Pet Food Branded by Celebrity Ellen DeGeneres

    By Dr. Becker

    http://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2012/01/19/vegetarianism-for-pets.aspx