Bil-Jac Dog Food (Dry)

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Rating: ★★★½☆

Bil-Jac Dog Food earns the Advisor’s mid-tier rating of 3.5 stars.

The Bil-Jac Dog Food product line includes nine dry recipes, two claimed to meet AAFCO nutrient profiles for all life stages, four recipes for adult maintenance, and three recipes for growth (Puppy formulas).

The following is a list of recipes available at the time of this review.

  • Bil-Jac Adult Select
  • Bil-Jac Puppy Select
  • Bil-Jac Senior Select
  • Bil-Jac Small Breed Adult
  • Bil-Jac Large Breed Adult
  • Bil-Jac Sensitive Solutions
  • Bil-Jac Small Breed Puppy
  • Bil-Jac Large Breed Puppy
  • Bil-Jac Reduced Fat (1.5 stars)

Bil-Jac Adult Select was selected to represent the other products in the line for this review.

Bil-Jac Adult Select

Dry Dog Food

Estimated Dry Matter Nutrient Content

Protein = 30% | Fat = 20% | Carbs = 42%

Ingredients: Chicken, chicken by-products (organs only, source of arginine), corn meal, chicken by-product meal, oatmeal, dried beet pulp, brewers dried yeast, flaxseed, dl-methionine, l-lysine, sodium propionate and mixed tocopherols (preservatives), salt, vitamin A acetate, vitamin D3 supplement, vitamin E supplement, riboflavin supplement, niacin, biotin, choline chloride, folic acid, thiamine mononitrate, pyridoxine hydrochloride (vitamin B6), ascorbic acid, vitamin B12 supplement, d-calcium pantothenate, manganous oxide, inositol, BHA (a preservative), ferrous sulfate, copper sulfate, zinc oxide, cobalt carbonate, potassium iodide, sodium selenite, rosemary extract

Fiber (estimated dry matter content) = 4.4%

Red items when present indicate controversial ingredients

Estimated Nutrient Content
MethodProteinFatCarbs
Guaranteed Analysis27%18%NA
Dry Matter Basis30%20%42%
Calorie Weighted Basis25%40%35%

The first ingredient in this dog food is chicken. Although it is a quality item, raw chicken contains about 80% water. After cooking, most of that moisture is lost, reducing the meat content to just a fraction of its original weight.

After processing, this item would probably account for a smaller part of the total content of the finished product.

The second ingredient includes chicken by-products, what’s left of a slaughtered chicken after all the good cuts have been removed.

In addition to organs (the nourishing part), this stuff can include almost anything — feet, beaks, undeveloped eggs — anything (that is) but skeletal muscle (real meat).

However, here the manufacturer specifies “organ meat only” which makes this item something more desirable, and better described as chicken giblets.

Once again, this item is inclusive of water and is subject to the same drying effects of cooking previously described.

The third ingredient is cornmeal, a coarsely ground flour made from dried corn. Corn is an inexpensive and controversial cereal grain of only modest nutritional value to a dog.

For this reason, we do not consider corn a preferred component in any dog food.

The fourth ingredient is chicken by-product meal, a dry rendered product of slaughterhouse waste. It’s made from what’s left of a slaughtered chicken after all the prime cuts have been removed.

In addition to organs (the nourishing part), this stuff can contain almost anything — feet, beaks, undeveloped eggs — anything except feathers.

On the brighter side, by-product meals are meat concentrates and contain nearly 300% more protein than fresh chicken.

In any case, although this item contains all the amino acids a dog needs, we consider chicken by-products an inexpensive, lower quality ingredient.

The fifth ingredient is oatmeal, a whole-grain product made from coarsely ground oats. Oatmeal is naturally rich in B-vitamins, dietary fiber and can be (depending upon its level of purity) gluten-free.

The sixth ingredient is beet pulp. Beet pulp is a controversial ingredient, a high fiber by-product of sugar beet processing.

Some denounce beet pulp as an inexpensive filler while others cite its outstanding intestinal health and blood sugar benefits.

We only call your attention here to the controversy and believe the inclusion of beet pulp in reasonable amounts in most dog foods is entirely acceptable.

The seventh ingredient is brewers yeast, which can be a controversial item. Although it’s a by-product of the beer making process, this ingredient is rich in minerals and other healthy nutrients.

Fans believe yeast repels fleas and supports the immune system.

Critics argue yeast ingredients can be linked to allergies. This may be true, but (like all allergies) only if your particular dog is allergic to the yeast itself.

In addition, a vocal minority insists yeast can increase the risk of developing the life-threatening condition known as bloat. However, this is a claim we’ve not been able to scientifically verify.

In any case, unless your dog is specifically allergic to it, yeast can still be considered a nutritious additive.

What’s more noteworthy here is that brewers yeast contains about 48% protein, a factor that must be considered when judging the actual meat content of this dog food.

The eighth ingredient is flaxseed, one of the best plant sources of healthy omega-3 fatty acids. Provided they’ve first been ground into a meal, flax seeds are also rich in soluble fiber.

However, flaxseed contains about 19% protein, a factor that must be considered when judging the actual meat content of this dog food.

From here, the list goes on to include a number of other items.

But to be realistic, ingredients located this far down the list (other than nutritional supplements) are not likely to affect the overall rating of this product.

With three notable exceptions

First, we find no mention of probiotics, friendly bacteria applied to the surface of the kibble after processing to help with digestion.

Next, the minerals listed here do not appear to be chelated. And that can make them more difficult to absorb. Non-chelated minerals are usually associated with lower quality dog foods.

And lastly, this food is preserved with BHA, a suspected cancer-causing agent.

Bil-Jac Dog Food
The Bottom Line

Judging by its ingredients alone, Bil-Jac Dog Food looks like a below-average dry product.

But ingredient quality by itself cannot tell the whole story. We still need to estimate the product’s meat content before determining a final rating.

The dashboard displays a dry matter protein reading of 30%, a fat level of 20% and estimated carbohydrates of about 42%.

As a group, the brand features an average protein content of 27% and a mean fat level of 18%. Together, these figures suggest a carbohydrate content of 48% for the overall product line.

And a fat-to-protein ratio of about 65%.

Near-average protein. Near-average fat. And near-average carbs when compared to a typical dry dog food.

Even when you consider the protein-boosting effect of the brewers dried yeast and flaxseed, this looks like the profile of a kibble containing a moderate amount of meat.

Bottom line?

Bil-Jac Dog Food is a plant-based kibble using a moderate amount of chicken and chicken by-products as its main sources of animal protein, thus earning the brand 3.5 stars.

Recommended.

However, BHA phobics may wish to ignore our rating and look elsewhere for another product.

Please note certain recipes are sometimes given a higher or lower rating based upon our estimate of their total meat content and (when appropriate) their fat-to-protein ratios.

A Final Word

The descriptions and analyses expressed in this and every article on this website represent the views and opinions of the author.

The Dog Food Advisor does not test dog food products.

We rely almost entirely on the integrity of the information posted by each company on its website. As such, the accuracy of every review is directly dependent upon the quality of the test results from any specific batch of food a company chooses to publish.

Although it's our goal to ensure all the information on this website is correct, we cannot guarantee its completeness or its accuracy; nor can we commit to ensuring all the material is kept up-to-date on a daily basis.

Each review is offered in good faith and has been designed to help you make a more informed decision when buying dog food.

However, due to the biological uniqueness of every animal, none of our ratings are intended to suggest feeding a particular product will result in a specific dietary response or health benefit for your pet.

For a better understanding of how we analyze each product, please read our article, "The Problem with Dog Food Reviews".

Remember, no dog food can possibly be appropriate for every life stage, lifestyle or health condition. So, choose wisely. And when in doubt, consult a qualified veterinary professional for help.

In closing, we do not accept money, gifts or samples from pet food companies in exchange for special consideration in the preparation of our reviews or ratings.

To learn how we support the cost of operating this website, please visit our public Disclosure and Disclaimer page.

Have an opinion about this dog food? Or maybe the review itself? Please know we welcome your comments.

Other spellings: Biljac, Bil-Jac

Notes and Updates

04/15/2015 Last Update

  • Dori

    Thanks Labs. Glad you all knew what I meant in my post. It’s just hard to believe anyone could read it and get it so wrong. Apparently, as you say, reading comprehension skills are in need.

  • LabsRawesome

    Dori, the comment from Jaclyn was for you. I just can’t figure out how she got so confused by reading your post. I think Jaclyn needs to brush up on her reading comprehension skills, because her post to you makes no sense.

  • Dori

    Melanie, you may be correct because I honestly couldn’t figure out what I might have posted that would set someone off. I have read and re-read my post to D. O. and just couldn’t figure out the posters response to me. But in any event if it was meant for me I’m happy knowing that you and all that know me from this site knew my intention when I posted to D. O. Thank you Melanie.

  • Melanie

    Dori, I just read that post again. I truly think the angry, rude, above post was meant for someone else and got posted to you. There were some pretty nasty, mean posts above yours. I think that was the case because it makes no sense.

  • Dori

    Thank you Melanie for your kind words.

  • Melanie

    I am soooo confused right now. Was the above comment meant for Dori? What is your problem. Maybe you replied to the wrong person. We love your input Dori. I think you were just trying to say that DO is like a friend now. Seems like she’s been posting here for a long time.

  • theBCnut

    BTW, I didn’t find what you had to say to be nice in any way.

  • Dog_Obsessed

    I did not feel that Dori’s post was at all offensive, or against my opinion. She was simply stating that it seems like I have been here for longer than I actually have, which I took as a compliment.

    Thanks Dori, BC, and Labs. :)

  • Dori

    Thanks BC. I didn’t even know how to respond to Jaclyn. I know D O and the rest of you knew exactly how I meant that so I was really dumb founded at what I might have said that could have been misinterpreted. Again, thank you BC and LabsRawsome.

    D O. You knew how I meant it, right? Like I’ve, (and we’ve) always known you? Right? I wouldn’t offend you for the world.

  • theBCnut

    Jaclyn

    Dori and D O are friends. That was not sarcastic. That was sincere. D O has fit right in here and it is hard to believe that it’s only been since October that we’ve started reading D O’s posts. We feel like we have known D O much longer than that.

  • LabsRawesome

    ??????

  • Jaclyn

    You’re rudely sarcastic and should really get an attitude check. Dog_Obsessed did absolutely nothing offensive enough for you to act like you’re better than them. They posted their opinion, if you’re offended then get off. If you have nothing nice to say then don’t say anything at all – your parents/school must have never taught you! :)

  • Dog_Obsessed

    Lol, your last line made me laugh! I completely get what you’re saying though, about not wanting to be viewed as the enemy. I think it should be fine to not have it in your username and just say it in posts, though you probably want to check the Terms of Use or check with Dr. Mike just in case.

  • Dori

    Thanks BC!

  • theBCnut

    Edited: I just wanted you to see that.

  • barbkohl

    Thank you for the suggestion, but I can’ even tell you the last time I went on a food list. (Probably the last time I was a Bil-Jac rep, 5 years ago.)
    II would be very lucky if this job lasted a long time, but no one knows, and I don’t want to identify myself one way, and then it changes, and no one knows who I am or was. Then it sounds sneaky to me, to keep changing your name. Thanks anyway, and besides, I don’t want to brand myself as a “evil rep”. would you?? I don’t mind saying that I am one, but would you want to have a name that said “I am the horrible enemy”? I don’t.

  • Dog_Obsessed

    Yup, October 11th was my first day on the forums. Thanks!

  • Dori

    Wow Dog Obsessed! You’ve only been here since October???? This past October???? Seems like you’ve been here for such a long time! Hard to believe. Well I think of you as a regular that’s for sure.

  • Shawna

    Okay, that makes me feel better!!!! :) I was having a hard time doing the math, knowing you have older children. Math isn’t my thing but I’m not totally incompetent….. :)

  • theBCnut

    Uh, no! LOL! If 50 is the new 30, I’m 30. I’ve been around the block a few more times than that.

  • Shawna

    If 50 is the new 30 then you’re like — 15…. :) Happy belated birthday!!

  • Dog_Obsessed

    I have not been a user on this site for long (I joined in October), but I am on pretty frequently. I don’t know if that makes me a “regular” or not lol. Anyway, I do not feed raw. I am not against it, and I fully support raw feeders, it just doesn’t work for me at this point in time. I feed a rotational diet with various combinations of kibble, canned, and The Honest Kitchen. Not everyone on this site feeds raw, though there are quite a few people who do. I think that most everyone agrees that it is not the only way to feed a dog good food.

    I agree that discussions can sometimes get a bit harsh, especially on the comments part of the site (less so on the forums.) I usually try to stay out of things when that happens and just observe. I was pretty busy in the days that this discussion was taking place, so I didn’t see all of it, but it seemed to be about a lot of difference of opinion that fizzled into argument.

  • Dog_Obsessed

    Thank you for posting this story as clarification. You may want to indentify yourself as a rep in your username, just to avoid further confusion. I know that dog food companies are required to identity themselves on DFA, but I don’t know if the same holds true for reps. Probably not a bad idea to.

  • Dog_Obsessed

    Lol, congrats!

  • Dori

    LMAO!!!!

  • theBCnut

    WooHoo! I just turned 30!!
    Um, I think older poster means you have been posting here longer.

  • barbkohl

    Apology accepted, but no need to apologize. There were a few people that seemed like they might be able to hold a civil discussion, rather than operate in High School Clique mode, and I’m sure this group/list has the potential to be a nice, informative group, less those few people that have an attitude.
    As I said, I appreciate your knowledge and willingness to share it.
    As Bil-Jac rep, I am not supposed to say anything about any other foods, (amongst other things) so I figure what I don’t know won’t hurt me.
    When my dogs were on kibble (and many different kinds over the past 35 years) I always tried to do research, and picked what I thought were the best. I even home cooked for my dogs for awhile (That got VERY old).
    At the time I didn’t know about Bil-Jac. When I checked it out, I was delighted to find it, and have been very pleased with it ever since, besides it being a reasonable price.
    5 years ago, I called Bil-Jac, and asked if they had product representatives in my area. They said they didn’t, and hired me. After a short while, but an excellent introduction form the regional manager, I realized my district manager sucked, so I quit. At that time, was when I did very extensive research, and also got excellent training on how to demonstrate, which I had previous experience in anyway, but the training was very thorough.
    I have called periodically, and they still had that same district manager, so that was that.
    About a year ago, I was on one of the stores I used to demonstrate in, and strangely asked the manager if they had Bil-Jac reps. He said not for a very long time.
    I called up BIl-Jac, and found out the hiring process was being done by another company, although it has nothing to do with Bil-Jac changing.
    The other company hired me, and the regional manager now is quite easy to work with. Also if I have any questions, the Customer service lady it WONDERFUL, and has worked there over 20 years, and unfortunately, (for her) I call her often, with strange questions (I have an insatiable curiosity) She is just wonderful and is very well informed and most of all patient!
    That is the only place I am coming from, and might be interested in other foods, but cannot be IMO, becaseu what I don’t know, I can’t refer to. That is also the strict policy of PetSmart, where I demonstrate.
    If the managers say, “You can’t say anything about the other foods,” I can, in all honesty, say “I DON”T know about the other foods, so I don’t say anything about them!”.
    That is simply my stance, and I have no ulterior motives, except I think it’s an excellent food, and is processed differently than the plain ingredients would dictate.
    Bil-Jac DOES tell me what I ask, but they have no hidden agenda, like the companies subsidized by Mars, Proctor and Gamble, Diamond, Nestle, etc.
    I just went on here wondering what the public said about the food, and to try to clear up some of the misconceptions about it.
    I really don’t care what anyone feeds. They are their dogs’ caretakers, and the dogs eat what the owners want them to, or they starve. Not much of a choice, I don’t think! Either way, I just think it’s a really good food, and since they don’t publicly advertise at ALL (unlike the big corp foods), I try to let people know about it.
    That’s TOTALLY all I went on here about. Thanks.

  • Dori

    Hey there lady!!! At 66 I still think I’m in my prime and I will fight anyone that says differently. Heck I haven’t even reached middle age yet. I’ve got a long way to go. Gotta love your cousin, I think she should be my honorary cousin. I like her way of thinking. Love you too Shawna!!

  • Shawna

    Either you edited or I misread cause there for a second I thought you were calling me OLD… You may be my honorary sister but — I’ll take you down woman.. hee hee hee Edit — at 48, I’m in my prime. My cousin recently stated that “50 is the new 30″!! YEP

    Love you Dori!!

  • Dori

    Please take to heart what Shawna has said below my post. I would guess that the majority of the posters on this site feed kibble, then canned. It is the older posters, or regulars. not sure which term would be more appropriate, feed either raw (like myself) or a combination as Shawna stated.

    As I’ve mentioned to you once before, this is a fabulous site with a wealth of information to be had. We’ve learned from each other and then pass it along. We do get heated up at times and I’m sorry if it comes off as being too harsh or too strong. It’s alike to sitting around at dinner time with family and friends and getting into some crazy heated discussions (or arguments….at my house anyway). We Latins are an emotional loud no holds barred group. But, we love and care about each other and will defend each other one moment and then argue, yell and scream the next. Some of us that have been here awhile think of ourselves as family. Hope you’ll join this family and I hope you’ll not hold the discussion on Bil-jac against this site or it’s founder or any others posters either.

  • Shawna

    Okay, I did take your comment wrong then and I apologize if I was abrupt or unpleasant in my above response. I do hope you will look at this further!!

    I am a raw feeder but I have eight dogs and I foster so I feed some kibble, some canned, some dehydrated and so on to help keep costs manageable. I think most of the folks on this page are not raw feeders however most of the regulars either raw feed or use canned, raw or home cooked toppers. We are really an open group and I do hope you give us a chance (maybe even by lurking til you get to know us?). More than once I (and others) have openly admitted to being wrong and it will happen again but we are passionate and sometimes we come off strong—myself included.

  • barbkohl

    Shawna, I thought your statements were the most comprehensive of any, and valued your opinions. It most CERTAINLY was not anything you said that I was referring to!! Please accept that as the absolute truth!! I really enjoyed your comments and appreciated that your comments had real merit.
    I was referring to several other people that stated blatently and condescendingly to many things I said.
    I had not idea this was a sort of “group policing” site, (Maybe mostly raw feeders? I have no idea, and don’t really care), but either way, I think you are an asset to it, as your comments are cohesive and well informed.

  • Shawna

    I have no problem with you at all and I thought I was not in any way mean or rude? I feel however now that you are sort of calling me out. So my response — yes, you will still find lots of folks that believe the protein / kidney disease myth. But please, I beg of you, actually look at the research.

    Here’s some vet sources, some research and such. Maybe you can actually school those folks you talked to that are continuing the myth.

    1. Veterinarians Drs Foster and Smith “The myth that high protein diets are harmful to kidneys probably started because, in the past, patients with kidney disease were commonly placed on low protein (and thus low nitrogen) diets. Now, we often put them on a diet that is not necessarily very low in protein, but contains protein that is more digestible so there are fewer nitrogen by-products.” http://www.peteducation.com/article.cfm?c=2+1659&aid=1104

    2. Iams Nutrition Symposium “For years, physicians and veterinarians have treated renal failure by
    reducing protein levels in diets,” said Gregory Reinhart PhD, an Iams researcher. “After working with leading universities, we have now found that restricting protein in a dog’s diet may do more harm than good by potentially putting the companion animal at risk of protein malnutrition.” http://www.canismajor.com/dog/iamssym1.html#KIdney

    3. The journal Kidney International – ” These results do not support the hypothesis that high protein feeding had a significant adverse effect on either renal function of morphology in dogs with 75% nephrectomy.” http://www.nature.com/ki/journal/v29/n2/abs/ki198629a.html

    4. Dr. Dunn DVM on PetMD website “Ahhhhhh … I know what you’re thinking! Too much protein! Kidney
    damage! Well, guess what? The very early research that pointed a finger at protein as being a cause of kidney failure in dogs wasn’t even done on dogs! It was done on rats fed unnatural diets for a rodent — diets high in protein.”

    5. In the above article, Dr. Dunn sites Kirks Veterinary Therapy “…restriction of protein intake does not alter the development of renal lesions nor does it preserve renal function. Considering these
    (research) findings, the authors do not recommend reduction of dietary protein in dogs with renal disease or reduced renal function in order to achieve renoprotective effects.”

    -Kirk’s Veterinary Therapy XIII, Small Animal Practice, page 861, written by Finco, Brown, Barsanti and Bartges”

    6. Vet Dr. Barbara Royal created a higher protein, raw diet for Darwins. These two sources are sited on Darwins page “Disadvantages to reduced protein intake include reduced kidney function as measured by GFR and renal plasma flow, possibility of a negative nitrogen balance, and the promotion of a catabolic state. ~ Kenneth C. Bovee, DVM, “Mythology of Protein Restriction for Dogs with Reduced Renal Function”

    The whole theory of low-protein diets for dogs with kidney disease was blown apart in 1975 by David Kronfeld, PhD, who was at the time a veterinary researcher at the University of Pennsylvania. His concept was not to feed less protein but rather to feed higher-quality protein. ~Wendy Volhard, author of “Holistic Guide for a Healthy Dog” – See more at: http://www.darwinspet.com/for-veterinarians/kidney-health-issues-2/#sthash.o19r7oF3.dpuf

    I could go on.

    Regarding carbs and kidney disease — I wasn’t clear if I stated “carbs” as it was gluten grains (aka wheat, barley, rye and contaminated oats) that were shown to be linked to a form of kidney disease called IgA Nephropathy. “This suggests that in humans IgA nephropathy might be caused or aggravated by wheat lectin; indeed a trial of gluten avoidance in children with this disease reported reduced proteinuria and immune complex levels.” http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1115436/

    Edit — I find “Google” to be an extremely reliable source for finding pertinent information. But, in order to get past all the hype, you have to be quite specific in your queries. To get the info on gluten and kidney disease I googled “lectins kidney disease” as just one example.

  • barbkohl

    I am pretty much finished with this discussion, but in my defense, I would like to address a couple of points.
    Regarding my coming on the site and posting a lot on this food, I was up all night before my bitches emergency spay, and was anxious, killing time, and surfing. I decided to see what reviews were of Bil Jac. This site came up first, I spent several hours on it, to alleviate my anxiety.
    Secondly, People said I am parroting what Bil Jac has told me. SOME of this is true, but mostly I have done my own research on my own time.
    In Speaking to Science Diet and Blue representatives, I asked what tools they had to sell their food. Both told me they were “Nutrition Consultants” and were “experts in Nutrition”.
    I am supposing Blue and Science diet gave them that title with a minimum of training. I do not proclaim to be an expert on anything, becaseu there is always more to learn. Besides, Bil Jac has specific rules on what I can and can’t say, even though other companies say/claim those same things, openly. Personally, I will always research a question and am interested in the correct answer. I will not answer a person’s question unless I know the answer to be true and supported by facts.
    Several Reps of other companies don’t even HAVE dogs or cats, and many of those that do, don’t feed the food they represent. I know this because I have spoken with many.
    Lastly, when chastised for saying Protein was hard on the kidneys, that I was terribly misinformed, and that it was Carbs that were hard on the kidneys, I elected to Google, “Are proteins hare to process through kidneys,” and after, “are carbohydrates hard to process by the kidneys.”, to find the proper facts.
    Both queries brought up the same pages. There were hardly ANY reports on Carbs and kidneys, but plenty on High protein stressing kidneys and overworking them. Sites noted are “The Dog Food Project” (Is too much Protein Harmful), “VBulletin” (Too much Protein) and several others, including speaking to 2 RN friends of mine, ALL which support too much protein making the kidneys work harder.
    As I stated, Bil-Jac did not give me this information, I looked it up on my own, and as several people on this list called my knowledge “bogus”, my information is indeed, supported by facts.
    That’s pretty much what I wanted to note. Thank you.

  • barbkohl

    Sorry I used the unnecessary term of Pyometra spay. A normal spay is selective. One associated with Pyo is imminently more dangerous and life threatening. That’s the ONLY reason I mentioned it that way, personally being a vet tech and an owner of show and performance dogs for over 35 years. Being specific was in no way intended to impinge on the group members’ intelligence.

  • Dog_Obsessed

    Thanks to both of you! It seems like it’s basically ended now, hopefully it’ll stay that way.

  • Hater & Molly’s Mom

    Her posts were so chopped up that i had a hard time keeping up with the reading!

  • Dori

    OH! Now I get it. I couldn’t understand what that was all about. Duh? Not using my brain yesterday I guess. When I commented to her at one point I couldn’t figure out where my post didn’t show up. Later on in the day I just decided to continue scrolling all the way down and found it.

  • theBCnut

    Her comments are chopped all through the thread because she went back to post from 3 years ago to erroneously tell people that they are wrong.

  • Dori

    Sorry Dob Obsessed, I missed your post to me but glad BC saw it and answered for you. To see the entire discussion you just have to continue to keep scrolling down. There are other conversations along the way that got in the middle of the thread. Don’t know how that happened but anyway it did continue for quite a long time with many many posts. Somewhere along the way she did mention that though she wasn’t a rep, she worked for a company and demonstrated Bil-jac which is why she knows so much about the brand. As BC said, “whatever that means”.

  • Dori

    Actually I think quite a few of us know what a Pyometra spay is. If you’ve had animals long enough in your life there are many medical terms you become familiar with that you wish you hadn’t needed to know about. You don’t have to be in the veterinary profession to know what it is and what it entails. I’m sorry your girl had to go through this. How is she doing? On the mend I hope.

  • theBCnut

    She got on and posted about how BHA isn’t bad, a diabetic dog should go on a high carb food, protein causes kidney disease, and any other thing she could come up with.. You know me, I couldn’t just let those posts stand, so I replied to every one of them. Then she started hand waving and calling me a meany. She identified herself as a demonstrator, whatever that means, in, I think, her second post.

  • Dog_Obsessed

    What? Sorry, I’m super confused here. I haven’t been following this thread, because I was busy most of yesterday and almost all of today. I don’t see a post of her admitting to being a rep, but I’m really confused by the flow of replies because there are so many. Can someone please explain what happened? Thanks!

  • aquariangt

    You posted something like 24 times last night about a food most people here consider to be subpar, and are mad when they give you the reasons why? What exactly are you trying to do here? Aren’t the multitude of posts you trying to prove that you are ALWAYS right, as you put it? You have a slew of negative comments on everyone else’s comments that you dug up from 2 months-over a year ago and tried to disprove them, then lashed out when you were contradicted.

    I teach classes too, all positive. Less than 10 minutes ago I just told someone they couldn’t come back, because they too came to their first class, tried to tell me her way was best, and proceed to contradict many things I was saying (for the record, you show up to a +R trainer with a choke chain and refuse to use treats, ok.) So you didn’t exactly walk in here to make yourself feel welcome, you came in with an agenda, and when not agreed with, freaked out.

  • theBCnut

    I changed my mind.

  • DogFoodie

    Spiteful much?

  • Shawna

    Sorry barbkohl.. It was intended as a statement. I was in a big hurry to get this posted before I had to leave.. I don’t expect an answer.

  • barbkohl

    “You get more files with honey than you do vinegar.” I have taught classes for 18 years, and their is force training, or praise training. I wonder which gets your point across more effectively?
    Don’t sugar coat your comments by saying they are “blunt”. No, they were attacking, condescending, rude and unwelcoming, and they worked. I am fed up with your b.s. so it’s a little late to backpedal. You have no interest in a productive discussion, all you have an interest in trying to show everyone how much you know and that you are ALWAYS right, at any cost.
    Being civil can start some productive discussions, but I won’t be around to see it. You have made this a very unwelcoming and negative place to be. Congratulations!

  • barbkohl

    Why don’t YOU call them on it?? Great idea!! Put some action behind your words and REALLY become someone, instead of a “wannabe”,
    Viable people look up to people of action, not words. Why don’t you give it a go??
    Take some action and make your name! Do something to make yourself stand out in the BIG world, not just a big fish in a little pond.
    You might find it gratifying!

  • Shawna

    Protein being hard on the kidneys has actually been disproven for over 20 years now. The research used to suggest protein being problematic was actually done on rats. When the research was done on dogs (and cats) they found that protein requirements actually increase in dogs with kidney disease (and senior dogs in general).

    There TONS of data on the topic. My favorite though is Dr. Kenneth Bovee, Department of Clinical Studies, School of Veterinary Medicine. He wrote an article titled “Mythology of Protein Restriction for Dogs with Reduced Renal Function”. He writes “Evidence that high protein diets enhance renal function in normal dogs has led to confusion among veterinarians who have been told for decades that low protein diets may be beneficial for kidney function.” http://dogaware.com/files/bovee.pdf

    Another reliable source “These results do not support the hypothesis that high protein feeding had a significant adverse effect on either renal function of morphology in dogs with 75% nephrectomy.” http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3702209 This one is also referenced in the journal “Kidney International” http://www.nature.com/ki/journal/v29/n2/abs/ki198629a.html

    Note that both of the above references are discussing higher protein not being problematic to the kidney of dogs that already HAVE chronic kidney disease.

    Even Iams and Science Diet know this information. Iams Nutrition Symposium “For years, physicians and veterinarians have treated renal failure by
    reducing protein levels in diets,” said Gregory Reinhart PhD, an Iams
    researcher. “After working with leading universities, we have now found
    that restricting protein in a dog’s diet may do more harm than good by
    potentially putting the companion animal at risk of protein
    malnutrition.” http://www.canismajor.com/dog/iamssym1.html#KIdney

    Note — Dr. Bovee’s article was written in 1998. That was over 16 years ago. More recently they have discovered that older dogs actually need more protein not less. LOTS of reliable info, like Purdue above, all over the web. It’s not a misprint.

  • barbkohl

    Awesome! You should become a part time lawyer as well!!
    Whatever. You have gotten to the point where you can “Speak to the hand”. I’m not wasting any more time on you. My time is more valuable.

  • barbkohl

    I just got home from picking my bitch up at the vets with an emergency Pyometra spay. Your one person with all the knowledge can apprise you of what that entails. I am a vet tech as well, and have been for many years, amongst other things, but apparently I need to be “schooled” and not in a constructive way.
    I am going through my messages, so already posted just before.
    Your post is very nice, and I wish I had heard from you before, but the particular person has soured me so much on this site, I feel that she overshadows any reasonable discussion.
    There are 3 people like that, and the one even quite rudely referred to me in a negative comment, like I wasn’t even on the site.
    I hope this page does have more people that are not so petty, It seems it might, and it’s a shame for a few people to ruin it for others. (But, maybe that’s what they want to do, as they feel (mistakenly) that it gives them some modicum of ‘Power”). I don’t know, and I don’t care.

  • barbkohl

    One person’s comments every time I post something are critical, condescending, and arrogant.
    Mostly just one person, but her attitude is quite pervasive, and she calls herself a “regular”. I don’t even want to consider what that means..
    Food is food, and what is what, and if you know it all, and have said it, why do you have to wait like a spider for a fly, to be ale to have someone new to spout your supposed expertise to, and contradict at every turn?
    I won’t bother to visit this site again, nor certainly become a “regular” (what for?? It seems strange.)
    I like discussions too, but I find I get more out of constructive and civil discussions.
    If this person’s presence is so pervasive on this site (as she seems to think it is) than I don’t need that.
    I have a life, and I try to keep it filled with positive things, not sarcastic High School barbs.
    Feed what you want, or don’t. She, especially, can eat sawdust, for all I care. I don’t waste time with hostile people.

  • Hater & Molly’s Mom

    You can try and sugar coat it all you want! I’m not buying anything you are saying!

  • barbkohl

    I don’t have to “explain” anything. This is not an inquisition.
    Companies advertise the way they want to as long as it’s not false, Jeez!

  • Dori

    Well said BC.

  • Dori

    Yep! I posted that before I realized that this poster is a rep for Bil-jac and not the disgusting troll that posted today on a different thread with his/her old name from a couple of weeks or so back. I made the mistake of thinking this was the same person with a new name. Oops! My bad. Sorry

  • LabsRawesome

    MyButtHairStinks, sounds like a personal problem. Maybe you should try a different soap. A good deodorant soap might help your problem.

  • theBCnut

    If you are lumping me in that category, I guess I have to apologize again. I’m not being contrary for the sake of contrary, but people come here all the time and repeat old wive’s tales all the time that we are committed to exposing because they simply are not true and believing them can affect how people choose their dog food, which can affect their dog’s health. I freely admit that I am blunt. I don’t beat around the bush, I just say what I’m thinking. I don’t mean to be rude or appear short with people. I do get exasperated when I read the same misinformation 10 or 20 times a day, not your fault, but there you go. The purpose of this site is education and I’m kind of obsessive about it, but I only want people to have good information, so they can make good decisions.

  • theBCnut

    If Bil-Jac says something that is pure baloney, shouldn’t someone call them on it. How else do people learn? If someone tells you something that is simply wrong, wouldn’t you rather have someone educate you, so you will know the truth, instead of continuing to believe something that isn’t true, and passing it on to others. Sorry, we don’t just accept things at face value here.

  • theBCnut

    The government regulated label isn’t supposed to have extra words to describe the legally described ingredients, so saying chicken by products(organs only), they are already outside of the legal label parameters. Listing the individual ingredients that are not defined, but are still ingredients in the food is not outside of those parameters.

  • Dori

    Didn’t realize that she admitted to being a rep until I posted my fears of her being a troll. Thought it was just another troll after one of the regulars. Bil-Jac of all foods? Really cracks me up now that I realize the poster is really serious about this food. Lol is right! How funny.

  • theBCnut

    Dori, I don’t know what you are referring to. Are you, by chance, seeing the person that just responded to a disgusting person’s post from a few days ago and thinking that that individual is back?

  • theBCnut

    Rep do this all the time. That’s one of the ways we know they are reps.

  • theBCnut

    No, I have never been a rep for any company.

  • aquariangt

    wow, I just scrolled through this one. She has an overwhelming number of posts all from “20 hours ago” I’m not sure if it’s a troll, or just someone really passionate about…bil-jac? Lol. I’ve never seen that many posts at one time about one food

  • Dori

    UH OH BC! I think we’ve been duped by the troll. I’m embarrassed to say that I think we fell for it. I will not respond to that poster again. When will we ever learn !?! BC, don’t respond to this person or the other that has joined the discussion (you know who I mean). We all know you and you certainly don’t have to defend your position. I think we just fell into the “troll trap”.

  • Dori

    Yes, you are correct in that there have been the occasional trolls on this site through the years and they are contrary to everyone regarding everything. They must not have lives outside of being contrary on web sites. I will say that the majority of the posters on this site that have been long time posters are honestly concerned about not only our own animals but everyones. I certainly would never want to discourage anyone from coming on to Dr. Mikes DFA site to attempt to learn and teach others about their experiences with different foods. There are also Off Topics on the Forum sites for issues outside of foods. I would have for you to judge all of us with the same paint brush. Hope you are not discouraged by any negativity, we like a good debate.

  • Dori

    I don’t believe that there will be negative and contrary replies to your posts just to be contrary. No one has anything against you personally but just as you are allowed to give your opinions, so are we. We like discussion on this site. We like to be challenged and we like to learn things that we may not know or be aware of. We also like to share our experiences with the different foods and ingredients. That is a major proponent of this site. That’s my opinion and belief anyway.

  • Dori

    BHA is not necessary in any food for dogs or humans. There are many foods, dog and human, that do not contain BHA. If it was actually necessary then why are so many companies going to the extra expense to make sure that their foods and containers do not have any bha?

  • theBCnut

    I know the legal definition. The point is that if they use that defined term, they can legally use the worst by products. There is no legal definition of chicken by products(organs only), just chicken by products. However, chicken liver is only chicken liver and chicken heart is only chicken heart. Yes, I know they are by products, but I KNOW they are quality by products. I don’t have an issue with feeding named by products, because I know what I’m getting.
    AAFCO doesn’t have much power as far as regulating dog food. And you wouldn’t believe how many loopholes they provide dog food manufacturers with.
    Sent from my iPod

  • JeremyScottRenolds

    ButThairsTinks, your link states the
    FDA considers BHA and BHT safe. Are you aware of the
    revolving door that exists between industry and government? Many in the FDA are from chemical/pharma industries who hold regulatory
    positions in the FDA, making favorable decisions for their industry. When their time is up at the FDA, they go back to their high paying corporate positions. And that is the reason I would never trust any FDA ‘scientific’ study…they’re generally based on greed and corruption, not science.

    I do trust studies from respected universities and environmental groups who found these chemicals can cause cancer and pose a risk to wildlife and the environment.

  • DogFoodie

    So how do you explain the ingredients in Back to Basics Duck Formula: Duck and Chicken Giblets (Livers and Hearts), Duck Meal, Chicken Meal, Tapioca, Peas, Dried Whole Egg, Pea Protein, Duck Fat (Preserved with Mixed Tocopherols), Whole Flaxseed, Natural Duck Flavor, Pea Fiber, Menhaden Fish Oil, Sunflower Oil, Salt, Potassium Chloride, Choline Chloride, Zinc Proteinate, Iron Proteinate, Vitamin E Supplement, L-Carnitine, L-Ascorbyl-2-Polyphosphate (Source of Vitamin C), Manganese Proteinate, Biotin, Copper Proteinate, Niacin, Calcium Pantothenate, Sodium Selenite, Vitamin A Supplement, Riboflavin Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Thiamine Mononitrate, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Calcium Iodate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Folic Acid

  • barbkohl

    Anything other than muscle meat has to be identified as by-product, by FDA guidelines. That means organs have to be classified as By products. You are more than welcome to research the meaning of “By-Products” and I completely know what they generally mean, but as truth in advertising, Bil-Jac states right on the bag that the “by-products” they use are organs. (Lungs, Trachea, heart, Gizzards Liver, etc.) The front of their bags state that there are no fillers, gluten, wheat, soy or rendered fat.
    If any of that was untrue, the AAFCO would not let them print that as it would be false advertising

  • barbkohl

    So am I, or I wouldn’t be representing the food. I personally can’t recommend something I don’t believe in to other people. I know this about myself after 45 years in Customer service.
    I think most people are passionate about the best they can do for their pets, within monetary reason, depending on their circumstances.

  • barbkohl

    Thank you. I was just wondering.

  • theBCnut

    All preservatives are near the bottom of the list. A little goes a long way. No I wouldn’t leave my beef jerky lying around for 6 months, but then I wouldn’t do that with dog food either. And the dog food companies that use natural preservatives still have a long shelf life.
    Sent from my iPod

  • barbkohl

    In short (I am getting Very weary of all the non constructive contradictions) I wouldn’t think you would leave your beef jerky out in the open for 6 months, maybe an incorrect presumption. BilJac is not dehydrated. Check the ingredient list. BHA is nearly at the bottom, and if they used so much, it would have to be MUCH farther up in the ingredient list, as they are listed in descending order of volume.
    BTW, are YOU a rep for another company, or have you been? Just curious.

  • theBCnut

    Hands on is not the only small animal medicine they get. That is usually done during rotations, rounds, or externships, depending on the vet school and is done at the end of their education when they should already know their stuff. It is for practice, not to start learning small animal medicine.
    Sent from my iPod

  • theBCnut

    Sorry, but we are passionate about dog food and the health of our pets.
    Sent from my iPod

  • theBCnut

    The regulars know me, so I often forget that new people don’t. I was a vet tech before quitting to raise my children. But I didn’t learn about nutrition there either. In fact, I’ve had the same 3 hour Small Animal Nutrition class that vet students have and a lot of the same continuing education that vets have, mostly slanted towards Purina, Hill’s, and RC. Not at all adequate when you consider how many diseases and conditions are affected or just plain caused by food. I’ve had to continually study on my own to learn things and am always learning something new.
    BTW, I saw where you identified yourself within the first post or so, but sometimes it’s easy for people to miss seeing a post.
    Sent from my iPod

  • barbkohl

    For my personal interest, could you tell me the other brands? I would be interested, as there are a lot of designer foods that I am not familiar with. Thank you.

  • barbkohl

    Thank you, I will check into it, by doing my own research (I most certainly don’t consult Bil-Jac on many things!).
    Your last sentence is a question, and as such, I don’t understand it. I can see it as a statement, but not a question. I’m not sure how to answer it.

  • barbkohl

    On second thought, I will ask Bil-Jac the questions you presented, but not reply to them on this list, as I rightly presume that there will be a contrary, negative challenge to anything I say.

  • theBCnut

    No, they aren’t the only one.

    Sent from my iPod

  • barbkohl

    I have been told by several vets and graduates that it is 3 months HANDS ON with small animals.
    I don’t care to revisit this, especially with my vets, as everything I say seems to have a negative retort, of which you are an expert at. You can believe what you want to, It’s a country of free speech, so proselytize away..

  • barbkohl

    I can say, that I noticed that some people on here just want to be contrary for the “fun” of it
    There are several comments that reflect this as the Owner of this site has had to delete messages, and asked people SEVERAL times, on this thread, to be civil and decent to one another.
    Responding to negative people, or entertaining them is not in my repertoire of things I like to do with my spare time. Just sayin’.

  • barbkohl

    Just out of curiosity, people have told me that I need to “out” myself as a Rep. I think I have clearly done that, and have nothing to hide.
    May I ask your profession? Are you a nurse? That seems like a possiblity.

  • barbkohl

    Sorry, she asked if she was wrong, and I just answered her question. I was tired of defending this dog food. As my friend told me, “You’re not getting paid for this”. At this point, I don’t really care one way or not if anyone uses it, but I will ask the questions, because as a responsible person, I would personally like to know the answers.
    I don’t need to keep “selling” this food on my own, The food speaks for itself.
    The Dog Food Advisor is a very respected site, and I just went on it to see what they said about the food, and give the facts on the cooking of the corn, and the organs. I think my case is rested, but if I find out the answers to your questions, I will answer them and no more.
    I go on the computer for relaxation and enjoyment, not to make something i’m interested in turn out to be an unpleasant experience for me.
    I don’t like to argue, so usually back away from a confrontational situation ( That DOESN’T mean I won’t stick up for myself), but this is my spare time. I DO have a life, and i’m to the point I just simply don’t give a crap about letting people on this list know about this food.

  • barbkohl

    Thank you, I will, That was not Bil-Jac’s comment, My chemist friend asked me about it, and I looked it up on Google, It was referred to as a preservative and Omega 3 in several places. I think I typed in “Flaxseed in dog food” but I will check it later as well, and provide you with the information.

  • barbkohl

    Thank you for the suggestion, I will reword it when I call them in a little bit, and ask about some of the questions raised here.
    Also than you for this post not having the same tone as the others, which have been very argumentative and accusatory.
    I am only a rep, that works for another company. If it was MY Bil-Jac, I’d be off vacationing in the Caribbean in my own cabana!
    I will wait awhile to address the issues in those other posts, and, of course, in a civil manner.

  • barbkohl

    As I understand Wysong is the only food that is cooked lower than the Kibbles are, and it is baked. Bil-Jac is vacuum cooked, and I would challenge anyone to prove Wysong is any more fresh.

  • barbkohl

    Sorry, but you are misinformed. The “by-product” (which they HAVE to call them) are organs, and the bags say so.
    The corn is cooked for 45 minutes in another place, and then added. It is not corn, it is corn MEAL
    The tiny amount of BHA is in there so the food doesn’t spoil because it is so fresh. BHT is much more controversial and proven to cause cancer
    Use it, or don’t, I really don’t care, but Bil-Jac does not do false advertising (like B__e)

  • Shawna

    Regarding the corn.. It is fantastic that they process the corn in such a way as to lessen the damage to the nutrients in it.

    That said, that is not my concern with corn. Corn is one of four foods that have been shown to cause villous atrophy. Villi are the tiny hairs in small intestines that absorb nutrients from foods. Corn damages those hairs. Here’s one mention of it (with corn oil) in one article — “Villous heights, crypt depths, leukotriene B4 and C4 production in the
    intestine were measured. Crypt hyperplasia and villous atrophy were
    severer in the corn oil-fed group than those of control group” http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9396566 Villous atrophy leads to malnutrition.

    Corn may also cause leaky gut (or gut permeability) by increasing a hormone in the colon called zonulin. I believe I have papers bookmarked on this but I don’t have time to dig them up right now.

    Corn also has a type of protein called a lectin that in sensitive people (and pets) can cause a whole host of illnesses including autoimmune diseases. It’s unclear as to how many might actually have a sensitivity to the lectins in corn?

  • Shawna

    Hi barbkohl,

    Yes, chicken is definitely a good source of omega fats BUT it is primarily linoleic acid which is an omega 6 fatty acid. Although necessary for health, increasing omega 6 linoleic acid means an increase in omega 3 fats will be needed. And chicken isn’t a good source of AHA, DHA or EPA omega 3 fats. In fact, if you look at the nutrient profile of one ounce of a whole raw chicken it has 807mg of omega 6s and only 53.2mg of omega 3s. That’s just over a 15:1 ratio of 6 to 3. Since cooking damages 3s easier than 6s, the ratio in a kibble (even gently cooked) would be even higher in 6s. Edit – my source for the above numbers is nutritiondata.com and specifically this page http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/poultry-products/645/2

    I’ve never heard of flaxseed as a preservative. What antioxidants does it provide that would make it beneficial as a preservative?

    And as mentioned in my original post — yes, flax is a source of omega 3 but the omega 3 it supplies is ALA. Adult dogs can not adequately convert ALA to DHA/EPA so a source of those fatty acids would need to be included as well.

  • DogFoodie

    That’s what I assumed she probably meant, also. But since it’s not what she said, it’s just another of her inaccurate statements.

  • theBCnut

    No we don’t. We eat variety so we get small doses of a variety of toxins, but most dogs eat the same thing day in and day out for years, so they are exposed every day of their life to the same toxins. Different toxins are eliminated in different ways, so small doses of a variety of toxins are easily handled by our bodies, but when you are exposed to the same things every day, it can overwhelm the body’s ability to get rid of it. That’s why it is more common to see fatty tumors on dogs than on people. Those toxins get sequestered off in fat deposits. Another issue is that we choose to poison ourselves, our dogs don’t have a choice. Also, there are many substances that have been banned from human food, because they are know to cause disease that are still legal to put in dog food.

  • theBCnut

    For some dogs, changes in fat level do necessitate a transition time, even to this food. For some dogs, it’s the change in protein level, even to this food. Dogs that are used to switching foods frequently have no issues with switching to any food, any time, even to this food. The level of enzymes produced and the variety of probiotics in the gut are some of the factors that affect transition, no matter what food you are switching your dog to.

  • theBCnut

    I hope she meant Small Animal Nutrition, which we all know to be true.

  • theBCnut

    They spend only 3 months in Small Animal Nutrition, which is not the same thing as small animal medicine. They have several different classes in several different aspects of small animal medicine over the course of the years they are in college. You can go the college’s website and search for the actual required classes and see for yourself what they really took. Also, every college has different things they emphasize, so some colleges have more small animal, some have more large, and some are affiliated with zoos and have more exotics. Very little of which has to do with nutrition, which even DogFoodie would agree that vets have very little knowledge of.

  • theBCnut

    You starting posts by telling people “You’re wrong.” especially when they aren’t, is rude, insulting, and condescending. I’m sorry for being rude. I really believe you are repeating what Bil-Jac has told you, since you say exactly the same things as other Bil-Jac reps who have come here, regardless of actual science.

  • theBCnut

    Funny, I just did exactly that, because I have never heard of anyone even suggesting flax as a preservative, since it needs refrigeration and preservatives added or it goes rancid immediately, but this is what I found

    http://www.thedogpress.com/dogfood/ingredients_liquorman.asp

    Nothing about flax as a preservative though, maybe you could provide a link.

  • theBCnut

    I didn’t mean you, Bil-Jac is the one putting out the info, not you. Asking if the weight of the food is based on water weight does not make sense. You might want to find a more specific way of asking that question. As for ingredients with protein in them; corn meal, oatmeal, dried beet pulp, brewers dried yeast, flaxseed. Almost all of them.

  • theBCnut

    Yes, they do need to be preserved because the fat goes rancid in kibble just like it does in other foods. I make beef jerky. It is dehydrated. I have never added BHA to it to preserve it. Dehydrating does the job. Natural preservatives are added to dog food to preserve the fat. If the food is dry, a natural preservative is enough. If it isn’t dry, then so much BHA would have to be added to preserve it that it would really be scary to feed that food.

  • theBCnut

    How does feeding a processed high carb food to an animal that doesn’t require carbs help regulate the glycemic index, which is a number on a chart that indicates rise in blood sugar when a certain food is fed, not a process going on in the dog.

  • theBCnut

    There are other foods out there that are cooked at low temps that are preserved naturally. Personally, I would rather have a food cooked at a slightly higher temp and have a natural preservative, if that was the choice. BHA is a bad ingredient.

  • theBCnut

    Because the legal definition of by products means something else entirely and it isn’t good. How is it going to hurt to put accurate words on the bag?

  • Hater & Molly’s Mom

    I would never feed this food! It’s full of by products, corn and BHA! Please do some research on your own on the ingredients in Bil-Jac. You will see that they are not healthy for any dog.

  • barbkohl

    That is true.
    By being a small company, with only one plant, and privately owned, they can gauge the quality of their resources and hold them to a higher standard.
    Sorry if I didn’t make that more clear..

  • barbkohl

    From several vets and recent graduates of the University of Missouri at Columbia. Personally.

  • barbkohl

    My “Company” hasn’t fed me anything. That comment is rude, insulting and condescending. I will take credit for anything I say and will admit when I’m wrong. I’m not so weak as to be anyone’s puppet, and it is impertinent of you to indicate that.
    I will address your other issues in this comment tomorrow.

  • barbkohl

    I am not a chemist. By best friend is. I will ask her these things tomorrow. If you Gooogle “Flaxseed as a dog food ingredient” they say it is a preservative, and I have heard this fro other sources. I may be mistaken, but I don’t believe so.

  • barbkohl

    I am not trying to “fool” anyone, I have no need to.
    I did ask BilJac a while back if the weight of the food was based on water weight of the chicken before processing, and they said no, it was based on dry weight. I will call again tomorrow and confirm that or not.
    For my own education, what contents are plant based protein and fat? Thank you.

  • barbkohl

    I did state that in a later comment. No I don’t work for Bil-Jac, but I demonstrate their food. I have nothing to hide, and no ulterior motives or gain from posting or anything.
    I just know about the food, and think it’s really an excellent food.

  • barbkohl

    Most of what you call garbage foods are kibbled, and don’t NEED to be preserved, because they are cooked at such a high temperature. Any preservatives in them are only to keep the fat from going rancid.
    Bil-Jac is cooked at such a low temperature that, to be safe, they have to use BHA (not BHT) to keep it from spoiling.

  • barbkohl

    I realize that Diabetes is an endocrine disorder, and kidney problems are not. I probably should have made it more clear, that there are alternatives in Bil-Jac for most maladies that vets put dogs on “special” foods for. My analogy was pretty far off.

  • barbkohl

    Bil Jac does not extrude their food. Kibbles are extruded and cooked at 500 degrees.
    Bil Jac is cooked at 165 degrees and is slowly vacuum processed.

  • barbkohl

    I have been commenting on posts for the last couple of hours, and I have always seen a mature and decent attitude by the developer/moderator.
    That last snarky comment about Dave working in the Bil-Jac factory seems very underhanded and non professional.
    I am disappointed, and have been on this site long enough, I guess.

  • barbkohl

    My dogs teeth are fine, but I have larger dogs. Small dogs are notorious for bad teeth.

  • barbkohl

    Well, I’m not a “Nutrition Specialist” but I AM a Bil-Jac rep. You are welcome to try and throw me, but I am a scrappy old fart, and I’d put up a good fight, and I’m not a “him”.
    I also don’t lie, don’t make false statements, and have very little respect (like, none) for those that do.
    I do imagine I am an exception, so I can see your point, but don’t lump every rep, (or person) into a neat little boxed package. I think “out of the box” and can’t be wrapped up so easily!
    It is not good to make generalizations when you’re talking about something specific!

  • barbkohl

    Excellent post, Jeff!

  • barbkohl

    Corn helps regulate the dogs glycemic index. The comments you make are presented with a somewhat hostile tone, it seems. I’m sorry for that.

  • barbkohl

    Regarding your last paragraph, why does everyone have to have an ulterior motive that they are “selling” something, when, in reality, they are just so enthusiastic about a product that they want to share? It is very presumptuous of you to think that people just want to sell of benefit from something they recommend. Maybe they just want animals to be healthy and happy!

  • barbkohl

    The By _Products are organs, like they state, The corm meal is cooked for 45 minutes in another place, so is broken down into carbs, and is needed to bind and shape the food, and the BHA is there in a small amount because the food is so fresh, that it would spoil, otherwise.

  • barbkohl

    The BHA IS necessary, because the food is cooked at 165 degrees and not 500 degrees like the kibbled food! The food is so near fresh, that it would spoil if it didn’t have a small amount of preservative.

  • barbkohl

    Organs: Anything that is inside the skin, as opposed to muscle, bones, and connective tissue. i.e. Lungs, heart, gizzard, liver and any other ” Organs” that you can name, Why list them separately? Organs are organs!

  • barbkohl

    People are getting the frozen confused with the dry.

  • barbkohl

    It IS good for her. Even of it wasn’t, you are the owner. If you choose to feed her a food, it is your choice. Frankly, Bil Jac is an excellent food, and i’m glad to see it’s working for her. If you have any questions, call their office in Medina Ohio and they can help you.

  • barbkohl

    It is not odd, and Bil-Jac pays top dollar to use the same chickens as we eat. The chickens are processed at the BIL JAC plant, NOT Purdue.
    Bil-Jac uses their own quality control, and is only near any of the chicken areas because they can get fresher chicken there.

  • barbkohl

    I can ask my friends that are on Bil-Jac to write, but I was just surfing and trying to procrastinate (bad me) grooming my dog..
    I am posting because I believe it is a very good food, that too little correct information is given on.

  • barbkohl

    The BHA is used in very small amounts, Look at where it is on the ingredient list. BHA is a better quality preservative than BHT, and you’d be very surprised to know how much of it we eat, unknowingly, every day.
    Either way, the small amount of BHA is used to preserve the food, (as it is so close to being fresh, it would spoil if they didn’t use a tiny bit) should be of very little concern.

  • barbkohl

    You need to research how these ingredients are processed, It is different from other dog foods and THAT makes the difference!

  • barbkohl

    Regarding “cancer causing ingredients” , if you feed mice enough of anything, it will cause cancer! Do you know how much stuff (even GOOD things) they feed mice to say they got cancer? That kind of research is very bogus, IMO.
    Anyway, what are the ingredients you say are causing cancer in the dry food, or are you referring to the frozen?

  • barbkohl

    Amen!

  • barbkohl

    There is no Cocoa in the dry dog food! Where did you see that?? And the dry is not kibbled, it is pelleted.

  • barbkohl

    Kibbled foods are cooked at 500 degrees, and extruded, to make them kibbled. Then they are coated with fat and “digest” (the 4 D’s) to make them palatable.
    Bil Jac is cooked at 165 degrees and is vacuum cooked, giving it superior digestibility. The pellets look like rabbit food, and are very easily crumbled between your fingers (roll the pellet a little, don’t just squeeze it!)
    To make a kibbled food do that, you would have to hit it multiple times with a hammer!
    That is the real bottom line on why Bil-Jac is better than any other food that is kibbled.

  • barbkohl

    The reason dogs need to “transition” from food to food, is that their stomachs need to get used to the different fat and digest that kibbled foods use to coat their food.
    Because of this slow cooking, Bil-Jac needs NO transition time.

  • barbkohl

    A small note. Bil-Jac is not a kibble. That’s what makes it different.

  • barbkohl

    We eat so many varied processed foods that we get MUCH more of ANYTHING considered a toxin than dogs EVER get!!! Just a thought.

  • barbkohl

    Bil Jac cooks the corn for 45 minutes to break it down, before it adds the meal to the food. It is not filler at all, but used as carbohydrates. It is needed to bind the food into the pellet shape, or the food would be just powder.

  • barbkohl

    I’m not really clear on what you’re saying, but that’s o,k.
    You can switch immediately to Bil-Jac, with no transitioning, because of it’s superior digestibility, and lack of coating of Fat and digest to stress the stomach and digestive system out. If you switch right to it, your dog will NOT get diarrhea, It is the only food you can do that with.

  • barbkohl

    Shawna, There seems to be a misunderstanding or misprint in the information. The senior has LESS protein (as protein is hard for the kidneys to process in older dogs) and a little more fiber (For helping an older dogs slower digestion) and glucosamine and Chondroitin, for those old bones!.

  • barbkohl

    Yes, The Dry is very different from the frozen in that it is sourced from Chicken only, and no beef or other protein.. (The Sensitive and Farmers DO have fish in them.. (Whitefish for sensitive, and Menhaden fish meal in Farmers, but still the main ingredient in ALL the Bil-Jac dry food is chicken

  • barbkohl

    Gee, it seems you might be going to conclusions about any food that is not raw, withough all of the information on it. That is a shame.

  • barbkohl

    It is a shame, (if you felt that bag was “off”) that you didn’t return the whole bag. I have not heard of that before, but it certainly doesn’t mean it couldn’t happen! Still, I am very sorry to hear of your problems. I hope your dogs are well soon.

  • barbkohl

    I think there are a lot of comments about Bil Jac, because this is Dog Food Advisor’s PAGE on Bil-Jac. I think if you went to the other pages, like Blue, etc, you might find similar things.

  • barbkohl

    What a refreshing post and attitude!! I hope, if you like demonstrating, that you are able to do it for many more years! I think Blue is very lucky to have you!

  • barbkohl

    The Farmers has all of those things, and the beet pulp is only used for fiber, as it has a minimal amount.
    I know other foods use beet pulp to produce a firm stool, that can be deceptive in regards to the actual digestibility.

  • barbkohl

    I am terribly sorry about your loss, but I really don’t think it had anything to do with the dog food. I know of many cats that love it, but they have to have cat food as well, because they need taurine, and some other essentials. Did you have your cat necropsied?
    I had a dog that kept throwing up, and wanted to eat, but she wouldn’t. I finally put her down, and she was the only dog I have ever necropsied, and did so only at the request of my vet. He found that she had an inoperable tumor growing around her esophagus and part of her heart.
    Again, I’m sorry for your loss, either way.

  • barbkohl

    You know, it’s interesting that you say that about the stool eating! My Bichon friend who has only been on it for a few months said that, too!
    It is interesting for me to know, but I will not tell the general public about it, as I have not heard that from enough people for me to stand by it, but it IS very interesting! Thanks for the info!

  • barbkohl

    I am a representative because I WANT to be, and I called THEM, to ask if they needed anyone to demonstrate Bil-Jac as I think it’s such a great food!
    I know a lot about it, becaseu it’s my nature to find everything out I can about things, especially of I am going to tell someone about ot or recommend it to someone.
    BIl-Jac doesn’t pay me, I am paid by another company. I don’ get any breaks on the cost of food, and I don’ get any bonusus or anything for selling any bags.
    Even the other demonstrators, Mars, Science Diet, Nutro, Blue, etc, have said to me, they have never heard anything bad about Bil-Jac,
    People just don’t KNOW about it, because they don’t advertise.
    I have been doing customer service and sales for 45 years, and I can’t sell something I don’t have a large amount of information of that I don’t believe in. I am what I suppose you’d call an Ethical informer, not a salesman.
    I don’t want to “sell” anyone on anything. I HATE hard sell, and I think most people do.
    If people don’t want to use Bil-Jac, I TRULY don’t care! They can feed whatever they want!
    I just like to let people know about a superior product for the health of their dog (they ONLY make dog food) and see people happy their dogs are doing so well. I quite honestly have absolutely NO ulterior motive.
    I actually don’t like most “salespeople,” and feel badly that they have to make quota’s. I won’t sell anything I don’t believe in. I simply wont. So please don’t lump everyone into one category. That is closed minded, and prejudiced, and rather offensive.

  • barbkohl

    The stools are smaller because it is so digestible. DON”T feed them more!! It will only put weight on them!!

  • barbkohl

    We are talking apples and oranges.. I thought this was about Bil-Jac dry food. I may be mistaken, but my comments are ONLY about the DRY food. That is the one I have the most complete information on.

  • barbkohl

    You need to call the office, and talk with them. Really. I think more specific information about the ingredients would be very helpful. Just a suggestion!

  • barbkohl

    BHA is used in a very small amount, and is near the very bottom of the ingredient list.
    The reason they use it (BHT is the notable carcinogen, not BHA) is because the food is so fresh, it would spoil without some of this preservative.

  • barbkohl

    They only use a SMALL about of BHA and it is near the bottom of the ingredient list. They HAVE to use it, (but not BHT, which is a carcinogen) because the food is so fresh, it would spoil if they didn’t use a small amount.

  • barbkohl

    Bob, If you want to know they quality of their ingredients, you can call their office in Medina Oh.
    I don’t know how much better quality or more fresh you could get, than Bil Jac!
    The plant that they make it at is in the “chicken belt” (4 states) in Berlin, Md. and the chickens are specifically chosen from the area for the food. Why would they use a different process to produce it?
    It is slow cooked at 165 degrees and vacuum processed.
    Kibbled foods are cooked at 500 degrees and coated to make them palatable.
    Your logic is perplexing to me..

  • barbkohl

    I wont resort to being nasty, (there is no need to be), and I am quite surprised at the unpleasant posts here! Still, my Samoyeds are prone to Bloat as well as are any deep chested breeds, and big dog’s whose bones grow too fast, are always prone to bone problems.
    All big dogs, like Irish Wolfhounds, etc, are expected top live shorter lives, as small dogs like Papillons, often live into the late teens.
    You can say any dogs are “prone” to cancer, and any host of things! (Your average Bernese Mountain Dogs DO have a 50% greater chance of getting cancer, and that’s why so many are lost at a young age. A lot of show people leave the breed, because they are such wonderful dogs, and it is heartbreaking to lose so many at a young age.)
    Apparently according to some sources, my breed has a LOT of problems I and most breeders have never seen, and I’ve been “in” Samoyeds for 35 years! What can you say!?

  • barbkohl

    I have been going over this site with interest tonight, and made MANY comments (sorry) about Bil-Jac. If you have any interest in knowing how the corn (And Bil-Jac is NOT corn based, you are speaking out of turn on that one! it is CHICKEN based) is processed, (which is differently that other dog foods, and why they use the very small amount of BHA), you can call the number on the back of any Bil-Jac product, and the customer service person (Shannon) will be happy to help you and inform you about the food.

  • barbkohl

    If you were feeding too MUCH Bil Jac, the dogs would have had diarrhea. You don’t need to, and shouldn’t put water on it, except if there is an old tiny dog that only can lap food.
    You DO need to have plenty of water Available, though!
    If you buy a dog food, and more than 1/8 to 1/4 is gone, usually it is not returnable.
    Bil-Jac guarantees the WHOLE bag, and all of it’s food. I can guarantee that you will never have a bag that has a rancid smell!

  • barbkohl

    I feed Bil-Jac, and I have 5 Samoyeds. I called Bil-Jac and told them that the stool didn’t smell as much as when they were on other foods. The people at Bil-Jac were rather surprised, so they don’t claim anything that is not true or proven!
    Before, when my dogs were on kibble, I used to walk NEAR a poop, and I knew it was in the vicinity. Now I have to do a grid in my yard, and still usually miss some. Also the stools are so much smaller, they are not super easy to see.

  • DogFoodie

    Why do you think being a small company automatically means they use high quality corn? Those two things are mutually exclusive.

  • DogFoodie

    “When they’re in college, they only spend 3 months on Small animal medicine.”

    That’s ridiculous. Where are you getting your information?

  • barbkohl

    BHA and BHT are used as preservatives in so many foods that you already eat, it would surprise you.
    I believe you can Google the list of foods it’s used in.. it’s pretty astounding!

  • DogFoodie

    This is, as they say, a good training opportunity for you.

  • barbkohl

    Sorry I also failed to mention that high protein is not always a good thing! It is VERY hard for the kidneys to process high protein, unless the dog needs it,
    like a dog working in the field, running on a sled team, etc. That is why the Bil-Jac Senior has a lower protein, as the older dogs’ kidneys don’t function as well.

  • barbkohl

    Since this topic was originally about Bil-Jac, I can say that people that add supplements to the food often Do get diarrhea, as is the same with feeding too much of Bil-Jac, as you dog likes it a lot.
    Bil- Jac is a balanced food, and supplements affect the proper balance.

  • barbkohl

    Very interesting! You learn something new every day!! Pretty cool!

  • barbkohl

    Shawna, I know a lot of people that feed raw, and if it, or any other food works for them, that is the proof, and they should stick with it.
    Only to address a couple of your comments, the corn IS processed differently, as far as supplements food for one special and not another, cats will die if given aspirin. Not every species needs or tolerances are the same.
    Flaxseed is used as a preservative, and also a source of Omega 3’s.
    I am only speaking for the dry food.

  • barbkohl

    Most vets don’t study dog food at all! When they’re in college, they only spend 3 months on Small animal medicine. That’s why so many will apprentice in a multi Dr. Clinic, before going out on their own!

  • barbkohl

    Hey Dee!! GREAT explanation!! Do you demonstrate? If you do, don’t you find that Shannon in the office in Ohio is SO forthcoming with information, at least when I have a million dumb Questions about the food!! She’s just great!
    I LOVE demonstrating it, and seeing the people come back in to buy more, and them being so happy! That just makes my day!!

  • barbkohl

    As I understand, corn for many dog foods is from the bottom of the silo, and does often have mold, which is Very toxic!
    Since Bil Jac is a small company, they use high quality corn like you would find in your market.

  • barbkohl

    They cut no corners on their dry food, which is not kibbled. The dry is all I know about. I can guarantee, because it is a small company, with only one plant, making one food, they can adhere to the very highest standards, and do.

  • barbkohl

    The corn is the best grain for the glycemic index.
    The unfortunate thing, is that by not advertising at all, people don’t know that the corn is cooked for 45 minutes in another place, dried, and THEN added, to hold the shape of the pellets, and used for carbohydrates, not fillers.

  • barbkohl

    Because the second ingredient is higher, and is the organs. Farther down on the ingredient list is chicken by-product MEAL. That is made from the same high quality chickens, and is cooked and hen dried, and added to help hold the shape of the pellets. I hope that answered your question!

  • barbkohl

    Nunya, How did you find it? My Bichon friend has always had skin issues, and she decided to go with the grain free. Since the other ones are interchangeable, I buy any of it that’s on sale ( I have to pay full price, just like anyone else)
    Since that’s the case, I can’t really compare the Grain Free, or Farmers..
    My Bichon friend loves it, but I jwas just wondering what you think!
    (P.S. the high protein on the Grain Free is becaseu of the pea content, but while peas are used as protein, it is metabolized differently than meat proteins.) Still, what do you think of it? Thanks, I will look forward to your reply!

  • barbkohl

    Whaaat?? How would it create more work? I don’t understand..

  • barbkohl

    So? Everyone has the opportunity to make their own choice. This is America. I’m glad you are happy with your dogs’ food, That’s how it should be.. (no sarcasm.. just the truth!) If you like what you’re feeding, and it works for you, then that’s great, and you should stay on it!

  • theBCnut

    What “dog show people” have known for years does NOT make it true. Feeding cr*p for years fries kidneys, protein does not. Kidney function, when it comes to processing protein, is a passive process. They can do it all day long without a problem. That’s what they were made to do.
    Sled dogs are the ones that need carbs, not higher protein. Normal dogs do not have any problem getting all their energy needs from the protein and fat in their diets, however, endurance athletes can’t convert protein and fat fast enough and need carbs.
    Your company has fed you quite a line, and you have swallowed it, hook, line, and sinker, without looking for the truth for yourself one bit.

  • barbkohl

    Storm’s Mom, You are talking about semantics.
    Marketing is what the BIG corporations do with their foods, like Mars, Proctor and Gamble, Diamond, Del Monte, etc.
    People don’t have to “market” Bil-Jac. The food market’s itself. The problem is that people don’t know about it, because they DON”T market it! They don’t advertise!
    I am a demonstrator. I get paid by the hour, I get no breaks on the cost of the food, and don’t get any bonuses or anything, regarding how much food people do or don’t buy, during my shift.
    I just know it’s a great food.
    I have an interesting test for you to try!! It is one of the things that I use, that is shocking, and really convinces people about the quality of Bil-Jac.
    Take your own kibbled dog food, and put it in to a warm glass of water, and leave it.
    Next take an equal glass of warm water, and drop a few pellets of Bil-Jac into the water.
    ANY kibbled food will float, and puff up, and will do so for several hours. The water will become nasty. That is due to the fillers and fat and ‘Flavoring” sprayed onto the food.
    The Bil-Jac will sink almost immediately, and disintegrate into a powder as soon as it hits the bottom of the glass. The water will remain crystal clear. It is a pretty impressive thing to see! That’s how digestible it is.. Smaller stools, and you can start to feed less in about 2 weeks, so it becomes more economical in many ways, than other foods.
    Because I know about it, and like to see other people’s dogs be as healthy as possible, I tell people about it, and delight when they come back to me a nd report how happy they and their dogs are. I truly care about dogs. (They don’t make cat foods, parakeet foode, etc. ONLY dog food for 67 years).
    I am prohibited from talking about other foods when I demo, so I don’t. I don’t consider myself “marketing” but helping dogs to be healthier on a food people don’t know about.

  • theBCnut

    Chicken is an excellent source of omega 6, not omega 3. Flaxseed’s omega 3 is ALA, which dogs do NOT efficiently convert to DHA and EPA, the types of omega 3 that they need, so flax is not a good source of omega 3 for dogs. Flaxseed is not a preservative, in fact, it is known for going rancid very fast once the hull of the seed is cracked.

  • barbkohl

    If you switch foods, the dog will have to have a transition time, which is even harder on it’s system.
    Bil-Jac is a complete food, and usually dogs with “allergies” have a problem with the fat and “flavoring” (Digest, i.e. the 4 D’s..Dead, Disabled, Diseased, or Downed as per Nestle Purina).
    People who go on Bil Jac often find that their dogs “allergies” disappear, as Bil-Jac is not coated with anything.
    The only way to know if a dog is truly allergic to something, is to do the expensive allergy testing at the vet. NOT the “lets just cut out these ingredients and start adding one at a time. I mean the Scientific allergy tests that need to be sent to an independent lab.

  • barbkohl

    Just for the record, Bil-Jac doesn’t need shills. They are a small family operated company for over 67 years. Bill just died about 3 years ago, at 96 years old. His children are now taking the company over, and not changing a thing (If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it!).
    I called Bil-Jac on my own, and asked if they wanted a demonstrator in the St. Louis area. Afterward I found out that they only have 7 demonstrators in the whole Midwest region, and only 150 Nationwide.
    Bil-Jac doesn’t have the money nor desire to get “shills”. Their food speaks for itself. The testimonials on their site are from people who write in on the postcard attached to their coupons. They are not “fake” comments from unidentified sources.
    Until Bill Kelly died, the one thing the people said that he did every day was to go through those postcards and see what people said.
    It is a great food that I am proud to represent, so I can let other dog owners know about so they can have their dogs be as healthy as possible.

  • theBCnut

    Seriously, we don’t count the water that is cooked out of the chicken as part of the chicken. If you add the %protein and the %fat, you will see that they are 50% of the food. However, some of the protein and some of the fat come from PLANT sources, so the food is a majority plant based, if you figure based on dry matter, which is the only correct way to figure, unless you are trying to fool someone.

  • Hater & Molly’s Mom

    Do you work for Bil Jac? If so you need to state that you do.

  • theBCnut

    Do you know how wrong that advice is?!? Reduced protein/reduced fat foods are increased carb foods, which is exactly what you don’t want in diabetes. Diabetes is NOT kidney disease.

  • barbkohl

    You are wrong Shawna. Bil-Jac’s source of Omega 3 and beneficial fatty acids is the chicken. It is cooked at such a low temperature, as to not destroy these like the Kibbled foods do (that are cooked at 500 degreed and then coated).
    Flaxseed can be found in most dog foods, as it is also a preservative.
    It IS a source of Omega 3 as well, but in kibbled foods all the goodness of ANY ingredients is cooked out.
    BTW, when kibbled foods claim they have probiotics, the probiotics are sprayed on their food when it comes out of the extruder at 500 degrees. Kind of destroys the benefit, but it IS in there!
    Corn is one of the best grains for the glycemic index, and Bil-Jac’s corn is cooked for 45 minutes in another area, so it is not filler, it is used as carbs for energy, and is only used to keep the shape of the food, so it doesn’t crumble into a powder.
    As I said, it’s Very unfortunate that people don’t know about how the food is made, since they are a small family operation and don’t advertise, and never have…

  • theBCnut

    No, most garbage foods have one or the other. They are not needed to keep a food fresh. There are much better natural preservatives to keep food fresh.

  • barbkohl

    The cost of Bil-Jac is comparable to most other good grade dog foods. the price is NOT comparable with the supermarket brands, which are considerably lower, and none of the better foods can compete with those lower prices.

  • barbkohl

    I think the dog Food Advisor is a very good resource, based on the ingredients of a dog food.
    The dog food advisor can’t check on every brand that is not subsidized by Made or a large corporation, to get the details of how the food is made.
    That is the problem with Bil-Jac, that it’s made in such a unique way, that, unless you are knowledgeable about it specifically, it must be clumped in with other foods.
    I’m still not sure if, even with the specifics’ that it can be rated differently, because if you are going by just the ingredients, you can’t know how it’s processed.
    I think Dog Food advisor is a very comprehensive guide to most foods!

  • barbkohl

    Dog show people have known for years, that too high protein in dog foods will (as we say) “Fry” your dogs’ kidneys.
    Higher percentages of proteun are NOT always good unless you have a working field dog, or sled dog, etc.
    Domesticated dogs’ kidneys, as well as our own, are not designed to process a high amount of protein.

  • barbkohl

    Bil-Jac?? Are you adding anything else to the dogs diet? Bil-Jac hasn’t changed their dry food in 25 years!

  • barbkohl

    Bil-Jac is a complete food. There is absolutely NO need to put ANYTHING else with it, unless you want to, as a treat!

  • barbkohl

    You are wrong, How much space to they have to list each individual ingredient? Organs should be enough!
    If you have any questions, call the Bil Jac office, they are great people and will be happy to advise you!

  • barbkohl

    Bil Jac doesn’t look like cardboard. It looks like rabbit food and crumbles in your fingers if you press and roll it.
    Many people confuse it with other products.

  • barbkohl

    Use the lowest protein food from Bil-Jac, which is the Reduced Fat. My Schipperke had kidney problems, and I looked at the K.D. my vet wanted her to have, and it was egg and rice.. pretty much equal to cardboard.
    I said, surely Bil Jac must have SOMETHING comparable, I put her on the Low Fat, and she did fine. If she still has a problem you DO need to follow what the vet tells you, or go to cooking for the dog.
    You just have to manage the blood sugar levels with testing and insulin. Many Diabetic dogs are not on special food.

  • barbkohl

    BHT is the additive that is reputed to be so problematic with cancer. Most foods have to yse one or the other to keep the food from spoiling, if it is anywhere near fresh. There is only a very small quantity used. Look at where it is on the ingredient list.

  • barbkohl

    It is not vegetable based. All of the dry is top grade chicken based.

  • Shawna

    So the opinion of one nutritionist on About dot com is where all the non-scientific people should be getting their nutritional data from? Interesting.. If we’re going to go throwing out websites as gospel then how bout Berkeley University (yeah, I know those darn Subaru loving global warming fearing folks, but at least it’s a University website). http://www.berkeleywellness.com/healthy-eating/food-safety/article/two-preservatives-avoid

    Since Berkeley probably rubs your butThair the wrong way and the about website is a valid source of info, how bout chemestry.about dot com? http://chemistry.about.com/od/foodcookingchemistry/a/bha-bht-preservatives.htm

  • theBCnut

    Apparently, you read better than he does.

  • theBCnut

    You know what they say about assuming…

  • MyButThairsTinks

    Same mentality, probably drives a Subaru too. Non scientific people really should avoid getting ‘scientific” data from non scientific whacko web sites…here this site is more user friendly for you people:

    http://nutrition.about.com/od/changeyourdiet/a/bhabht.htm

  • Dog_Obsessed

    Wait, what part of the post does BCnut talk about global warming? I think it is an important thing to be concerned about, I just didn’t see it mentioned in her post.

  • MyButThairsTinks

    You’re worried about global warming too aren’t you?

  • theBCnut

    Yes, yes, and I suppose you don’t think the human diet has anything to do with cancer either. No “all of a sudden” about it. Most people believe the lie that they should put their dog on one food and feed it for life. That’s a lifetime of food dyes that have been proven to cause cancer, a lifetime of eating only processed foods, a lifetime of eating only a few different ingredients, and some of them extremely poor at that. What I think is amazing is that somehow dog food companies have suckered people into believing that that kind of diet could possibly be healthy. Think with the brain God gave you for just a minute.

  • MyButThairsTinks

    Amazing some of the posters here that think there is something in Bil-Jac or any dog food, that all of the sudden gave their dog cancer, diabetes, grey hair, ingrown toenails, LOL My God you people get a grip.

  • Anna Tor

    Bill Jac wet food mixed with Wellness dry food is the only combo that works for my chi-Pom.

  • ShepAussie

    I wonder if the chemical preservative BHA they use had anything to do with your dog developing cancer.