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#150183 Report Abuse
anonymous
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“Most dogs never have problems with their anal glands, but some unlucky dogs have to have their anal glands emptied several times a year. In these cases, your veterinarian may recommend removing your dog’s anal glands. This is a simple procedure that will prevent future problems with these glands”.

https://pets.webmd.com/dogs/anal-sac-disease-dogs

f your dog repeatedly has impactions, you vet may suggest adding more fiber to his diet. This increases the size of his poop, which puts more pressure on the sacs to empty naturally.
If your dog doesn’t have a problem, there is no need for you to empty his sacs.
Left untreated, the impaction will turn into an infection. Look for yellow or bloody pus oozing from his sacs. This painful condition can cause your dog to act fearful or angry. Your vet will wash out the sacs and give your dog antibiotics.

An untreated infection will develop into an abscess (a swollen, tender mass of puss) and could break open. Your vet will open and drain the abscess and usually prescribe antibiotics and anti-inflammatory drugs. Daily warm compresses can help, too.
If your dog keeps having problems, your vet may want to remove his anal sacs with surgery. It’s a simple procedure, but can result in complications like fecal incontinence (when his poop leaks uncontrollably).
Prevention
Put your dog on a healthy diet and make sure he gets plenty of exercise. Small, obese dogs are at the highest risk of anal sac disease. Also, if you dog has problems with his anal sacs, have your vet check them at every checkup.

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