Zignature Dog Food (Dry)

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Rating: ★★★★½

Zignature Dog Food earns the Advisor’s second-highest tier rating of 4.5 stars.

The Zignature Dog Food product line includes seven grain-free dry recipes.

However, since we’re unable to locate AAFCO nutritional adequacy statements for these dog foods on the product’s web page, it’s impossible for us to report specific life stage recommendations for these recipes.

The following is a list of recipes available at the time of this review.

  • Zignature Turkey Formula
  • Zignature Whitefish Formula
  • Zignature Duck Formula (4 stars)
  • Zignature Lamb Formula (4 stars)
  • Zignature Zssential Formula (5 stars)
  • Zignature Kangaroo Formula (4 stars)
  • Zignature Trout and Salmon Meal Formula

Zignature Trout and Salmon Meal Formula was selected to represent the other products in the line for this review.

Zignature Trout and Salmon Meal Formula

Dry Dog Food

Estimated Dry Matter Nutrient Content

Protein = 33% | Fat = 16% | Carbs = 43%

Ingredients: Trout, salmon meal, peas, pea flour, pea protein, flaxseed, chickpeas, dehydrated alfalfa meal, natural flavors, salmon oil, sunflower oil (preserved with citric acid), dried beet pulp, potassium chloride, calcium chloride, salt, chlorine chloride, minerals (zinc proteinate, iron proteinate, copper proteinate, manganese proteinate, cobalt proteinate), vitamins (vitamin A acetate, vitamin D3, vitamin E, niacin, d-calcium pantothenate, thiamine mononitrate, pyridoxine hydrochloride, riboflavin, folic acid, biotin, vitamin B12), blueberries, carrots, cranberries, calcium iodate, sodium selenite, naturally preserved with mixed tocopherols

Fiber (estimated dry matter content) = 7.2%

Red items indicate controversial ingredients

Estimated Nutrient Content
MethodProteinFatCarbs
Guaranteed Analysis30%14%NA
Dry Matter Basis33%16%43%
Calorie Weighted Basis29%33%38%
Protein = 29% | Fat = 33% | Carbs = 38%

The first ingredient in this dog food is trout, a freshwater species closely related to salmon. Trout is rich rich in omega-3 fatty acids but also contains about 80% water. After cooking, most of that moisture is lost, reducing the meat content to just a fraction of its original weight.

After processing, this item would probably account for a smaller part of the total content of the finished product.

The second ingredient is salmon meal. Because it is considered a meat concentrate, fish meal contains almost 300% more protein than fresh fish itself.

Fish meal is typically obtained from the “clean, dried, ground tissue of undecomposed whole fish and fish cuttings” of commercial fish operations.1

The third ingredient includes peas. Peas are a quality source of carbohydrates. And like all legumes, they’re rich in natural fiber.

However, peas contain about 25% protein, a factor that must be considered when judging the meat content of this dog food.

The fourth ingredient is pea flour, a powder made from roasted yellow peas. Pea flour contains as much as 25% protein, a factor that must be considered when judging the meat content of this dog food.

The fifth ingredient is pea protein, what remains of a pea after removing the starchy part of the vegetable.

Even though it contains over 80% protein, this ingredient would be expected to have a lower biological value than meat.

And less costly plant-based products like this can notably boost the total protein reported on the label — a factor that must be considered when judging the meat content of this dog food.

The sixth ingredient is flaxseed, one of the best plant sources of healthy omega-3 fatty acids. Provided they’ve first been ground into a meal, flax seeds are also rich in soluble fiber.

However, flaxseed contains about 19% protein, a factor that must be considered when judging the actual meat content of this dog food.

The seventh ingredient includes chickpeas, also known as garbanzo beans. Like peas, bean and lentils, the chickpea is a nutritious member of the fiber-rich legume (or pulse) family of vegetables.

However, chickpeas contain about 22% protein, a factor that must be considered when judging the actual meat content of this dog food.

The eighth ingredient is alfalfa meal. Although alfalfa meal is high in plant protein (about 18%) and fiber (25%), this hay-family item is more commonly associated with horse feeds.

After the natural flavor, we find salmon oil. Salmon oil is naturally rich in the prized EPA and DHA type of omega-3 fatty acids. These two high quality fats boast the highest bio-availability to dogs and humans.

Depending on its level of freshness and purity, salmon oil should be considered a commendable addition.

From here, the list goes on to include a number of other items.

But to be realistic, ingredients located this far down the list (other than nutritional supplements) are not likely to affect the overall rating of this product.

With four notable exceptions

First, sunflower oil is nutritionally similar to safflower oil. Since these oils are high in omega-6 fatty acids and contain no omega-3’s, they’re considered less nutritious than canola or flaxseed oils.

Sunflower oil is notable for its resistance to heat damage during cooking.

There are several different types of sunflower oil, some better than others. Without knowing more, it’s impossible to judge the quality of this ingredient.

Next, we find beet pulp. Beet pulp is a controversial ingredient, a high fiber by-product of sugar beet processing.

Some denounce beet pulp as an inexpensive filler while others cite its outstanding intestinal health and blood sugar benefits.

We only call your attention here to the controversy and believe the inclusion of beet pulp in reasonable amounts in most dog foods is entirely acceptable.

In addition, we find no mention of probiotics, friendly bacteria applied to the surface of the kibble after processing to help with digestion.

And lastly, this food contains chelated minerals, minerals that have been chemically attached to protein. This makes them easier to absorb. Chelated minerals are usually found in better dog foods.

Zignature Dog Food
The Bottom Line

Judging by its ingredients alone, Zignature looks like an above-average dry dog food.

But ingredient quality by itself cannot tell the whole story. We still need to estimate the product’s meat content before determining a final rating.

The dashboard displays a dry matter protein reading of 33%, a fat level of 16% and estimated carbohydrates of about 43%.

As a group, the brand features an average protein content of 32% and a mean fat level of 17%. Together, these figures suggest a carbohydrate content of 43% for the overall product line.

And a fat-to-protein ratio of about 53%.

Near-average protein. Near-average fat. And below-average carbs when compared to a typical dry dog food.

When you consider the protein-boosting effect of the pea products, flaxseed, chickpeas and alfalfa meal, this looks like the profile of a kibble containing a moderate amount of meat.

Bottom line?

Zignature is a plant-based dry dog food using a moderate amount of named meat meals as its main sources of animal protein, thus earning the brand 4.5 stars.

Highly recommended.

Please note certain recipes are sometimes given a higher or lower rating based upon our estimate of their total meat content and (when appropriate) their fat-to-protein ratios.

Zignature Dog Food
Recall History

The following list (if present) includes all dog food recalls since 2009 directly related to this product line. If there are no recalls listed in this section, we have not yet reported any events.

You can view a complete list of all dog food recalls sorted by date. Or view the same list sorted alphabetically by brand.

To learn why our ratings have nothing to do with a product’s recall history, please visit our Dog Food Recalls FAQ page.

Get free dog food recall alerts sent to you by email. Subscribe to The Advisor’s recall notification list.

Dog Food Coupons
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A Final Word

The descriptions and analyses expressed in this and every article on this website represent the views and opinions of the author.

The Dog Food Advisor does not test dog food products.

We rely entirely on the integrity of the information provided by each company. As such, the accuracy of every review is directly dependent upon the specific data a company chooses to share.

Although it's our goal to ensure all the information on this website is correct, we cannot guarantee its completeness or its accuracy; nor can we commit to ensuring all the material is kept up-to-date on a daily basis.

We rely on tips from readers. To report a product change or request an update of any review, please contact us using this form.

Each review is offered in good faith and has been designed to help you make a more informed decision when buying dog food.

However, due to the biological uniqueness of every animal, none of our ratings are intended to suggest feeding a particular product will result in a specific dietary response or health benefit for your pet.

For a better understanding of how we analyze each product, please read our article, "The Problem with Dog Food Reviews".

Remember, no dog food can possibly be appropriate for every life stage, lifestyle or health condition. So, choose wisely. And when in doubt, consult a qualified veterinary professional for help.

In closing, we do not accept money, gifts or samples from pet food companies in exchange for special consideration in the preparation of our reviews or ratings.

However, we do receive a fee from Chewy.com for each purchase made as a direct result of a referral from our website. This fee is a fixed dollar amount and has nothing to do with the size of an order or the brand selected for purchase.

Have an opinion about this dog food? Or maybe the review itself? Please know we welcome your comments.

Notes and Updates

05/17/2016 Last Update

  1. Association of American Feed Control Officials
  • Michelle

    Thank you I appreciate that, unfortunately neither one of mine can tolerate deer and fish is too oily for my Crohn’s boy ( upsets his GI and gives him diarrhea) and the baby is allergic to ALL white fish which is in all fish formulas unfortunately.

  • Zignature Dog Food

    Michelle, we want to ensure you’ve exhausted every option. We do have another exotic protein which is our Venison formula. If your pups have sensitive stomachs and/or skin, our fish formulas contain a lot of omega 3 and 6 which is great for skin sensitivities. If you have any questions about our other formulas please feel free to ask anytime. Thank you!

  • Michelle

    Sorry Susan, I am just now seeing your response, please forgive the delay. I agree, almost every dog food company has gotten on the lentil kick, it is getting impossible for those who have food sensitivities to find anything that our kiddos can tolerate!! I agree that they will lose customers over this, they have already lost me and once others notice the change they will follow. I love your profile :O)
    We can’t do the sweet potatoes here, glad your kiddos can do em!

  • LunaLove

    they are after a vet visit that cost me hundreds. but oh well they are ok. ive heard addiction a co worker has fed that to her dogs now for years. have you contacted the company about keeping or supplying you with the old formula? maybe there is a chance they can do something! you mean put one down like the people on here are bashing? lol

  • aimee

    Hi Michelle,

    I’m pretty sure I’ve read that piece before.

    For me the bottom line is that the various pathways that result in adverse food reactions are unknown. If it is unknown what the mechanisms are then it follows that a test to identify AFR can’t be developed.

    Additionally those specialists that deal with AFR’s do not find the test useful.

    The money would be better spent on doing a good food trial.

  • Michelle

    You may find this worthy of looking at:

    Benefits of Salivary vs Serum Food Intolerance Testing

    W. Jean Dodds, DVM

    Background

    Research in humans has shown that the key to delayed, or latent, or pre-clinical food sensitivity testing is the identification of the offending IgG or IgA antibodies and immune complexes in serum or feces, and the offending IgA or IgM antibodies in saliva. In fact, antibodies to food ingredients can appear in the saliva before the clinical or gastrointestinal biopsy diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease or “leaky gut syndrome” is made in human patients. Saliva testing can thus reveal the latent or pre-clinical form of food sensitivity. A similar elaboration of IgA or IgM antibody in saliva but not serum pertains to animals with latent or pre-clinical gastrointestinal disease.

    Delayed sensitivities are usually revealed as soon as 2 hours or as long as 72 hours after eating, which is the reason it can be difficult to connect the symptoms with a food or foods eaten as long as several days previously. There is a very high correlation between delayed food sensitivity and the amount and frequency of the food consumed.

    In serum testing, food sensitivity reactions in the gut lead to increased blood levels of IgA or IgG directed to these food ingredients. Similarly, the immune complexes being formed from food reactions in the blood adhere to red blood cells and these altered blood cells are then cleared by the body’s recticuloendothelial system in the liver and spleen. Individuals having more immune complex on their red blood cells are the ones who suffer from chronic food sensitivities.

    In saliva testing, deposition of food antigens or peptides in the gut has been documented in people and animals to lead to the production of IgA or IgM antibodies in the serum and in secretions such as saliva. In some situations, IgA or IgM antibodies to food ingredients appear in saliva but are not present in serum. So salivary antibodies serve as an indication of a general mucosal immune response and can be induced in people and animals without parallel antibodies being detected in serum.

    A good correlation exists between the saliva/ blood ratio of substances and salivary pH. Salivary flow rate and any existing pathophysiology of the oral cavity have also been shown to affect

    salivary distribution of substances. Saliva content of antigens and antibodies reflects the nutritional and metabolic status of the body, as well as the emotional, hormonal, immunological status of the individual animal.

    Examples in Animals

    Food sensitivity testing for common offending allergens and peptides in dogs can be achieved. The sensitivity and testing is for grains most often associated with inflammatory bowel disease and other symptoms of adverse food reactions – such as, but not limited to wheat and other glutens, corn and soy. These three grain types are among the major constituents (top 5 ingredients) that make up the bulk of standard commercial kibble fed to most dogs. Another common allergen in pet foods or animal food compositions is beef, and the testing and screening is also directed to but not limited to other meats, fish, dairy, eggs, other grains, botanicals, oils from seeds or fish, botanicals, vegetables, nuts, or fruit.

    A primary example of an immunologic food sensitivity or intolerance is sensitivity to wheat or other gluten foods, for example barley, rice, millet, and oats. In the Irish Setter breed, for example, wheat-sensitive enteropathy is an heritable condition. Immunological reactions to gluten foods causes atrophy of the intestinal villi and inflammation of the small intestine, which, in turn, results in diarrhea and weight loss from malabsorption of fluid, electrolytes, and dietary nutrients. Even though chronic or intermittent diarrhea and intermittent vomiting are the most common symptoms of this food sensitivity, there have been few studies of the prevalence of this condition in animals being presented to veterinarians with chronic diarrhea or vomiting or other common gastrointestinal symptoms. Furthermore, beyond costly measurements of serum IgE –mediated antibodies, there are no adequate methods in veterinary medicine to diagnose or noninvasively test for immunologic food sensitivities or intolerance. This frequently results in either no diagnosis or the missed diagnosis of an immunologic food sensitivity or intolerance.

    Despite this situation, many animals with gluten or other food sensitivity or intolerance do not have diarrhea or weight loss, but instead have other signs and symptoms such as vague abdominal pain, nausea, abdominal bloating, flatulence, chronic fatigue, constipation, poor growth and maturity, iron deficiency anemia, osteoporosis, seizures or other neurologic disorders, or even just elevated serum liver enzyme levels. Some animals may be asymptomatic.

    Furthermore, animals with gluten or other food sensitivity or intolerance may not have fully developed intestinal lesions. Therefore, the immunologic food sensitivity or intolerance of these

    animals may not be properly diagnosed using known testing methods, such as endoscopic intestinal biopsy and blood or serum testing. Additionally, these animals may present with other immunologic diseases such as the autoimmune diseases of skin, liver, joints, kidneys, pancreas, and thyroid gland, or microscopic colitis.

    Saliva testing for food sensitivity and intolerance in animals differs significantly from all other food allergen tests available for use in animals. It is highly reproducible and clinically relevant. In serum, the food antigen or peptide being tested, and any specific IgA or IgG antibody in serum bind to each other and then fix complement. In saliva, the food antigen or peptide being tested reacts directly with the IgA or IgM antibody in the test animal’s saliva.

    Delayed food-related sensitivities begin in the gastro-intestinal tract when the intestinal lining becomes hyperpermeable. This problem is known as “leaky gut syndrome” or intestinal dysbiosis, and is defined as an increase in permeability of the intestinal mucosa to partially digested protein macromolecules, micromolecules, antigens and toxins. The immunological reaction to these proteins or other molecules in the liver initiates and perpetuates chronic food sensitivity or intolerance. When the gut is unhealthy, the rest of the body is unhealthy. The disease process that ensues is typically chronic or intermittent and often involves the gut and skin, as well as internal organs such as the liver. Gastro-intestinal tract function is disrupted when the lining of the gut is inflamed or damaged. With a leaky gut, large food antigens can be absorbed into the body. The body’s defense systems then attack this antigen or antigens and the result is the production of antibodies against what was once a harmless, innocuous food ingredient. These IgA or IgG antibodies and immune complexes are formed in the bloodstream and circulate throughout the body where they can damage other tissues along the way. In saliva, these reactants are typically IgA or IgM.

    Comments on Saliva vs Serum Testing in People

    Saliva hormone or food antigen testing is a new technology. It’s been used only in the last decade and, therefore, is not yet widely accepted by the medical community. Saliva testing also is not readily available in many laboratories. Furthermore, there’s room for human error when gathering the saliva sample, as food or blood can easily contaminate the specimen.

    The good news is saliva collection is noninvasive, painless, relatively inexpensive and convenient for the patient. When comparing saliva and serum methods, published studies have shown a saliva sample is more accurate than a serum sample.

    For this reason, measurement of saliva IgA, IgG, and IgM antibodies against specific antigens of foods, intestinal bacterial and fungal flora is of considerable importance in the pathogenesis of immunologically mediated diseases, including food allergies or intolerance and autoimmunities.

    Secretory IgA is capable of functioning as a blocking antibody, which can create a barrier to certain macromolecules, bacteria, and viruses. The interaction with secretory IgA will not permit such antigens to interact with the mucosa and blocks their entrance and exposure to the gut-associated lymphoid tissue. This blockage permits the host to shield efficiently the systemic immune response, local immune response, or both, from being bombarded by many molecules. An additional role of secretory IgA is prevention of diffusion of food antigens into mucous membranes.

    Unlike the immediate effects of IgE-mediated allergy, the IgG and IgA-mediated food allergy and intolerance reactions can take several days to appear. Levels of IgG and IgA antibodies in the blood against different food antigens have been used for demonstration of delayed food allergy and intolerance reactions. Therefore, raised serum or plasma IgG and IgA levels of food-specific antibodies are often associated with food allergies. However, measurement of IgG or IgA in the blood may miss abnormal immune reaction to many food antigens. In one instance, it is known that oral or intragastric administration of dietary soluble proteins such as bovine gammaglobulin (BGG) and ovalbumin or egg albumin results in salivary IgA production, but not in any antibody production in serum.

    The deposition of antigens in the gut has been shown to lead to the production of IgA antibodies in secretion at sites distant from the gut, such as colostrums, lacrimal and salivary secretions in man and salivary secretions in rhesus monkeys and in rats.

    A general conclusion, therefore, is that the secretory immune system can be stimulated centrally and that precursors of IgA-producing cells migrate from the gut-associated lymphoid tissue to several secretory sites in addition to the lamina propria of the gut itself. Therefore, if antigens are injected into the submucosal tissues, they are likely to induce serum IgG antibodies as well as secretory IgA antibodies in saliva. However, if it is applied topically to the skin or to the intraepithelial tissue, secretory IgA is the main product, which is detected in saliva. The role of topically applied antigen in the localization and persistence of IgA responses has been demonstrated in several secretory sites, including the respiratory tract, oral cavity, gut and vagina.

    More Specific Information

    Saliva is a source of body fluid for detection of an immune response to bacterial, food, and other antigens present in the oral cavity and gastrointestinal tract. Indeed, salivary antibody induction has been widely used as a model system to study secretory responses to ingested material, primarily because saliva is an easy secretion to collect and analyze. It seems to be a general feature that salivary IgA antibodies can be induced in a variety of species in the absence of serum antibodies. This has been demonstrated after immunization with particulate bacterial antigens in humans that could selectively induce an immune response to Streptococcus mutans by oral administration of the antigen. This route of administration resulted only in antibody production in saliva and not in serum. Similar mucosal immune response in the form of saliva IgA did occur in monkeys, rabbits, rats, and mice after oral administration of Streptococcus mutans, Staphylococcus or different viral antigens and peptides.

    References

    * Kiyono H, Kweon M N, Hiroi T, Takahashi I. The mucosal immune system: from specialized immune defense to inflammation and allergy. Acta Odntol Scand 59:145, 2001.

    * Kanda M, Inove H, Fukuizumi T, Tsujisawa T, Tominaga K, Fukuda J. Detection and rapid increase of salivary antibodies to Staphylococcus lentus and indigenous bacterium in rabbit saliva, through a single tonsillar, Application of bacterial cells. Oral Microbiol Immunol 16:257, 2001.

    * Zee K Y, Samaranayake L P, Attstrom R. Salivary Immunoglobulin A levels in rapid and slow plaque formers: A pilot study. Microbio S 106 Suppl 2:81, 2001.

    * Plante M, Jones T, Allard F, Torossian K, Gauthier J, St-Felix N, White G L, Lowell G H, Burt D S. Nasal immunization with subunit proteosome influenza vaccines induces serum HAI, mucosal IgA and protection against influenza challenge. Vaccine 20:218, 2002.

    * Kraft S C, Rothbert R M, Kramer C M. Gastric output and circulating anti-BSA in adults. Clin and Exp Immuno 2:321-326, 1967.

    * Kagnoff M F. Effects of antigen feeding on intestinal and systemic immune responses. I. Priming of precursor cytotoxic T-cells by antigen feeding. J Immunol 120:395-399, 1978.

    * Challacombe S J, The induction of secretory IgA responses in: food allergy and intolerance edited by Brostoff J, Challacombe S J, published by W. B. Sanders Eastborne England, 1987.

    * Davies A. An investigation in to the serological properties of dysentery stools. Lancet 203:1009-1012, 1922.

    * Montrien B de, Serre. Etudes des immunoglobulins salivaires aptes vaccination locale antistreptococcique. Pathol Biol (Paris) 22:305-312, 1974.

    * McGhee J R, Michalek S M, Webb J et al., Effective immunity to dental caries: protection of gnotobiotic rats by local immunization with Streptococcus mutants. J Immuno 114:300-305, 1975.

    * Krasse B, Gahnberg L, Bratthall D. Antibodies reacting with Streptococcus mutants in secretion from minor salivary glands in humans. Adv Exp Med Biol 107:349-354, 1978.

    * Husband A M, Gowens J L. The origin and antigen-dependent distribution of IgA containing cells in the intestine. J Exp Med 148:1146-1160, 1978.

    * Mesenteric J, McGhee J R, Arnold R R. Selective induction of an immune response in external secretions by ingestion of bacterial antigen. J Clin Invest 61:731-737, 1978.

    * Walker W A, Isselbacher K J. Intestinal antibodies. New Engl J Med 297:767-773, 1977.

  • Michelle

    Sorry to hear that yours got sick on the Canine Caviar! :O( :O( I do hope they are better now? My boy ended up not liking it either :O( I hope you have been able to find something yours can eat also! My 10 yr old boy is trying Addiction Kangaroo, even tho he had a violent reaction with fresh peas when I made their food b4, he seems to be okay for now. The baby is eating up the old stock of the Zignature Kangaroo I have stocked up on. I may try to transition her over later to trying the Addiction as I don’t want to create an issue for her with it at a later time. I greatly appreciate your effort and concern, I will be checking out the “Gather”! You are correct, rather than to put one down we will try anything, that’s been my baby’s life story thus far :O)

  • Zignature Dog Food

    Hello everyone! We are always here to answer any questions, however responses through Dog Food Advisor can get a little messy. If anyone has any questions at all about our product, please feel free to contact us via Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Email and/or Phone. Please keep in mind we ourselves are pet owners who love our furry friends and we understand that you view your pets as family and want the best for them. Thank you for taking the time to read this and have a wonderful rest of your day!

  • Zignature Dog Food

    Our food has always been AAFCO certified.

  • LunaLove

    is this food just now AAFCO apporved?

  • LunaLove

    ok well this is all news to me because ive only dealt with companies making thier own food for my dogs. it makes more sense because i just contacted candiae wanting to try some pure formulas and they after 5 emails finally told me that they use multiple co packes one including diamond pet which to me is pretty concerning. ive heard great things about the company and thought they moved away from diamond pet.

  • LunaLove

    I am sorry that sucks!! it took a long time to find zignature for mine as well!! canine caviar made two of my dogs very ill and the only one that didnt get sick was the one that didnt eat it..someone suggested gather which i would trust bc its by petcurean they have a formula that has no meat i woudnt want to feed that but when you run out of options what can you do till you find something else that works? but now that i think of it im pretty sure it has lentils :/

  • Zignature Dog Food

    In regards to who you spoke with over email about the ingredient change.

  • Bobby dog

    That could be, TBH I don’t follow her. I just remember another Vet that I follow making comments on her work in a certain field which I was surprised about.

    I like Dr. Peterson’s site and blog for info on endocrinology. I found allot of useful info for my cat that has been diagnosed with hypothyroidism on his sites.

    Anyone who has a cat or dog with any such issues should check his site out:
    http://www.endocrinevet.info/
    http://www.animalendocrine.com/

  • Michelle

    Yes, the Zignature Kangaroo is the “only” thing I am able to use on them. Hope you find something w/o lentils, very hard to do. I contacted canine caviar re: kanga meat, they said they looked into it but are regulated against it in California :O( So unless someone else who is not regulated OR Zignature decides to make 2 formulas of their Kanga I am left with no options :O( :O( I already bought $3,000.00 of their old stock in 3 days for however long that will last these guys they eat 10 cups a day.
    Thanks for the kind words. I love danes too :O)

  • aimee

    I believe she’s best known for her work in hematology. In my own opinion I think she missed the mark regarding thyroid.

  • Bobby dog

    Not sure the procedure for her thyroid tests. She has done some respected research on this condition. I believe it’s the direction she has chose to focus on in the past ten years that is controversial in the Vet field.

  • disqus_SBl7sCuYS7

    She does mail in thyroid testing too?
    Buyer beware……

    “Also, Dr. Dodd’s claims to be the leading authority on thyroid testing, but she says her assays for the thyroid tests are “patented” and won’t tell anyone how she is doing them. How can you really trust those results then?”

  • Bobby dog

    You’re welcome, hopefully your sleuthing skills will prove better than mine!!!

  • aimee

    Thanks Bobby dog!

  • disqus_SBl7sCuYS7

    Excellent discussion going on at that site.
    Hope it saves someone some money!
    Thanks for posting this.

  • Bobby dog

    Hi aimee:
    Whenever the Nutriscan topic is brought up I end up trying to find more info on the test samples sent in to Dr. Dodds; never can find much. I did find a site that posted correspondence from the ACVD Diplomat who sent the samples to Dr. Dodds for testing. Maybe this will help you track down more info on the subject.

    http://www.danesonline.com/forums/forum/great-danes-forums/health-and-welfare-forum/82928-very-interesting

  • Michelle

    Follow up this am, just got my babies thyroid results TgAA is 11!!!!!!! She is no longer autoimmune thyroiditis!!!!!!!!!

  • Pitlove

    Yes some companies use multiple co-packers. I would imagine that makes it much harder to keep track of any problems that come up. If you’re ever interested in a food/specific formula contact the company and ask them who makes their food and if they use more than one co-packer. If they won’t tell you move on to another company. I prefer companies that manufacture their own foods.

  • LunaLove

    For what occasion? I have contacted the comanpy many times.

  • LunaLove

    thank you for letting me know!! i have emailed the company with no response just yet. as i was worried about it being made multiple places bc like i said im not sure ifs thats normal or not.

  • LunaLove

    Zignature just said they didnt add them to any formuals except the kangaroo are you sure its not a different kind of dog food your talking about? theres so many kinds that could be easily confused lol and “Due to customer complaints, we are adjusting the Zssential formula to contain five proteins listed first on the ingredient list.” seems they changed that and since people dont like it they are trying to get back some customers which to me isnt a bad thing but rather a good thing.. but i agree im pretty sure my dogs dont do well with lentils so i look for food with out them!! which is pretty hard! I hope you find something that works for your pups! I love danes.

  • disqus_SBl7sCuYS7

    I have had excellent results with Nutrisca Salmon and Chickpea kibble as a base. However, for my dog with environmental allergies, it is just a small part of her treatment, in conjunction with care from a veterinary dermatologist, allergen specific immunotherapy (desensitization).
    But I agree, Nutrisca is a good food. Whenever I try something different 🙂

  • Kelly Marie Bialeschki

    I have 4 dogs my Saint Bernard and basset hound have major allergies to it seems everything. My food recommendation is Nutrisca I feed my bunch the salmon and chickpea recipe. We’ve tried so many different brands and recipes it’s really quite ridiculous. Then I came across Nutrisca on my favorite website ever for buying anything animal related http://www.chewy.com and everything else is history. All the skin issues, diarrhea, excessive licking, yeast infections, ear infections all of it gone!! On top of all of my personal review of Nutrisca it’s rated a 5 star food on here (dog food advisor) you’ve got nothing to lose and your fur baby has everything to gain!!

  • aimee

    Hi. Michelle,

    Yes I sent to Glacier Peaks.. I should have put the name in my post.

    Skept vet writes about the nutriscan testing here. Roughly in the middle of the page. http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2015/06/canine-nutrigenomics-by-dr-jean-dodds-science-as-windowdressing/

    I found a response from Dr. Dodds regarding the results (can’t find it now Grrr) and she claimed that not enough sample was sent in and that the control samples caused problems with her testing … but all of this was after the fact.

    It made me wonder ….if she determined that the samples were inadequate and that an inadequate sample can yield false results why did she run them? Dr Dodds should have contacted the person who sent the samples in and requested a new sample. Instead she ran the tests and then when the results were questioned she claimed it was because of insufficient sample, Just seemed kind of weird to me.

    In any case glad your dog is doing well.

  • Michelle

    Thanks for your input, yes the sample you sent in was not to Nutriscan but to Glacier Peak Holistics. I cannot vouch for Glacier Peak Holistics as I have had no dealings with them. I do not see where you have any scientific proof for your claims towards her as your comment seems to imply the samples were sent to Nutriscan. And yes Dr. Dodd’s test is Nutriscan not Nutriscam. Although, I am not in total agreement with all of Dr. Dodd’s methods I must say her report on the food sensitivities for me (and others, and there is a large number who have sent in their dog’s saliva) have been quite accurate. In addition I did my own trial of food testing in addition to the results as I too was skeptical but as I said she was quite correct in her reports for several of us. I will continue to be on alert tho, thanks.

  • Zignature Dog Food

    Would you be able to inform us which representative you were in contact with?

  • Zignature Dog Food

    We would also like to clarify that as of now, none of our formulas have lentils except for Kangaroo.

  • LunaLove

    i had my dogs on fromm lamb and lentils they did ok (before trying fromm they were eating zignature). they had more energy but there seemed to be something they couldnt tolaerate they were all itchy. and i say they did do ok but not great bc i have one dog that literally will vomit if she eats the smallest piece of food that she shouldnt have. she did not vomit once during transition. i was hoping to do rotating with fromm and zignature. she has been on zignature for years now and that seems to be the only thing she can have. so if they ever change the formula i would be upset.

  • LunaLove

    I emailed ziganture they said there is no igredient change.

  • Susan

    This is SOOOOOOO wrong Zignature should be fixing their web page & Chewys web page, I know the only way online pet food warehouses like Chewy can change the ingredient list the actual dog food company has to send them the new ingredient list, & ask for it to be changed….Has Zignature added the red & green lentils to all their formula’s?? People need to send Zignature emails & whinge, lentils are no good if your dog suffers with digestion problems, IBS & IBD symptoms….chickpeas when cooked are softer where lentil need to be soaked in water over night then cooked & then lentils are still hard to digest, I hate them as a kid my mum added lentils to our soup there’s red, green & orange lentils.. this is soooo wrong what Zignature has done do you know how many poor dogs with food allergies & food sensitivities are on the this food, I think Zignature will lose a few customers the new bags should have that the ingredients have been changed, so people can start to introduce slowly…. I will warn people on the dog issues & allergies f/b page… Lentils are cheap & easy to purchase like corn… Lentils are the new filler for Grain free foods, I buy kibbles with Sweet Potatoes & you don’t find too many grain free foods with Sweet potatoes any more…

  • aimee

    Hi Michelle,

    Discus did specify that I sent in a hair/saliva test so yes clearly not nutiriscam. I shredded the cotton from the Q tip in the kit and sent

    that in as “hair” and IV solution as saliva and got numerous “positives”

    In regards to nutriscam a vet dermatologist sent in samples from patients whose food reactions were known and samples from dogs for whom food reactivity was ruled out along with plain water as a control.

    All samples came back with the same sensitivity patterns. Perhaps the test has been improved since then.

    Troubling to me is that for years Dr Dodds had promised to bring forth data and publish showing the validity of the test but so far that has never occurred.

  • Michelle

    Thanks. Would be awesome for them to make 2 formulas, one for fur babies who can eat lentils and another for those who can’t. :O)

  • Pitlove

    Hi Michelle-

    They aren’t “catering” to AAFCO, they are legally obligated to be in compliance with AAFCO.

  • Michelle

    Thank you for that, greatly appreciate it!

  • Crazy4cats

    I think it is because everyone is on the grain free high protein wagon and lentils are most likely a way to do both without jacking up the price a lot. It’s too bad 🙁

  • Crazy4cats

    Sorry to hear what you are going through. I hope you find something that works for your furries.

  • disqus_SBl7sCuYS7

    I have no idea what you are talking about. All I can say is that I have had positive results by consulting a specialist and going along with the recommended treatment.
    Sorry, if your experience was different.
    Best of luck.

  • Michelle

    Great for you, mine was also tested the same way for environmental, came back tons of allergies, ex: mite allergy to all mites was in the 3000″s as you know 150 is significant, considered extremely high so 3000 would be..off the chart high. We did the allergy treatment (I was giving her shots) unfortunately they contained phenol a known toxin. I had requested no phenol, vet lied to me. After giving them to her for a year and getting worse I called the manufacturer who confirmed phenol was the preservative. I am so glad you are so knowledgeable but you haven’t been where I have been nor through what I have. I have the first dog who has autoimmune phemphigus the fatal one! And guess what she no longer has it!! I detoxed her and have been through He.. and back for her. Her autoimmune thyroiditis antibodies were in the 68+ last test a year ago was 17!!!! Just sent in new test last night, expecting her to no longer be autoimmune. So please get a life and pick on someone else who knows and has been through less than you have.

  • Michelle

    Blanket fiber @ Nutriscan, impossible. Get your facts straight so you don’t look like an complete id. Nutriscan requires a saliva sample.

  • disqus_SBl7sCuYS7

    I had one allergy test (intradermal skin testing) done for my dog by a veterinary dermatologist 5 years ago. The dog has responded to the treatment recommended.
    Treatment for environmental allergies is lifelong, no cure, just effective treatment.
    No further allergy testing has been needed.
    Ps: She tolerates a variety of foods, always has, as soon as her environmental allergies were under control.

  • disqus_SBl7sCuYS7

    That’s nice that’s its working for you. One of the regular posters here, hopefully will respond.
    She sent in some blanket fiber or something like that for the test (one of the saliva/hair food sensitivity tests) and got a complete list of ingredients to avoid.
    Totally bogus.

  • Michelle

    lol.lol yes and they levels continue to go up and say avoid, avoid, avoid…

  • Michelle

    Thank you, no confusion. I just absolutely hate that you changed the formula. Some of us have no option as to what we “need” to feed our kids. It becomes a choice of finding something they can tolerate or put them down for lack of being able to find something they can tolerate. It should be up to us as consumers what we need to feed our kids regardless of AAFCO’s stance. I have no choice due to rescuing them and them being over vaccinated through the rescue I got them from. We have blown through ALL other proteins including frog legs, alligator (yes, I was just as desperate then as now), even went through a period of beans for them. Just wish you would continue to make the “old” formula and a separate one if you want to cater to AAFCO. Companies who add more than one protein do us a great disservice b/c when our kids become allergic to one protein we lose ALL the other proteins in that…..
    So, no confusion here.

  • disqus_SBl7sCuYS7

    Nutriscan? Food sensitivities fluctuate. Did you read the fine print? They recommend that you repeat the test every year, lol

  • Michelle

    That is you, I have food tested my Danes through Nutriscan to find out what they can and cannot have thank you. Also, my body hates lentils and peas too.

  • disqus_SBl7sCuYS7

    Well, I pretty much lived on lentil soup all winter, red and brown. Guess what? My cholesterol level went down (no statins)
    My dogs thrive on Nutrisca.
    You guys are over analyzing this stuff. Find a vet you trust and go by what he recommends.
    That’s what has worked for me.

  • Michelle

    The newly added lentils are causing significant urinary issues for one of my Danes, the other gets diarrhea.

  • Michelle

    They have added in red and green lentils. This was the ONLY food my fur babies could eat. I have been going around town buying up as much of their “old” formula as possible. Hope the lentils don’t cause your problems, seems everyone wants to add lentils into the dog food nowadays.

  • Pitlove

    Nutrisca is only made by one manufacturer. Tuffy’s.

  • Francesca G

    If you log onto Petcurean.com they offer a $5.00 coupon. Every dog is different however I know you will not be disappointed in Gather. My dog is thriving on it.

  • Susan

    Hi if you click on this link below, then at the top click on “Our story” then “Our Journey”, there’s a video Ethos Pet Nutrition, Canidae is independently small family owned Business, started by 2 men who live on a Bison ranch in Wyoming America, they make small batches of food, with fresh ingredients off the local farmers, they do have their new Small Breed Pure, Bison or Salmon that has no potatoes or chicken..or there’s their normal limited ingredient Pure Formulas that have small size kibbles, my boy loves the Pure Wild so does the cat… http://www.canidae.com/dog-food/products

  • Zignature Dog Food

    Hello Michelle! Firstly, we would like to apologize for any confusion this has caused you or anyone else. To clear up any misinformation, some of our original formulas were required to be reformulated by AAFCO to comply with their 2017 regulations for large breed puppies. Our Kangaroo formula was one of the formulas that was changed, Zssential originally had a total of four proteins listed first on it’s ingredient list. To comply with the new regulations presented by AAFCO for the large breed puppies it was dropped to three. Due to customer complaints, we are adjusting the Zssential formula to contain five proteins listed first on the ingredient list.

    We hope this has cleared up any confusion,

    Zignature

  • LunaLove

    thank you!! i have tried go! but they didnt do well on it. i have looked into gather and will try it soon but can not keep them on it all the time bc it is so expensive.

  • disqus_SBl7sCuYS7

    Hey, believe whatever you want. No guarantees with anything in life.

  • LunaLove

    I like Nutirsca but im not trying it. I would love to but I have read reviews about random peices of different kinds of dog food being in the bag and about plastic found in the bag. And that multiple manufacturs according to you..I know its all from the same company or assume it is but that to me is kinda weird unless thats normal?

  • disqus_SBl7sCuYS7

    Nutrisca salmon and chickpea
    No potato, no grains, no this, no that
    Check chewy dot com
    PS: regarding environmental allergies, it is best if you consult a veterinary dermatologist.
    Go to forums and search allergies, see my posts. (anon101)
    Good luck

  • LunaLove

    thank you!! I am looking into the small breed pure lid grain free salmon..do you know who manufactures canidae? i would prefer to stay away from chicken and potatoes anyways so i havent gotten a test done..they didnt do well on fromm

  • Susan

    There’s 2 new formulas coming out, “Catfish” & “Pork” formula when you click link below then click on a formula the Pork & Catfish formula’s run along the top with all the other formulas, just click on the new formula’s to read their ingredients, Canidae has similar ingredients but uses human quality ingredients.. My boy does real well on Pork probably cause he’s never eatin Pork before in a kibble.. http://zignature.com/?page_id=333&lang=en

  • Susan

    Hi have a look at “Canidae” Pure formulas, Canidae has limited ingredients, look at their Pure Sea, it is for dogs with skin problems, very high in omega 3 what is needed for skin problems. read all formulas as they very with their ingredients… have you actually tested & done a food elimination diet to make sure 100% your dog is sensitive to Chicken & Potatoes? My boy has IBD & Skin Allergies to environment & food Sensitivities & Patch is doing really well on Canidae Pure Wild at the moment…I rotate when Spring/Summer is coming I start introducing a fish kibble cause it’s higher in omega 3 for the skin & then when Winter is coming I start feeding a Lamb or Pork kibble http://www.canidae.com/dog-food/products

  • LunaLove

    would you be able to list the new ingredients?

  • Michelle

    Heads up. Zignature has changed it’s ingredients in it’s limited diet dog foods, bag has the new additions but Chewy’s website and Zignature’s websites do not list the new ingredients. If your fur baby is all of a sudden having issues, check the ingredients out!

  • Francesca G

    I used to feed Zignature for years until my dog became very thirsty while on it. I’m currently feeding my 13 1/2 year old Cockapoo Gather by Petcurean. My dog is allergic to chicken and potatoes. I HIGHLY recommend this kibble. My dog is thriving on it and when you smell the kibble it does not have the typical fishy smell. Every piece of kibble is a different size as if you baked it yourself. You will not be disappointed with Petcurean. The only problem about the new Gather line is that it just came out in October hence it’s hard to find. Any top quality pet store can order it for you. It’s not cheap however IMO it’s worth it. http://www.petcurean.com/product/gather-wild-ocean-recipe-adult-dogs/

  • LunaLove

    thank you for your feed back!! is that normal for a couple places to make one dry food brand? i was trying to avoid sodium selenite but heard Selenium Yeast is better which is what nurtisca has yet it still has a lot of the minerals and things im just not sure is good.

  • disqus_SBl7sCuYS7

    Tuffys makes it, as well as Dogswell and Nutrisource and some others.

    Dogswell had some recalls back when, it had to do with jerky treats China?
    Nutrisca chicken kibble had a recall for possible salmonella a few years ago.

    All I can tell you is that my dogs do well on Nutrisca as a base about 5 years now.

  • LunaLove

    do you know who makes it?

  • disqus_SBl7sCuYS7

    Nutrisca Salmon and Chickpea is similar to Zignature (imo) Check chewy dot com for reviews

  • LunaLove

    hello i am wondering if anyone can help me out. i have been feeding this dog food for years now. i have tired other brands with no luck. i would like a suggestion for something similar to this food that comes from a trustable company. i dont want potatoes or chicken in it as one of my dogs is allergic. one of my other dogs has urinated alot since a puppy (even on other dog food brands) and so every couple months i get a UA and SDMA test that is supose to show early kidney disease. the levels have came back elevated and sometimes they are on the high end. one of my dogs also suffers from colitis and things in that matter. so i would like to roatate but my dogs are very sensitive as they each have thier own issues. i would be ok giving different brands to each however they all seem to do well on zignature just looking for somehting healthier for them.

  • Zignature Dog Food
  • Francesca G

    Discuss what further? I do not feel comfortable posting my email address on a forum. I hope you understand.

  • Zignature Dog Food

    Hello Francesca, we would like to get in contact with you to discuss this further. Would you please provide us with your email address?

  • aimee

    A food can meet a claim of nutritional adequacy by meeting the profile or passing a feeding trial. It does not have to do both. Each method has advantages and disadvantages.

    A feeding trial helps to ensure the nutrients are bioavailable. A food can meet the chemical profile and yet fail a feeding trial. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1659568

    A feeding trial on the other hand ensures in the short run the diet is adequate. But because the trials are of short duration nutrient deficiencies may not always reveal themselves.

    My preference, especially during growth, is for diets that both meet the profile and have passed a trial

    In this case Natures Logic food doesn’t meet an AAFCO profile. The company did a feeding trial so that they can label the diet as complete and balanced. The diet passed and so it can be labeled as complete and balanced and Natures Logic is in compliance with AAFCO for that diet even though the diet doesn’t meet an AAFCO profile.

    The problem as I see it though is that Natures Logic is saying all their diets of that type are in compliance because one passed a feeding trial. But to do this the nutrient levels between the diets need to meet certain criteria. In the case given, according to the information from the company, Natures Logic should not be claiming AAFCO nutritional adequacy for the sardine diet because it neither meets the profile, has passed a feeding trial nor meets the criteria for the family rule.

  • Pitlove

    HI AImee-

    If a food passes a feeding trial and is not AAFCO compliant how does that work? I assumed that was part of why feeding trials were important.

  • aimee

    Hi Alex,

    As with many sites that are trying to be helpful, the information isn’t quite accurate. A tip off is that they don’t cite any peer reviewed sources for their claims. For example, instead of saying “some studies prove…” the author should cite the study.

    In regards to contributing to soft tissue calcification I suppose any one could say any source of calcium contributes to that since calcium is involved in calcification.

    Patients at risk of forming calcium containing kidney stones are advised to control calcium levels in the diet but the stone production is from other factors.

    The presence of Dicalcium phosphate on an ingredient list poses no medical concern when used appropriately. Where it could be problem is if the levels in the diet are exceedingly high for a particular life stage or patient with an underlying medical problem. But then that could be said of any calcium containing ingredient.

  • aimee

    Hi Pitlove,

    Natures logic claims to meet the AAFCO nutritional adequacy requirement via feeding trials. A diet which passes a feeding trial does not have to meet the min. required by the AAFCO profile.

    However, according to the information I have thus gathered Nature’s logic appears to be using the “family rule” incorrectly and I do not think some of the foods should be carrying the AAFCO statement for complete and balanced.

  • Zignature Dog Food

    Hello Francesca! High fiber diets are known to improve colon health and help with weight management. It can also assist in relieving symptoms of IBD (Irritable Bowl Disease).

    A dog relieving themselves 2-4 times is generally deemed healthy and shouldn’t raise concerns. We would like to point out that our Kangaroo formula is also a 4.5% fiber content. Salmon, Venison, Whitefish and Zssentials all have a 5% Fiber content.

    We want you to make the best decision for your dog, if that happens to be another brand we completely understand.

    We encourage your questions and understand your concerns. Thank you!

  • Storm’s Mom

    This is part of why I find what AAFCO does a bit odd…. why set levels that are apparently impossible to achieve using whole foods (ie naturally) and can only be achieved using synthetic ingredients?

  • Pitlove

    Hi Alex-

    The first and only time I ever spoke with our Champion rep in person, he explained to me that no matter what the company tried to do, they could not be compliant with AAFCO mins for zinc and copper without using a synthetic form. They attempted to do it using whole foods like they do for the rest of the vitamins and minerals, but were unsuccessful.

    I asked him how companies like Natures Logic were doing it and he said he had no clue. He said when Champion looked at NLs nutrient profiles they were deficient in zinc and copper so he had no idea how they were claiming to meet AAFCO.

  • Sydney

    Where it says “with just 1 added vitamin” and then zinc. If you see the name of a vitamin or mineral it’s synthetic. It says zinc therefore its synthetic. And it is not easier to absorb. Chelates typically are but not the sunthetic form as they are still isolates. Causing the body to pull the other cofactors from its own mineral reserves to then use the copper or zinc. Research synthetic vitamins in pet food.

  • Alex

    Copper Chelate is easier to absorb. There are Natural Zinc and copper in the ingredients that they use. I do not see where it says they use synthetic copper and zinc on their ingredients on their website.

  • Alex

    Aimee Here is the website that tells you it on it. https://www.munch.zone/15-ingredients-avoid-buying-dog-food/

    Dicalcium Phosphate

    Despite the danger, this problematic dog
    food ingredient can still be found in up to 25 percent of commercial
    brands. What is it for? It adds texture to the kibble, making it dry and
    hard. Dicalcium Phosphate
    is an ingredient to avoid when buying dog food because of the number of
    problems it can lead to. This ingredient cannot absorb water, making it
    nearly insoluble. In turn it acts as an alkalizer, contributes to soft
    tissue calcification, and from some studies is proven to lead to kidney
    stones. Do not let this ingredient become toxic to your pet.

  • Alex

    Here is the website that tells you it on it. https://www.munch.zone/15-ingredients-avoid-buying-dog-food/

    Dicalcium Phosphate

    Despite the danger, this problematic dog
    food ingredient can still be found in up to 25 percent of commercial
    brands. What is it for? It adds texture to the kibble, making it dry and
    hard. Dicalcium Phosphate
    is an ingredient to avoid when buying dog food because of the number of
    problems it can lead to. This ingredient cannot absorb water, making it
    nearly insoluble. In turn it acts as an alkalizer, contributes to soft
    tissue calcification, and from some studies is proven to lead to kidney
    stones. Do not let this ingredient become toxic to your pet.

  • Francesca G

    IMO it’s important that dog owners know the sodium level in their dogs kibble. Especially if you have a senior dog who has one faulty heart valve.My dogs cardiologist asked me what kibble my dog eats and what is the sodium %. I noticed that Gather, Petcurean, Orijen and Acana all list their sodium %’s on their websites.

  • Francesca G

    It’s probably the sodium however it can’t hurt to get a routine CBC though. Better to be safe than sorry. I spent $600 on doing every imaginable test which was negative (thank god). My Vet even made me record how much water my dog was drinking per day while on Zignature. Once I switched her kibble she stopped drinking as often. It was the sodium % in the Salmon and Trout. FYI the fiber content is high in Zignature and my dog used to poop 3-4 times a day. Since changing her kibble to Gather by Petcurean she only poops twice a day. Their fiber is only 4.5%.

  • aimee

    I don’t see that dicalcium phosphate in and of itself would cause kidney stones or liver failure. Is it that you are concerned about the ingredient or do you feel the diet is formulated with excessive amounts of the ingredient?

  • Sydney

    I don’t feed kibble. Orijen is close but they still use synthetic zinc and copper.

  • disqus_SBl7sCuYS7

    I prefer Nutrisca. However, my neighbor’s dog has been doing very well on Zignature.
    I had a dog that suffered bladder stones and needed emergency surgery. From what I could determine, the main culprits were genetic predisposition and inadequate fluid intake.

  • Larry “Harley” Harley Wilkenso

    Hello Angela, You do NOT want this food coming to Australia because you do NOT use
    this food at all by this company, it has Di-Calcium Phosphate
    in it that causes kidney stones/failure and liver failure too. Orijen and Acana is Best!

  • Larry “Harley” Harley Wilkenso

    Hello DM, You do NOT want this food coming to Australia because you do NOT use
    this food at all by this company, it has Di-Calcium Phosphate
    in it that causes kidney stones/failure and liver failure too. Orijen and Acana is Best!

  • Larry “Harley” Harley Wilkenso

    Hello Will, You do NOT want this food coming to Australia because you do NOT use
    this food at all by this company, it has Di-Calcium Phosphate
    in it that causes kidney stones/failure and liver failure too. Orijen and Acana is Best!

  • Larry “Harley” Harley Wilkenso

    Hello Aimee, You do NOT want this food coming to Australia because you do NOT use
    this food at all by this company, it has Di-Calcium Phosphate
    in it that causes kidney stones/failure and liver failure too. Orijen and Acana are Best!

  • Larry “Harley” Harley Wilkenso

    Hello Francesca, You do NOT want this food coming to Australia because you do NOT use
    this food at all by this company, it has Di-Calcium Phosphate
    in it that causes kidney stones/failure and liver failure too. Orijen is Best!

  • Larry “Harley” Harley Wilkenso

    You do NOT want this food coming to Australia because you do NOT use this food at all by this company, it has Di-Calcium Phosphate
    in it that causes kidney stones/failure and liver failure too. Orijen and Acana are Best!

  • Larry “Harley” Harley Wilkenso

    Yes this food is very bad for your dog. Do NOT use this food at all by this company, it has Di-Calcium Phosphate
    in it that causes kidney stones/failure and liver failure too.

  • Larry “Harley” Harley Wilkenso

    You may NOT use this food at all by this company, it has Di-Calcium Phosphate
    in it that causes kidney stones/failure and liver failure too.

  • Larry “Harley” Harley Wilkenso

    Do NOT use this food at all by this company, it has Di-Calcium Phosphate
    in it that causes kidney stones/failure and liver failure too.

  • disqus_SBl7sCuYS7

    If the excessive water drinking continues, I would take them to the vet for lab work and rule out medical causes.
    Diabetes is one medical condition that can result in increased water consumption.

  • Zignature Dog Food

    We try and provide as much information on the website as possible, however Sodium is not one of our most frequently asked questions so other information took precedence. Again, we will gladly answer any questions you or anyone has and we apologize for any faulty information that was provided. If you have any more information on who you talked to so that we can make sure this doesn’t happen again, please, let us know.

  • Zignature Dog Food

    For how long have you been feeding them our formula? Any change in sodium can result in a high need for water consumption until they are transitioned to our food completely.

  • Zignature Dog Food

    Hello Susan! We ultimately plan on being purchasable around the world. We are working on it, however there is no time frame for exactly when it will happen and for that we apologize.

  • Larry “Harley” Harley Wilkenso

    Do NOT use this food at all by this company, it has Di-Calcium Phosphate in it that causes kidney stones/failure and liver failure too.

  • Susan

    Change kibble to another brand & see if they both continues drinking water… Have a look at “Canidae” Pure Formulas they have a few new formulas, look at the Pure Wild, Pure Land, Pure Sea, Pure Sky all have limited ingredients… http://www.canidae.com/dog-food/products

  • JC

    I started feeding Zignature Lamb to both my Danes. They have both noticeably increased water intake. My female acts like she is rabid for water. If its not the sodium what else in the food would cause them to both dramatically increase their water intake?

  • Francesca G

    Wouldn’t it be better to include the sodium % on your web site or on the bag? After all I received supposedly incorrect information as well as someone else when contacting your office in CA.

  • Susan

    Hi Zignature, will Zignature ever come to Australia? maybe just a few formulas like the new Pork, Catfish, Venison & kangaroo formula’s….I know we have very strict custom & quarantine laws with pet foods, buy we don’t have many single protein foods for dogs with skin allergies & food Sensitivities… We get Canidae Pure formulas & Life Stages formulas wet & dry but they’re always sold out by the end of the month & fat & protein % is too high…. Taste Of The Wild has their 2 single protein kibbles the Roasted Lamb or the Smoked Salmon the rest of TOTW formulas have about 3-4 different proteins in their other formulas & high protein & fat %, we get Holistic Select wet & dry & Artemis & we don’t get the Royal Canine vet diets with single protein & 1 carb formulas……we do have a few Australian made formulas but the fat & protein is too high when you have a dog with health problems like Pancreatitis & IBD…

  • Zignature Dog Food

    Catfish would be 0.63%
    Pork would be 0.54%

  • Sydney

    What about catfish ?

  • Zignature Dog Food

    Regardless of their name we sincerely apologize for your experience with our customer service team. We never want our fans or possible fans to have a bad experience dealing with us. Here is the correct sodium levels for all of our Zignature formulas:

    Salmon-0.72%
    Venison-0.60%
    Kangaroo-0.67%
    Whitefish-0.51%
    Duck-0.70%
    Lamb-0.62%
    Trout & Salmon-0.57%
    Turkey-0.54%
    Zssential-0.52%

  • Zignature Dog Food

    Thank you so much for the information, we’ll be sure to investigate this problem with false information being provided.

    We don’t withhold our sodium content from our website for any malicious reason, when handling the website we try to fit all the important information on it. Any information that isn’t shown on the website can always be answered by our representatives through our customer service or through our social media. If you have any questions about the contents in our formulas we will gladly provide it.

  • Sydney

    Even better lol! I def won’t be buying anything from Pets Global anymore.

  • Francesca G

    They do not include their sodium % on their web site or on any of their bags. No idea why they do this.

  • Francesca G

    I got the same information there as well. LOL

  • Francesca G

    May I ask why you don’t include the sodium %’s on your website?

  • Francesca G

    I spoke to a woman with an accent and I also spoke to a young millennial guy. Both people answer the phone. I hope this information is helpful.

  • Sydney

    They didn’t state their name. They also weren’t very pleasant

  • Zignature Dog Food

    Would you be able to provide us with the name of the representative you talked to? We would like to correct any false information being provided.

  • Sydney

    Lol your office.

  • Zignature Dog Food

    Hello Aimee! We would like to just clarify that our highest sodium content is 0.72% which would be our Salmon formula. The rest vary from 0.50%-0.72%. We apologize for any confusion.

  • Zignature Dog Food

    Hello Sydney! We would like to inform you of the correct sodium content for our Trout & Salmon formula, which is 0.57%. Our highest sodium content is our Salmon formula at 0.72%. If you are able, we would like to know where you obtained this information so that we can correct any false information from being given out.

  • Zignature Dog Food

    Hello Francesca! We would like to inform you and apologize for the wrong information you were provided. Our Trout & Salmon formula’s sodium content is 0.57%. Our highest sodium content is our Salmon formula at 0.72%. If you are able, we would like to know which representative you spoke to over phone. It would be immensely helpful so that we can correct any false information being provided.

  • marymorrison

    Who told you that people with arthritis shouldn’t eat potatoes? As a 44 yr RN, I’ve heard numerous dietician classes and instructions in the hospital for people with arthritis, and I’ve never heard that once.

  • Anthony DeFalco

    The extra water drinking is due to the seriously high sodium levels .with trout and salmon being the highest . I’m conflicted with trying this product. The reviews from dog owners with allergies are exciting. But my vet warned me the excessive sodium long term in the diet could lead to hearth problems in dogs

  • txn64

    Why don’t you just look on the bags online.

  • Susan

    I normally suggest adding tin Sardines as a topper if feed a kibble….

  • Beth Harris Bankston

    I never thought about rotating. Good idea. But with all the responses no one said to feed actual salmon, chicken or beef. I don’t know what people are afraid of. Its not cost because we spend a fortune on food. At least, those of us in this discussion.

  • Will Maer

    Where did you get that number? They gave me completely different numbers when I contacted them yesterday. These were the numbers they gave me for sodium levels:

    Salmon-0.72%
    Venison-0.60%
    Kangaroo-0.67%
    Whitefish-0.51%
    Duck-0.70%
    Lamb-0.62%
    Trout & Salmon-0.57%
    Turkey-0.54%
    Zssential-0.52%

  • Sydney

    I would NEVER recommend feeding anything where you see the actual name of the vitamin or mineral, such as “sodium selenite” on the label. This means that it is synthetic, man made in a lab, placing a tablet in your dogs food versus just getting that from a whole food source.

  • Sydney

    Zignature now has 2% sodium in their diets. Also keep in mind this is synthetic sodium, not even naturally occurring but made in a lab into a tablet and put into the mix. If you want a low sodium diet check out either Nature’s Logic or a raw food like Primal

  • Diane

    Nulo is a really good food if you want to look into that. Grainfree also

  • disqus_SBl7sCuYS7

    It’s safe, I agree. But, not necessary, unless the dog has a specific type of allergy, such as dust mites.
    There are other gentle shampoos that would do the trick. For example: https://www.chewy.com/veterinary-formula-clinical-care/dp/43540
    So, rather than go to a dermatologist and get a diagnosis and treatment specific for their pet, they spend more than they have to on shampoo. Malaseb is not cheap.

  • Pitlove

    Yes this is true, however given the gentle cleansing nature of Malaseb and having an understanding of what both active ingredients do, I find it is usually safe to recommend if a skin condition is present.

  • Susan

    Yes, online or I buy from Pet Shop a vet doesn’t have to prescribe Malaseb its excellent, do the weekly baths or every day if needed… join this Face Book group its called “Dog Issues, allergies and other information support Group” you’ll learn heaps & get your dog more comfortable… https://www.facebook.com/groups/240043826044760/