Solid Gold Dog Food (Dry)

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Rating: ★★★★½

Solid Gold Dog Food receives the Advisor’s second-highest tier rating of 4.5 stars.

The Solid Gold product line includes nine dry dog foods, two claimed to meet AAFCO nutrient profiles for growth (puppies), six formulas for adult maintenance, and one formula for all life stages (Just a Wee Bit)..

The following is a list of recipes available at the time of this review.

Solid Gold Just a Wee Bit was selected to represent the other products in the line for this review.

Solid Gold Just a Wee Bit

Dry Dog Food

Estimated Dry Matter Nutrient Content

Protein = 31% | Fat = 20% | Carbs = 41%

Ingredients: Bison, ocean fish meal, millet, brown rice, cracked pearled barley, rice bran, canola oil, tomato pomace, flaxseed, natural flavor, salmon oil (source of DHA), choline chloride, taurine, dried chicory root, parsley flakes, pumpkin meal, almond oil, sesame oil, Yucca schidigera extract, thyme, blueberries, cranberries, carrots, broccoli, vitamin E supplement, iron proteinate, copper proteinate, ferrous sulfate, zinc sulfate, copper sulfate, potassium iodide, thiamine mononitrate, manganese proteinate, manganous oxide, ascorbic acid, vitamin A supplement, biotin, calcium pantothenate, manganese sulfate, sodium selenite, pyridoxine hydrochloride, vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin), riboflavin, vitamin D supplement, folic acid

Fiber (estimated dry matter content) = 4.4%

Red items when present indicate controversial ingredients

Estimated Nutrient Content
MethodProteinFatCarbs
Guaranteed Analysis28%18%NA
Dry Matter Basis31%20%41%
Calorie Weighted Basis26%40%34%

The first ingredient in this dog food includes bison. Although it is a quality item, raw bison contains about 80% water. After cooking, most of that moisture is lost, reducing the meat content to just a fraction of its original weight.

After processing, this item would probably account for a smaller part of the total content of the finished product.

The second ingredient is ocean fish meal. Because it is considered a meat concentrate, fish meal contains almost 300% more protein than fresh fish itself.

Fish meal is typically obtained from the “clean, dried, ground tissue of undecomposed whole fish and fish cuttings” of commercial fish operations.1

Unfortunately, this particular item is anonymous. Because various fish contain different types of fats, we would have preferred to have known the source species.

We are pleased to note that, unlike many fish meals, this particular item appears2 to be ethoxyquin-free.

The third ingredient is millet, a gluten-free grain harvested from certain seed grasses. Millet is hypoallergenic and naturally rich in B-vitamins and fiber as well as other essential minerals.

The fourth ingredient is brown rice, a complex carbohydrate that (once cooked) can be fairly easy to digest. However, aside from its natural energy content, rice is of only modest nutritional value to a dog.

The fifth ingredient lists barley. Barley is a starchy carbohydrate supplying fiber and other healthy nutrients. However, aside from its energy content, this cereal grain is of only modest nutritional value to a dog.

The sixth ingredient is rice bran, a healthy by-product of milling whole grain rice. The bran is the fiber-rich outer layer of the grain containing starch, protein, fat as well as vitamins and minerals.

The seventh ingredient is canola oil. Many applaud canola for its favorable omega-3 content while some condemn it as an unhealthy fat.

Much of the objection regarding canola oil appears to be related to the use of genetically modified rapeseed as its source material.

Yet others find the negative stories about canola oil more the stuff of urban legend than actual science.3

In any case, plant-based oils like canola are less biologically available to a dog than fish oil as a source of quality omega-3 fats.

The eighth ingredient is tomato pomace. Tomato pomace is a controversial ingredient, a by-product remaining after processing tomatoes into juice, soup and ketchup.

Many praise tomato pomace for its high fiber and nutrient content, while others scorn it as an inexpensive pet food filler.

Just the same, there’s probably not enough tomato pomace here to make much of a difference.

The ninth ingredient is flaxseed, one of the best plant sources of healthy omega-3 fatty acids. Provided they’ve first been ground into a meal, flax seeds are also rich in soluble fiber.

However, flaxseed contains about 19% protein, a factor that must be considered when judging the actual meat content of this dog food.

From here, the list goes on to include a number of other items.

But to be realistic, ingredients located this far down the list (other than nutritional supplements) are not likely to affect the overall rating of this product.

With three notable exceptions

First, salmon oil is naturally rich in the prized EPA and DHA type of omega-3 fatty acids. These two high quality fats boast the highest bio-availability to dogs and humans.

Depending on its level of freshness and purity, salmon oil should be considered a commendable addition.

Next, chicory root is rich in inulin, a starch-like compound made up of repeating units of carbohydrates and found in certain roots and tubers.

Not only is inulin a natural source of soluble dietary fiber, it’s also a prebiotic used to promote the growth of healthy bacteria in a dog’s digestive tract.

And lastly, this food also contains chelated minerals, minerals that have been chemically attached to protein. This makes them easier to absorb. Chelated minerals are usually found in better dog foods.

Solid Gold Dog Food
The Bottom Line

Judging by its ingredients alone, Solid Gold Dog Food looks like an above average dry product.

But ingredient quality by itself cannot tell the whole story. We still need to estimate the product’s meat content before determining a final rating.

The dashboard displays a dry matter protein reading of 31%, a fat level of 20% and estimated carbohydrates of about 41%.

As a group, the brand features an average protein content of 29% and a mean fat level of 14%. Together, these figures suggest a carbohydrate content of 49% for the overall product line.

And a fat-to-protein ratio of about 48%.

Near-average protein. Below-average fat. And near-average carbs when compared to a typical dry dog food.

Even when you consider the protein-boosting effect of the flaxseed, peas and pea protein (contained in other recipes), this looks like the profile of a kibble containing a moderate amount of meat.

Bottom line?

Solid Gold Dog Food is a plant-based kibble using a moderate amount of named meats and meat meals as its main sources of animal protein, thus earning the brand 4.5 stars.

Highly recommended.

However, due to it’s apparent lower meat content, we cannot recommend the Holistique Blendz formula.

Those looking for a meatier food from the same company may wish to visit our review of Solid Gold Barking at the Moon Dog Food.

Please note certain recipes are sometimes given a higher or lower rating based upon our estimate of their total meat content.

Special Alert

Rice ingredients can sometimes contain arsenic. Until the US FDA establishes safe upper levels for arsenic content, pet owners may wish to limit the total amount of rice fed in a dog's daily diet.

A Final Word

The descriptions and analyses expressed in this and every article on this website represent the views and opinions of the author.

Although it's our goal to ensure all the information on this website is correct, we cannot guarantee its completeness or its accuracy; nor can we commit to ensuring all the material is kept up-to-date on a daily basis.

Each review is offered in good faith and has been designed to help you make a more informed decision when buying dog food.

However, due to the biological uniqueness of every animal, none of our ratings are intended to suggest feeding a particular product will result in a specific dietary response or health benefit for your pet.

For a better understanding of how we analyze each product, please read our article, "The Problem with Dog Food Reviews".

Remember, no dog food can possibly be appropriate for every life stage, lifestyle or health condition. So, choose wisely. And when in doubt, consult a qualified veterinary professional for help.

In closing, we do not accept money, gifts or samples from pet food companies in exchange for special consideration in the preparation of our reviews or ratings.

To learn how we support the cost of operating this website, please visit our public Disclosure and Disclaimer page.

Have an opinion about this dog food? Or maybe the review itself? Please know we welcome your comments.

Notes and Updates

12/05/2009 Original review
06/11/2011 Review updated (added Sun Dancer)
03/03/2012 Review updated (example changed to Wolfcub Puppy)
09/04/2013 Review updated
09/04/2013 Last Update

  1. Association of American Feed Control Officials
  2. Solid Gold Customer Service, 4/24/2012
  3. Mikkelson, B and DP, Oil of Ole, Urban Legends Reference Pages (2005)
  • Kachichan

    Our westie has experienced the same thing within the last 2 months. Got so bad she developed pancreatitis and almost died. Are now searching for another dry kibble. She does well on low-fat canned food, but need to find something to help with the accompanying soft stool.

  • bella

    Our 6 month old lab pit mix loves it. I got her started on it after I saw she was eating poop. She has been eating wolf cub large breed puppy food for about a month. She no longer eats poop. Her coat is very nice and she is growing nicely. I pick it up at Pet store. They will deliver it but I don’t want to wait watch and pay shipping.

  • Shawna

    I’ve had my two dogs on Wolf King for almost two years, happily and without incident. Both dogs are having digestive problems from just the last two bags I’ve bought. Has anyone else had problems in the last month or so? I’m wondering if they changed the formula.

  • lacy nissen

    We are using it on 5Week old Olde Enlgish Bulldogge Puppies and they are doing great on it.

  • http://enria.org/ Storm’s Mom

    I would try a totally different brand, personally, with different ingredients ..for the reason Pattyvaughn mentions below. Have some probiotics, digestive enzymes, and canned pure pumpkin on hand to help her stomach adjust to the transition to a new food, and introduce the new food very slowly – start with 25% new food mixed in with 75% old food (plus the probiotics, etc mentioned above), and increase the % of new food to 50% once her stools are solid. Next to to 75% new food, 25% new food, and then finally to 100% new food. This process usually takes 2-3 weeks. Hope that helps!

  • Pattyvaughn

    Two years is a long time for anyone to eat only a single food. Yes, you should change and you should also look for a couple more foods that she does well on to rotate through.

  • Barry

    I have a brown lab that has been on SG wolf King for almot 2 years…she loves it. She will be 8 in april and I wonder if I should change to Barking a tthe moon or sundancer….or keep her on wolf kIng

  • HealthyDogs

    Sure, I’ll email you., be happy to help where I can.

  • tanngina

    Healthy Dogs, I am a new Great Dane mom. I’ve read many of your comments on the forums here and would like to get in touch with you if you’d be willing to share your knowledge! If so, please let me know tanngina @ neo.rr.com

  • Shana

    After extensive research and realizing I have been feeding my dog (english bulldog) “junk food” for most of her life, I decided to try Solid Gold Wolfking for adult dogs.
    Wow, the changes have been amazing.
    One MAJOR change was that she no longer is eating her own poop (i know, gross), so she no longer is constantly stinky.
    Less bathing, no more itching, great coat and normal doggie breath instead of the nasty poopy smell!!!
    I had no idea that just by changing her food that we would see such fabulous results.
    Yes, its more expensive but worth it in every way.
    She no longer inhales her food like shes starving and isn’t always begging and/or looking for more food.
    She requires less of the solid gold each day as opposed to the common grocery store/walmart type dog food.
    I am happy that she is actually full with good quality food. No more begging at the dinner table! Oh, and she can finally sleep in my room again since she maintains a nice clean smell since switching to solid gold.
    If you have a dog with skin issues or has the nasty habbit of eating their own poop, then i would highly consider this brand of dog food or ANY quality dog food that doesnt have a bunch of worthless fillers!

  • Karin

    Any reason why the Solid Gold Wolfcub Large Breed Puppy has not been rated? I will be getting a lab puppy in a couple of weeks and interested in this food because it is lower in protein than the Orijen and Acana brands.

  • Kelly

    Hi all,

    FYI, I wrote to Solid Gold this morning (August 23, 2013) for an update as to who manufactures what as I was confused. If it’s helpful, here’s what they said:

    Wolf King, Wolf Cub and Wee Bit are made at Diamond.

    Hunden Flocken, Hundchen Flocken, Holistique Blendz, Millenia, Sun Dancer, Barking at the Moon, Katz N Flocken and Indigo Moon are made at Crosswinds.

    Thanks!

  • Pingback: New Puppy or Older Adoption Checklist - Pet Health and Life | Pet Health and Life

  • Hound Dog Mom

    Diamond manufactures Hund ‘n Flocken, WolfCub, WolfKing and Just a Wee Bit at their Meta, MO plant. Crosswind Industries, located in Kansas, manufactures Holistique Blendz, Hundchen Flocken, Barking at the Moon, MMillennia and Sun Dancer.

  • rene659

    When it was made in Mo., Solid Gold moved. Now it is in Ak. So they hope for this not to happen.

  • Angie Hendrickson

    Interesting. Thanks for your reply Patty.

  • Pattyvaughn

    Some foods have a location where they were manufactured on the bag without a company name. Did you look to see if there was anything like that on your bag?

  • Pattyvaughn

    Last I heard it was Diamond, but you should contact the company and ask, in case that has changed. At least the Meta, MO plant isn’t having all the problems of the SC plant, but the company attitude about the whole thing still stinks.

  • Angie Hendrickson

    Responding to this one year later – hopefully some one can answer. But who DOES manufacture Wolf Cub now? That is what I’m currently buying.

  • Angie Hendrickson

    I’m currently feeding my my puppy SG Wolf Cub. The only thing that scares me is that Wolf Cub was once recalled last summer. I’m really hoping this doesn’t mean they’re careless with their manufacturing.

  • Angie Hendrickson

    Wait, I currently have my puppy on Solid Gold Wolf Cub. He is really healthy and has more energy than most puppies! Who actually manufactures this, then?

  • Angie Hendrickson

    I agree Patty. Many people think like this. Not sure where the logic comes from. Must be learned behavior from childhood.

  • rene659

    I have many years of using Solid Gold, with no problem. I wish it was made only in Ca., when it was baked. I am not happy it is being made some where else. It does every good for my German Shepherds. When I go to Ca., I go and buy my dog food at the Solid Gold Store there. When I come back from Ca., I buy a lot of food there. In my opinion they are the best food out there.

  • Pugsonraw

    Just saw that SG added a beef freeze dried raw to their product mix. 44% protein…

  • Pattyvaughn

    That is a lie fed to you by corporate greed to create brand loyalty. That is as ridiculous a statement as saying you would be healthier if you picked just one food and only ate it all your life. Can’t you see how stupid that is. There is no such thing as a perfect food and feeding the same imperfect thing day in and day out is how you get malnutrition. Not to mention that if you go to a nutritionist for advice the first thing they will tell you to do is cut out processed foods. Kibble is about the most processed food there is. Shouldn’t you want better for your loyal friend?

  • Emmy

    Dogs should not be finicky eaters if they are fed the same nutritious foods daily. They are not like people. You should not need to “switch things up” with your pet. Consistency is of the utmost importance with your sweet pets and their diets. That’s why the best food available is important. They will eat when they are hungry. If this continues, see your vet for advice.

  • Hound Dog Mom

    I was under the impression that Diamond manufactured all Solid Gold’s foods. It’s good to know they they don’t. I like the looks of Barking at the Moon and Sun Dancer, but never recommended them because I thought they were manufactured by Diamond.

  • Woof1

    I emailed Solid Gold about Diamond mfg their products as I have used TOTW by Diamond but am looking for something still of better quality.  I will say I have never had a problem with Diamond products because they came from the MO facility which doesn’t seem to have the issues their other plant(s) do. This was Solid Gold’s response: 

    In April, Diamond Pet Foods did stop producing the 4 foods that they had been making for us; in mid-August they resumed production of those four foods which include Hund n Flocken and our three bison products (WolfCub, WolfKing and Just a Wee Bit) at their Meta, MO facility. Diamond Pet Foods has established new protocols, which include testing for a variety microbials including salmonella, along with a positive release program to assure food safety.

    Crosswind Industries, located in Kansas, manufactures our remaining formulations which include Holistique Blendz, Hundchen Flocken, Barking at the Moon, Millennia, Sun Dancer, Katz N Flocken and IndigoMoon. 

  • Pattyvaughn

    There are a couple of foods made by Diamond that are being reported as causing illness or death in some dogs.  So far the foods that I’m aware of are grain inclusive formulas.  A few vets are saying that this summer’s drought conditions were perfect for aflatoxins and that now is a great time to go grain free.  I think I have to agree with them.

  • InkedMarie

    Sometimes the dogs are smarter than the humans. If you have not stopped feeding the food, please do so. Save the bag, if you still have it and the food. Contact Solid Gold tomorrow. 

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1140685339 Betsy Greer

    Hi William,

    The recall was in May of 2012, the affected lots should’ve all been removed. However, the product is still manufactured by Diamond, which remains to be a concern (for me, anyway).

    Maybe they’re tired of it. Several years is a long time to be eating the same thing, day in and day out. Don’t you agree? And maybe it’s one that’s not interested and the other is following his lead.

    It’s better for dogs to have a variety of proteins and not be exposed for prolonged periods of time to the same ingredients (which could create a favorable environment for intolerance or allergy) or to questionable ingredients that could result in serious health issues.

    Maybe it’s time to start switching things up for those little cuties. : )

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/FZGXSEFU7I4GDAFBSCMPS2SWFA William

    We have two Westies (ages 5 and 14) and have been feeding them Solid Gold Adult Maintenance (Lamb in the purple trimmed bag) for a number of years.  They have always eaten all of their food with no issues, but we just bought a new bag and now neither of them eat it all.  Have there been any known issues with this product or batches of it?  Is it affected by the recall notice – it didn’t seem to apply when I read it.  Did they change their formula which would affect the  taste somehow?  It seems strange that both dogs would not eat it.

  • Connie8562

    I’ve been feeding my white long haired chihuahua the “Wee Bits” for most of her life.  She will be nine years old in February 2013.  I had to switch her food earlier this year because of transportation difficulties.  I was unable to buy her food at the nearest pet store.  I should have known better. 
    She ate the other well rated brand just fine, (she can be a fussy eater) but I noticed she had larger stool and gained weight too. 
    I tried another brand, also well rated (my husband purchased it, I wanted to take it back) and she developed a rash on her back near her tail. 
    All of these problems disappeared after I bought her “Wee Bits” again.   She’s very happy with her food now and doesn’t have difficulty eating it at all.  Some of the other food we bought her were marked for small dogs but the kibble was still too big for her to easily eat. 
    I love her “Wee Bits” because it seems to make her happy, healthy and playful as a puppy.  I will never switch again.

  • Rebecca Presley

    It is very disappointing that Solid Gold used Diamond manufacturers. You would think everyone would learn that Diamond is not to be trusted, but for some reason very good pet foods still seem to think it is okay to take a gamble with them.  What it tells me is that no matter how badly I had hoped to purchase this food for my pup, I don’t trust them enough to go through with it. Also very surprised at Natural Balance for the same reason.

  • Emackinnon

    This is a cross comment from your article about Ethoxyquin. Not to spam your page, but I was pretty gratified with Solid Gold’s very prompt and thorough response to my query:

     
    All of our formulations specify Ethoxyquin free ingredients.

    We
    do not add Ethoxyquin to our diets nor is the fish meal used in our
    formulations preserved with Ethoxyquin; the fish meal used in our diets
    are preserved with
    the natural preservative Naturox and additional Naturox is added to our
    formulations during production.

    We
    receive a sample of every production run that the manufacturing mill
    produces, each of these samples is then sent out for Ethoxyquin testing;
    the test results
    we have received show no presence of Ethoxyquin.

    Solid Gold Health Products for Pets, Inc.

  • HealthyDogs

    Interesting.  I just received an email from Solid Gold via my distributor that, according to the email, Diamond unexpectedly dropped Solid Gold in mid-April (The Wolfking & Wee Bits- Bison Foods that Diamond Co-Packed).  Solid Gold has not been able at this point to find another copacker to manufacture their Bison Products, so until they do, they will be unavailable.

    I hate to be suspicious, but the timing coinciding with the Recalls…..just too coincidental.   It is pretty clear from the email that there is some bad blood between Diamond and Solid Gold.

    Hopefully something better will come out of it all.

  • Jess

    Solid Gold sent out an E-mail that they are dropping  Diamond as their manufacture. I haven’t heard who they are changing to, but this is a good move on their part, unless the choose Menu.

  • hounddogmom12

    TJCCHANEL,

    Solid Gold recently had some of their foods recalled that had been manufactured by Diamond. Their WolfCub and WolfKing formulas were the only ones recalled, so you should be fine if you’re feeding Hundchen Flocken. Solid Gold isn’t a bad food ingredients-wise, but you may want to look into a brand with a more reputable manufacturer (Diamond has had many quality issues in the past and doesn’t seem to be learning from past mistakes).

  • TJCCHANEL

    What is Diamond Gaston plant? And, why is it bad? I just started my puppy Pom on Solid Gold Hudgen-Flocken puppy dry food this week. She seems to like!?! Anything bad in it? Thank you.

  • Ricki Diehl2

    My american bulldog is super picky and has been eating wolfking for a few months now and he loves it. It also has firmed up his stools. I am saddened by the fact some of the bags were however recalled, and if it weren’t for the fact that it has done him well stool wise I would put him back on Natura food immediately. I’m hoping Solid Gold stops using diamond plants forever since they seem to have this recurring issue so that my dog can continue on something both myself and he enjoy! Nothing better than finding a food that your dog AND his insides love.

  • J101

    Solid Gold Facebook page reporting they are brand #14 on the Diamond recall list. Looks like two products made in Gaston plant.  http://www.facebook.com/pages/Solid-Gold-Health-Products-for-Pets-Inc/205937222776518

  • gaffagirl

     I would choose to feed Solid Gold Just a Wee Bit if price wasn’t an issue.  I think it’s a great product!

  • Katseres

    Thanks again Melissa and Shawna.  I appreciate all the information I can get.  

  • Shawna

    I sure will :)

  • melissa

    Please share when you find out!I would love more info on the tear staining issue. Thanks

  • Shawna

    She does mention staining as separate but no useful info yet..  “The cause of the red or red-brown staining is something I’ll discuss in detail in an article soon. You won’t believe what I’ve learned.”  Patiently waiting :)

  • melissa

    Shawna points out very useful information, but I wanted to add that not all dogs who get red/brown tear stains suffer from Epiphora. Epiphora is excessive tear production, but not all dogs with excessive tears will stain brown. For example, my shihtzu had epiphora due to a blocked tear duct, but no brown stains. My white boy has normal tear production on a schirmer tear test, but what does hit his face stains red/brown when pearled barley is high up in the food list.

    The mix I mentioned is an old “schnauzer handler” trick that was shared with me many years ago. I mix it up to a paste consistency and then just work it into the hair. When dry, I comb it out and rinse well with a little water.

  • Shawna

    Katseres ~~ Jan Rasmusen, owner of two Maltese and author of “Scared Poopless:  The Straight Scoop on Dog Card”, has done extensive research on tear staining and discusses it on her website — dogs 4 dogs.

    Here’s a quote from the site.
    “Excessive tearing in dogs (called epiphora) and red and brown tear staining is not merely a cosmetic nuisance. It is a symptom of disease, poor diet, allergies, genetic predisposition or physical malfunction…..

    Epiphora caused by too many tears is an automatic response to irritants such as dust, infection, allergens, poor diet or a health problem. Think of tearing because of a health problem as you would a runny nose. It’s one way bodies rid themselves of
    toxins.”  http://www.dogs4dogs.com/Tear%20Stains.html

  • Katseres

    Melissa-
    Thank you for the information.  Do you use equal parts of the ingredients to remove the stains?  Also, what do you feed your white dog to prevent the staining? I hate to change her food but the stains are bad. 
     

  • melissa

    Katseres-

    It could be. My white dog gets bad staining under his eyes and beard if  cracked pearled barley appears in the top 4 or 5 ingredients. I get rid of the rust colored stains when and if they  occur by mixing hydrogen perioxide, cornstach and white mylanta-of course being careful not to get it in the eyes. It also works on rusty colored beard stains : )

  • Katseres

    I have been feeding my 3 yr old Bichon Frise the Solid Gold Bison Wee Bite for approximately 1 yr.  The staining under her eyes have become much more noticeable.  Is there something in this food that may be contributing to the staining?

  • http://DogFoodAdvisor.com/ Mike Sagman

    Hi Dr. Patterson,

    I’m so sorry you had difficulty posting here today. And I can assure you, your comments have never been blocked.

    For proof, please notice all your comments have been published.

    Unfortunately, Disqus, the company who operates the comments function of The Dog Food Advisor website has had some technical problems throughout the day.

    Thankfully, the issue appears to have been fixed now.

    I’m especially happy to welcome you here as input from a trusted veterinary professional (like yourself) is always welcome.

    Thanks for dropping by.

  • melissa

     Mary-

    I am sure it was a glitch-I have had issues posting from time to time in the past, but it usually resolves itself quickly-

  • Mary Patterson

    Actually now I’m un-blocked so maybe it was just a glitch :-)

  • Mary Patterson

    This message is for Mike Sagman.  Earlier I left a comment on the Back to Basics dry forum, and now I’m blocked.  Is it because I let it be known that I’m a vet in the St. Louis area?  I would never counsel people or give advice obviously since I have no dr./patient relationship with anyone on the internet.  In fact, I give your site information to all of my clients and highly praise it as a great place to start learning more about canine nutrition and reading/understanding food labels (along with some other great sites).  Nor am I trying to drum up clients or business – I work at a very non pushy clinic that strives to offer great services, not sell product or unneccessary services.  So I don’t know, maybe I broke an unwritten rule perhaps…I’m just very passionate about dog and cat nutrition. 

  • Bella

    Unfortunately, my Chi would not eat Solid Gold at all.

  • sandy

    Maybe adding some of the D-Zyme by Solid Gold will help with digestion.  Kibble takes a long to breakdown - possibly even longer than  12 hours.

  • king

    Hello, great site!
    I had been feeding my 2.5 year old Aussie mix the same food for about 1 year and a half with no problems.  Relatively high quality food:  “Solid Gold – Wolf King”.  Recently he has been throwing up almost all of it, pretty much undigested.  Long story short, vet x-rays and prescription food isolated problem to the Kibble of Wolf King.  Said it may be IBD problem, and to switch food.  That brought me to your site.  I cannot tell if it is ingredients or kibble size or what!  He seems to have no problem (yet) with smaller kibble or canned food.  Is it weird to have him reject this food after eating it for so long?

  • Tiffanizorarose

    THIS FOOD IS AWESOME FOR PET HEALTH! It’s a must in a pets diet…

  • Jan_Mom2Cavs

    Thanks Sandy, for some reason my mind couldn’t think of all the foods I normally know about lol!  

  • sandy

    test

  • sandy

    Also Horizon Legacy/Amicus, Back to Basics, Brothers Complete Allergy, Grandma Lucy’s Pureformance, Earthborn Holistic Grain Free Great Plains, Natures Variety Instinct, EVO herring and salmon,

  • Jan_Mom2Cavs

    Yes, please let us know how your dog does on Precise Holistic or Nutri-Source grain free (whichever one you choose).  Btw, there are other foods without potatoes in the ingredients.  The one that comes to mind first is Brothers Fish.  I don’t know if you specifically need fish based.  If not, then California Natural has grain free foods without potato as well as Dogswell and Canine Caviar.

  • Debra

    I have always had my dogs on solid gold, but I have one dog which is getting yeast infections and now hotspots. I was told to switch her to precise holistic or nutri-source grain free seafood. These have no potatoes in the first 5-6 ingredients. I will update in a month. I had her on the sg holistic type and it was all carbs and little meat. The dog coats are absolutely beautiful.

  • Jan (Mom to Cavs)

    It sounds like you might need to try a hypo-allergenic food for the one dog. Eventhough, Sundancer is going in the right direction (I believe it’s grain free) it’s still not hypo-allergenic. And even if you want to feed one food to both dogs, it would still be okay to feed your non allergic dog the hypo-allergenic food. Check out the “best dog foods” title on the left of this site. Then click on suggested hypo-allergenic foods for some great suggestions. Some I recommend are: Nature’s Variety LIDs, Natural Balance LIDs and California Natural.

  • Sharon

    Hi all,

    I have tried switching my two bassetts from Pedigree dry dog food to, first, Avoderm, and now, Solid Gold Sundancer. I have one dog that seems to be allergic to every good dog food I try to switch him to as his nose becomes so dry and nasty and his eyes become runny. The other one is fine with any dog food. Does anyone have any suggestions as I am at my wits end and feel like putting him back on Pedigree as to not make him uncomfortable. Thanks!

  • Tanya

    Julie: Try Solid Gold’s “Barking at the moon” it’s grain free and has a higher protein % which should keep them fuller for less food. Also, it should help for any lingering allergies as well.

  • Shawn Dalton

    If your dog is getting gas after eating, use the Seameal powder that Solid Gold sells. Our dog eats Hunderflocken and the Seameal powder. It contains the same substance as beano. If we forget to put the Seameal on his food, we notice right away with his horrible gas. By the way, it says to mix the seameal with some water, but we found he eats it by just putting it on his food dry.

    Shawn

  • Julie Santos

    Frustrated here. I have 5 dogs. 4 of them cocker spaniels, 1 husky/shepherd mix. I have been feeding them Purina One all their lives and they were doing well. Until one day the husky developed 2 hot spots, and 3 of the cockers started chewing their paws and backsides. My vet told me that it was possible they had developed allergies (all at the same time?) or that Purina had changed the formula. I put them all on Solid Gold Hund-n-Flocken and miraculously they all stopped scratching, hot spots cleared up. BUT, 3 of the cockers started gaining weight at a very fast pace. I cut back on the amount, but they drove me nuts acting like they were starving. So we switched to Solid Gold Holistique Blendz. Losing weight, but one cocker started scratching again and another refuses to eat it. Lord can anyone give me some advice here.

  • Shawna

    Tonya,

    IMO it’s not the food that is causing the issue but rather the digestive healthy of your pup.. I foster Boston Terriers and they are, so I’ve heard, one of the worst breeds when it comes to gas (and snoring). I have had over 30 foster dogs (not all Bostons and not all gassy) but those that are usually are gas free within a few weeks and all have left my home gas free..

    The first thing I do when a dog comes in is start them on digestive enzymes and probiotics. Digestive enzymes help break the food down into its absorbable parts so as many of the nutrients as able are utilized by the body versus being pooped out.

    Probiotics prevent bad (gas producing bacteria and yeast) from being able to colonize the intestines.

    I was only able to find one ingredient list for Kahoots dog food but it appears to have a significant amount of grains in it. The grains in food promote gas as the sugars are a source of food for the bad bacteria and yeast. The below is quoted from Dr. Karen Becker DVM clinic website..

    “Grains foster an inflammatory response, which exacecerbates chronic skin problems, allergies, degenerative joint disease and gastrointestinal problems (Inflammatory Bowel Disease, chronic diarrhea, mucus stools, vomiting and excessive smelly gas, to name a few).” http://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/dog-food-reviews/solid-gold-dog-food-dry/#comments

    Often times when probiotics are introduced, the battle that ensues between the good bacteria/yeast and the bad bacteria/yeast will cause a worsening of symptoms TEMPORARILY. Some times this can be alleviated by giving 1/4 the recommended dose and working up, over time, to the recommended dose.

    If you decide to give probiotics a try, look for one that has many different strains of bacteria and yeast. It is known that at least 14 strains are natural to the canine gut. By only adding one or two you are not providing all the benefits that probiotics have to offer — AND, possibly not providing the correct ones that will help with the gas/loose stool etc.. Dr. Karen Becker has a wonderful product on Mercola Healthy Pets. You can purchase her product OR take the information supplied in the product description and look for one locally that is as close to as possible. I use Garden of Life Primal Defense but I think it’s actually more expensive then Mercola Healthy Pets product AND missing one of the bacteria that are beneficial to dogs.. Dr. Becker’s product can be found here http://probiotics.mercola.com/probiotics-for-pets.html

    To reiterate — get a no grain and lower glycemic (no potatoes) food and start enzymes and probiotics.

    I hope this is helpful information!!!!

  • sandy

    I’m currently feeding my dogs raw and potato free kibble and they hardly have any gas now.

  • Tonya

    My 8 mo amstaff is currently eating 1/2 Taste of the Wild Bison formula (he loves it) and 1/2 Kahoots chicken brand (which he isn’t enthused about). His gas is horrific and I keep rotating dog food and it doesn’t change. Also, since feeding him Taste of the Wild his stools are loose. Is this too much protein? I give him Solid Gold supplements which worked wonders on our cat. I hear conflicting reviews from trainers and breeders about Solid Gold kibble. Also, my local Kahoots employee told me to switch from Kahoots lamb to Taste of wild….but his gas is worse than ever. So I am weening him off to the chicken brand. Id like to feed him a brand that will hlp him. Help!

  • Gordon

    Royal Canin?. and Natural Harmony Farms (The latter I’m not aware of). I wonder what Dr. McKenzie would say? I mean, since grain, high carb and artificial preservative rich kibbles are an improvement on Nature and better than home prepared or BARF type foods. Because you know, dogs have evolved to do better on made made, mass produced, cheaper, and assorted coloured doggy pellets/biscuits, and that dogs have long ago evolved from wolves with now no relevance to same what so ever.

    My sarcasm is not aimed at you Aimee. Get it? Aimed at Aimee, Huh, gee I’m funny, NOT, I hear in the back ground.

  • Aimee

    It was a dog food called Natural Harmony Farms. I think it was a preservative they were using. She broke out with Royal Canin…that was when I first got her and didn’t know about healthy dog food. She loves this Gold stuff and looks great. I don’t know what was in the other food, but she’s fine on this.

  • Gordon

    Aimee – No way! :O What kibble caused the break out? Are you sure? Because Dr. Brennen McKenzie (Anti-Christ Vet) says grain and artificial preservative ridden kibble is so healthy!

  • Aimee

    I put my Shihtzu on this food a week ago because the kibble she was on was making her break out on her stomach. Within 2-3 days after switching her to the wee bits her rash was gone. Her coat is a lot softer as well. Aside from the fish being ethoxiquen free it seems very healthy. I’ve noticed her coat is a lot softer and she wastes less.
    Side note for Jana- instead of going to Purina try some other lines like Avoderm Lamb and Rice or the Fromm line like surf and Turf. These are excellent companies and the food isn’t so pricey. Avoderm sends out awesome coupons if you call or e-mail them as well. I would have my Shihtzu on the Avoderm Lamb but the pieces were a little to big for her. She’s 8lbs. The small bites chicken they make didn’t interest her, even though it seems like an excellent food as well. Avoderm also has a grain free line Beef and Fish. Good luck.

  • http://DogFoodAdvisor.com Mike Sagman

    Hi Jana… Sorry to hear about your dog’s issues. Unfortunately, since I’m not a veterinarian and due to the biological uniqueness of each pet, it would be inappropriate for me to provide specific health advice or product recommendations. Please see our FAQ page and our reviews for more information. Or check back for a possible response from one of our other readers. Wish I could be more help.

  • Jana Hald

    I have been feeding my dogs (Golden Retriever and German Shepherd) Solid Mmillenia for awhile now. The dogs go through about 9 cups of food a day. $50 worth a food every 3 weeks. So I decided to go back to what we fed our first German Shepherd that lived 13 years, Purina One. The dogs now seemed to like it, but I have noticed the Golden is crabbier and the coats on both dogs aren’t nearly as shiny as before. My question is, the Shepherd has a thyroid problem is Mmillenia the best choice out there for her???

  • Rebel

    I did a lot of research on dog foods 4 years ago as we lost our 14 year old sheltie to the bad wheat/rice? that was found in the science diet and other brands 5 years ago. I chose the Solid Gold for several reasons when we got our now 4 year old GSD, mostly as the Wolf King Brand was for large breed dogs. He loves it, I usually mix about 1/4 cup of baked chicken with it. Large breed pups can get Panosteitis and I had actually changed him over to the Blue brand (a little cheaper) and he started having problems with his front legs due to the Pano, put him back on Wolf King and problem was gone within 24-30 hours….I would highly recommend this product to anyone with a large breed dog.

  • http://DogFoodAdvisor.com Mike Sagman

    Hi Jane… Like all reviews, my reports are based upon both knowledge and opinion. Please see my About page for more information about who I am. More to the point of your question, I’ve made an effort to include clear explanations in the words on every one of my 500+ reviews detailing how I arrived at my conclusions. Hope this helps.

  • Jane

    Hi, who are you Mike? Your reviews are on the base of your knowledge or opinions? Thank you.

  • tina

    my jack russell terrier did well on this food

  • http://www.whosyourvet.com Sandi

    Heidi,

    You can call Solid Gold and all dog food mfgrs. and I’m sure they will tell you taurine comes from China. I called a few human vitamin companies in the US and they all said taurine comes from China because it’s cheaper. I bet you probably don’t know where your raw ingredients come from in your supplements. Remember, it can be made in the U.S., but the raw ingredients can come from China. It’s always best to call the mfgr. and ask.

  • http://DogFoodAdvisor.com Mike Sagman

    Hi Heidi… To learn why I intentionally ignore the place of origin of each ingredient in the more than 2,500 dog food products covered on this website, please take a moment to visit my article, “The Problem with Dog Food Reviews“. Hope this helps.

  • Heidi

    I was wondering about the Taurine in all of Solid Golds Dry and Wet Foods? My Yorkie really likes Solid Gold and Artemis but the Taurine in the Solid Gold concerns me. Does it come from China? By the way I love your dog food reviews. Thank you.

  • http://DogFoodAdvisor.com Mike Sagman

    Hi Juanita… We recently updated this review and switched our “example” to the puppy product. There are some variations between products, but my star rating remains the same for the adult product, too.

  • Juanita P

    Hi Mike,

    Some one in a previous post ask about the Hund-n-Flocken Adult food, you say to look above at the review, but that is the puppy hund-n-flocken you have for review. I have checked Solid Golds website and that is the puppy formula! Would also like to know about the adult formula, thank you!

  • Jackie

    Dear Louise,

    I do give him a glucosamine and chondroitin supplement pill once a day, when I stopped for about 10 days to test it out he seemed worse, so I think the pills do work a little.

    I believe Solid Gold recommended those two kinds and the Seameal because of the Omega 3 and 6 oils, they reduce inflammation around joints. They also said the other “minerals, vitamins & enzymes [will] help heal, build and strengthen the joints and tendons.” I don’t think anything will heal the deformed knee cap except surgery, but healthy food to maintain muscles sounds logical to me. I also have heard good stuff about the Seameal from animal rescuers. I probably will stick with that, may rotate around the dog food though with some other brands to keep him interested in eating, he is a bit picky. Was considering Grandma Lucy’s and Acana.
    Jackie

    PS His luxating patella is pretty minor and doesn’t seem to hurt him, but he is 5 so I would like to keep him in the best shape possible for when he ages. We got him from a dog rescue and love him a lot.

  • Anna

    Stephanie Matz, you’re best off with a dog food with acidophilus in it, in part, due to his age. You don’t need a dog food with beet pulp to cure diarrhea from bad proteins and fats as is commonly advised.

  • Louise

    Hi Jackie,
    Sorry to hear about your poodle’s luxating patella.
    My chihuahua had two luxating patellas. The only thing my vet recommended was glucosamine and chondroiton supplements. Even though my chi ended up having surgery to correct the problem, my vet and I are convinced these supplements gave her some relief. To this day, with my vet’s permission, my girl still gets a maintenance dose.
    Am curious as to why the Solid Gold Representative told you those two foods might be good for your poodle. If they were trying to claim that the foods would help with the luxating patella, I would personally be very suspect of that claim.
    Don’t know anything about their seameal supplement, though – maybe someone else on this site has had experience with that.
    Good luck with your poodle – hope all turns out well.

  • Jackie

    Solid Gold has a new grain-free food, called Sundancer. It isn’t on here. Their customer service representative recommended Sundancer and Barking at the Moon for my poodle with a luxating patella. Also their Seameal supplement. Can’t wait to see a review on Sundancer! It says on their website it is also gluten free…

  • Donna Mason

    Thanks guys for the advice! I’m avoiding the high carbs to try to keep the cancer risk to a minimum since I read that carbs feed cancers. Besides, who needs all those fillers? I also read that there are noted differences in bloodwork w/ dogs that eat a war diet and high protein grain free diets. The research is showing that the normal reference values for dogs fed raw food diets should probably be revised. I know for a fact my vet is a Science Diet junkie who doesn’t necessarily buy into grain-free so I may be battling him to keep our 3 dogs on this diet. Thank you Mike for looking into Sundancer…I’m gonna try it anyways but will keep checking to see what you think about it!

  • http://DogFoodAdvisor.com Mike Sagman

    Hi Donna… The reason Nutro Natural Choice Grain Free isn’t included on our Best Grain Free list is because it does meet the 4 or 5-star requirement to be eligible for inclusion on this list.

  • ShamelessRawFoodie

    Donna – Many brands have recently come out with grain-free kibble choices that are low in protein. Their low-protein recipes are obviously high in carbs, primarily from potatoes and peas. Nutro Natural Choice Grain-Free is low protein (compared to other grain-free). Mike has rated Nutro NC GF, but it’s not yet listed on his grain-free page. You can look it up by brand name.

  • http://DogFoodAdvisor.com Mike Sagman

    Hi Donna… Most grain free dog foods are above average in their protein content. So, if low protein is what you’re looking for, you may find this option offers you very few choices.

    Solid Gold’s Sundancer is already on my To Do list. However, due to our current backlog of products for review, it could be a while longer before we get to it. Thanks for the reminder.

  • Donna Mason

    Hi Mike…any updates on reviewing the Sundancer by Solid Gold? I was just informed by my vet that my boxer’s Kidney blood work is slightly high. She’s been on Acana Grain Free for over a year now. He says I need to change to a lower protein food but I want to stick w/ grain free. Any suggestions?

  • http://DogFoodAdvisor.com Mike Sagman

    Hi Harky… In most cases, we rate dog foods by selecting a typical product to represent the full product line. We only rarely rate each individual product. Please see the big yellow “dashboard” near the top of this report. Notice this review actually uses Hund-n-Flocken as representative example for the full Solid Gold product line.

  • harky

    Any idea what abt Hund-n-Flocken Adult Dog (lamb)?

  • Pingback: Best Large Breed Puppy Foods- Labradoodles and Goldendoodles in Washington State

  • Gordon

    I’m glad we have a Vet admitting what I’ve been saying in many posts. Don’t get me wrong. I’ve always had great respect for Vets. After all they’re great animal loving people and a God-send when it comes to saving out beloved pets from illnesses and injuries.

    But take for example my Vet. She insists Hills Science Diet is the best there is. Yet she couldn’t explain why.

  • Mary

    Hey Cally – I just saw your post above mine, I am the vet. Personally, I would not feed the Science Diet Nature’s Best – look at the ingredients – mostly corn, lots of fillers, and I’m sure there is Menadione in there. And yes, it is probably b/c your vet sells Science Diet that he or she recd this. I would feed the Solid Gold or another high quality diet – there are thankfully alot of good ones out there now and you no longer have to drive to a specialty pet store to get them, PetCo carries alot of them now. We had a Hills rep come in our hospital recently with a new line they have started, a line that only vets will carry, so not in the pet stores, and not the prescription line, and after looking at the ingredients, I just couldn’t get excited about it – again, mostly corn, by-products, and fillers!! and at i’m sure a very expensive price. It is called Healthy Advantage, and the first ingredient of all the diets, including for feline, is chicken by-product meal, and has corn, mill runs, and so on. I think the rep realized she wasn’t dealing with an uninformed consumer/pet lover/vet. Good luck.

  • Meagan

    Thank you Mary I wish you could be my dogs vet.

  • Mary

    I am a veterinarian, and unfortunately it is true that we don’t receive much in the way of nutrition education while in vet school. I was also spoon fed the hype from the major food companies and regurgitated this dutifully for years to my clients, until I decided to educate myself on ingredients/products and what is really in our pets foods – very scary stuff!! I subscribe to Whole Dog Journal and have developed a more holistic way of looking at things when it comes to my family and my pets. I currently feed Solid Gold Hundenflocken dry, but also feed some canned food every am as well – usually the Blue Buffalo, Merrick, Natural Balance, or Wellness. I no longer recd any Science Diet or Purina products to my clients. The hospital where I work is going to start carrying the Blue Buffalo, and I will probably switch to the dry when we do. It is very important for pet owners to do their homework and research what they are feeding.

  • Cally

    Teri, I think Solid Gold is pretty good about responding. I had a question about a preservative and they got back to me within a day or two.

    My (almost) 3 mo lab puppy has been having digestive issues. I’d had her on iams smart puppy because thats what the breeder had her on but I wanted to transition her to solid gold wolf cub. When we were at the vet this morning he recommended against it and had me get science diet natures best. I’m trying not to be cynical and believe that it’s just because he sells science diet. But it’s difficult. I’m willing to give the science diet a chance but if she isn’t responding well I’ll get the wolf cub food.

  • Cathy Nichols

    Yes, I would like to see the analysis! Getting a new Wheaten this summer and they need not as much protein and certainly no glutens or grains will help allergy issues. I have been researching for weeks.

  • Mike Tann

    I am hoping that SUNDANCER just might make it into the 5* foods. I am going to switch my 15 year old Siberian Husky to it because she’s lost 6 lbs. on a high quality(5*) grain-free food.

  • A Hodges

    Thanks for your work!

  • Britni

    Hi!
    We have been feeding our 3 beagles sun dancer! they LOVE it!! it is highly digestible and affordable! They were on barking at the moon, but they were tired of the taste.

  • http://DogFoodAdvisor.com Mike Sagman

    Hi Kristin… Thanks for the tip. Sun Dancer is now on my list. And it looks interesting.

  • http://dogoninn.com Kristin

    Solid Gold has a new formula, Sun Dancer. Its chicken based and gluten free. http://www.solidgoldhealth.com/products/?product=102&code=1651 Perhaps you could add it to you ‘to do list’. Thanks!

  • http://DogFoodAdvisor.com Mike Sagman

    Hi April… We do not currently track the individual micro nutrient content of the dog foods in our database. We have chosen to accept the AAFCO nutritional adequacy statements as a screening tool for the numerous vitamins and minerals in each product. For example, we assume that if a company claims a product meets the AAFCO requirements for a particular life stage (growth or maintenance) that it’s appropriate for your pet. According to AAFCO (for puppies, for example), calcium must be at least 1.0% and phosphorus 0.8%. And the calcium-to-phosphorus ratio between the two minerals must not exceed a 2:1 proportion. Look on the package and be sure these numbers are met. If you need lower amounts than these. Hope this helps.

  • April

    What are the calcium and phosphorus percentages?

  • Teri

    Mike,

    I will do that. I wonder if they will even bother responding.

  • http://DogFoodAdvisor.com Mike Sagman

    Hi Teri… You may wish to contact Solid Gold’s customer service department.

  • Teri

    Can someone please advise on the changes that Solid Gold, specifically Hund-n-Flocken, may have had in recent months. I’ve fed this to my schnauzers all of their lives and have never had skin problems. And now in just the past couple of months they are experiencing some skin irritations. Nothing has changed in their diets, but I keep seeing tidbits of info about Solid Gold and some changes that they may have made. Anyone have any inside scoop?? Thanks!

  • Heather

    I purchase my dog food at a holistic dog food store. They informed me that they no longer sell the solid gold (which is what my doobieshave been on for the past year) Because they have increased the amount of grain in their dogfood. They suggested for an equivalant that I switch them to Canidae which my dogs dont seem to like as well.

    Is this as bad as what the people at the store made it sound out to be? they did stop selling it; but it is a store, so they may have a biased opinion based on some other factors I am unaware of. According to this site, they both score 4 stars.

  • http://DogFoodAdvisor.com Mike Sagman

    Hi Stephanie… As much as I’d like to help, I’m not a veterinarian. So, it would be misleading and inappropriate for me to recommend a specific dog food (like Solid Gold) to treat your dog’s digestive condition. By the way, I’m not sure if you could call this product “low residue”.

    There are a number of quality foods that claim to be digestive. Click the “Tags” tab at the top of our website. Then click on the link that’s labeled “digestive”. This will give you a list of product lines that contain at least ONE of its foods that’s claimed to be for digestive problems by its manufacturer. Hope this helps.

  • Stephanie Matz

    What a great site! And, I have a question. We have a 14-1/2 year old Border Terrier, struggling with digestion–lots of diarrhea. He’s been on IAMS Low Residue (now recalled) and that’s been just OK. In its place, vet suggested Science Diet ID (got worse) and then Science Diet Sensitive Stomach (got still worse.) As a puppy, he ate Solid Gold Hundchen Flocken with no problems. So, question: Would the adult version of this contain the ingredients necessary to help his digestion? Thanks for any thoughts you have.

  • Dean Jones

    Love this site! Our dog has a chicken allergy, and we had been feeding him IVD dog food which we purchased at our vet. Over the past six months, his allergy symptoms had been getting worse – and two different vets could not correctly diagnose the source of his symptoms. We finally discovered that IVD was purchased by Royal Canin, which is owned by Mars.

    Royal Canin is ostensibly a high-end dog food – but they have had to recall their food and numerous pet owners report that, since the acquisition, IVD/Royal Canin has caused issues for their pets. We switched recently to Solid Gold – and all of our dog’s allergy symptoms have disappeared. We can tell that he is still adjusting to this food – and that it is “richer” than IVD.

    The only advice that I would add to your entry is that most vets actually are NOT a good source of nutrition advice. Most of their information comes from pet food companies, and they receive only a superficial education in animal nutrition. If your pet has allergies or nutrition issues, you are better advised to do the research yourself than rely on your vet.

  • http://DogFoodAdvisor.com Mike Sagman

    Hi Shea… you didn’t make a mistake. This is still a very good dog food. It’s just that by our standards, some of the products in the line are not especially high in meat content.

  • Shea

    After trying several brands of dog foods, my small dog has preferred and done very well on Hund-n-Flocken and Just a Wee Bit formulas. I’m disappointed to see it’s considered just an average dog food and noticing there are four controversial ingredients in the food. After reading your review, I hope I’m giving her a high quality dog food. I picked this food for her because it’s on the Whole Dog Food Journal’s Best Dry Dog Food List.

  • http://DogFoodAdvisor.com Mike Sagman

    Hi Jan… Oops! You’re right. Thanks for calling this oversight to my attention. Look for an “update” and another review of Solid Gold in the next day or two.

  • Jan McCollam

    Hi, I was wondering why you didn’t include Barking at the Moon? It isn’t in the 5 star ratings, either. It is Solid Gold’s grain-free formula.