Dog w/allergies – switching to home cooked/raw good idea?

Dog Food Advisor Forums Diet and Health Dog w/allergies – switching to home cooked/raw good idea?

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  • #117259 Report Abuse

    Jenny L
    Member

    My 5.5yr old yorkie has had food and environmental allergies for a few years now. Per the vet she has been on Hill’s Prescription Z/D food with the corresponding treats. She had an allergy test almost two years ago (after trying to fix the problem with prescription food with no luck) and came back with quite a bit of food allergies. The vet suggested she continue with the Z/D food, however I recently read the ingredients. First on the list is corn starch, and my dog is allergic to corn.

    The vet hasn’t seemed terribly open about my interest in either home cooking meals or going raw. However I’ve done some searching and have seen instances where cooking/raw has helped dogs with all types of ailments tremendously.

    She is allergic to the following food: pork, milk, corn, barley, peas. She’s also right on the edge of the scale being allergic to: beef, salmon, chicken/turkey, lamb, fish, duck.

    Any guidance, suggestions, help is VERY appreciated.

    #117264 Report Abuse

    Lori H
    Member

    Hi Jenny,

    My dog Buddy has been through a lot, much like your dog. He just turned 10 and during his life he has had surgery on his spleen, surgery for bladder stones, been diagnosed with Diabetes and I was told by my vet that he was suffering from liver failure and was preparing me for the fact that Buddy was going to die. The liver failure diagnosis was over a year ago and today, he is healthy, happy, looks amazing and has so much energy. I just had him into the vet for blood work Friday and his numbers are almost perfect! It has been am amazing turnaround so I know how you feel. I basically had to get him healthy myself. My vet did not support my decision to do what I did, but it does not matter, he is healthy and that is all that matters!

    I now believe wholeheartedly that most vets know nothing about nutrition. They are told to carry a line of food in their offices by one of the large pharma/dog food companies because most of these companies go out and recruit at the vet universities across the United States when vets are in school and provide them with a kickback when the sell either Science Diet or Royal Canin in their clinics, up to 40%. Don’t get me wrong, I LOVE my vet, I just don’t believe he knows much of anything about nutrition. He has been great to me, my dog Buddy and my three cats. He is good at what he does, diagnose and perform much needed surgeries and procedures. He did Buddy’s bladder stone surgery which has complications.

    I was at my wits end as well and thought that I was going to lose Buddy, but I was not willing to give up so I did a Google search and found an amazing person who brought Buddy back to the healthy dog he is.

    Buddy is on a very special diet and he has made huge strides in the last 10+ months. He is a very healthy dog to what he was 6 months ago.

    I worked with a man named Rick Scheyer. He has an amazing website http://www.doglivershunt.com He has helped many dogs with liver shunt, kidney disease, bladder stone problems and much, much more become healthy dogs again. I would suggest reaching out to him for a free consultation. It might be the answer you need.

    If you choose to go with his program, it is not cheap, but I believe that over time, I will save money by not taking Buddy to the vet time and time again because I don’t know what is wrong and having a battery of tests run and racking up bills in the thousands, I have been there!

    He was slowly weened off of his processed food Science Diet U/D and placed on a diet of fresh veggies and meat based on a very slow transition to follow with Rick’s help.

    Buddy’s diet is a balance of ¾ veggies to ¼ meats. Dogs with liver issues do not need as much protein as you would expect. He gets lots of yellow veggies (squash, tomatoes, peppers, cucumber, celery, carrots, Brussel sprouts, snap peas, etc.) along with hemp oil and nori blended with goat yogurt into almost a smoothie consistency. I then add meats, liver is great as it helps to detoxify the liver (funny that you feed liver to a dog with liver issuesJ) and then he gets a variety of supplements. He receives three gut supplements in the morning (Acidophilus, Bifudus and a Spectrabiotic) along with an Enzyme and something called Whole Body. In the evenings he gets the Enzyme, Whole Body and a Mushroom supplement. The process to make his food is not that time consuming and if you are at your wits end like I was, I was ready to do anything.

    He also gets to have as much goat yogurt as he wants with coconut oil. He also gets sweet potato chews and coconut slices.

    He is also allowed to eat fruits, not during his morning and evening meals since they digest differently than veggies, but he has not yet warmed up to them yet. I don’t know if he ever will.

    He is doing great! He has so much energy and the numbers don’t lie! I got a glucose meter and I am going to start checking his levels daily. I would really like to get him off the insulin if I can. I believe the medicine is what causes the blindness, not the actual diabetes, my vet believes otherwise.

    My vet has not said much of anything. I explained I was taking him off the prescription food and putting him on this program and he never responded. When I took him in the last time for blood work, I think he was surprised Buddy was doing so well, but did not ask me further about what I was doing. He is a pretty straight and narrow vet and I don’t think he looks outside the box. If Buddy’s glucose numbers continue to decline, I will take him back and back off on the number of units he is given. Now it is just maintenance and keeping a spreadsheet and monitoring how he is doing.

    I suggest reaching out. I think Rick saved Buddy’s life. I took him to the vet in October to have blood work done and he is perfectly healthy!

    Let me know if I can be of anymore help.

    Good luck on your search and reach out if you have further questions or concerns. It was hard to take the jump and trust someone other than my vet with my dogs nutritional health, but I am so glad that I did.

    Lori

    #117384 Report Abuse

    Susan
    Member

    Hi Jenny,

    look at “Natural Balance” LTD Sweet Potato & Bison formula, Sweet Potato & Venison formula..
    https://www.naturalbalanceinc.com/dog-formulas/special-category-limited-ingredient-diets

    You’re better off doing a food Elimination Diet this way you will know 100% what ingredients your dog is sensitive too, these salvia, blood & fur tests give false positives..
    You have a small dog so home cooked or raw meals would probably work out cheap, just make sure diet is balanced after 1-2 months & diet is high in Omega 3 ingredients & oil for skin.

    Look for a kibble or wet can food that has 1 novel protein & 1 carb & start from there…
    also bath in a medicated shampoo, weekly or twice a week baths are best to wash off any allergens on their paws, skin etc
    If you want to stay with vet diets look at the “Royal Canine” Select Protein, PR-Potato & Rabbit wet can & dry vet formula, the Natural Balance limited ingredient formula’s are similair & cheaper, there’s also “Rayne Canada” vet formula’s have Rabbit, Crocodile, Kanagroo.
    http://www.raynecanada.ca/canine-diets/

    #117391 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Excerpt from an article written by a veterinarian that specializes in nutrition. She is affiliated with one of the best veterinary medical centers in the country.
    Hope it helps someone, if not the OP, maybe someone else reading this.
    https://www.mspca.org/angell_services/choosing-the-right-diet-for-your-pet/
    Raw diets are another popular option on the market today. Studies have shown that 20-35% of raw poultry and 80% of raw food dog diets tested contained Salmonella. This poses a health risk for your pet, but also for humans. This is especially true for children or immunocompromised adults, whether exposed to the raw food directly, or the feces of the pet eating the raw food. Additionally, there is increased risk of other bacterial infections and parasitic diseases when feeding raw diets. And the bottom line is there is no reason to believe raw food is healthier than cooked food.
    The numerous dietary choices for your pet can be daunting but if you pick an AAFCO approved food made by a manufacturer with a long track record, odds are good that you will find a suitable food for your pet. Most of the large pet food companies employ full time veterinary nutritionists and have very high quality control standards. That is not to say that a small company cannot produce nutritious and high quality food, but you should check out their website if it’s a company that is not familiar to you. Take the time to research, and ask your veterinarian if you have specific questions or concerns.
    Please understand that this article is meant to provide basic dietary guidelines for healthy pets. If your pet has specific health issues, then your veterinarian may make specific food recommendations, which may include special prescription diets.

    Also: http://skeptvet.com/Blog/category/nutrition/

    Excellent science based articles (nothing is being sold at that site)

    #117392 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    For best results go to a board certified veterinary dermatologist. Food allergies are rare. Food sensitivities fluctuate.
    More often than not environmental allergies are the culprit.
    The only accurate test for that is intradermal skin testing. The most natural treatment for environmental allergies is allergen specific immunotherapy otherwise known as allergy shots or desensitization.
    See my posts, example https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/topic/hes-got-good-and-environmental-allergies/#post-113364

    #117395 Report Abuse

    Bobby dog
    Member

    I agree the MSPCA article is a good article. Two of Dr. Papp’s references for the article are a few of my go to sources for small animal nutrition. Dr. Lisa Freeman, Veterinary nutritionist and professor at Tuft’s University and Dr. Rebecca Remillard of petdiets.com. Both diplomats of the ACVN. I am not familiar with Ed Carlson who is a Certified Veterinary Technician and is a member of the Academy of Veterinary Nutrition Technicians.

    However, Dr. Papp, DVM, DACVIM, does not specialize in nutrition. According to her listed credentials and MSPCA’s site she is an internal medicine specialist. MSPCA lists Dr. Dana Hutchinson, DVM, DACVN as their nutritionist; she is also a ACVN diplomat.
    https://www.mspca.org/angell_services/meet-the-internal-medicine-team/
    https://www.mspca.org/angell_services/meet-the-nutrition-team/

    #117396 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    “MSPCA lists Dr. Dana Hutchinson, DVM, DAVCM as their nutritionist; she is also a ACVN diplomat”.

    Exactly! They all work together as a team 🙂

    Dr Papp is very well informed and interested in nutritional issues
    https://www.mspca.org/?s=papp&post_type=angell_services

    PS: Above was in response to a post that appears to have been removed.

    #117397 Report Abuse

    Bobby dog
    Member

    I agree the MSPCA article is a good article.

    Two references for the article are a few of my go to sources for small animal nutrition. Dr. Lisa Freeman, Veterinary nutritionist and professor at Tuft’s University and Dr. Rebecca Remillard of petdiets.com. Both diplomats of the ACVN. I am not familiar with Ed Carlson who is a Certified Veterinary Technician and is a member of the Academy of Veterinary Nutrition Technicians.

    However, Dr. Papp, DVM, DACVIM, does not specialize in nutrition. According to her listed credentials and MSPCA’s site she is an internal medicine specialist. MSPCA lists Dr. Dana Hutchinson, DVM, DACVN as their nutritionist; she is also an ACVN diplomat.
    https://www.mspca.org/angell_services/meet-the-internal-medicine-team/
    https://www.mspca.org/angell_services/meet-the-nutrition-team/

    #117398 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    “However, Dr. Papp, DVM, DACVIM, does not specialize in nutrition”. “According to her listed credentials and MSPCA’s site she is an internal medicine specialist”.

    Nice catch!

    Maybe, since you seem to have the time, you could review all the other posts, as I see incorrect information being posted at this forum as well as others, daily.

    I was told information posted by anonymous sources (unless someone is here in a professional capacity and identifies themselves) does not have to be correct, by a moderator here.

    Just opinion based on one’s perception. So, in my opinion based on her articles and such Dr Papp does indeed specialize in nutrition ( non based on her clinical credentials) and I would consider her a reliable source.

    Have a nice day.

    • This reply was modified 2 months ago by  anon101.
    #117399 Report Abuse

    Wow, and you get mad at others when your behavior is just as bad? She is not credited as specializing in nutrition. End of story, in this case your opinion does not matter as it doesn’t lead to a factual statement

    #117404 Report Abuse

    Bobby dog
    Member

    Hi anon:
    I was posting information to anyone interested about MSPCA’s Dr. Hutchinson. I like to read and keep up to date on small/large animal nutrition. She is credentialed in nutrition and has written several articles, a few with Dr. L. Freeman, that are interesting. Other posters might find her info relevant or helpful in the search to provide the best care they can in regards to nutrition.

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