Zignature Dog Food (Dry)

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Rating: ★★★★½

Zignature Dog Food receives the Advisor’s second-highest tier rating of 4.5 stars.

The Zignature Dog Food product line includes 11 grain-free dry dog foods.

Each recipe below includes its related AAFCO nutrient profile when available on the product’s official webpage: Growth, Maintenance, All Life Stages, Supplemental or Unspecified.

Important: Because many websites do not reliably specify which Growth or All Life Stages recipes are safe for large breed puppies, we do not include that data in this report. Be sure to check actual packaging for that information.

  • Zignature Turkey Formula [U]
  • Zignature Salmon Formula [U]
  • Zignature Whitefish Formula [U]
  • Zignature Pork Formula (5 stars) [U]
  • Zignature Duck Formula (4 stars) [U]
  • Zignature Lamb Formula (4 stars) [U]
  • Zignature Catfish Formula (5 stars) [U]
  • Zignature Venison Formula (4 stars) [U]
  • Zignature Zssential Formula (5 stars) [U]
  • Zignature Kangaroo Formula (4 stars) [U]
  • Zignature Trout and Salmon Meal Formula [U]

Zignature Trout and Salmon Meal Formula was selected to represent the other products in the line for this review.

Zignature Trout and Salmon Meal Formula

Dry Dog Food

Estimated Dry Matter Nutrient Content

Protein = 33% | Fat = 16% | Carbs = 43%

Ingredients: Trout, salmon meal, peas, chickpeas, pea flour, dehydrated alfalfa meal, natural flavors, salmon oil, flaxseed, sunflower oil (preserved with citric acid), dried beet pulp, calcium carbonate, potassium chloride, salt, minerals (zinc proteinate, iron proteinate, copper proteinate, manganese proteinate, cobalt proteinate), choline chloride, dicalcium phosphate, vitamins (vitamin A acetate, vitamin D3 supplement, vitamin E supplement, niacin, d-calcium pantothenate, thiamine mononitrate, pyridoxine hydrochloride, riboflavin, folic acid, biotin, vitamin B12 supplement), blueberries, carrots, cranberries, lactic acid, calcium iodate, sodium selenite, preserved with mixed tocopherols

Fiber (estimated dry matter content) = 6.7%

Red items indicate controversial ingredients

Estimated Nutrient Content
MethodProteinFatCarbs
Guaranteed Analysis30%14%NA
Dry Matter Basis33%16%43%
Calorie Weighted Basis29%33%38%
Protein = 29% | Fat = 33% | Carbs = 38%

The first ingredient in this dog food is trout, a freshwater species closely related to salmon. Trout is rich rich in omega-3 fatty acids but also contains up to 73% water. After cooking, most of that moisture is lost, reducing the meat content to just a fraction of its original weight.

After processing, this item would probably account for a smaller part of the total content of the finished product.

The second ingredient is salmon meal. Because it is considered a meat concentrate, fish meal contains almost 300% more protein than fresh fish itself.

Fish meal is typically obtained from the “clean, dried, ground tissue of undecomposed whole fish and fish cuttings” of commercial fish operations.1

The third ingredient includes peas. Peas are a quality source of carbohydrates. And like all legumes, they’re rich in natural fiber.

However, peas contain about 25% protein, a factor that must be considered when judging the meat content of this dog food.

The fourth ingredient lists chickpeas, also known as garbanzo beans. Like peas, bean and lentils, the chickpea is a nutritious member of the fiber-rich legume (or pulse) family of vegetables.

However, chickpeas contain about 22% protein, a factor that must be considered when judging the actual meat content of this dog food.

The fifth ingredient is pea flour, a powder made from roasted yellow peas. Pea flour contains as much as 25% protein, a factor that must be considered when judging the meat content of this dog food.

The sixth ingredient is alfalfa meal. Although alfalfa meal is high in plant protein (about 18%) and fiber (25%), this hay-family item is more commonly associated with horse feeds.

After the natural flavors, we find salmon oil. Salmon oil is naturally rich in the prized EPA and DHA type of omega-3 fatty acids. These two high quality fats boast the highest bio-availability to dogs and humans.

Depending on its level of freshness and purity, salmon oil should be considered a commendable addition.

The next ingredient is flaxseed, one of the best plant sources of healthy omega-3 fatty acids. Provided they’ve first been ground into a meal, flax seeds are also rich in soluble fiber.

However, flaxseed contains about 19% protein, a factor that must be considered when judging the actual meat content of this dog food.

From here, the list goes on to include a number of other items.

But to be realistic, ingredients located this far down the list (other than nutritional supplements) are not likely to affect the overall rating of this product.

With four notable exceptions

First, sunflower oil is nutritionally similar to safflower oil. Since these oils are high in omega-6 fatty acids and contain no omega-3’s, they’re considered less nutritious than canola or flaxseed oils.

Sunflower oil is notable for its resistance to heat damage during cooking.

There are several different types of sunflower oil, some better than others. Without knowing more, it’s impossible to judge the quality of this ingredient.

Next, we find beet pulp. Beet pulp is a controversial ingredient, a high fiber by-product of sugar beet processing.

Some denounce beet pulp as an inexpensive filler while others cite its outstanding intestinal health and blood sugar benefits.

We only call your attention here to the controversy and believe the inclusion of beet pulp in reasonable amounts in most dog foods is entirely acceptable.

In addition, we find no mention of probiotics, friendly bacteria applied to the surface of the kibble after processing to help with digestion.

And lastly, this food contains chelated minerals, minerals that have been chemically attached to protein. This makes them easier to absorb. Chelated minerals are usually found in better dog foods.

Zignature Dog Food
The Bottom Line

Judging by its ingredients alone, Zignature looks like an above-average dry dog food.

But ingredient quality by itself cannot tell the whole story. We still need to estimate the product’s meat content before determining a final rating.

The dashboard displays a dry matter protein reading of 33%, a fat level of 16% and estimated carbohydrates of about 43%.

As a group, the brand features an average protein content of 33% and a mean fat level of 17%. Together, these figures suggest a carbohydrate content of 42% for the overall product line.

And a fat-to-protein ratio of about 53%.

Above-average protein. Near-average fat. And below-average carbs when compared to a typical dry dog food.

When you consider the protein-boosting effect of the pea products, flaxseed, chickpeas and alfalfa meal, this looks like the profile of a kibble containing a notable amount of meat.

Bottom line?

Zignature is a plant-based dry dog food using a notable amount of named meat meals as its main sources of animal protein, thus earning the brand 4.5 stars.

Highly recommended.

Please note certain recipes are sometimes given a higher or lower rating based upon our estimate of their total meat content and (when appropriate) their fat-to-protein ratios.

Zignature Dog Food
Recall History

The following list (if present) includes all dog food recalls since 2009 directly related to this product line. If there are no recalls listed in this section, we have not yet reported any events.

You can view a complete list of all dog food recalls sorted by date. Or view the same list sorted alphabetically by brand.

To learn why our ratings have nothing to do with a product’s recall history, please visit our Dog Food Recalls FAQ page.

Get free dog food recall alerts sent to you by email. Subscribe to The Advisor’s recall notification list.

Dog Food Coupons
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A Final Word

The descriptions and analyses expressed in this and every article on this website represent the views and opinions of the author.

The Dog Food Advisor does not test dog food products.

We rely entirely on the integrity of the information provided by each company. As such, the accuracy of every review is directly dependent upon the specific data a company chooses to share.

Although it's our goal to ensure all the information on this website is correct, we cannot guarantee its completeness or its accuracy; nor can we commit to ensuring all the material is kept up-to-date on a daily basis.

We rely on tips from readers. To report a product change or request an update of any review, please contact us using this form.

Each review is offered in good faith and has been designed to help you make a more informed decision when buying dog food.

However, due to the biological uniqueness of every animal, none of our ratings are intended to suggest feeding a particular product will result in a specific dietary response or health benefit for your pet.

For a better understanding of how we analyze each product, please read our article, "The Problem with Dog Food Reviews".

Remember, no dog food can possibly be appropriate for every life stage, lifestyle or health condition. So, choose wisely. And when in doubt, consult a qualified veterinary professional for help.

In closing, we do not accept money, gifts or samples from pet food companies in exchange for special consideration in the preparation of our reviews or ratings.

However, we do receive a fee from Chewy.com for each purchase made as a direct result of a referral from our website. This fee is a fixed dollar amount and has nothing to do with the size of an order or the brand selected for purchase.

Have an opinion about this dog food? Or maybe the review itself? Please know we welcome your comments.

Notes and Updates

11/17/2017 Last Update

  1. Association of American Feed Control Officials
  • ANI Support Group

    “After the natural flavors, we find salmon oil. Salmon oil is naturally rich in the prized EPA and DHA type of omega-3 fatty acids. These two high quality fats boast the highest bio-availability to dogs and humans.
    Depending on its level of freshness and purity, salmon oil should be considered a commendable addition.”

    YES, if its not exposed to air and heat. When its exposed to these elements, it becomes rancid and pet can have adverse reactions….?

    They say their roo is rich in omega 3. Not when its been processed surely!?

  • Susan

    Hi Debbie,
    you have 2 beautiful dogs, I love this breed, very smart love their humans, very loyal dogs…..Start bathing your dogs weekly, I use “Malaseb” medicated shampoo for Patches allergies & red itchy skin, when you bath them you wash off allergens that’s on their skin, paws stomach & head, the Malaseb shampoo relieves red itchy paws, skin & puts moisture back into their skin. You’ll find your dog with pink skin white fur will probably have more skin problems, everywhere Patch has pink skin white fur he gets red skin especially when Spring & Summer comes around, I also use creams on Patches paws & stomach area, at night I check his whole body & if he’s red anywhere I use Hydrocortisone 1% cream by morning his red paws & red around mouth & above left eye is all cleared up then I apply some Sudocrem” before he goes outside. Sudocrem is a healing cream for Eczema, Dermatitis, Nappy Rash etc the Sudocrem acts as a barrier & protects their paws & skin when they lay on grass, from allergens & stops & relieves any redness, if you live America you can buy “Sudocrem” on Amazon & Ebay, I’ll upload an before & after photos of a staffy with bad stomach rash then after using Sudocrem the next day all clear stomach.
    I feed Patch TOTW Sierra Mountain Roasted Lamb & “Canidae” Pure Wild & an Australian kibble MfM, work out if your dogs are sensitive to certain ingredient Patch gets red paws after he eats Chicken, Tapioca, Corn gluten meal & Carrots make his ears itch.. I also give him tin Salmon in spring water drained & add boil some sweet potato, as treats I give “K-9 Natural” Freeze Dried Mussels, feed foods that are high in Omega 3 fatty acids, bath dogs as soon as they start getting itchy & check their body before bed or while they’re sleeping at night & apply cream & apply Sudocrem first thing in teh morning before they go out side its excellent the Sudocrem… https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/aa4560820696d605b202998d2e161776a5c4f312a85f961343320c76ee60a7e2.jpg https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/8fe43cbe0dc75546e9493e6017ce8556226ceddd1bb97c89c91002a35f048d83.jpg

  • Briggs

    Also ask if their SOURCES use ethoxyquin; if the source uses it but the manufacturer doesn’t, it doesn’t have to be listed on the label IIRC.

  • anon101

    ?
    Call their 1-888 number with your concerns.

  • Angie

    I want to try the catfish but they don’t carry it yet in the store where I shop. One more question…what about BPS in the cans? Is there really such thing as BPA free cans?

  • anon101

    Not that I’m aware of, the answers to your questions can be found here http://zignature.com/?page_id=624&lang=en

    If you navigate around the site, lots of information.
    PS: The catfish is good too, if your dogs do well on the whitefish, they may like it.

  • Angie

    Thank you for the reply! Does Zignature use Ethoxyquin?

  • vader1013

    mercury is a problem in larger fish, such as some species of tuna, because they live longer and have more time to accumulate mercury in their systems. smaller varieties of fish that usually comprise the “whitefish” category are most likely of no concern.

    HOWEVER… what you need to watch with ANY fish based food is whether or not the manufacturer uses ethoxyquin as a preservative for their fish. It is applied to the fish when on a fishing vessel as a preservative so that the fish will not become rancid before the ship comes ashore again. Ethoxyquin has been linked to certain cancers. i know of a few… Performatrin Ultra, Honest Kitchen,Earthborne Venture, Acana, Orijen… who do not use ethoxyquin. I’m sure there are more, just as there are those that DO use ethoxyquin- use due diligence and contact the companies directly. If they word their response vaguely or use redirection, they probably use ethoxyqin. Companies that do not will answer you quickly and cite documentation. And some such as Orijen or Earthborne Venture will call it out directly on the bags.

    Happy healthy dogs!

  • Angie

    Thank you and will do.

  • anon101

    No. I would not be concerned.
    Go to Zignature’s website. They will answer your questions via e-mail or their 1-800 number.

  • Angie

    I have a question regarding mercury. I’ve been feeding my dogs zignature canned whitefish for a couple of years because it’s the only protein they can tolerate (they have very sensitive stomachs). Should I be concerned about mercury levels in Zignature’s products??

  • Angie

    I have a question regarding mercury. I’ve been feeding my dogs the canned whitefish for a couple of years because it’s the only protein they can tolerate (they have very sensitive stomachs). Should I be concerned about mercury levels in your products??

  • aimee

    It wouldn’t concern me if they limited their focus to marketing the diet as low glycemic. My concern is that the company is promoting medical nonsense.

    I’m glad the diet is working for your dog

  • Chris

    Maybe they’re not marketing it right by calling it “low-glycemic” or whatever but I’d just like to add my unsolicited 2 cents: I’m very grateful for this line of food. My doggos are allergic to chicken, grain, and one of them to white potatoes. You won’t believe how hard it is to find a dry food without those three things! So however they market it, I hope to high heaven they keep making it the way it is. We’ve done the Catfish and the Venison so far and they’re thriving on it. I also rotate with Victor Yukon.

  • Chris

    Maybe they’re not marketing it right by calling it “low-glycemic” or whatever but I’d just like to add my unsolicited 2 cents: I’m very grateful for this line of food. My doggos are allergic to chicken, grain, and one of them to white potatoes. You won’t believe how hard it is to find a dry food without those three things! So however they market it, I hope to high heaven they keep making it the way it is. We’ve done the Catfish and the Venison so far and they’re thriving on it. I also rotate with Victor Yukon.

  • Charles Clark

    That is sad. I’d guess that dog woulda got kicked down the road anyways for behavior problems. Someone that petty and clueless would never be able to train such a fast dog. I have had dogs all my life and been around alot of boxers. I still find getting them to focus a challenge. They are brilliant once you break through the crazy. This kibble even helped with the training. The venison formula was what I used for treats and he was very driven to get em. The better nutrition I’m sure was also a factor. I know I wouldn’t nor want to perform well just eating McDonald’s from a dumpster. Otherwise known as Alpo and it’s competition. How’s a dog supposed to focus when his body is constantly crying out for nutrition.
    Thanks for the kind words about my dog. I’m most proud of him. Even if he is a weirdo inside and out.

  • A Nonnie Mess

    I like his colors, his little spots on his neck and the ball next to him that look a lot like the toy our youngest loves. It’s a kong football =)
    We trained very briefly with someone who got a Boxer at almost a year old, a really nice dog with so much potential and she said that if the dogs ears didn’t stand after a few weeks she would get rid of her. The trainer explained to her that Boxers don’t have ears that stand on their own and they need surgery, and the lady gave the dog away =/ Pretty silly and sad.

  • Charles Clark

    He has a heavier dose of white than most fawns with some brown dots mixed into it https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/46de24bbbbcec0f467f1bda919ea56960e894f6ebf7d2c1140e19808eb5fc429.jpg. Most just have white boots, or socks if higher up the leg, with white in the face and neck. Its just not a common fawn pattern and I guess undesirable to alot. I personally love it, it makes him one of a kind and fits his quirky personality.

  • A Nonnie Mess

    I’m not sure what a regular pattern in boxers is but I think he’s really cute as is!

  • InkedMarie

    He’s beautiful!

  • Charles Clark

    Thanks, everyone passed him over because of his irregular fawn pattern. He has all the good goofy boxer traits but a breeze to train (rare for the breed). Finally giving a dog proper food helps with other things besides nutrition, hes a all around better dog because of it. Happy dogs behave best.

  • A Nonnie Mess

    He’s gorgeous!

  • Charles Clark

    I love the multi protein as a base for frozen or freeze dried raw. My boxer really seems to thrive on this kibble. He never needs to see the vet and has no known allergies. I feed him just about every protein and appropriate veggie never eating the same thing 2 meals in a row. Between all this he’s the healthiest dog I’ve ever had. It’s mostly thanks to reading reviews on this site. Thanks to all the knowledgeable people who comment. https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/85315371fb6ca545e8555d0d75b669ffb05e8d4bf42cb52cb26951e45feefcf0.jpg

  • anon101

    No problem. 🙂

  • Crazy4cats

    I’m sorry if I misspoke, I honestly thought it was. My apologies.

  • Crazy4cats

    I thought it used to be right on their front page. But, I cannot be certain.

  • anon101

    No

  • anon101
  • aimee

    I found mention in the FAQ. Did it use to be in other areas that have now been changed?

  • Crazy4cats

    Hmmm? No mention of the GRI on Zignature’s site that I could find any longer.

  • aimee

    Hi Zignature,
    You wrote “After initially formulating our diets with our nutritionist, he
    explained to us that the ingredients we used would make the food good
    for dogs that have issues with candida (a yeast infection) as they can
    starve out the yeast which can stop itchiness, ear infections, redness
    of the paws, etc.

    This is an example of why a veterinary nutritionist would be an asset to you. A veterinary nutritionist, being a medical professional in addition to a nutritionist would know that there is no basis for such a statement.

    Dogs, like people, can of course get systemic Candida. They are very ill and usually die within days. No time for a food like yours to “starve” out the yeast even if such thing was possible.. which it is not. You can verify this yourself by reading the medical literature.

    While Candida can be a part of the intestinal flora of the dog this plays no bearing on itchy paws, and ears. Skin infections with Candida are rare. Again read the medical literature.

    Unfortunately your company has fallen prey to unsubstantiated nonsense

  • Crazy4cats

    Thank you for your response.

  • Zignature Dog Food

    After initially formulating our diets with our nutritionist, he explained to us that the ingredients we used would make the food good for dogs that have issues with candida (a yeast infection) as they can starve out the yeast which can stop itchiness, ear infections, redness of the paws, etc. We then decided to get it tested so we would know the levels so we could better explain to customers some of the benefits of a single animal, limited ingredient diet with healthy ingredients.

    Many of our customers will see positive changes in their dogs in regards to candida, and we wanted to understand why, so we can explain to them. We don’t change or adjust based on anything they say to us. Our diets were initially formulated to have the types of ingredients they do based on feedback we received from veterinarians when we asked them what sorts of issues they were seeing more of. They replied allergies, especially chicken, and an abundance of high starch ingredients were having negative impacts on many dogs. So we decided to totally eliminate chicken from our line, be a limited as possible (while still being nutritionally balanced), and remove high starch ingredients.

    It can be seen as an unnecessary step for others, but Zignature is the passion project for our president and owner, which is why we take additional steps that other companies might not. We have strict standards on everything from sourcing to transportation, and we expect (and demand) that our diets are handled correctly from start to finish. If we need to pay a little extra to get those results, we’ll do it. That’s why we take additional steps when cleaning the equipment between formulas, locating potential farms to source ingredients from, and why we test every production run multiple times (at the start, end, and randomly throughout the middle). It’s a little more expensive, but our primary focus is the health of the dog, so we’re okay with that cost.

    As a family owned company with no outside investors we are able to be a little more flexible with our money to make these additional costs, and to us it’s worth it to know that we do things the right way for the right reasons, and it’s one of the reasons why we’re proud of what we do.

    On that note, if anyone has any additional questions they may e-mail us at [email protected], as that is a more appropriate forum to answer sincere questions about our diets or our process.

  • anon101

    oops! This appears to be turning into a pile on.
    I’m sure if anyone is sincere with their concerns or questions that they will visit the Zignature website and/or call the 1-888 number.
    Thanks again for your participation.

  • aimee

    As I see it each ingredient has strengths and weaknesses. I find no basis to say that Zigniture chose a “healthier choice of carbs” just a different one.

  • aimee

    Zignature didn’t answer my follow up questions either. …

  • Bobby dog

    No, they did not consult with a boarded Vet or PhD nutritionist, but the changes made on their current diet were only “minor…” What does that even mean? Well they stopped answering my e-mails when I sought clarification on “minor” changes.

  • aimee

    That really is the crux of the matter. Right now there just isn’t any information and yet companies are marketing their food based on the unknown. Buyer beware!

  • aimee

    I give up.. what did they say?

  • Bobby dog

    “kitchen-stupid” LOVE IT!!!!!

  • Bobby dog

    It really was an afterthought after I received answers confirming they consulted with credentialed people in small animal nutrition.

    Sometimes I don’t feed certain companies for a while and they usually come back into play because there is a sale on their food. lol So I re-visit sites to see if they have any new recipes and I noticed on one site the name of the Vet nutritionist was no longer posted. That got me to thinking, why not? It should be proudly displayed. Asked the question received a song and dance know matter how I posed it. What do you think the answer was?!?!

  • Anonymous

    Cool article. And my dogs love popcorn. When I moved into my first apartment I had a single dog with me and was 100% kitchen-stupid. I decided to make popcorn. After it began popping, my dog began leaping into the air to catch it as I scrambled for a lid, LOL

  • aimee

    I really llke that last question. It never occurred to me to ask that one!

  • Crazy4cats

    I guess my question to you would be, why do you bother having it tested if they do not have any impact and apparently, there has been no proof that the glycemic index is even relevant when it comes to dogs? It seems like a very unnecessary expense. I’m sure it’s not cheap. Do you have any other type of food safety procedures in place?

  • Bobby dog

    Hi aimee:
    I would like to add to your post about my experiences searching for pet food and finding who formulates them.

    When looking into a company first question I ask is always who formulated their diets and what are their credentials. Are they boarded Vet nutritionists or have a PhD in small animal nutrition? I have found quite a few on LinkedIn which gives further background on their experience in the pet food industry.

    Asking for their specific credential is important. I have found the “credentials” or “certification” mentioned on several pet food sites are not in nutrition. The last company I posed this question to employed a Vet who specialized in reproduction.

    Next question is are they employed full time or consulting. I don’t mind if they are a consultant. If that’s the case my next question is always are the CURRENT recipes formulated by one. As time goes by and supply/demand, prices, sourcing etc. change the recipes may have been tweaked. If there were any changes I want to know if they consulted with a boarded Vet or PhD animal nutritionist for their current recipes. Asking this specific question returned a few interesting answers.

  • Crazy4cats

    For your enjoyment while you are eating popcorn with your pups, here is an article written by the Skept Vet:

    Glycemic Index/High Glycemic Foods
    The glycemic index is a measure of the tendency of a particular food to raise blood sugar in humans. It has some value in making food choices for diabetics, and diets with a lot of foods with a high glycemic index have been associated with a number of diseases in humans. There are many other factors that influence the effect of food on blood sugar and on overall disease risk, including portion size, total carbohydrate content of the diet, genetics, concurrent disease, and many others, so the glycemic index cannot be relied on in isolation, but it is a useful tool for human dietary planning.

    However, we cannot simply assume that principles of human nutrition and health automatically apply to dogs. Dogs are obviously quite different from humans in terms of anatomy, physiology, and evolutionary history, and while there are many similarities due to shared evolutionary history as mammals, long-term association between our species, and intensive deliberate breeding of dogs, not all nutritional guidelines for humans apply to our canine companions. The concept of glycemic index and the role of high glycemic index foods in disease risk for dogs have not been established through sound scientific research. We don’t know which foods have a high index in dogs and which don’t because the effect of different foods on blood glucose have mostly not been evaluated in this species.

    The evidence does suggest that such foods promote certain diseases in humans, including diabetes and cancer, and the same relationship may be found in dogs. As of now, however, there is virtually no research on the subject in dogs. While it is plausible that high quantities of such foods may have undesirable health effects, and some of these claims may well be true, when such claims are little more than speculation and opinion, they should not be presented as settled scientific fact. Recommendations against feeding high glycemic index foods should be acknowledged to be speculative and supported only by weak evidence.

    Here are some resources on the subject of glycemic index: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

  • aimee

    When I wrote to Zignature one of the questions I asked was “Who formulates the diets and what are their credentials?” They answered ” Our formulations are done between our owner and our nutritionist. Our
    nutritionist is a biologist who specializes in nutrition, and is one of
    the top pet nutritionists in the industry, and our owner has 20 years in
    the pet food industry and he spent 9 years researching pet food and
    nutrition before leaving to launch Zignature.”

    Note they didn’t answer the question.. no credentials given.

    Additionally when I specifically asked about a veterinary nutritionist the company didn’t seem to know what one was ” we find that many times veterinarians don’t tend to have as much training and education on the nutritional aspect of health…..Similar to doctors and nutritionists for humans, while doctors have some
    basic knowledge on nutrition, they spend more of their education
    focusing on diseases and emergencies… Again, we want to stress that we still want people to consult with
    their vets when making dietary changes, but we elected with a
    nutritionist because they tend to be more qualified for what we need in
    terms of formulations and nutrition..”

    The company seems unaware that a veterinary nutritionist is a veterinarian with post grad education in nutrition I think most if not all have PhD’s

    You wrote” And of course, a veterinary nutritionist” most companies, Zignature included from how they answered the question, do not have a veterinary nutritionist on board.
    Personally I like to see one but I think that there are very well qualified PhD’s who are able to formulate diets for pets without health concerns. When making therapeutic diets I want a veterinary nutritionist involved.

    They do employ a PhD but they didn’t say what field this person had their PhD nor where that person was educated.

  • anon101

    Thanks, it was clear as a bell to me that you use more than one resourse to

  • Pitlove

    Via the Zignature website:
    “WHY IS IT IMPORTANT THAT ZIGNATURE® CONTAINS NO POTATOES?
    Potatoes have been identified as a high-glycemic carbohydrate for dog food. Zignature® only uses low glycemic carbohydrates such as whole Chickpeas, and garden Peas which also provide valuable soluble and insoluble fiber. For more details, visit the Glycemic Research institute at gripetfoods.com.”

    That statement is slightly misleading if the diets are not meant to be formulated based on GRI research.

  • Zignature Dog Food

    Please keep in mind our diets are not based on GRI research, but rather our nutritionist, who’s a food scientist. We send the formulas to the GRI to test the glycemic levels, and that’s it. They do not have any impact on what we put into our formulas.

  • Anonymous

    I think that’s reasonable.
    Had someone told me 5 years ago I’d be reading about potatoes on a dog food site with great interest I would have laughed!
    I don’t feed potatoes but I have a few dogs (and cats, for that matter) with minor health problems that are inflammatory in nature, and being nightshades it’s my personal choice that potatoes may or may not make those problems worse, so I don’t experiment with what works for us!

  • anon101

    If potatoes agree with your dog, no problem.
    I personally would not want potatoes to be more than 10% of the diet.
    Zignature chooses to omit them completely and instead use a healthier choice of carbs.
    In my experience, this is what works the best.
    To each his own 🙂

  • Crazy4cats

    😀

  • Anonymous

    Holy damn I never knew potatoes were so controversial! =D

  • anon101
  • Crazy4cats

    There is no data on that website anyway. Turns out that Zignature is referring customers to a bogus site.

  • Pitlove

    Aimee does not work for Zignature though and is not helping them formulate diets based on outdated research.

    No one is suggesting that you don’t use Zignature, however there has been a constant back and forth with you and Susan about the use of potato in food and to settle the bowel for GI upset. If you believe in science based medicine you have to understand and accept that science and medicine is a practice and is always evolving. We are learning new things every day about medicine including for our pets. Basing diets and your companies philosophy around research that seemingly came to an end in 2012 is not good science.

  • Crazy4cats

    I hope so too!

  • InkedMarie

    She does much better with lower fiber; she’s eaten Earthborn Primitive natural (2.5%) and small stool, only 2-3 times a day. Tried a couple other Earthborn (around 4% give or take) and nope. Smell isnt a problem here; I use ground tripe LOL.

  • anon101

    My dogs are enjoying it as a base. I got a big bag and put about half in the freezer and it seems to be fine. It doesn’t smell too fishy, like Orijen did.
    Good luck

  • InkedMarie

    Nothing to do with the topic at hand but I just picked up a bag of Zignature catfish; hope it works well for Ginger.

  • Crazy4cats

    Yes! A dream come true!

  • aimee

    Wow how interesting… I’m thinking I need to get me some of that there quantum chocolate along with a side of fat burning water

  • aimee

    Anon It surprises me as you are satisfied with Zignature’s explanation as you always advocate for science based statements. Without data, Zignature’s statement is nothing more than marketing.

    You wrote “They did provide data”
    Will you provide a link to the data? I looked all over that sight and didn’t find any clinical studies or data.

    What I did find was a lot of woo and hookum…. high glycemic ingredients increase risk of hypothyroidism, diabetes, allergies, yeast infections, cancer and epilepsy…

    Corn isn’t species appropriate… “When is the last time you saw a dog grazing in a corn field?” … Why do they not ask the same for lentils and pea?

    I found this interesting as well. If a food had ingredients from China it wasn’t accepted for testing.

  • Crazy4cats

    I totally respect your science based beliefs and the fact that you trust your vet. I lean that way myself. But, there are others on this site that also have a lot of knowledge, such as Aimee, that are very helpful as well. I wish you could be a little more open-minded to their contributions.

  • Crazy4cats

    I wonder if they will weigh in with this information: http://www.anndeweesallen.com/

    Maybe you would like to buy some of her fat-burning coffee, tea, or water.

    You should do a little background check on the owner of that site that Zignature is referencing. You might find it very interesting.

  • Crazy4cats

    Again, I was only referring to the glycemic website. I have no opinion on Zignature. Many people on this site, including yourself have had good results with it. I’m good with that. Funny how when there is evidence different from what you believe, we have suddenly gone off topic or you change your identity.

  • anon101

    Dr Mike is a dentist, he was offering his opinion, which I respect.

    But, I trust my vets opinion first.

    Let’s see if Zignature weighs in?
    Although, they have no obligation to do so.
    Otherwise, I think we have gone off topic…….

  • Crazy4cats

    I’m sure you do. You may want to check out the Commonly Asked Questions. One being “How can pet food that contains potatoes be considered low glycemic?” It explains it in detail. http://www.gripetfoods.com/AwardsProgram.htm

  • Crazy4cats

    This site came up a few years ago on this site and was brought to the attention to Dr. Mike. After investigating, I believe he found it to be bogus and out of date.

  • anon101

    Well, you may want to check the dates on all articles that are provided via comments then.
    For example this one provided by another poster (a) regarding potatoes/glycemic index about 5 comments above yours is over 12 years old!
    I trust a reputable dog food company like Zignature that meets AAFCO standards not to refer me to a bogus site 🙂

  • Pitlove

    Good catch C4c. Research such as what they are claiming to do at that institution should not just abruptly end 4 years after inception.

    Since 2012 (when they stopped updating the GRI website) a lot has likely changed about what we know about GI and yet this company and others continue to quote old and likely out dated research regarding GI. Worse yet, are formulating diets for our pets based on it.

  • Crazy4cats

    Just to be clear, I was referring to the Glycemic Research site you provided. I don’t remember ever saying anything about Zignature one way or the other.

  • anon101

    There may be no need to update if the information (facts) have not changed.

    If you don’t think Zignature is a quality product, you don’t have to buy it.

  • Sweetnurse

    Thanks I will do that.

  • Sweetnurse

    Thank you. They have a check up this week and I will mention it. I didn’t know there were veterinary dermatologists.

  • Crazy4cats

    That website has not been updated for years.

  • Susan

    Hi Sweetnurse,
    you should never feed the same food 24/7 for years the dog has more chances of reacting to another new ingredient, I would change the brand & different protein source & then rotate with another kibble after 3 months when you see them doing good, also baths weekly baths to wash off any allergens in an anti-bacterial anti-fungal shampoo. ..
    Have a look at “Ëartborn Holistic” Venture, there’s Pork, Rabbit, Squid, Turkey, Duck & Pollock LID formulas https://www.earthbornholisticpetfood.com/dog-food-formulas
    Also look at “Under The Sun” formula’s they use chickpeas like Zignature use https://www.canidae.com/dog-food/products

  • anon101

    If the symptoms are due to environmental allergies (they tend to wax and wane) then changing the food will not have an effect.

    For best results see a veterinary dermatologist for testing/diagnosis/treatment.

    Otherwise, the regular vet has no choice but to continue to offer you bandaid remedies.
    Have you discussed apoquel or cytopoint with your vet?

    How about prescription food/therapeutic diet? That would be a good place to start.

  • Sweetnurse

    Hi, I’m not sure now but I might have started this discussion several hundred comments ago! I hope not. Anyways I have a new question. Bith my Shi tzu and Birder Collie have been on Duck formula for approximately 3 years due to previous allergies. They have bith developed some kind of allergy again which we can not figure iut the source. It has got to the point where they are bith on a course of Vanectal-P right now. ( corticosteroid.) I am wondering if I should change the duck to one of the others now to see if thsts the source. They cannit habe anything with chicken or lamb.

  • anon101

    I am satisfied with Zignature’s explanation regarding potatoes not being an ideal carb to be added to kibble in abundance.

    PS: They did provide data

    “Why is it important that Zignature® contains no potatoes?”
    “Potatoes have been identified as a high-glycemic carbohydrate for dog food. Zignature® only uses low glycemic carbohydrates such as whole Chickpeas, and garden Peas which also provide valuable soluble and insoluble fiber. For more details, visit the Glycemic Research institute at gripetfoods.com.”

    That’s a lot more information than other dog food companies provide…..

  • aimee

    Hi anon… You lost me… I’m not sure what the connection is between saying that dog food companies employ veterinary nutritionists and not chemists and the fact that Zignature doesn’t have any data to support their claim of potato being high glycemic ingredient in dog food.

    I sent Zignature a few questions it took them over a month to answer and the company just didn’t impress me. They didn’t answer the questions I asked of them and instead responded with lots of holistic nonsense about cooling proteins to decrease yeast growth ( ” proteins that assist in cooling the body down to help keep yeast from growing”) and carbs feeding yeast (“Eliminating potatoes, grains, and things like that help us starve out that candida “) and oddly enough they didn’t seem to know what a veterinary nutritionist was.

    In regards to potato. They are low fat so not at all a high calorie food they are high in starch. Filler content ( fiber) is decent but pea and chickpea have much higher filler (fiber) contents There isn’t a lot of protein in potato but the protein that is there is a very high biologic value. I don’t know what commodity prices are but if potato is inexpensive too that’s wonderful!

    Lots of goodness contained within the skin of the lowly potato.

  • anon101

    Dog food companies employ veterinary nutritionists to advise them, not chemists.
    Potatoes are high calorie, high starch, cheap fillers…….

  • aimee

    When I evaluate a company I look at the statements they make.. do they make sense and is there data to support or refute the statement. I specifically asked Zignature for data to support the statement “”Potatoes have been identified as a high-glycemic carbohydrate for dog food””and they had none.
    As the statement goes against conventional knowledge regarding the glycemic index of potato it leads to me look a tad unfavorably on this company.

    “when a red potato was boiled, refrigerated, and consumed cold the next day, the Glycemic
    index plummeted 37% from the upper end of a high Glycemic index food (89) to one point away from a classification
    of a low Glycemic index food (56)http://www.andersenchiro.com/potatoes-and-the-variability-of-the-glycemic-index.shtml

  • anon101

    No potato is a good thing too (imo)
    A lot of the cheaper kibbles are loaded with potato and some dogs are sensitive to it.
    “Potatoes have been identified as a high-glycemic carbohydrate for dog food”
    per the Zignature website.

  • Susan

    Hi Zignature,
    I’m pretty sure it’s illegal to kill & sell wild animal meat, If this is the case then why doesn’t Zignature write all this on their site & on their bags of kibble that Zignature meat is Free Range animals & Wild caught ?

    Wild animals are full of disease, if Zignature pet food had our Australian wild Kangaroos the dogs would get sick, we do not touch our wild Kangaroos they are riddled with parasites tapeworm & disease, the same as wild boar so I’d say the American wild animals would be the same & what Pet Food companies goes that extra mile to do what you have just posted..
    Zignature is a dry over processed kibble, Zignature meats would be sourced like most pet foods at auction or slaughter houses, pet food companies buy these meats that are not fit for human consumption, bruised meats, carcasses that didn’t pass for human consumption is normally sold as pet meat…

  • Bluefin

    Wondering if you advertise that fact as some other manufacturers do? If not, why not? As that is an important fact to some purchasers.

  • Bluefin

    Well that is good news because I am a believer in your food and recommend it when asked. The protein sourcing was something I never had a answer for. I would never use a food that intentionally inflicted pain and suffering just to feed my dog. I hope others agree including the manufacturer.

  • Zignature Dog Food

    Hello Bluefin,

    We can confirm that we would never source from anywhere that treated any animal unethically. The vast majority of our formulas use wild caught or free ranged animals, and the ones that don’t, we carefully select the source to ensure that it’s cruelty free.

  • Bluefin

    Zignature is excellent food, but there has been a price creep. I wish the company could give some assurance that the animal protein is derived from ethically raised animals. Since this is a priority for me, I would switch if I can find a similar food where the manufacturer can unequivocally make a statement about ethically raised meats. I like that there are no chicken components in their food since chicken protein is a major allergen.

  • Kenneth Baird

    We are trying the catfish one next but I have not opened it yet. I will post how they like it when I open it up this week.

  • Jo Ann Wacker

    So true. Thanks. And Mysti is happy right now.

  • Susan

    Hi Jo,
    sorry about your dog that has passed away & your other dog who has gone blind…
    What protein source (Zignature formula) were they eating when all this happened was it Fish?, google “Toxins in Pet Foods” scroll down a bit & there’s a company testing pet foods you will be surprise with their test result & the pet foods that tested the highest in toxins.
    Zignature hasn’t been tested as yet cause this company which Im not allow to post on DFA which is stupid cause these 4 & 5 star pet foods are the pet foods that are really high in Metals, Arsenic, Lead, Mercury & other contaminates, Zignature hasnt been test yet cause they’re only testing the best selling pet foods but Zignature is on their list to be tested in the new year…
    Change your other dogs food, you should always rotate your dogs food so if something is wrong with the food youre’rotating between a few different brands & proteins & not eating the same brand kibble 24/7 & start adding fresh foods to her diet…
    “Canidae” tested very well in the pet food testings, try Canidae’s Pure Meadow Senior formula, it’s high protein, low fat, high in Omega 3, Glucosamine & Chondroitin for aging joints & has healthy ingredients…”Pure Meadow Senior” is on page 3
    https://www.canidae.com/dog-food/products

  • anon101

    I’m afraid that only more diagnostic testing ($) may be able to answer your questions, or not.
    See what your vet recommends.

  • Jo Ann Wacker

    It was just a wondering question as these two incidents happened within 2 months of each other.

  • anon101

    Well, I guess the diagnosis is “etiology unknown”
    Depending on if it was within your means and your vet thinks it may lead to successful treatment, you could ask for a referral to a specialist.
    I can’t imagine food causing these issues.

  • Jo Ann Wacker

    The ShihTzu was 10. My lab mix is 8. She has no cataracts. Just sudden blindness and now the sense of smell which is an off and on thing. All my animals go for yearly checkups plus yearly dental. That is why this is so hard for me.

  • anon101

    How old are the dogs? Some of what you describe may be age related and or genetic.
    I have one dog that has developed cataracts at the age of 8. Other dogs in my care did not develop cataracts till age 9 or 10, if at all.
    I have had several dogs develop heart murmurs after the age of 7 (senior) usually small breeds, often asymptomatic.
    Losing sense of smell is another symptom of aging.
    All these things are true for people too.
    Perhaps these ailments would have shown up even sooner if the dogs weren’t being fed a quality diet?
    I now take may dogs in for annual checkups and go along with recommended lab work.
    Hope to pick up any disease process that has begun and discuss treatment options or lack of.
    PS: Sudden failure is a generic cause of death.
    An autopsy may have shown some cardiac issues or other cause.

  • Jo Ann Wacker

    I have two dogs or had two dogs that have been on Zignature for a few years. My Shih Tzu died suddenly of heart failure now my lab/rottie mix has sudden blindness and is losing her sense of smell. My vet has no etiology for any of these issues…could this be a food issue

  • Anonymous

    Thank you, Haley, Pitlove and Anon! I can’t wait to see their line, I like keeping canned cat food on hand cause you never know..

  • anon101

    Copied from the FAQ section at the Zignature website

    Does Zignature® make cat food?
    Not yet, but we’re currently developing recipes for our feline friends. Until then, we recommend Fussie Cat, a high quality cat food line made in human-grade plants which is also produced by Pets Global. To learn more, visit Fussiecat.com.

  • anon101

    Have you tried the catfish? It’s good 🙂

  • anon101

    I’m not sure, but I think KB meant to direct this comment to you https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/dog-food-reviews/zignature-dog-food/#comment-3587130897

  • Kenneth Baird

    I have two mini pens they love Zignature. I have tried most of the flavors. They love all of the ones I have tried so far. I always put water in their food since I believe they do not drink enough water during the day. I would tell you to try it but mix it with your food the vet recommended too for a while. I would say try one of the fish ones first for your UTI problem. I started my mini pens on the fish first. Hope it works for you.

  • Pitlove

    Hi Anonymous-

    Zignature(Pets Global), makes a dry and canned line called Fussie Cat. This would be the “Zignature cat food” line.

  • haleycookie

    I could be wrong but I do believe the fussie cat line is the cat sister to the zignature dog line. Sold under the same company.

  • Anonymous

    This is a bit off topic but I’m unable to find any information regarding cat food by Zignature. I’m wondering if this in the works. The dog food looks great and it would be great if the company was able to accurately formulate a good food for our purr-kids, too!

  • Anonymous

    Catheryn, the only real experience I have with frequent UTI’s is with a cat, not a dog, but…moisture, moisture, moisture. If you feed dry, add water. If you feed canned, add water. It’s not going to hurt.
    In the past, any dry food (no matter how good of quality) was not good for this particular cat and would bring on a UTI if fed without additional water over a period of days. She eats a very moisture rich diet now.
    Would a dog water fountain vs. a stagnant bowl be a good option? My fountain is very popular in this house and my dogs and cats both drink a bit more than they used to =)
    Best wishes.

  • Zignature Dog Food

    Hello Anon101, we are who we say we are, don’t worry.

    In terms of the discrepancy, there are two different measurements there! One is talking about the percentage and the other is milligrams per 100 kcal. Hope this helps!

  • Zignature Dog Food

    Hello Anon101,

    We can confirm, it’s us. Feel free to give us a call or e-mail us at [email protected] if you’d like confirmation! We monitor and will jump in every so often on this area, but we don’t participate in the forums, and wouldn’t unless we felt it was absolutely necessary. Knowing there are a lot of very knowledgeable people here (including you), we’d rather organic conversation. Anyone who ever has any questions are free to call us at 888-897-7202 or e-mail us at [email protected] and we’ll do our best to assist!

  • anon101

    If you have questions about Zignature, go to their website http://zignature.com/?page_id=8&lang=en
    or call them
    Toll Free: (888) 897-7207
    Hours of Operation: 8:00am – 5:00pm PST
    The last time I spoke to someone there, I was told that they do not participate in this forum (DFA)

  • Zignature Dog Food

    Hello Cathryne,

    Zignature isn’t designed to treat any specific medical issues, so we don’t want to give any advice that would go against the recommendations of your vet. The only thing we would suggest, and this is regardless of which brand you feed, would be to increase water intake to ensure that your pup is urinating enough to keep everything moving.

    We always suggest keeping a water dish full as much as you can! Dogs should be drinking about 1/2 an ounce to 1 ounce per pound of body weight, and when dealing with UTI’s that hydration is extra important! Most people don’t realize just how much water that is, but for large breed dogs it can easily be anywhere from half a gallon to a full gallon! This is how much a full grown adult human should be drinking, even though our furry friends are often less than half the weight of an adult human, so having plenty of water is essential for canine health!

  • aimee

    Hi Cathryne,
    UTI’s are not from diet Zignature won’t decrease their frequency.

  • anon101

    Zignature is a quality kibble, my dogs are doing well on it.
    However it is not a prescription food. Until your dog has been stable for at least 6 months to a year I would go by the vet’s recommendation and use the prescription food.
    Also, add water to kibble/presoak and or use the prescription canned food. Always have fresh water available.
    Offer the dog frequent bathroom breaks, opportunities to urinate, keep the bladder flushed.
    Continue to work closely with your vet.
    Is your dog on antibiotics now? If so, it is important to complete the course.
    see my posts https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/urinary+tract+infections/

  • Susan

    Hi Cathryne,
    after reading post on DFA & post on facebook groups I’m reading a few dogs seem to be getting UTI’s that are eating these dry grain free diets that have Lentils & Chickpeas, I dont know if its a coincidence but why is this happening? same happened with my Patch after he was eating a kibble with chickpeas, the Chickpeas were further down the ingredeint list so I thought he’d be OK cause he has IBD he can’t eat Lentils at all but he can eat kibbles that have the Chickpeas but only when Chickpeas are after the 6th ingredient, after eating this high protein, higher in fiber-5% G/F kibble for 3 months Patch started to have weeing problems, he couldn’t wee in the mornings, he’d just do little drible wees & he was whinging, (when I rescued him 4-5 yrs ago he was weeing blood but the rescue vet put it down to having an infection from being used as a breeding/stud dog) anyway I took him to his vet with me to have him weighed & to drop off his morning wee sample I managed to get but the vet wanted him to stay & have further tests, a sterile urine sample then he had to have an urgent Xray as vet thought he had a blockage, I ended up taking him off the grain free kibble he was eating at the time & everything seem to all clear up & went away, also now I make sure I rotate & feed 2 different brands, 1 kibble has Turkey Meal, Brown Rice & green veggies both are low in fiber, medium protein & 26 & under & don’t feed the same kibble brand 24/7 I also I feed cooked & wet tin foods & watch that he’s drinking water, he’s a big water drinker which is a good thing when he eats his “Taste Of The Wild” Sierra Mounatin Roasted Lamb he seems to drink water & I have no problems with him drinking…TOTW Lamb has Sweet Potato, Potatoes, Peas, Egg, Blueberries & Raspberries & is low in fiber under 4% & very easy to digest. TOTW is made with Purifed Water & has Probiotics, something seems to work with the TOTW & Patch seems to have no problems 2 yrs until I feed the other new grain free kibble that was higher protein, fiber & fat & had the Chickpeas….
    Scroll down the Zignature page & please read all the post for Zignature, the Sodium percentages for all Zignature formula’s was posted on here about 6 months ago but apparantenly it was incorrect & Zignature had posted lower Sodium % then what it was in all the Zignature formula’s…..

    Do your own research & I would be feediing a cooked diet or Freeze Dried, wet canned or if you do pick a dry kibble make sure you check it all out first, & it is really easy to digest, how you know this is get a glass/cup of warm water & put 2-3 kibbles in the glass of warm water & the kibbles should float to top of water & the kibble should swell & go soft with in 40 mins, TOTW kibble only takes 20mins & the kibble is soft all the way thru. I wouldnt listen to a store person they might just like Zignature as their favorite brand, its good for dogs with Food & Skin Allergies there was a post you’d have to scroll down & look thru them, the poster posted that all her 3 rescue dogs got UTI’s after eating the Zignature kibbles…
    Feed something that has higher water content even look at “Honest Kitchen” freeze dried where you ad water & the food swells up & absorbs the water, there would be a few freeze dried foodd where you added water, that’s if you dont want to cook & freeze meals etc
    Go on facebook & follow. “Dr Judy Morgan” she has home cooked recipes for UTI’s & really good easy to follow video’s, Judy has 8 Cavalier Charles Spaniels all with health problems & I’m pretty sure 2 of her female dogs suffer from UTI’s so she will have her special recipes also there’s a group on F/B called
    “K-9 Kitchen” run by “Monia Segal” she also has good recipes for dogs with re accuring UTI’s..

    Here’s a link please read & try & work out why your dog keeps getting uti’s?. https://www.whole-dog-journal.com/issues/13-4/features/Delecting-Urinary-Stones-Dogs_16215-1.html

    Here’s an insert from the link above.

    “In general, the benefits of a meat-based diet far outweigh the risks posed by protein’s ammonia generation. Plus, by feeding your dog a home-prepared diet of fresh ingredients, you can provide food that is higher in quality and much more to your dog’s liking than diets that come out of cans or packages.

    Other prescription pet food strategies -such as keeping the diet low in fiber so that fluids are not lost through the intestines, using highly digestible ingredients for the same reason, and increasing the dog’s fluid intake by adding salt to the diet -can be better accomplished with a home-prepared diet and management techniques that encourage the dog to drink more water. The more concentrated the urine, the more saturated it becomes with minerals that can precipitate out, so extra fluids, which dilute the urine, reduce the risk.
    Urinary acidifiers are not used to dissolve or prevent stones caused by urinary tract infections, since acidification does not help while an infection is present.”

  • Cathryne Rich Czarnecki

    My dog gets frequent UTI’s. My vet recommended hills prescription cd. She still however is getting frequent utis. A store recommended Zignature Turkey Formula. Does anyone know if this will help my dog or do I just have to give it a try and hope for the best?

  • anon101

    Zignature is the best! My dogs are thriving on the whitefish (our favorite) and the catfish formulas as a base.
    Just be aware, there is someone that posts here from time to time and gives the impression that they are a Zignature representative, however, I have not been able to confirm.
    So, if you have any questions about Zignature, it may be best to go to their website or call the 1-800 number.

  • Crystal

    I just wanted to add a comment on here regarding how well my dog has done on this food. After the passing of my last furbaby at 15.5 yrs, I wanted to spoil my next one just as much but buying better food. In the last month’s of my past furbaby’s life I had to buy food better suited for his health issues, and that is when I was introduced to a pet supply store I didn’t even know about in my town. The foods were so much better than conventional! I didn’t even know they were offered! So, after he passed I knew I’d get better food for the life of my next doggo.
    Well, I rescued my newest dog 2015. He is a mixed breed small dog, around 25 lbs. He had hives and dry fur all the time. I had to eliminate grains. After reading dog food advisor I learned about Zignature and how it has helped dogs with allergies. I’m happy to say he has had no more hives in 2 years and his fur is shiny and silky smooth! He is very healthy and I use Zignature as a base food in a rotating diet mix (Fromm, Acana, etc., he gets a half cup of Zignature and another, mixed). But he loves the Zignature best! I usually buy him the Zssential.

  • Sweetnurse

    This is true. My other dog who is a shi tau has dogfood specific to his breed. The kibbles are much smaller!

  • Crystal

    I also encountered this issue when I had my older dog and he began having trouble chewing dog food, even though they were already smallish sized kibble. One thing I did that helped was to use a food chopper and chop his food into smaller bits. Another thing was to give more canned food. We had to do this for a few years. I also had contacted companies about smaller kibble or even crumbs (hey, I’d buy them for my senior furbaby!), but I was told they didn’t offer any alternatives. Anyway, a food chopper works! It’s loud, but does work.

  • aimee

    Hi Cassie Jow,
    There is variation between the formulas some may be more appropriate than others. Large breed puppy formulas are formulated to be not as energy dense as traditional puppy foods and you’ll want the calcium level around 3 grams/1000kcals. The company should be able to give this information to you.
    During growth I prefer products from companies that have veterinary nutritionists on staff and from a company that has fed the food to a large breed during the growth period and monitored for correct skeletal development.

  • Susan

    Hi Cassie,
    I would be looking for a “Large Breed Puppy” formula, Zignature is a bit too rich for large breed puppies… You need to slow down his growth down not speed it up…

    “Canidae” make a few different Large Breed Puppy formula’s, Canidaes new Turkey Meal formula is a really good formula, Canidae made the best large breed puppy foods list..so did Wellness, Orijen, Canidae & Holistic Select…… click on link below, scroll down a bit look to your right & click on “View all” click on page 5 & the Large Breed Formula’s will come up….
    https://www.canidae.com/dog-food/products

  • Cassie Jow

    I have a 4.5 month old golden retriever and our vet recommended Large Breed Puppy food. Since Zignature is an all stage food, is it still as beneficial as puppy food? Will he be getting all of the appropriate nutrients for his age to help with growth long term?? Thanks!

  • Sweetnurse

    Oh Ok! Thanks. I’ll stick with her vet then.

  • anon101

    Umm, the “anesthesia free” dental cleanings are just cosmetic.
    Often used for show dogs. Not the same thing as a professional cleaning.
    When the dog is under general anesthesia a thorough examination and x-rays are done. Most of the trouble is under the gum line.
    The teeth can look pristine on the surface, yet there can be root remnants and such that can cause pain and infection. Not visible by just looking.
    Also, if you have questions for Zignature, I would go go to the official Zignature website, or call their 1-800 number.
    I spoke to someone at Zignature recently and the person I spoke to was not aware of anyone from their company posting here at DFA.

  • Sweetnurse

    Hi!, thanks for the reply. I’ll try the warm water. I was wondering about that because she free feeds. Her weight and health is good. I didn’t know there was anesthesiogy free places. I’ll definitely look into it.

  • Zignature Dog Food

    Hi Susan,

    All of our formulas other than our Zssentials formula are 65% animal protein and 35% plant protein. Our Zssentials formula is a 70%-30% split. We are primarily meat based, we’re always happy to help clear up any confusion regarding what we’re doing and why, all you need to do is ask! Hope this helps!

  • Zignature Dog Food

    Hi Sweetnurse! While we don’t have any small bites kibble, we are always looking at customer feedback for ways we can improve our products in the future based on the needs of you guys! For now if your senior dog is having a little bit of a harder time with chewing, you may want to look into adding a little bit of warm water and letting it soften the kibble a little bit before feeding. This will assist with swallowing, slowing down eating, and making it a little easier on teeth. There are often great, anesthetic free teeth cleaning that many vets will be able to offer to maintain tooth/jaw strength as well! We always recommend a check up when you notice any behavioral changes like this, always better to be safe in our opinion!

    We hope this helps!

  • anon101

    http://www.vetstreet.com/care/chronic-otitis-chronic-ear-infection-in-dogs
    (excerpt below)
    A medical history and physical examination findings can provide valuable information for your veterinarian when trying to diagnose an ear infection. The medical history may include trying to determine how long the ear infection has been going on, whether it has occurred before and whether any other signs of illness have been observed. Physical examination findings may reveal evidence of underlying illness, such as thyroid disease and Cushing’s disease.
    Diagnosis of chronic otitis is usually based on a history of previous ear infections and physical examination findings. Redness, inflammation, discharge, and other changes within the ear will readily indicate the presence of an ear infection. That’s the easy part. The hard part is finding out a) what kinds of microorganisms are taking advantage of the dog’s inflamed ears and b) what’s causing the inflammation in the first place.
    Determining both a) and b) generally requires diagnostic testing. In the case of identifying microorganisms, these are the tests most commonly used:
    Microscopy: The most common test used to identify the presence of mites, bacteria, and yeast is a simple evaluation of the discharge obtained from the ear under a microscope. Mites are readily identified in this way. With special staining techniques, yeast and bacteria can also be identified and their characteristics evaluated.
    Culture and sensitivity testing: Testing the debris inside a dog’s ear using simple microscopy isn’t always enough when the otitis has been stubborn or severe. Obtaining a sample of the discharge using a sterile swab and submitting it to a diagnostic laboratory will help determine exactly which bacteria and/or yeast are present. This information helps veterinarians devise the ideal drug strategy to treat the infection.
    Underlying illnesses leading to the overgrowth of microorganisms will require a different approach. Here are the most common tests:
    Otoscopy: An otoscope is a tool used to help a veterinarian visualize the ear canal. This is the ideal tool to help identify the presence of an eardrum rupture, a polyp, or a mass in the ear canal. Unfortunately, most dogs require sedation — if not anesthesia — before they’ll submit to this kind of examination.
    Thyroid testing: To determine whether thyroid disease may be playing a role.
    Adrenal gland testing: Tests to explore the possibility of Cushing’s disease are sometimes required in dogs with otitis externa.
    Allergy testing: Testing for allergies is never embarked upon lightly, but it’s something owners of dogs with otitis externa may have to consider.
    Food trial: Since food allergies are such a common feature in the chronic otitis landscape, food trials are perhaps even more important than blood testing. Most food allergic dogs are allergic to the primary protein source in their food. A food trial’s goal is to change the proteins the patient eats to those she’s never been exposed to before. If the otitis resolves when the diet is changed, a food allergy may be the underlying cause of the condition. A 12- to 16-week period in which the diet is restricted is considered the ideal approach to undertaking food trials.

  • anon101

    Ask your vet about a prescription food/elimination diet. Otherwise, whatever food you try, there is always cross-contamination.
    That doesn’t happen with prescription dog food. Hence, the increased cost.

  • Cstar

    Thankyou, I will check that out.

  • Susan

    Hi Cstar, you need to work out what ingredients your dog is sensitive too that’s probably causing his yeasty ears? look back at all the foods he has eaten when he has gotten his ear infections & try & work out what ingredient was in all the formula’s that he might be sensitive too?? My boy cant eat carrots & chicken he starts shaking his head, scratching his ears & gets red paws & smelly yeasty skin, have a look at “Canidae” Pure Meadow, Senior grain free kibble it’s high in omega 3 for the skin ears etc & has Glucosamine + Chondroitin for joints, has probitics & supplements that’s needed for aging dogs… https://www.canidae.com/dog-food/products

  • Sweetnurse

    Thanks, she is seeing her vet next week for consultation. He had mentioned to me before that if I ever wanted her teeth cleaned ect. That they would put her under to do it. I was thinking about it before but this has made up my mind.

  • Crystal Beal

    Thanks for sharing. I will discuss it with the veterinarian.

  • anon101

    No, I am not a veterinarian. But I have worked in healthcare (humans). If you read the disclaimer on the bottle of any supplement it will say something like this: This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent disease.
    Also: https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/articles/0261-dietary-supplements
    Dietary supplements may seem like harmless health boosters. But while some have proven benefits, many don’t. Unlike drugs, dietary supplements aren’t evaluated or reviewed by FDA for safety and effectiveness, and even “natural” supplements can be risky depending on the medicines you take or the medical conditions you have. In recent years, hundreds of supplements also have been found to be tainted with drugs and other chemicals. Always talk to your doctor before you take a new supplement, and avoid any supplement claiming it’s a “cure.”
    And: http://skeptvet.com/Blog/category/herbs-and-supplements/

  • Crystal Beal

    Ok thanks. His is in fact yeast not allergies. So not the same issue as yours had, therefore treatment may differ depending the cause. Glad to hear your pup is doing better.

  • Crystal Beal

    Im looking at all options. Why exactly do you believe supplements wouldnt help? Supplements have been used to treat and prevent things for years. I already stated that hes been diagnosed, we know whats causing it and hes been treated numerous times. Are you a vet?

  • anon101

    My dog with allergies had 3 ear infections within 1 year.
    That was 6 years ago. Since seeing a veterinary dermatologist and receiving treatment, she has never had an ear infection again.
    She was diagnosed with environmental allergies. It had absolutely nothing to do with her diet. Also, most supplements are scams.
    Good luck
    PS: I have never used probiotics.

  • anon101

    It might be time to ask the vet for a referral to a specialist.

  • Crystal Beal

    Hes been to the vet and treated several times through the years for his

  • anon101

    Food and supplements will have NO effect on treating, curing or preventing ear infections.
    First you have to go to the vet and get a diagnosis. What is causing the ear infections?
    At the least, the vet can offer prescription ear drops (antibiotic, steroidal) that will help.
    It is up to you as to how aggressive you want to get regarding testing and such.
    Zignature is an excellent food, my small breeds (one is a senior) are thriving on it.

  • anon101

    Schedule the vet visit for a dental exam, once the teeth are cleaned and extractions as needed are done.
    Your dog will have no trouble eating any kibble.
    However, softening the kibble with a little water would not hurt………a lot of dogs don’t drink enough water and kibble is dry.

  • Crystal Beal

    I know this is an all stage food but how is it for senior dogs? My dog is going on 10 and is a little over weight. Plus he has chronic ear infections. So I tried Now Fresh senior weight management which also has probiotics to hopefully help his ear infections. But the Now Fresh kibble is very hard, which i do understand since its for seniors. My 4 yr old loves his Zignature but i just cant find any info on how well seniors do on it. Any advise from those out there already feeding it to their seniors?

  • Sweetnurse

    I think that’s the best idea. She does have some plaque on her back teeth. I would never switch from Zignature.

  • Sweetnurse

    Hi, she is on the Duck one but maybe I’ll try another one such as lamb or turkey. Not sure if they are different or not. She’s due for a new bag soon.

  • ZeekandT

    Some of the Fromm Grain Free formulas also have smaller kibbles and they’re different in shape. Some dogs appreciate the texture change as well.