Wysong Au Jus Diets (Canned)

Rating:

Product May Have Been Discontinued
Unable to Locate Current Information
On the Company’s Website

Wysong Au Jus Diets receives the Advisor’s top rating of 5 stars.

The Wysong Au Jus Diets product line includes six recipes, each containing 95% meat and intended for intermittent or supplemental feeding only.

  • Wysong Beef Au Jus
  • Wysong Duck Au Jus
  • Wysong Rabbit Au Jus
  • Wysong Turkey Au Jus
  • Wysong Chicken Au Jus
  • Wysong Venison Au Jus

Wysong Duck Au Jus Diet was selected to represent the others in the line for this review.

Wysong Duck Au Jus

Canned Dog Food

Estimated Dry Matter Nutrient Content

Protein = 46% | Fat = 32% | Carbs = 15%

Ingredients: Duck, water sufficient for processing, animal plasma, guar gum

Fiber (estimated dry matter content) = 6.8%

Red denotes controversial item

Estimated Nutrient Content
MethodProteinFatCarbs
Guaranteed Analysis10%7%NA
Dry Matter Basis46%32%15%
Calorie Weighted Basis33%56%11%
Protein = 33% | Fat = 56% | Carbs = 11%

The first ingredient in this dog food is duck. Duck is considered “the clean combination of flesh and skin… derived from the parts or whole carcasses of duck”.1

Duck is naturally rich in the ten essential amino acids required by a dog to sustain life.

The second ingredient is water, which adds nothing but moisture to this food. Water is a routine finding in most canned dog foods.

The third ingredient is animal plasma. Plasma is what remains of blood after the blood cells themselves have been removed. Plasma can be considered a nutritious addition.

The fourth item is guar gum, a gelling or thickening agent found in many wet pet foods. Refined from dehusked guar beans, guar gum can add a notable amount of dietary fiber to any product.

Wysong Au Jus Diets Dog Food
The Bottom Line

Judging by its ingredients alone, Wysong Au Jus Diets is an above-average canned dog food.

But being 95% meat, the product was never intended to be fed as a complete and balanced canine diet.

Wysong Au Jus Diets is a supplement only.

Because they probably lack some essential nutrients, supplements must not be fed continuously as the sole item in a dog’s diet.

The company recommends Au Jus Diets be fed as part of a diet rotation — or as an appetizing topper to be served over dry kibble.

The dashboard displays a dry matter protein reading of 46%, a fat level of 32% and an estimated carbohydrate content of 15%.

As a group, the brand features an average protein content of 46% and a mean fat level of 30%. Together, these figures suggest a carbohydrate content of 16% for the overall product line.

And a fat-to-protein ratio of about 67%.

Above-average protein. Above-average fat. And below-average carbs when compared to a typical canned dog food.

Free of any plant-based protein boosters, this looks like the profile of a wet product containing an abundance of meat.

Bottom line?

Wysong Au Jus Diets is a meat-based canned dog food using an assortment of various species as its main sources of animal protein, thus earning the brand 5 stars.

Enthusiastically recommended.

However, this product appears to be designed for supplemental use only and may not be suitable for long term daily feeding.

Those looking for a nice dry kibble to use in rotation with this food may wish to visit our review of Wysong Optimal Performance.

A Final Word

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Important FDA Alert

The FDA is investigating a potential link between diet and heart disease in dogs. Click here for details.

Notes and Updates

  1. Adapted by the Dog Food Advisor from the official definition for chicken published by the Association of American Feed Control Officials, 2008 Edition

11/11/2014 Last Update