Stella and Chewy’s Freeze Dried (Freeze-Dried)

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Rating: ★★★★★

Stella and Chewy’s Freeze Dried Raw Dog Food earns the Advisor’s top rating of 5 stars.

The Stella and Chewy’s product line includes seven freeze dried raw dog foods, each claimed to meet AAFCO nutrient profiles for all life stages.

The following is a list of recipes available at the time of this review.

  • Chewy’s Chicken Freeze Dried Dinner
  • Stella’s Super Beef Freeze Dried Dinner
  • Stella & Chewy’s Surf N Turf Freeze Dried Dinner
  • Stella & Chewy’s Dandy Lamb Freeze Dried Dinner
  • Stella & Chewy’s Simply Venison Freeze Dried Dinner
  • Stella & Chewy’s Absolutely Rabbit Freeze Dried Dinner
  • Stella & Chewy’s Duck Duck Goose Freeze Dried Dinner

Stella & Chewy’s Duck Duck Goose Freeze Dried Dinner was selected to represent the other products in the line for this review.

Stella and Chewy's Duck Duck Goose Freeze-Dried

Freeze-Dried Dog Food

Estimated Dry Matter Nutrient Content

Protein = 42% | Fat = 30% | Carbs = 20%

Ingredients: Duck with ground bone, turkey, turkey liver, goose, turkey gizzard, pumpkin seed, potassium chloride, organic cranberries, organic spinach, organic broccoli, organic beets, sodium phosphate monobasic, organic carrots, organic squash, organic apples, organic blueberries, choline chloride, dried Pediococcus acidilactici fermentation product, dried Lactobacillus acidophilus fermentation product, dried Bifidobacterium longum fermentation product, dried Enterococcus faecium fermentation product, taurine, tocopherols (preservative), calcium carbonate, zinc proteinate, zinc sulfate, iron sulfate, iron proteinate, vitamin E supplement, niacin, copper sulfate, copper proteinate, manganese sulfate, sodium selenite, manganese proteinate, thiamine monohydrate, pyridoxine hydrochloride, vitamin D3 supplement, calcium iodate, vitamin B12 supplement

Fiber (estimated dry matter content) = 4.2%

Red items when present indicate controversial ingredients

Estimated Nutrient Content
MethodProteinFatCarbs
Guaranteed Analysis40%28%NA
Dry Matter Basis42%30%20%
Calorie Weighted Basis31%53%15%

The first item in this dog food lists duck. Duck is considered “the clean combination of flesh and skin… derived from the parts or whole carcasses of duck”.1

Duck is naturally rich in the ten essential amino acids required by a dog to sustain life. Plus this particular meat also includes ground bone… an excellent source of natural calcium.

The second ingredient includes turkey, another poultry item with a nutrient profile similar to duck.

The third ingredient is turkey liver. This is an organ meat sourced from a named animal and thus considered a beneficial component.

The fourth ingredient is goose, yet one more poultry item.

The fifth ingredient lists turkey gizzard. The gizzard is a low-fat, meaty organ found in the digestive tract of birds and assists by grinding up a consumed food. As foreign as it may seem to us humans, the gizzard is a favored delicacy to a dog.

The sixth ingredient is pumpkin seed. Pumpkin seeds are rich in fiber, vitamins, minerals and, more importantly, linoleic acid — an essential omega-6 fat.

The next several items includes a number of nutrient-rich fruits and vegetables

  • Organic cranberries
  • Organic spinach
  • Organic broccoli
  • Organic beets
  • Organic carrots
  • Organic squash
  • Organic apples
  • Organic blueberries

From here, the list goes on to include a number of other items.

But to be realistic, ingredients located this far down the list (other than nutritional supplements) are not likely to affect the overall rating of this product.

With two notable exceptions

First, we note the inclusion of dried fermentation products in this recipe. Fermentation products are typically added to provide enzymes to aid the animal with digestion.

And lastly, this food also contains chelated minerals, minerals that have been chemically attached to protein. This makes them easier to absorb. Chelated minerals are usually found in better dog foods.

Stella and Chewy’s
Freeze Dried Raw Dog Food
The Bottom Line

Since this recipe contains a number of organic ingredients, we feel compelled to grant this line a more favorable status as we consider its final rating.

That’s because organic ingredients must comply with notably more stringent government standards — standards which significantly restrict the use of any synthetic pesticides, herbicides, insecticides, hormones or antibiotics.

With that in mind…

Judging by its ingredients alone, Stella and Chewy’s Freeze Dried Raw Dog Food looks like an above-average raw product.

But ingredient quality by itself cannot tell the whole story. We still need to estimate the product’s meat content before determining a final rating.

The dashboard displays a dry matter protein reading of 42%, a fat level of 30% and estimated carbohydrates of about 20%.

As a group, the brand features an average protein content of 43% and a mean fat level of 32%. Together, these figures suggest a carbohydrate content of 17% for the overall product line.

And a fat-to-protein ratio of about 73%.

Above-average protein. Above-average fat. And below-average carbs when compared to a typical raw dog food.

Free of any plant-based protein boosters, this looks like the profile of a freeze-dried raw dog food containing a significant amount of meat.

Bottom line?

Stella and Chewy’s Freeze Dried is a meat-based raw dog food using a significant amount of named meat and organs as its main sources of animal protein, thus earning the brand 5 stars.

Enthusiastically recommended.

Please note certain recipes are sometimes given a higher or lower rating based upon our estimate of their total meat content.

To read about another raw food from the same company be sure to see our review of Stella and Chewy’s Raw Frozen Dinners.

For more suggestions, be sure to visit the Advisor’s Recommended Raw Dog Foods summary page.

Special Alert

Rice ingredients can sometimes contain arsenic. Until the US FDA establishes safe upper levels for arsenic content, pet owners may wish to limit the total amount of rice fed in a dog's daily diet.

A Final Word

The descriptions and analyses expressed in this and every article on this website represent the views and opinions of the author.

Although it's our goal to ensure all the information on this website is correct, we cannot guarantee its completeness or its accuracy; nor can we commit to ensuring all the material is kept up-to-date on a daily basis.

Each review is offered in good faith and has been designed to help you make a more informed decision when buying dog food.

However, our rating system is not intended to suggest feeding a particular product will result in specific health benefits for your pet.

For a better understanding of how we analyze each product, please read our article, "The Problem with Dog Food Reviews".

Remember, no dog food can possibly be appropriate for every life stage, lifestyle or health condition. So, choose wisely. And when in doubt, consult a qualified veterinary professional for help.

In closing, we do not accept money, gifts or samples from pet food companies in exchange for special consideration in the preparation of our reviews or ratings.

To learn how we support the cost of operating this website, please visit our public Disclosure and Disclaimer page.

Have an opinion about this dog food? Or maybe the review itself? Please know we welcome your comments.

Notes and Updates

06/15/2010 Original review
01/14/2011 Updated (chelated minerals)
10/19/2012 Review updated
11/02/2013 Review updated
12/30/2012 Rating adjusted to 4.5 stars due to modified protein, fat and carb guidelines for our raw dog food category
11/02/2013 Last Update

  1. Adapted by the Dog Food Advisor from the official definition for chicken published by the American Association of Feed Control Officials, 2008 Edition
  • Mary McCulley

    Nicole…same here, the dehydrated works better for us. Some people think you shouldn’t mix raw and kibble because the rates of digestion are supposed to differ. I don’t think using a small amt. of dehydrated raw is an issue at all. I now have another bag of S&C carnivore crunch (beef) and she’s been fine. Not sure if the duck was just too rich…but she’s had it before. Anyway, all back to normal for now!

  • Kevin Stockfish

    The classic proteins (chicken, beef, lamb, duck and surf & turf) of Stella & Chewy’s FD have 95% meat ingredients. Also they have about 4.6% fruits/vegetables and vitamins/minerals/probiotics make up only about 0.4% of the formulas. On the other hand, the exotic proteins (pheasant, rabbit, venison) have 90% meat ingredients, 5% olive oil as a healthy binder, about 4.6% fruits/vegetables and 0.4% vitamins/minerals/probiotics. Research is key in any decision in figuring out what the best option is for your pet(s). Just because it looks like there is an abundant amount of vitamins/minerals added due to the long list on the label, they only make up about 0.4% of the formulas.

  • Michelle Fichter

    Thanks :)

  • USA Dog Treats

    Thank you!

  • USA Dog Treats

    Hi Michelle

    Sorry to hear about your boy becoming diabetic!

    The first thing I would do is know what his blood sugars are at different times during the day. Test first thing in morning (fasting) before meals (pre-prandial) and 2 hours after meals (post-prandial). This will give you an idea of how he doing on his current regimen.

    Once you get into the habit of home testing his blood sugar you can decide to make a change in his food and or insulin regimen.

    Are you currently testing his blood sugars? How often and when? What are the results?

    What type of insulin (N, NPH, Lantus, etc) is he on.

    What time do you give it and how much do you give?

    Testing his blood sugar is the tool that will allow you to evaluate how your boy is doing no matter what food or insulin he is on. Without this knowledge it is near to impossible to evaluate how his diabetes is being controlled. Remember diabetes is manageable and you are one who will be managing your boy’s diabetes.

    BC nut is right. I subscribe to the Diabetic Dog Food thread on DFA so I get those posts in my email.

  • theBCnut

    If you post questions on the link I left, USA Dog Treats has experience with diabetes and will more likely see your post.

    http://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/frequently-asked-questions/diabetic-dog-food/
    Don’t feel bad about feeding kibble, when every vet everywhere has been telling everybody that kibble is the thing to feed. You have to start somewhere, but at least now you are on the right road. S&C is definitely better than any kibble, but you don’t have to stick with only one flavor and I don’t recommend sticking with only one brand, but with diabetic dogs you do have to be more careful switching foods.

  • Michelle Fichter

    I am such a newbie when it comes to this raw/freeze dried food so please excuse my dumb questions.

    We have been feeding our miniature poodle kibble since he was a baby *hangs head in shame* and haven’t had any issues since. About 6 months ago our 8.5 year old got diagnosed with diabetes. So he was put on Hills Metabolic kibble to reduce his waist size (which has worked perfectly). He is a one dose of insulin a day dog and now more than ever we want to give him the best possible chance at a long and healthy life.

    We know that he will never be cured of his diabetes but if we can make things easier on his organs while digesting his food, give him more nutrients, energy ,and if there is a side benefit of soft/shiny coat and nice teeth then that’s what we want to do.

    What is everyone’s opinion on Stella and Chewy’s freeze dried Dandy Lamb? Should we be using the chicken instead?

    Any info I can get to discuss with my vet I’d appreciate. I want to be fully informed when I chat with him.

    Thanks

  • Nicole

    I should probably point out that while the dehydrated food hasn’t made her sick, she didnt do so well with the frozen medallions. :-/

  • Nicole

    Hi Mary,
    I also have been crumbling S&C dehydrated food (the dandy lamb dinner) in small amounts on my dog’s kibble. I haven’t had any problems so far, but I keep my dog on only two protein sources at a time…currently it’s salmon and lamb. I haven’t had any problems so far. You mention mixing raw and kibble…is this a bad thing to do? I use only 1/4 -1/2 a patty as a tasty topper to boost the nutrition a bit, but I obviously don’t want to make my pup sick. Any advice on that is appreciated. :)

  • http://DogFoodAdvisor.com/ Mike Sagman

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  • http://DogFoodAdvisor.com/ Mike Sagman

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  • Dave

    What you have them on is great. Also try Nature Variety dog food as well as Nutrisource dog food.

  • Deborah Therien

    Also, I won’t be using this brand of dog food, I don’t care how many stars on this site it gets.

  • Deborah Therien

    All the listed ingredients do not seem to be taken into account here. Potassium chloride is the ‘seventh’ ingredient, and sodium phosphate monobasic is the ‘twelfth’ ingredient. Why should these ingredients even be in the dog food, let alone in those prominent areas of listing??? Count them down and you’ll see what I’m talking about. Even the fermentation products on the list are lower down than these two as well as some of the fruits.

  • Mary McCulley

    I have a concern about Stella and Chewys right now. I don’t use it as a primary source to feed my dog…I give her Acana Kibble…but I sometimes sprinkle a little of the dehydrated patties or a couple of pieces of carnivore crunch over her kibble. She’s done fine with this until recently when I got some new CC (duck) that was in a different style bag. She had diarrhea after eating this. Took it away and it stopped, tried it again, and it happened again, so I know that’s the culprit. I have some older bags of the patties, have used them, and no problems. I read on their website they’ve changed their formula and have added some vitamins, minerals, and Taurine…which I’ve read can cause diarrhea if you get too much. Any thoughts on this…and anyone else having any issues with S&C?

    (should add: not interested in a discussion about mixing raw and kibble…it’s a very small amt and she’s had perfect stools up until this event). ;-)

  • Sharon

    Shawna
    Would it help the ratio to add some fresh (cooked) meat to the patty?

  • Kathy15

    Sandy thank you so much. I ordered the weruva grandmas chicken soup, green eggs and chicken and also chicken and duck, she loves it. I would have rather feed raw but finally found something she likes that’s halfway decent. I also made some homemade beef stock to rehydrate the raw with and she will eat a little of the k9 chicken like that. Just received the k9 lamb green tripe formula today so I will try mixing some of that in too. Thanks for your help!

  • Kathy15

    I checked out the ziwipeak canned and it also has carrageenan.

  • Kathy15

    Thanks Nicole. She really doesn’t care for the stella and chewy. She will eat the ziwipeak (jerky style) in the evening.

  • Kathy15

    Thanks! I appreciate it!

  • Pattyvaughn

    As far as comparing foods, wet versus dry, wet foods have all different levels of moisture in them, so if you want a true picture of what you are really paying for, dry matter comparisons are the only way to go, and are what we are used to looking at, so we aren’t confused by them.

  • http://www.dfwpugs.com/ sandy

    I’ve been using freeze dried/dehydrated The Honest Kitchen and Grandma Lucy’s Pureformance lately. These are not raw though but still less processed than kibble. And my 14 yr old loves it!

  • Shawna

    Hi drockasap,

    I’m actually not talking about the overall content of fat in the diet but rather the protein to fat ratio. A general rule of thumb, based on the ancestral diet, when evaluating any food (raw, freeze dried, kibble etc) is that the fat amount should not exceed about 50% of the protein amount. So if protein is 46% than fat should be no more than 23(ish)%. Most freeze dried foods far exceed the 50% guideline making the majority of calories in the diet from fat. This is appropriate for a sled dog but not for most house dogs.

  • drockasap

    Freeze dried is not high in fat. The numbers your are reading are based on dry matter analysis. When you add the proper amount of water back to the product/reconstitute , then the fat % dilutes down significantly. For example if the fat % reads 38% on a freeze dried product then its really about 12-13% fat when reconstituted. wet matter analysis is where its at! that’s the true number…but you have to make sure the water is added back or your relying on your dogs self regulating water intake to offset what’s missing from any dry matter diet.
    I hope this helps.

  • DEB

    Thank you again for your time Shawna. I will take your advice & try a variety of the options you suggested.

  • Nicole Elocin

    I just read some controversy on the HPP – High Pressure Processing of Stella-chewys since is freezed dried (ensuring it kills bacteria however some people question how much of the raw benefits have been altered). There is an entire thread about it – IDK how I feel about it. Unless you cook for your dog, seems its impossible to find a perfect dog food. I do incorporate dog friendly veggies and fruits but need to do it more often.

  • Nicole Elocin

    My little dogs love stella-chewys -raw-freeze dried and Ziwipeak (also has 5 stars). I switch it up for them (they don’t have sensitive stomachs). I buy both stella and ziwipeak from my local organic dog/boutique type of pet stores (never seen those brands sold at chain pet stores). My stores will order it for me since both of those brands fly off the shelf. I also integrate safe people foodc- veggies & fruits in their diets. There are some good dog holistic dogs books on amazon. Ziwipeak has a 5 star can food too . If you make your dogs food – I was told to make sure they get enough calcium in their diet.

  • Nicole Elocin

    My little dogs love stella-chewys -raw-freeze dried and Ziwipeak (also has 5 stars). I switch it up for them (they don’t have sensitive stomachs). I buy both stella and ziwipeak from my local organic dog/boutique type of pet stores (never seen those brands sold at chain pet stores). My stores will order it for me since both of those brands fly off the shelf.

  • Shawna

    No, no, not opposed to the idea of freeze dried at all!!! I just think it’s hard to find adequate variety when so many of the options are REALLY high in fat. With active dogs this is less of a concern but since senior dogs, as a general rule, need more protein than do younger dogs, a diet too high in fat could prevent them from meeting their desired protein needs. Could being the operative word….

    I’m not particularly fond of high pressure pasteurization either but that is hard to get away from even in commercial raw..

    I’m a raw feeder so I do, of course, think raw is “best” but certainly not the only good option.. :) You could, if you desire, use a variety of products and processes — freeze dried, dehydrated premixes with raw or lightly cooked meat, commercial raw, toppers on anything (eggs and sardines are generally good options). The options are endless…

    And no, I don’t think it is ever “too little, too late”!!!!!! :) Your girls are lucky to have you!!

  • DEB

    Thank you Shawna. So it kind of sounds like you’re not a big fan of freeze dried. Would I be better off ordering one of the frozen raw foods? It may be too little too late, but I’m just trying to keep my old girls as healthy as possible for as long as I can. I run them 3 miles about 3 times a week & they are the healthiest looking 13 yr olds I have seen & I’m a dog groomer!

  • http://www.dfwpugs.com/ sandy

    Weruva Human Style (I haven’t looked at their other lines) is on my BPA free list and some of their recipes are carrageenan free too.

  • Kathy15

    Thank you so much for your reply. I am so sorry for your loss.
    She had blood work done at the end of Oct. and the holistic vet I took her to said that her levels were slightly elevated but nothing horrible. I have tried heating the darwins slightly on very low heat, even adding cooked ground turkey. I am going to try healthy dogma today with cubes of beef. It is cooked but I am running out of options. I will check out that facebook site. Thanks again

  • Kathy15

    Sorry hound dog mom, I have been reading so much lately having a hard time keeping it all straight. Do you have any suggestions on canned food without bpa and also carrageenan. Was going to try ziwipeak but they add it. Still having a rough time with the raw. I have since tried answers pork, no luck. OC raw fish flavor no luck. Bravo dehydrated chicken and beef, Stellas venison freeze dried, sojos chicken mixed with cooked chicken breast(this looked pretty good, she kind of picked it apart and ate most of the chicken) I have also tried mixing tripett canned with raw. I just noticed that it has garlic and also the carrageenan in it also. What is your take on garlic? I was adding garlic powder to the water that I was boiling the chicken in, and also sprinkled it on the raw. I didn’t know that it was questionable. Sorry about so many questions, just don’t know where to turn next.

  • Crazy4dogs

    Kathy15, we lost our old boy 80 lb lab/ridgeback mix last year @ 14.5 years old to degenerative myelopathy. He was always a picky eater, even though we fed grain free dry, canned & started him on raw. My choc & black labs adjust to my rotations very well but we had to transition him very carefully. When we first gave him raw (frozen) he would get up and walk away. I think it was just a matter of his being older and not used to it. I finally started cooking it and mixing a bit of cooked ground beef in it. He did eat it and I was able to slowly cook it less, but he only liked it when it was slightly cooked. I know that raw feeders might not agree to cooking but for me, it worked in getting him to eat raw. This might work for your dog. I do feed raw in rotation of 3-4 meals/week since I have big dogs & it’s a bit cost prohibitive for me to feed only raw. Also, a lot of times dogs won’t eat because of kidney failure. They build up a lot of acid and it takes their appetite away. In the final 6 months of my old boys life, his blood panels showed the beginnings of kidney failure. I asked my vet what she had for me besides K/D and she gave me some home cooked recipes. I also joined CRF Dogs on Facebook. They have a lot of information for dog owners in feeding healthy fresh meals for dogs that are in all stages of renal failure. They also include supplements and a lot of help. It helped us keep our dog going. I’m not sure if this would apply to your situation but I thought I saw you post that his kidneys aren’t in the best shape.

  • Shawna

    From what I’ve seen, the issue with freeze dried foods is that they are too high in fat. Fat should not exceed about 50% of the protein amount. So if, on a dry matter basis, protein is 42% than fat ideally should be about 21% (give or take a little each direction). However, since your dogs are active you can get by with a bit higher fat..

    Many of the freeze dried products are also still subjected to high pressure pasteurization. Is that an issue for you? If not, Primal has a freeze dried turkey and sardine that is high in protein 61% and moderate fat 26%. This could be fed with other higher fat products to lower the overall fat of the entire diet. http://www.primalpetfoods.com/product/detail/c/14/id/56

    Stella & Chewy’s chicken (also high pressure pasteurized) is another option at 42% protein and 25% fat. http://www.stellaandchewys.com/dog-driedchicken.php And their Duck Duck Goose might work too. http://www.stellaandchewys.com/dog-driedduck.php

    Nature’s Variety (also HPP) products are all a bit high but if combined with Primal Turkey could work as well. http://www.instinctpetfood.com/instinct-raw-freeze-dried-dogs-and-cats
    Those are the “freeze dried” options I am aware of. Maybe some others know of more.

  • DEB

    Anybody??

  • Pattyvaughn

    Oh well.

  • Hound Dog Mom

    I see it, but I have no idea what it’s about! lol.

  • Kathy15

    I hope so!

  • Pattyvaughn

    Maybe she will see this and know what it is all about.

  • Kathy15

    I cant remember the exact wording but it is a study that is done every other year on odd numbered years. It bugs me now that I can’t go back and find it. Mabey it wasn’t her that posted it.

  • Pattyvaughn

    You mean Hound Dog Mom, but I don’t even have a guess what “best dog foods on odd numbered years” is referring to.

  • Kathy15

    I was just reading a post by someone that listed the best dog foods on odd numbered years. Now I cant find it. Can anyone help? I believe it was the lady with the 3 bloodhounds?

  • DEB

    Looking to replace half my two old girls (13) diets with a freeze dried product. Will need to have it shipped as I’m in outback MT. What’s best protein to fat ratio?. My dogs are active. An Aussie & a Chessie. They are currently eating Wellness Core Dry & I add water & K9 Power ShowStopper supplement. Any help would be appreciated.

  • Kathy15

    Are any of these HPP?

  • Kathy15

    I haven’t tried raw or canned tripe but I did buy some of the Dr. Harvey’s power patties(dehydrated tripe). She seemed to like it, but today I gave her one and it layed there for an hour or 2 before she ate it. I will try to hydrate it and mix it with some of her food. Tried the darwins again tonight with some garlic powder and cheese on it, slightly warmed on the stove but no luck again.

  • Kathy15

    I don’t think I want to fast her. She’s 14(aprox) and I would feel terribly guilty. She was eating Merrick canned grammys pot pie and turducken. (when she felt like it).I was also giving her some blue kibble. Unfortunately she has always gotten some (not a lot) people food also. She had some intestinal inflammation and was put on steroids and antibiotics at the beginning of October. Of course on the steroids, her appetite was out of control. Now she is back to being really picky.

  • Kathy15

    I will try it!

  • beaglemom

    I also thought last night about how occasionally people suggest fasting the dog for a little bit (12-24 hrs) during the transition to raw – the hungrier the dog the more likely he/she is to try something new. I personally couldn’t do this because my dogs know how to push my buttons (ie. huuuge puppy eyes, lol) but figured I’d throw it out there…

    I’m also curious – what food DOES she like to eat?

  • Shawna

    Carb of a raw diet is usually around 25 to 30%. I like closer to 25 but wouldn’t rule out those with a little higher as long as the carbs are veggies and a small amount of fruits. Protein will likely range from 40(ish) to low 50′s depending on what meat is used etc.
    For a picky dog —– I’d personally try THOROUGHLY mixing some canned, or better yet raw, tripe with whatever raw you are trying to get her to eat. You can gradually lower the amount of tripe and see if she will accept the raw without it..

  • Pattyvaughn

    Some dogs really appreciate a sprinkling of parmesan cheese.

  • Kathy15

    Oh no problem. All of the info is a little bit overwhelming. I’m not sure what to try next. What is the ideal fat / protein / carb / ratio? I did boil some plain chicken with a little garlic powder and hydrated the stella beef patty with that and also put a little of the shredded chicken with it and she did eat it but she doesn’t seem crazy about it. I think she was actually just trying to get all the chicken. I guess she may adjust over time. I am going to try Darwins again because I still have quite a bit left. Mabey mix that with some shredded chicken? Any info / comments are appreciated!

  • Shawna

    Hi Kathy15,

    So sorry I missed your post yesterday… I am in the US so I am evaluating the freeze dried option.

    Crucifers are cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, kale etc. Raw crucifers can contribute to thyroid issues by blocking the uptake of iodine (which the thyroid absolutely needs for proper health).

    That said, raw crucifers are also known to prevent cancer.. So you definitely don’t want to cut them from the diet completely. So, to get the benefits for cancer without contributing to thyroid problems, eat/feed raw crucifers no more than 3 to 4 times per week. If one were to only feed this brand of food there is no way they could do that.

    The fat content of the chicken variety is just a teeny tiny bit high. Ideal is — fat should not exceed 50% of the protein. So if protein is 41.3 (as in the chicken variety), fat should be 20.65 (22 is close enough)…

    Hope that helps :).. Sorry, again, for the delayed response.

  • Sugar

    I just posted to you again, I guess you got it.

  • Sugar

    Kathy15 only the Beef and the Lamb are high on fat. The chicken is fine.
    That is why I recommended the chicken to you and nothing else. Because when you have an older dog you may want to watch the fat content, it depends.
    Shawna pointed out the beef and lamb only and perhaps should have mentioned the foods that are fine.

  • Sugar

    There are herbal tinctures you can give to her to support the kidneys.

  • beaglemom

    What I said applies to frozen raw — but you said you’d gotten the freeze-dried so don’t worry. :)

  • beaglemom

    I agree – it’s fine to feed dry but better to rehydrate — dogs need and benefit from the moisture in their diet. It’s not as big of an issue here as it is with say, kibble, but it’s still better for them to consume food with moisture whenever possible.

  • beaglemom

    Shawna (a regular here) is an expert on all things kidney so maybe she can weigh in here.

  • Kathy15

    Also with Darwins, I was worried about the sea salt. Her kidney function isn’t quite up to par.

  • Sugar

    it is better to hydrate them but it is also ok the companies say to feed them dry. The K 9 has blood in it and stronger taste.

  • Sugar

    Same here. Only the dehydrated Stellas they eat!

  • Kathy15

    Sorry I didn’t see your post until after I posted to Shawna.

  • Kathy15

    Gosh with that being said I’m almost scared to feed her the k9.

  • Kathy15

    This may sound stupid but I am new to all of this. What is crucifers? I ordered the chicken. What is your take on the fat content?