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Spot and Tango UnKibble Dog Food Review (Dry)

Mike Sagman  Julia Ogden

By Mike Sagman & Julia Ogden

Updated: April 18, 2024

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Our Verdict

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Spot and Tango UnKibble Dog Food earns The Advisor’s second-highest tier rating of 4.5 stars.

The Spot and Tango UnKibble product line includes the 3 dry dog foods listed below.

Each recipe includes its AAFCO nutrient profile: Growth (puppy), Maintenance (adult), All Life Stages, Supplemental or Unspecified.

Product line Rating AAFCO
Spot and Tango UnKibble Cod and Salmon 4.5 A
Spot and Tango UnKibble Beef and Barley 4.5 A
Spot and Tango UnKibble Chicken and Brown Rice 4.5 A

Recipe and Label Analysis

Spot and Tango UnKibble Chicken and Brown Rice was selected to represent the other products in the line for detailed recipe and nutrient analysis.

Spot and Tango Unkibble Chicken and Brown Rice

Estimated Dry Matter Nutrient Content

27.7%

Protein

17.1%

Fat

47.2%

CarbsCarbohydrates

Chicken, brown rice, sweet potatoes, carrots, apples, kale, chicken liver, chicken gizzard, sunflower seeds, ginger root, kelp, salt, mixed tocopherols (natural source of vitamin E) cellulose powder, fish oil, l-tryptophan, choline chloride, organic zinc proteinate, potassium chloride, rosemary extract and mixed tocopherols, iron amino acid chelate, vitamin E supplement, organic selenium yeast, calcium carbonate, beet, tomato, broccoli, carrot, spinach, orange, cherry, cranberry, strawberry, apple, blueberry, pumpkin, riboflavin, pyridoxine hydrochloride, folic acid


Fiber (estimated dry matter content) = 2.5%

Red denotes any controversial items

Ingredients Analysis

The first ingredient in this dog food is chicken. Although it is a quality item, raw chicken contains up to 73% water. After dehydrating, most of that moisture is lost, reducing the meat content to just a fraction of its original weight.

After processing, this item would probably account for a smaller part of the total content of the finished product.

The second ingredient is brown rice, a complex carbohydrate that (once cooked) can be fairly easy to digest. However, aside from its natural energy content, rice is of only modest nutritional value to a dog.

The third ingredient is sweet potato. Sweet potatoes are a gluten-free source of complex carbohydrates in dog food. They are naturally rich in dietary fiber and beta carotene.

The fourth ingredient includes carrots. Carrots are rich in beta-carotene, minerals and dietary fiber.

The fifth ingredient is apple, a nutrient-rich fruit that’s also high in fiber.

The sixth ingredient is kale. Kale is a type of cabbage in which the central leaves do not form a head. This dark green vegetable is especially rich in beta-carotene, vitamins C, vitamin K and calcium.

And like broccoli, kale contains sulforaphane, a natural chemical believed to possess potent anti-cancer properties.

The seventh ingredient is chicken liver, an organ meat sourced from a named animal and thus considered a beneficial component.

The eighth ingredient is chicken gizzard. The gizzard is a low-fat, meaty organ found in the digestive tract of birds and assists in grinding up a consumed food. This item is considered a canine dietary delicacy.

The ninth ingredient lists sunflower seeds, a good source of plant-based fatty acids that are also rich in vitamins, minerals and dietary fiber.

From here, the list goes on to include a number of other items.

But to be realistic, ingredients located this far down the list (other than nutritional supplements) are not likely to affect the overall rating of this product.

With 5 notable exceptions

First, we find powdered cellulose, a non-digestible plant fiber usually made from the by-products of vegetable processing. Except for the usual benefits of fiber, powdered cellulose provides no nutritional value to a dog.

Next, we note the inclusion of fish oil. Fish oil is naturally rich in the prized EPA and DHA type of omega-3 fatty acids. These two high quality fats boast the highest bio-availability to dogs and humans.

Depending on its level of freshness and purity, fish oil should be considered a commendable addition.

In addition, we find no mention of probiotics, friendly bacteria applied to the surface of the kibble after processing to help with digestion.

Next, this recipe contains selenium yeast. Unlike the more common inorganic form of selenium (sodium selenite), this natural yeast supplement is considered a safer anti-cancer alternative.

And lastly, this food includes chelated minerals, minerals that have been chemically attached to protein. This makes them easier to absorb. Chelated minerals are usually found in better dog foods.

Nutrient Analysis

Based on its ingredients alone, Spot and Tango UnKibble looks like an above-average dry dog food.

The dashboard displays a dry matter protein reading of 31%, a fat level of 23% and estimated carbohydrates of about 38%.

As a group, the brand features an average protein content of 29% and a mean fat level of 19%. Together, these figures suggest a carbohydrate content of 45% for the overall product line.

And a fat-to-protein ratio of about 66%.

Above-average protein. Above-average fat. And below-average carbs when compared to a typical dry dog food.

Free of any plant-based protein boosters, this looks like the profile of a dry dog food containing a notable amount of meat.

Our Rating of Spot and Tango Dry Dog Food

Spot and Tango UnKibble is a dry dog food using a notable amount of named meats as its dominant source of animal protein, thus earning the brand 4.5 stars.

Please note certain recipes are sometimes given a higher or lower rating based upon our estimate of their total meat content and (when appropriate) their fat-to-protein ratios.

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Highly Recommended

A Final Word

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