Butternut Box Dog Food Review (Fresh-Cooked)

Julia Ogden

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Julia Ogden
Julia Ogden

Julia Ogden

Content Director

Julia is the content director at the Dog Food Advisor and responsible for the overall strategy of the website.

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Updated: May 1, 2024

Verified by Laura Ward

Laura Ward

Laura Ward

Pet Nutritionist

Laura studied BSc (Hons) Animal Science with an accreditation in Nutrition at the University of Nottingham, before working for eight years in the pet food and nutrition industry.

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Laura Ward

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Pork This Way Butternut Fresh Dog Food

Rating:
star
star
star
star
star

Which Butternut Box Fresh-Cooked Recipes Get Our Best Ratings?

Butternut Box Dog Food earns The Advisor’s top rating of 5 stars.

The Butternut Box product line includes the 11 fresh-cooked dog foods listed below.

Each recipe includes its AAFCO nutrient profile when available… Growth (puppy), Maintenance (adult), All Life Stages, Supplemental or Unspecified.

Product Rating AAFCO
Butternut Box Beef it Up 3.5 U
Butternut Box Chicken You Out 5 U
Butternut Box Gobble Gobble Turkey 5 U
Butternut Box Wham Bam Lamb 3 U
Butternut Box Pork This Way 5 U
Butternut Box Duo of Duck and Chicken 4.5 U
Butternut Box Salmon to Love 5 U
Butternut Box Pork of the Town 5 U
Butternut Box Tuck in Chicken 5 U
Butternut Box Ready Steady Veggie 3 U
Butternut Box Plant Get Enough not rated U

Recipe and Label Analysis

Butternut Box Pork This Way was selected to represent the other products in the line for detailed recipe and nutrient analysis.

Label and nutrient data below are calculated using dry matter basis.


Butternut Box Pork This Way

Estimated Dry Matter Nutrient Content

38.7%

Protein

25.8%

Fat

27.5%

CarbsCarbohydrates

Freshly prepared pork 60% (minced pork, pork heart, pork liver), carrots, split red lentils, butternut squash, green beans, broccoli, cauliflower, brewers yeast, minerals, ground flaxseed, dried sage, nutritional additives (per kg): vitamin D3 150iu, vitamin E 40mg, zinc (as zinc chelate of protein hydrolysates) 25mg, iron (as iron (ii) chelate of protein hydrolysates) 15mg, manganese (as manganese chelate of protein hydrolysates) 2.5mg, copper (as copper (ii) chelate of amino acids hydrate) 2.5mg, iodine (as calcium iodate anhydrous) 0.7mg


Fiber (estimated dry matter content) = 0.4%

Red denotes any controversial items

Estimated Nutrient Content
Method Protein Fat Carbs
Guaranteed Analysis 12% 8% NA
Dry Matter Basis 39% 26% 28%
Calorie Weighted Basis 30% 49% 21%

Ingredient Analysis

The first ingredient in this dog food is pork. Pork can be defined as “the clean flesh derived from slaughtered pork” and includes skeletal muscle or the muscle tissues of the tongue, diaphragm, heart or esophagus.1

This item includes pork heart. Although it doesn’t sound very appetizing to us humans, heart tissue is pure muscle — all meat. It’s naturally rich in quality protein, minerals and complex B vitamins, too.

And pork liver is an organ meat sourced from a named animal and thus considered a beneficial component.

Pork is naturally rich in all ten essential amino acids required by a dog to sustain life.

The second ingredient includes carrots. Carrots are rich in beta-carotene, minerals and dietary fiber.

The third ingredient lists lentils. Lentils are a quality source of carbohydrates. Plus (like all legumes) they’re rich in natural fiber.

However, lentils contain about 25% protein, a factor that must be considered when judging the actual meat content of this dog food.

The fifth ingredient is squash. Squash is a nutritious addition high in complex carbohydrates, vitamins, minerals and dietary fiber.

The sixth ingredient includes green beans, a healthy vegetable notable for its vitamin, mineral and natural fiber content.

The seventh ingredient is broccoli. Broccoli is a healthy green vegetable and a member of the kale family. It’s notably rich in vitamin C and fiber and numerous other nutrients.

Like other cruciferous vegetables, broccoli is believed to provide anti-cancer benefits.

From here, the list goes on to include a number of other items.

But to be realistic, ingredients located this far down the list (other than nutritional supplements) are not likely to affect the overall rating of this product.

With 3 notable exceptions

First, we find brewers yeast, which can be a controversial item. Although it’s a by-product of the beer making process, this ingredient is rich in minerals and other healthy nutrients.

Fans believe yeast repels fleas and supports the immune system.

Critics argue yeast ingredients can be linked to allergies. This may be true, but (like all allergies) only if your particular dog is allergic to the yeast itself.

In addition, a vocal minority insists yeast can increase the risk of developing the life-threatening condition known as bloat. However, this is a claim we’ve not been able to scientifically verify.

In any case, unless your dog is specifically allergic to it, yeast can still be considered a nutritious additive.

What’s more noteworthy here is that brewers yeast contains about 48% protein, a factor that must be considered when judging the actual meat content of this dog food.

Next, flaxseed is one of the best plant sources of healthy omega-3 fatty acids. Provided they’ve first been ground into a meal, flax seeds are also rich in soluble fiber.

However, flaxseed contains about 19% protein, a factor that must be considered when judging the actual meat content of this dog food.

And lastly, this food contains chelated minerals, minerals that have been chemically attached to protein. This makes them easier to absorb. Chelated minerals are usually found in better dog foods.

Nutrient Analysis

Based on its ingredients alone, Butternut Box looks like an above-average moist dog food.

The dashboard displays a dry matter protein reading of 39%, a fat level of 26% and estimated carbohydrates of about 28%.

As a group, the brand features an average protein content of 40% and a mean fat level of 24%. Together, these figures suggest a carbohydrate content of 28% for the overall product line.

And a fat-to-protein ratio of about 61%.

Above-average protein. Near-average fat. And near-average carbs when compared to a typical wet dog food.

When you consider the protein-boosting effect of the lentils, brewers yeast and flaxseed, this looks like the profile of a wet dog food containing a notable amount of meat.

Our Rating of Butternut Box Fresh-Cooked Dog Food

Butternut Box is a fresh-cooked then frozen dog food using a notable amount of named meats and organs as its dominant source of animal protein, thus earning the brand 5 stars.

Enthusiastically recommended.

Please note certain recipes are sometimes given a higher or lower rating based upon our estimate of their total meat content and (when appropriate) their fat-to-protein ratios.

Frequently Asked Questions


How much is Butternut Box a month?

The cost of Butternut Box varies depending on your meal plan size and delivery frequency. Based on our findings, Butternut Box will typically cost upwards of £70 per month but you can keep costs down if you choose to top up your dog food with cheaper, high quality kibble.


Where is Butternut Box based?

Butternut Box is based in London, England.


Is Butternut Box expensive?

Butternut Box is not overly expensive when compared to other fresh dog food brands. The cost of the meals depends on the size of the dog and the number of meals ordered but generally, Butternut Box costs between £2.50 to £3.50 per meal.


Is Butternut Box vet approved?

Yes, Butternut Box is vet approved which is one of the most important things we look for in a dog food brand. According to their website, Butternut Box works closely with veterinary nutritionists to create balanced meals for dogs that meet the nutritional requirements of the Association of American Feed Control Officials (AAFCO).


Can you mix Butternut Box with kibble?

Yes, you can absolutely mix Butternut Box with kibble. However, it’s important to carefully select any accompanying kibble to make sure the kibble you’re using is nutritionally complete and tailored for your dog’s age, size and activity level.


Is Butternut Box good for dogs?

Yes, we feel Butternut Box is a great option for dogs as proven in our review. It’s a subscription-based service that provides freshly cooked meals tailored to your dog’s individual needs. The meals are made with natural, human-grade ingredients and are free from artificial additives, preservatives, and fillers.


Do Butternut Box offer discounts?

Butternut Box regularly offers discounts for new customers, so check our review above. We’ve even included a mega 25% off your first 2 boxes!


Butternut Box Dog Food Recall History

The following automated list (if present) includes all dog food recalls related to Butternut Box through July.

No recalls noted

You can view a complete list of all dog food recalls since 2009 here.

Get Free Recall Alerts

Get free dog food recall alerts sent to you by email. Subscribe to The Advisor’s recall notification list.

Sources

1: Adapted by the Dog Food Advisor from the official definition of meat by the Association of American Feed Control Officials

A Final Word

The Dog Food Advisor does not accept money, gifts, samples or other incentives in exchange for special consideration in preparing our reviews.

However, we do receive a referral fee from online retailers (like Chewy or Amazon) and from sellers of perishable pet food when readers click over to their websites from ours. This helps cover the cost of operation of our free blog. Thanks for your support.

For more information, please visit our Disclaimer and Disclosure page.

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