People Foods That Can Be Dangerous to Dogs

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Some foods that are edible for humans can pose serious health risks for dogs. Although many of these foods cause only minor digestive issues, others can lead to severe illness — even death.

Here’s a list of some of the more common or controversial people foods dogs should never eat.

  • Avocado
  • Alcoholic beverages
  • Bones (cooked)
  • Chocolate
  • Coffee
  • Currants
  • Fatty trimmings
  • Fruit pits
  • Garlic
  • Grapes
  • Macadamia Nuts
  • Marijuana
  • Mushrooms
  • Onions
  • Raisins
  • Tea
  • Tobacco
  • Yeast dough
  • Xylitol sweetener

Did We Forget Something?

In the comments section below, please let us know if you’re aware of any toxic human foods that should be included on this list.

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  • el doctor

    Hi Leena

    For a balanced look at the possible benefits and risks of feeding garlic to dogs, there is an article here on DFA you might take a look at!

    http://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/red-flag-ingredients/dog-food-garlic/

  • aimee

    I must be missing it I’m only seeing that a sheep intestinal parasite was tested. Also if I’m reading this right it seems to me the control should have been methanol not saline.

  • Shawna

    Yep, meant in vitro. However it is the adult worm I was referring to not the larva (microfiliria).

    This is the test I was referring to however when I first found the article it stated Dirofilaria immitis, now helminths. I have the paper buried in my email somewhere. Here they state “worm” so I assume it is the worm. “The number of worms dead at 6 h PE to various plant extracts was compared statistically” http://www.fspublishers.org/published_papers/9174_..pdf

  • aimee

    They prevent the development of larva into adult heartworns. I don’t recall larva ever being referred to as heartworms

    To clarify I’m quite sure you have your in vivo and in vitro mixed up. in vivo means “in life”, in vitro “in glass”

    You’ve previous posted in vitro studies not in vivo.

  • Shawna

    Neither has preventatives despite their name. They don’t “prevent” either. :)

    Garlic has been shown to kill heartworms in vivo but I agree I haven’t seen anything in vitro, at least that I remember. I do wonder however due to garlics antibacterial benefits if it kills wolbachia? My guess would be yes but I think it’s too new to see research one way or the other.

  • aimee

    Leena,
    It appears you have been greatly misinformed! Garlic is not a great substitution for a heartworm preventative as it has never been shown to prevent your dog from getting heartworms.

  • Leena

    Garlic is a natural anti-parasitic for dog… It a great substitution for the heart worm pill. My dog (Rottie) had a bad allergic reaction to some of the filler… And ever since then we have being giving him half a clove twice a week and NEVER had an issues. The vet even said he’s a healthy happy boy… It also even keeps fleas and ticks away and super inexpensive!

  • Itsdatruth

    Please Josh DO NOT feed your dog grapes. I fed mine peeled grapes, not even that many, and she died from kidney failure. I reckon the reason she wouldn’t eat them with the skin on was she knew they were not good for her. It’s pretty hard knowing you killed your best friend through ignorance.

  • Dori

    I agree with you about a bit of explanation would be more helpful. I’ve been on this site a number of years now and I cannot tell you how many people post on the review site for a dog food that contains avocado’s that “Oh I thought avocados are poisonous or toxic” why are they in the food why do they have whatever amount of stars it has. It’s exhausting!!!!!! We all have to answer the same questions over and over and over again. Same thing with people that think it’s okay to throw an apple on the ground for their dog to eat and then wonder why their dog is at the emergency vet. Over a peach or apricots or what have you. Got to answer those posters again and again and again. I’ll never understand why people don’t just google and find out if something you’ve decided to give your dog is okay. They usually think because their dog likes it and eats it it’s a good thing, no harm no foul. Dogs also like anti-freeze. Not a good thing.

  • Some Pets

    I think you definitely hit upon the main problem with lists like this. They tend to be too generic. It would be better if it had a bit of explanation by each item. I too prefer to find more in depth sources.

  • Dori

    I like Dr. Basko and read his blogs quite a bit.

  • Dori

    Though a lot of mushrooms are perfectly safe (probably most actually) and, in fact, I feed medicinal mushrooms to one of my dogs with multiple cancers; I’m not sure how Dr. Mike would be able to contain the list of safe ones and the unsafe ones since there are literally thousands of species. I guess the safest way with an ingredient like mushrooms is just add it to the list. I think, possibly, if it’s not on the list people walking their dogs would think it perfectly acceptable and safe to eat any old mushroom they come across while hiking in the woods. Some are but some are not. That’s my only assumption as to why they’re on this list. It’s like avocados. The avocado is not a health risk, but the pit is. But under that premise, why aren’t peaches and apples on this list. Hmmmm? The more I think about this the more problematic this list is becoming to me. I don’t look at this list for guidance. I go on line and check anything I’m in doubt about multiple times on different holistic and homeopathic sites that I like and also get advice from homeopathic and integrative vets that I trust.

  • Dori

    If you or your dog has mold, mildew, fungus allergies then mushrooms being a fungi should not be fed.

  • Some Pets

    A good and very complete article on mushrooms, including various concerns with them (such as allergies) is here: http://www.drbasko.com/site/pets-mushrooms-health-benefits/

  • Some Pets

    I just take issue with seeing them listed among dangerous items, when they generally are not.

  • Dori

    None of the foods on this list are here because of choking hazards, they’re all here because they can be toxic to animals. Personally I think the list should be updated to include apple seeds, pits from fruits and avocados in moderation are fine as you will find avocado in some dog foods, BUT not the pit. Most seeds and pits of fruits are extremely toxic to animals.

  • Dori

    Mushrooms should be avoided if you have a dog with allergies. Just sayin.

  • Some Pets

    Mushrooms safe for humans are OK for dogs. It is wild mushrooms that should not be given (just as humans should be cautious with those too unless they know what they are doing)

  • Crazy4dogs

    Please don’t feed your dogs grapes. DogFoodie is absolutely correct!

  • Josh

    oh I didn’t know that

  • DogFoodie

    Grapes are dangerous for dogs and have been associated with the development of kidney disease. Dogs shouldn’t eat grapes at all. It sounds as though you think they might just be a choking hazard, but that’s very far from accurate.

  • Josh

    I think it’s ok if your dog eat grape but cut in half because my dog cant eat whole grapes so I chop em

  • Dog_Obsessed

    That is super interesting, thanks!

  • Timbeans

    right, and definitely about our society. for many people there is honestly no real solution, its just that way. not that there isn’t or wouldn’t be some scenario out there that would make their lives feel worthwhile, but, finding that thing would be extremely arduous and weighing on unlikely. For the majority of our human history, we weren’t living in cities, we lived in the forests of the world. things like ADD or ADHD while i’m sure very rare relative to the size of the human population then, would have been an advantage in that scenario. This idea of ‘mental disease’ is a misnomer, because the one’s making these types of diagnosis are making them from the point of view of ‘higher society’. where everyone is placed into some synthetic paradigm, and if you don’t ‘fit’ then something is wrong with you, and you are outcast(or placed on some drug to numb you up and make you a zombie). The issues do not reside in the people, they reside in this crazy way we live, dictated by the very few. but i’m sure you understand much of that. thanks for talking :)

  • theBCnut

    Of course, you are right. The people I know/knew that use/used pot had serious issues and pot was their way of coping instead of looking for real answers. One of them is long dead. Pot was a gateway to bigger and badder stuff. Another is a gourmet chef that can’t hold it together and keep his own dream job. Another is probably undiagnosed ADHD, I think getting a diagnosis is a much more legit treatment option, even if he keeps using. And I don’t find using alcohol to self medicate any better, BTW. I think our culture is pretty sick there.

  • theBCnut

    I’m actually pro medical marijuana. I know too many people who could greatly benefit from it, my aunt being one of them. But I’m not pro making it easier to abuse.
    Border Collies, potato chips, who knew?

  • Shawna

    Hi Dog_Obsessed,

    The ingredient is not actually the problem with french fries (in humans or dogs) but rather the way they are cooked makes them cancer causing (just like charring meats). http://www.dogcancerblog.com/blog/dog-food-is-there-a-cancer-risk/

    That said, a single french fry here and there isn’t going to be problematic.

  • Shawna

    Interestingly, in my opinion at least, there is quite a lot of research on the benefits of some of the compounds in marijuana (specifically CBD as mentioned above). Google scholar has more than I care to read on the anti-inflammatory affects alone. http://scholar.google.com/scholar?q=cannabis+CBD+anti-inflammatory&btnG=&hl=en&as_sdt=0%2C28

    And also interesting, in my opinion, is that gluten (in wheat, barley etc) has been shown to damage brains in susceptible individuals (specifically the brains white matter). More recently dairy has been shown to do the same by the way. ” MRI revealed atrophy of the cerebellum in 79% and white matter hyperintensities in 19%. Forty‐five percent of patients had neurophysiological evidence of a sensorimotor axonal neuropathy….. Gluten ataxia is therefore the single most common cause of sporadic idiopathic ataxia. Antigliadin antibody testing is essential at first presentation of patients with sporadic ataxia.” http://brain.oxfordjournals.org/content/126/3/685

    For the record, I am not advocating the illegal use of marijuana but there definitely has been some research demonstrating it’s benefits when used therapeutically.

  • Shawna

    There actually is (and has been) some pretty interesting research on cannabis. Here’s some data regarding cancer from cancer.gov website (CBD is the compound the above poster is discussing).

    “Cannabinoids are a group of 21-carbon–containing terpenophenolic compounds produced uniquely by Cannabis species (e.g., Cannabis sativa L.) .[1,2] These plant-derived compounds may be referred to as phytocannabinoids. Although delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the primary psychoactive ingredient, other known compounds with biologic activity are cannabinol, cannabidiol (CBD), cannabichromene, cannabigerol, tetrahydrocannabivarin, and delta-8-THC. CBD, in particular, is thought to have significant analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity without the psychoactive effect (high) of delta-9-THC.” http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/pdq/cam/cannabis/healthprofessional/page4

    Edit — I have, completely legal, essential oil called “balsam copaiba” made from the cannabis plant that I am using to treat my Shih Tzu’s inflamed joint. Working beautifully. Here’s some info on the essential oil (this is not the brand I use – http://younglivingconnect.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/Scientists-Discover-Healing-Power-of-Copaiba.pdf)

  • Timbeans

    i’m rreeaallyy not trying to be rude or project anything, but, animals really aren’t ‘stupid’ as we make them out to be, especially relative to the natural world. their noses are incredibly sensitive. a man made product is one thing, but, for things that have existed in the natural world, they have a genetic makeup that would allow them to recognize these things, what they are, and what that would do for them. i’m not saying this is what it is, but.. there are plenty of instances were animals, or, in this particular case, dogs have committed suicide..

  • Timbeans

    “never did anything with their life” is relative. considerate to most human ambition causing some degree of destruction. However, what was written above and what you wrote are entirely different. i’m sure their brains held the same or very similar capacity. a lazy person that uses this substance is still going to be lazy. lastly, it sounds like they may have had some psychological issues and they were using this substance as an escape. we have a socially accepted version of this called alcoholism, only that actually destroys multiple organs in the body, and has high correlation with violent behavior.

    stigmatic beliefs and the truth will always be in contradiction.

  • theBCnut

    I’ve never read any studies on it, but I sure have known some potheads that never did anything with their life because smoking weed was the only thing they really cared about. I would consider that reducing gray matter.

  • Timbeans

    false, maybe ‘reducing’ left brain dominance and as our society functions ‘negative connotations’ could be drawn from that i guess, but, harmful hardly, quite the opposite.

    The information in which you are drawing your conclusion comes from the US gov funded propaganda going way back. they pumped pure smoke into a mask fitted to a monkey, as, no additional oxygen. …they suffocated the animals. as it turns out, oxygen deprivation causes cell death in the brain..

  • OLD PIZZA

    Yeah, it does great job of reducing your gray matter.

  • OLD PIZZA

    It’s ok to give dogs store bought mushrooms.

  • http://atozpetcare.com A to Z pet care

    Unfortunately, many people don’t realize that what is good for them has the potential to be harmful to dogs. The typical thinking is it works for me, so it should work for my dog. I have many people asking me whether it is good idea to give ibuprofen to dogs. Nope, its a very bad idea. I wrote a long article on why it can be dangerous on my blog. http://atozpetcare.com/can-i-give-my-dog-ibuprofen/

  • Dori

    Oh Lord. Please tell me you’re kidding and this is a joke question. I myself love to partake McDonald’s french fries once in a blue moon but for any of my dogs. NO! Absolutely not! If your dog inadvertently snuck a fry from McDonald’s then, no it’s not the end of the world but it is not a food that should be given when you go through McDonalds. Unhealthy or canines to say the very least.

  • Dog_Obsessed

    There is no ingredient in french fries that is particularly harmful to dogs, but all the oil, fat, and salt is definitely not good for them. And the ones form McDonalds are probably spiked with all sorts of chemicals. It wouldn’t be the end of the world if a dog got a single french fry, but it would not be good to feed a dog them frequently, so skip ’em. There are plenty healthy dog treats on the market.

    Edit: Here is a more complete answer from canigivemydog.com : http://canigivemydog.com/french-fries

  • hector

    What about French fries from McDonald’s

  • Dog_Obsessed

    Were they human-safe mushrooms? If so, they shouldn’t cause a problem. It is some kinds of wild mushrooms, the ones that are also toxic to humans, that are toxic.

  • Heather Meachum

    My dog got into the trash and ate spaghetti that had mushrooms in it

  • http://theuglypugglyboutique.com/ sandy

    Preferably without the onions and soy sauce.

  • Nadeen Alderman

    can a dog eat a pork eggroll?

  • Dog_Obsessed

    Dairy, especially in large amounts, can cause stomach upset in some dogs. It’s not poisonous though. It would be similar to a person being lactose intolerant. Again, this is only in some dogs.

  • Dog_Obsessed

    The core is also bad, for the same reason as the seeds, and also a choking hazard. The rest of the apple should be fine though, including the peel.

  • Amanda

    Apples are safe, the seeds can be poisonous since they contain arsenic, but the rest of the apple is fine. May cause gas though, so only a little at first until you know. I can toss an entire cored apple to my dog, she’s been eating them for 7 years.

  • floridagirl83

    My dog loves apple peelings does anyone know if they are harmful to dogs. Thank you

  • cyndishisara

    Yes, sorry I am so (mentally) slow. I would think people from India would have something to say on the subject. They must feed their dogs curry all the time with no ill effect. I guess I have been initially fear struck about peoples cautions (do not remember where I saw them) about turmeric and ginger. I wish I could focus on how to season my dogs food to make it tasty for her.

  • theBCnut

    And that’s exactly my point. There is research done on foods that are bad, but they don’t bother to do research on ones that are not a problem. People just use them and no one reports that it killed their dog, because it didn’t. As far as therapeutic dosing of turmeric and ginger, they are used in the same dosages as they are for people. A 100 lb dog would be given a full dose, a 50 lb dog would be given a half dose, a 25 lb dog would be given a quarter dose. If you need a paper to prove it, good luck. They may be out there, but I haven’t seen them. Sometimes you can find some research done on people, but that doesn’t mean it applies to dogs, especially if good science matters to you.

  • cyndishisara

    Of course, I was referring to information on turmeric and maybe ginger. I can look for myself. With xylitol, garlic, onions, chocolate, macadamia nuts, and avocadoes (persin) there is research showing ill effects.

  • Lynne Tighe-Boland

    I don’t see dairy on the list, but have heard it is a problem for dogs.

  • theBCnut

    I haven’t seen a study proving that beef or chicken are safe for dogs to eat, but we feed them beef and chicken all the time and they don’t die from it, so even though I don’t have a study, I know it’s OK to feed. Sometimes common sense has to prevail.

  • Dori

    Dogs should not be fed onions.

  • cyndishisara

    Thank you. I will try it. But remember science is about research that keeps all factors the same and alters one. No ensure this the sampling issue (a large # of dogs so are studied to factor out genetic variability and pre-existing health conditions are not include) and a control group is needed.

  • cyndishisara

    To whom? Are you brainwashed by the eighty years of propaganda that goes on even until this day?

  • theBCnut

    The amount that would cause noticeable problems is different for every dog. It depends on several different factors.
    The amount that you would have on your fingers and that would come off on something else is negligible, so not a problem.

  • janet1111

    does cross contamination make a dog sick like if you peel an onion and then touch their toy can they get sick and how much onion do they have to ingest in order to get sick.

  • theBCnut

    Actually, onions in any amount are toxic to dogs, just not deadly. They cause a reaction in dogs that destroys red blood cells. If only a few RBCs are destroyed then you will never notice. But if enough are destroyed, the dog can not recover. Some dogs seem to be more susceptible than others, but all are affected.

  • Jared French

    Very small amounts of fresh onion is not toxic. Cut onions, however, are very efficient at absorbing toxins from the air or whatever else they touch. This is why they can be dangerous, not only to dogs, but also to humans, if not eaten shortly after being cut.

  • Susan

    In Australia people have been taking heap oil & its supose to do wonders, for cancer patients,epilepsy, etc now they are trying to pass something thru government, so it can be bought legally from a chemist with a prescription…

  • Timbeans

    quite the opposite. look up Dr Courtney’s research on that topic. raw cannabis is an amazing medicinal plants. its raw forms are much different that heated ones. also, CBD, found in the plant, shows great medicinal potential.

  • Abby Lawless

    isn’t eating mirjuana bad anyway O.o anyway what about onion powder seasoning on a bit of hamburger?

  • ryanna

    Ok thanks

  • http://www.dfwpugs.com/ sandy

    MSG in soy sauce can be problematic. It can potentially be addicting and is an excitotoxin according to Dr Russell Blaylock. You can read more about it his book “Excitotoxins The Taste That Kills”.

  • ryanna

    Whst about soy sauce

  • Pat C.

    Broccoli: Give no more than 5% of a dogs daily food intake! 25% can be fatal. – source: http://www.candogseat-this.com/can-dogs-eat-broccoli/

  • Dog_Obsessed

    Your welcome!

  • losthope

    Thank you!

  • Dog_Obsessed

    I’m so sorry for your loss. Please don’t blame yourself, we all make mistakes.

  • losthope

    *WARNING GRAPHIC* But people need to be aware! I had to moved from a condo because of one too many dogs and he was such a good dog, it was worth it… moved to the county with a nice huge yard for them to have a blast and the same dog I moved for decided to eat mushrooms… Now these looked like some ordinary mushrooms, not bright in color or slimy like you would think and my wife and I realized what he did once it was too late. After he ate them he seemed fine but was salivating. My wife asked if I let him in when I went into the house thinking he was just drinking water but he stayed outside. My wife started to cut the lawn and he was running by the tractor so I put him in his cage so he wouldn’t get ran over.. An hour later my wife was calling me into the house, our dog looked super I’ll, huge pupils, drooling and going to the bathroom on himself and wouldn’t move at all. We took him out, cleaned him up and called the vet, they told us give him small amounts of peroxide to make him vomit it up. It was coming out of both ends and looked bloody. Took all of three hours to succumb.. he stretched out, stiffened up and took his last breath.. one of the most horrible things we had to go through. Turns out, most all mushrooms are poisonous to dogs and about thirteen other random plants in our yard that we had no clue existed or could kill our dogs.. Howell, Michigan by the way. Watch your dogs at all times, they’re like little curious kids and get into everything. R.I.P Archie.

  • Dori

    Both ginger and turmeric have long been known world wide as anti-inflammatories. I myself have an autoimmune illness. All autoimmune illnesses are known to be inflammatory illnesses. My doctors have had me on turmeric for years as an added supplement for years with no adverse effects. Turmeric should always be given in conjunction with curcumin or something else but not alone to be at its most beneficial self.Ginger, though also an anti-inflammatory has a history of being beneficial for gastrointestinal and nausea issues. The dosing of ginger must be watched closely for those taking aspirin, Warfarin or any other blood thinning products. Hope this helps on the ginger and turmeric.

  • Dog_Obsessed

    I wish this was my site, but unfortunately it isn’t. Mike Sagman, who replied to you up above, is the owner of the site and has a complete answer for you.

  • theBCnut

    You seem to be confused about whose site this is and you seem to have entitlement issues. Try doing a little research yourself. I’ll even give you a great resource.

    http://canigivemydog.com/

  • http://DogFoodAdvisor.com/ Mike Sagman

    This article was published more than 2 years ago and was written with the intention of being a simple, public service list. It was never designed to be (in any way) a complete list.

    The “evidence” you are requesting here would involve a separate in-depth article (complete with references) for each individual item.

    On this website, you’ll already find a few of those posts. For example, visit the library and look for the article on “xylitol”. Or the recent article I just posted just 2 days ago that addresses the controversy surrounding “garlic”.

    Hope this helps.

  • cyndishisara

    I am wondering what you consider appropriate. Again you present no data to backup your claims.

  • theBCnut

    Ginger and turmeric are fine in the appropriate dose.

  • cyndishisara

    Fine. However, that was not made clear in your site. Actually it is the same with us humans!

  • Dog_Obsessed

    This list is talking about wild mushrooms, some species of which can be toxic to both dogs and humans. Cooked mushrooms that are human-safe are not toxic to dogs.

  • cyndishisara

    The list is given without evidence. How come? I know about xylitol, garlic, onions, and chocolate, however cooked mushrooms? Why? How about ginger and turmeric?

  • Walter Schrager

    Thnx Stephen. :) Couple pix of my little girl’s. Belle: Yorkie Cross Chyna: Min Pin

  • aimee

    It could be that each of us at one time has mentioned that study.

  • theBCnut

    Thanks aimee! I didn’t find their search function to be very helpful, but your directions got me right to it. I believe they are citing the same study that you have mentioned before. Or was it USA?

  • aimee

    Go to the homepage FEDIAF dot org. Click on “self regulation” on the left. At the next screen click on “nutrition” in the drop down under “self regulation” on the left. On that screen scroll about 2/3 down there is a link to click to go to the nutritional guidelines for cats and dogs.

  • theBCnut

    Sheesh! I still can’t get it. I also tried going to the Fediaf home page and doing a search, but still got nowhere. Is it any wonder I can’t find things on the internet?!?

  • theBCnut

    Thank, I’ll try again.

    Sent from my iPod

  • Stephen Crook

    Good – hope it’s useful

  • aimee

    Thanks for the lead. I found it!

  • Stephen Crook

    Sorry Cyndi – not what the research says

    Refer to FEDIAF Nutritional guidelines

    5-10grams/kg of body weight is enough to cause problems

  • Stephen Crook

    Sorry – worked for me

    Alternatively Google “fediaf” and the link will be there

  • theBCnut

    Your link is no good:-(

  • Stephen Crook

    Hi Walter – sent extract from FEDIAF (2008) report re Toxicity of Onions and garlic. Newest report is here – for anyone interested good document
    http://www.fediaf.org/fileadmin/…/Nutritional…/Nutritional_guidelines.pdf

  • Walter Schrager

    Oh! and one is a three year old Yorkie cross named Belle, and my other is a ten year old min pin name Chyna.

  • Walter Schrager
  • theBCnut

    Poor pup! Bob is right. She should be ok, but will likely have a bellyache. If she does vomit or have diarrhea, fast her for a while to give her systom time to settle down before it has to handle food again. Skipping one meal is usually enough, but if her systom is really messed up 24 hrs may be necessary.

  • Bob K

    What size dog? She might puke or have soft stools. Most likely she will be ok but watch her to clean up the mess just in case. If you ate a 2 dozen donuts how would you be?

  • April Marie

    My dog just ate 3 glazed doughnuts will she be okay? There was no chocolate on them though.

  • autumn

    My dog ate vegi fried rice with soy sauce sesame oil and peas and onions
    She is, acting overly tired

  • Sam

    Is a small amount of soy sauce as flavoring safe for a small dog?

  • Ashley Dempsey

    Mushrooms? I understand you should never feed your dog wild mushrooms, but I thought mushrooms from the grocers was ok (in small amounts).

  • Dori

    Please keep an eye on you dog. You probably should take him to the vet and get him/her checked out. Could certainly wind up with pancreatitis which is very dangerous. I had a 30 lb Tibetan Terrier once eat an entire package of hot dogs that she snatched off the kitchen counter. She wound up at New York Animal Hospital for 10 days. We almost lost her.

  • diane

    My yorkie ate frozen pork chops possibly the whole pack had runny poops today

  • Cyndi

    No, not at all. I give my dog garlic on a regular basis. Your dog would have to eat a LOT of garlic for it to be even considered dangerous. Garlic is good for dogs, in small quantities. Supposedly keeps away fleas too.

  • Liz Strathman

    My dog ate some garlic and herb spreadable cheese. Is that enough garlic to be considered dangerous?

  • Sydney Geer

    My puppy that’s about maybe 3 months now ate cheese and garlic last night when we were all sleeping will he be okay?

  • Wendy

    Peanuts are not a true nut but a legume..not the same as tree nuts at all…same goes for cashews.

  • rhonda

    the only way to keep your dog healthy is to make your own, what I eat they eat, will not feed them canned food, I then know what they are eating

  • Cyndi

    I wouldn’t be too worried. Just keep an eye on him. He’ll probably get a bit of runny poop, but I doubt there were enough onions on the sandwich to cause any harm. Maybe the hot sauce will deter him from doing it again, lol!

  • teresa

    My dog got ahold of a half of a half of cheesesteak with fried onions and hots on it should I be worried

  • Shawna

    Absolutely! Is there any specific information you are wanting or just general info?

  • Samrudhi Sanjeev

    THANK U A LOT!!.This is my first dog,so could you give me some tips

  • James Herron

    You would be surprised at how many foods are not so great for dogs. A good website for checking certain people foods for your dog is:

    http://canigivemydog.com

    They also cover lots of human medicines that people commonly give to their K9s which can be very dangerous, even fatal.

  • Shawna

    Unless he has pancreas issues he should be alright. I bought clarified butter for myself but couldn’t tolerate the taste of it so fed it to my toy breed dogs (in small amounts of course) and they LOVED it.

  • Samrudhi Sanjeev

    My dog had a bit of clarified butter. should i take him to vet or is he alright?

  • carol

    Have smoked ham and pork chops That where done organic bit not done well can I m a ke dogfood out of them . Weould boiling h r lp draw smke flavor out