Taste of the Wild (Dry)

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Rating: ★★★★½

Taste of the Wild Dog Food receives the Advisor’s second-highest tier rating of 4.5 stars.

The Taste of the Wild product line includes seven dry dog foods, four claimed to meet AAFCO nutrient profiles for all life stages and three for adult maintenance.

The following is a list of recipes available at the time of this review.

  • Taste of the Wild Sierra Mountain (4 stars)
  • Taste of the Wild Wetlands Formula (5 stars)
  • Taste of the Wild Southwest Canyon (5 stars)
  • Taste of the Wild High Prairie Formula (5 stars)
  • Taste of the Wild Pacific Stream Formula (4 stars)
  • Taste of the Wild High Prairie Puppy Formula (4 stars)
  • Taste of the Wild Pacific Stream Puppy Formula (4 stars)

Taste of the Wild High Prairie Puppy Formula was selected to represent the other products in the line for this review.

Taste of the Wild High Prairie Puppy

Dry Dog Food

Estimated Dry Matter Nutrient Content

Protein = 31% | Fat = 19% | Carbs = 42%

Ingredients: Buffalo, lamb meal, sweet potatoes, egg product, pea protein, peas, potatoes, canola oil, tomato pomace, bison, roasted venison, beef, flaxseed, potato fiber, natural flavor, ocean fish meal, salmon oil (a source of DHA), salt, choline chloride, dried chicory root, Yucca schidigera extract, tomatoes, blueberries, raspberries, dried Lactobacillus acidophilus fermentation product, dried Bifidobacterium animalis fermentation product, dried Lactobacillus reuteri fermentation product, vitamin E supplement, iron proteinate, zinc proteinate, copper proteinate, ferrous sulfate, zinc sulfate, copper sulfate, potassium iodide, thiamine mononitrate (vitamin B1), manganese proteinate, manganous oxide, ascorbic acid, vitamin A supplement, biotin, niacin, calcium pantothenate, manganese sulfate, sodium selenite, pyridoxine hydrochloride (vitamin B6), vitamin B12 supplement, riboavin (vitamin B2), vitamin D supplement, folic acid

Fiber (estimated dry matter content) = 5.6%

Red items when present indicate controversial ingredients

Estimated Nutrient Content
MethodProteinFatCarbs
Guaranteed Analysis28%17%NA
Dry Matter Basis31%19%42%
Calorie Weighted Basis26%39%35%

The first ingredient in this dog food is buffalo. Although it is a quality item, raw buffalo contains about 80% water. After cooking, most of that moisture is lost, reducing the meat content to just a fraction of its original weight.

After processing, this item would probably account for a smaller part of the total content of the finished product.

The second ingredient is lamb meal. Lamb meal is considered a meat concentrate and contains nearly 300% more protein than fresh lamb.

The third ingredient is sweet potato. Sweet potatoes are a gluten-free source of complex carbohydrates in a dog food. They are naturally rich in dietary fiber and beta carotene.

The fourth ingredient is egg product, an unspecified (wet or dry?) form of shell-free eggs. Quality can vary significantly. Lower grade egg product can even come from commercial hatcheries — from eggs that have failed to hatch.

In any case, eggs are easy to digest and have an exceptionally high biological value.

The fifth ingredient is pea protein, what remains of a pea after removing the starchy part of the vegetable.

Even though it contains over 80% protein, this ingredient would be expected to have a lower biological value than meat.

And less costly plant-based products like this can notably boost the total protein reported on the label — a factor that must be considered when judging the meat content of this dog food.

The sixth ingredient includes peas. Peas are a quality source of carbohydrates. And like all legumes, they’re rich in natural fiber.

However, peas contain about 25% protein, a factor that must be considered when judging the meat content of this dog food.

The seventh ingredient is potato. Potatoes can be considered a gluten-free source of digestible carbohydrates. Yet with the exception of perhaps their caloric content, potatoes are of only modest nutritional value to a dog.

The eighth ingredient is canola oil. Unfortunately, canola can be a controversial item. That’s because it can sometimes (but not always) be derived from genetically modified rapeseed.

Yet others cite the fact canola oil can be a significant source of essential omega-3 fatty acids.

In any case, plant-based oils like canola are less biologically available to a dog than fish oil as a source of quality omega-3 fats.

The ninth ingredient is tomato pomace. Tomato pomace is a controversial ingredient, a by-product remaining after processing tomatoes into juice, soup and ketchup.

Many praise tomato pomace for its high fiber and nutrient content, while others scorn it as an inexpensive pet food filler.

Just the same, there’s probably not enough tomato pomace here to make much of a difference.

From here, the list goes on to include a number of other items.

But to be realistic, ingredients located this far down the list (other than nutritional supplements) are not likely to affect the overall rating of this product.

With four notable exceptions

First, flaxseed is one of the best plant sources of healthy omega-3 fatty acids. Provided they’ve first been ground into a meal, flax seeds are also rich in soluble fiber.

However, flaxseed contains about 19% protein, a factor that must be considered when judging the actual meat content of this dog food.

Next, salmon oil is naturally rich in the prized EPA and DHA type of omega-3 fatty acids. These two high quality fats boast the highest bio-availability to dogs and humans.

Depending on its level of freshness and purity, salmon oil should be considered a commendable addition.

In addition, chicory root is rich in inulin, a starch-like compound made up of repeating units of carbohydrates and found in certain roots and tubers.

Not only is inulin a natural source of soluble dietary fiber, it’s also a prebiotic used to promote the growth of healthy bacteria in a dog’s digestive tract.

And lastly, this food contains chelated minerals, minerals that have been chemically attached to protein. This makes them easier to absorb. Chelated minerals are usually found in better dog foods.

Taste of the Wild Dog Food
The Bottom Line

Judging by its ingredients alone, Taste of the Wild Dog Food looks like an above-average dry product.

But ingredient quality by itself cannot tell the whole story. We still need to estimate the product’s meat content before determining a final rating.

The dashboard displays a dry matter protein reading of 31%, a fat level of 19% and estimated carbohydrates of about 42%.

As a group, the brand features an average protein content of 31% and a mean fat level of 18%. Together, these figures suggest a carbohydrate content of 43% for the overall product line.

And a fat-to-protein ratio of about 57%.

Above-average protein. Above-average fat. And below-average carbs when compared to a typical dry dog food.

When you consider the protein-boosting effect of the pea protein, peas and flaxseed in this recipe, and the potato protein and garbanzo beans contained in other recipes, this looks like the profile of a kibble containing a moderate amount of meat.

Bottom line?

Taste of the Wild Dog Food is a plant-based kibble using a moderate amount of various named species as its main sources of animal protein, thus earning the brand 4.5 stars.

Highly recommended.

Please note certain recipes are sometimes given a higher or lower rating based upon our estimate of their total meat content and (when appropriate) their fat-to-protein ratios.

Taste of the Wild Recall History

The following list (if present) includes all dog food recalls since 2009 directly related to this product line. If there are no recalls listed in this section, we have not yet reported any events.

You can view a complete list of all dog food recalls sorted by date. Or view the same list sorted alphabetically by brand.

To learn why our ratings have nothing to do with a product’s recall history, please visit our Dog Food Recalls FAQ page.

Get free dog food recall alerts sent to you by email. Subscribe to The Advisor’s recall notification list.

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A Final Word

The descriptions and analyses expressed in this and every article on this website represent the views and opinions of the author.

The Dog Food Advisor does not test dog food products.

We rely almost entirely on the integrity of the information posted by each company on its website. As such, the accuracy of every review is directly dependent upon the quality of the test results from any specific batch of food a company chooses to publish.

Although it's our goal to ensure all the information on this website is correct, we cannot guarantee its completeness or its accuracy; nor can we commit to ensuring all the material is kept up-to-date on a daily basis.

Each review is offered in good faith and has been designed to help you make a more informed decision when buying dog food.

However, due to the biological uniqueness of every animal, none of our ratings are intended to suggest feeding a particular product will result in a specific dietary response or health benefit for your pet.

For a better understanding of how we analyze each product, please read our article, "The Problem with Dog Food Reviews".

Remember, no dog food can possibly be appropriate for every life stage, lifestyle or health condition. So, choose wisely. And when in doubt, consult a qualified veterinary professional for help.

In closing, we do not accept money, gifts or samples from pet food companies in exchange for special consideration in the preparation of our reviews or ratings.

To learn how we support the cost of operating this website, please visit our public Disclosure and Disclaimer page.

Have an opinion about this dog food? Or maybe the review itself? Please know we welcome your comments.

Notes and Updates

05/08/2015 Last Update

  • http://www.facebook.com/catonaharley cathy joyce-furtado

    Mike, we are ALL just in search of knowledge for the greater good for our animals. and trying to help each other. thank you for moderating

  • http://www.facebook.com/catonaharley cathy joyce-furtado

    Karen Mitchell, thank you for the idea of donating the open bags of foods, but most shelters will not take it, due to possible tampering with the product to kill off their animals.

  • Chadia

    thank you Shana! appreciate your reply :)

  • http://DogFoodAdvisor.com/ Mike Sagman

    Please be sure to read our commenting policy which states:

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    Thanks for your cooperation.

  • Karen Mitchell

    Raw bones is a good source of calcium.

  • Karen Mitchell

    My research has proven over and over again that a balanced raw diet is the best.

  • Karen Mitchell

    4 times? Wow, his tummy will be confused. All those preservatives and additives will do that. Low to high protein diet will also do this…Regardless, changing their diet will always give them diarrhoea and in a lot of cases vomiting if not done gradually.

  • Karen Mitchell

    Don’t you believe raw is the best???
    Raw is the best. It is natural. When intruding something new, it must be done gradually a it will cause vomiting and diarrhoea.
    I have a group on Facebook, we are a bunch of people like you and also some great professionals who want to share our knowledge on raw diet because we believe they should have the best care possible.
    Even if your wondering how to start your dog or cat on an all natural raw nutritional diet, or your not sure about some things, like what’s safe and how much to give them… That and more!
    Follow this link to join my Facebook group.. and get a friend to tag along too….
    Cheers

    https://www.facebook.com/groups/324599134386758/

  • Karen Mitchell

    Commercial food is not natural. It’s processed, along with additives that would make your skin crawl. Ever looked up the ingredients to see what they are? Obviously not..
    Raw is the best. It is natural. When intruding something new, it must be done gradually a it will cause vomiting and diarrhoea.
    I have a group on Facebook, we are a bunch of people like you and also some great professionals who want to share our knowledge on raw diet because we believe they should have the best care possible.
    Even if your wondering how to start your dog or cat on an all natural raw nutritional diet, or your not sure about some things, like what’s safe and how much to give them… That and more!
    Follow this link to join my Facebook group.. and get a friend to tag along too….
    Cheers

    https://www.facebook.com/groups/324599134386758/

  • Karen Mitchell

    Raw meat is the best. It is natural. When intruding something new, it must be done gradually as it will cause vomiting and diarrhoea.
    I have a group on Facebook, we are a bunch of people like you and also some great professionals who want to share our knowledge on RAW diet to help because we believe they should have the best care possible.
    Even if your wondering how to start your dog or cat on an all natural raw nutritional diet, or your not sure about some things, like what’s safe and how much to give them… That and more!
    Follow this link to join my Facebook group.. and get a friend to tag along too….
    Cheers

    https://www.facebook.com/groups/324599134386758/

  • Karen Mitchell

    Their stomachs and organs will be suffering from the commercial food. I would leave for 24 hours then try what you last gave them plus some raw meat, boiled race and vegetables (half what you came them last with half of new diet.
    Raw is the best. It is natural. When intruding something new, it must be done gradually a it will cause vomiting and diarrhoea.
    I have a group on Facebook, we are a bunch of people like you and also some great professionals who want to share our knowledge to help because we believe they should have the best care possible, AND, it doesn’t have to cost an arm or a leg..You would be surprised!
    Even if your wondering how to start your dog or cat on an all natural raw nutritional diet, or your not sure about some things, like what’s safe and how much to give them… That and more!
    Follow this link to join my Facebook group.. and get a friend to tag along too….
    Cheers

    https://www.facebook.com/groups/324599134386758/

  • Karen Mitchell

    Raw is the best. It is natural. When intruding something new, it must be done gradually a it will cause vomiting and diarrhoea.
    I have a group on Facebook, we are a bunch of people like you and also some great professionals who want to share our knowledge to help because we believe they should have the best care possible, AND, it doesn’t have to cost an arm or a leg..You would be surprised!
    Even if your wondering how to start your dog or cat on an all natural raw nutritional diet, or your not sure about some things, like what’s safe and how much to give them… That and more!
    Follow this link to join my Facebook group.. and get a friend to tag along too….
    Cheers

    https://www.facebook.com/groups/324599134386758/

  • Karen Mitchell

    She should if they have a money back guarantee, and most stores do

  • Karen Mitchell

    I would switch to an all natural raw diet. Seriously, there is no comparison. If and when you do, you must do it gradually as making a sudden change to any pet diet will cause vomiting and diarrhoea.

    I have a group on Facebook, we are a bunch of people like you and also some great professionals who want to share our knowledge to help with raw diets, because we believe they should have the best care possible,.
    Even if your wondering how to start your dog or cat on an all natural raw nutritional diet, or your not sure about some things, like what’s safe and how much to give them… That and more!
    Follow this link to join my Facebook group.. and get a friend to tag along too….
    Cheers

    https://www.facebook.com/groups/324599134386758/

  • Dori

    Of course they. Most of us have had to do this even for reasons that our dogs just don’t like the food. Any reputable dog food store and manufacturer will always take the food back. Exchange for a different food in the same store.

  • Crazy4dogs

    So sorry. :(

  • http://www.facebook.com/catonaharley cathy joyce-furtado

    believe me…I have been, many times, in contact with a doctor in the formulation/QC department at Diamond. she is and has been taking the issue seriously…I just got off the phone with her. most of the meats they use are sourced in America. so I questioned her about any potential toxins; she is investigating with ALL diamond plants (4) and labs

  • http://www.facebook.com/catonaharley cathy joyce-furtado

    you should add the word “nowadays” in front of all vets should. we, the public are becoming more and more knowledgeable in what the “crap” is in dog/cat foods

  • Crazy4dogs

    That’s terrible. All of the pet stores around me always take back bags that dogs won’t eat, of course the bag can’t be almost empty. Most manufacturers also guarantee their food. I’ve never used TOTW, but I’d call and ask.

  • http://www.facebook.com/catonaharley cathy joyce-furtado

    my vet has been nothing but wonderful through this ordeal

  • http://www.facebook.com/catonaharley cathy joyce-furtado

    good idea. I’ll have to see if there is a nutritionist near me

  • http://www.facebook.com/catonaharley cathy joyce-furtado

    my small guys get 1/2 or less cup of kibble in the am and pm. my Berner mix gets 2/3 cups in am and pm. they get fresh fruits and veggies for treats…no Greenies, rawhide, bones…nothing else
    and NO table scraps

  • http://www.facebook.com/catonaharley cathy joyce-furtado

    can’t return opened 30# bag. they won’t take it

  • http://www.facebook.com/catonaharley cathy joyce-furtado

    stores do not take back opened bags

  • Crazy4dogs

    Have you tried the boiled chicken/rice/pumpkin diet yet just to get them eating?

  • http://www.facebook.com/catonaharley cathy joyce-furtado

    2 hairless chinese cresteds (8# & 11#) and a Bernese mix (30#). they were on TotW – bison, GF. Tried so far :
    Wysong -Epigen 5 star; Evolve – 4 star, GF, Turkey, garbanzo beans & peas; AvoDerm – 4 star, Turkey; Waggers TenderMoist chicken and duck. Plus AD, ID canned foods. I even broke down and bought Moist & Meaty – 1 star.

    NOTHING IS WORKING!! they do NOT get human foods except fruits and veggies.

  • http://www.facebook.com/catonaharley cathy joyce-furtado

    my 3 are on antibiotics and probiotics. no difference and it’s been a week of meds

  • Crazy4dogs

    What kind of dogs and what kind of foods?

  • Worried

    Me too. I have various dog food now. Dry, canned, treats, natural, raw, etc. one german shorthaired is coming around. She’s starting to sniff food at least. But they are drinking.

    Vet gave me cerenia to give them, but it’s not happening.

  • http://www.facebook.com/catonaharley cathy joyce-furtado

    already did, they turned their noses up at it

  • Crazy4dogs

    Try adding some wet food to the dry and see if that works.

  • Crazy4dogs

    Take the bag back & get a different formula or a different brand of food.

  • http://www.facebook.com/catonaharley cathy joyce-furtado

    my 3 have been this way for 1 1/2 months, now. I’ve spent hundreds in vet bills and 10 different dog foods. It seems like they’ll eat or drink when they are STARVING, only.

  • Worried

    My dogs won’t eat TOTW anymore. Actually they won’t eat anything anymore, for 3 days. Yes, they’ve been to the vet.

    They just vomit everything up

    The last food they ate was TOTW Sierra Mountain (lamb)

  • Worried

    My dogs won’t eat TOTW anymore. Actually they won’t eat anything anymore, for 3 days. Yes, they’ve been to the vet.

    They just vomit everything up

    The last food they ate was TOTW Sierra Mountain (lamb)

  • http://www.facebook.com/catonaharley cathy joyce-furtado

    I used to recommend it to everyone….not any more

  • Concerned

    My dog has been on TOTW for more than 5 years and started vomiting and having diarrhea when I bought a new bag of the bison flavor two weeks ago. I returned it and purchased a different flavor and he is still having diarrhea. I emailed TOTW and asked if they changed the formula but I have not heard back yet.

  • Shana Stegman

    I recommend TOTW to everyone I know. I feed it to my dog and two cats and they couldn’t healthier. When my dog was only 3 he started having severe hip issues and could barely walk. This was due to his breed type but I still thought there had to be something I could do since he was so young. I switched him to TOTW and also bought Alaskan Salmon oil that I squirt on his food. My dog showed almost immediate recovery. He is 7 now and doing just great. Haven’t had an issue with his hips since TOTW and Salmon Oil. TOTW is also the one food I have found that my animals always enjoy eating, doesn’t ever make them sick, and their fur has improved as well. TOTW feed has also seemed to balance their weight well too. I don’t know much about the other two feeds you mentioned, but this is just me giving my personal experience. Hope it helps! Everyone’s pets are different.

  • Crazy4dogs

    I would in a heartbeat! Especially since all 3 dogs don’t want it. They know better than we do a lot of the time! :)

  • http://www.facebook.com/catonaharley cathy joyce-furtado

    yeah, that’s what I was thinking on doing. thanks

  • Crazy4dogs

    I don’t personally feed TOTW but if the dogs are refusing to eat it, there might be a problem with the bag. I would return it for a new one. Check the best buy date and pick a different date. If they still won’t eat it, either pick a different formula or switch to a different food. Rotating between brands is a healthy thing to do for your dogs.

  • http://www.facebook.com/catonaharley cathy joyce-furtado

    have there been any recent formulation changes made to the grain free bison? my 3 dogs are refusing to eat TotW

  • aquariangt

    TotW isn’t a brand “manufactured by Diamond” such as the solid gold bison recipes, it is a Diamond owned brand. That means even if there is a special TotW plant, it’s owned by Diamond, so the QC is going to be the same

  • Crazy4dogs

    It might be, but it doesn’t change the fact that it is a Diamond product made by Diamond.

  • Gerry Ingram

    TOTW is made in its own facility. They just built the new facility recently, because they could not keep up with demand.

  • Chadia

    I have a 5 months yorkiepoo. Do u recomend this food?
    We live in dubai and not many options available here is either taste of the wild, eukanuba or royal canine
    Any advise?
    Thanks

  • Linda Connolly

    Yes, indeed, this site is wonderful! I wish there was one for cats as well. She’s a little grayer now but this is my favorite picture of her.

  • Crazy4dogs

    No need to apologize. It’s not a bad food, I just pick companies that have a good track record.

  • mjfromga

    Yes, but I didn’t see TOTW on the recall lists nearly as much as the Kirkland and Diamond dog foods so my conclusion came from that. If I am wrong, I apologize.

  • Dori

    Don’t feel bad Linda. Before I switched my senior to commercial raw frozen diet I blamed everything on her age. She was 12 at the time. She’s now 15 + and acting like a puppy again. It’s so easy to just assume it’s age related. I did that with so many things that were going on with her and it turned out most of it was her diet. Again, don’t feel bad. Live and learn, that’s all we can do and thank Dr. Mike for this fabulous site that has helped so many of us.

  • Linda Connolly

    I feel terrible that we all assumed her BM accidents were age related. But once off TOW bison, no more accidents. I only joined into this conversation in case someone out there has a dog doing the same thing. I recently met a woman who’s dog was on Blue and having accidents in the house. I suggested switching foods and then a vet. The food change did the trick. Again, what works for one might not work for another.

  • Shawna

    I had touched upon this last night but wanted to put some additional data out there regarding geriatric / seniors pets requiring MORE protein then their adult counterparts.

    Purina Veterinary Diets website (I’m not any happier with Purina than I am Science Diet but they do put out some decent research).

    Senior dogs and cats have a greater need for protein than young adult pets. 4,5

    Protein requirements actually increase by about 50% in older dogs, while their calorie needs tend to decrease.

    Older cats also need more protein than their younger counterparts.

    Because older pets metabolize protein less efficiently, they can
    benefit from a diet with ample supplies of high-quality protein.

    Increased protein can actually help slow age-related loss of lean body mass and support a healthy immune system.” https://www.purinaveterinarydiets.com/nutrition-myths-facts/senior-pets-and-protein/

    One of the sited articles from the above page says

    “Protein restriction for healthy older dogs is not only unnecessary, it can be detrimental. Protein requirements actually increase by about 50% in older dogs, while their energy requirements tend to decrease. When insufficient protein is provided, it can aggravate the age-associated loss of lean body mass and may contribute to earlier mortality. Older dogs should receive at least 25% of their calories from protein, typically provided by diets containing at least 7 g protein/100 Kcal ME.” http://www.companimalmed.com/article/S1938-9736(08)00042-1/abstract

    “At least” 25% of calories from protein. If Dr. Mike’s numbers are correct, TotW would be an appropriate diet (protein percents at least) for geriatric dogs at 26% calorie weighted. Fromm Four Star Nutritionals Grain-Free (Dry) has 27% calorie weighted protein and 32 on a dry matter basis. I didn’t look at the fat content of these two diets at all — may be inappropriate amounts (or kinds as MCT can’t be lumped with other fats) for some senior pups.

  • Shawna

    LOL!! I must admit, it is good to see a nutritionist call out some of the issues with SD.. :)

  • Shawna

    Leanne,

    Protein and carbohydrates have the same amount of calories per gram fed.

    From Merck Manual
    4 calories in a gram of protein or carbohydrates

    I’m on my phone and, for some reason, can’t copy /paste now. When I can get to my laptop I’ll link the page quoted from.

  • Linda Connolly

    Maybe they have better quality control now. And yes there have been recalls with other foods as well but again, Diamond Foods has had more than any other company. Outside of that…what works with one dog might not work with another.

  • Linda Connolly

    Amen!

  • Melanie

    Thanks. I will check those out.

  • Melanie

    That’s ok. Thanks!

  • http://theuglypugglyboutique.com/ sandy

    It’s been deleted. Unfortunately I just can’t delete a photo, the whole post gets deleted.

  • Crazy4dogs

    There are many foods that have limited ingredients, Nature’s Variety Limited Ingredient diets have a really limited list. They might work for you.

  • JeremyScott10

    Leanne, I agree not all vets are uneducated in nutrition but you may want to be aware of the special interests at work in vet schools that are often controlling nutrition education. Here is a link about that corruption, written by Dr. Karen Becker.
    http://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2012/10/31/veterinary-practice.aspx

    If you like the article or want to learn more about holistic veterinary medicine, you can sign up for her newsletter…she’s very cutting edge and I think you will like her articles. There’s also some great information on Dr. Peter Tobias’ website. I hope you like it because we need more good holistic vets!

  • Crazy4dogs

    Fromm is a good company with no recalls. If it’s working for you, then I would stick with it. I have and do use Fromm in rotation and they do have a much better track record.

  • Melanie

    Finally! You guys agree on something!!! It’s been fun reading your back and fourth posts!!!

  • Melanie

    Excuse the picture off Noelle eating the face off of her chocolate Easter bunny. Not sure how that got posted. SANDY!!!!! Where are you? Can you delete my photo like you did before? Ha Ha!!!

  • Melanie

    My dogs don’t do well on Fromm. IMO there’s way too many ingredients in this food. My lab sheds excessively and is very itchy. I can never pinpoint the problem ingredient because there’s so many. Maybe it’s the cheese powder. Strange ingredient. My dogs do very well on TOTW. The recalls do. Freak me out though. They eat and I pray. One day I will find the perfect foods to rotate.

  • Crazy4dogs

    It’s interesting that you say you feed raw. I have many friends who feed raw and I don’t know of any who would suggest feeding a lower protein, low fat to prevent kidney problems or a senior diet. All of these things are quite the opposite of the basis of raw feeding. You are quite an anomaly.

  • Dori

    It’s wonderful isn’t it? I mean in reality I realize that Hannah’s not going to be with us forever but I really do want whatever time she has left (I pray it be long) that she live a happy, healthy, energetic quality life and enjoy her time here on earth and with us. So glad to hear about your 10 year old Lab. Great news.

  • Crazy4dogs

    That’s wonderful, Dori! It is amazing & yet so simple on how important diet is. Since we feed raw for dinner all the time, my 10 y.o lab has even more energy than before. No one can believe her energy level @ her age! :)

  • Crazy4dogs

    Absolutely! I didn’t bring that up because I wanted to focus on the inaccurate comments.

  • Dori

    C4D. The muscle atrophy was what was happening to Hannah when she was on high quality kibble. Stupidly I attributed the condition to her age at the time. She was 12. After switching her and my other two girls, her muscles developed again. She was at the point where we would have to carry her up and down any stairs. She is now faster at going up and down than my other two and they are very quick. Funny, or not so funny because I never put it all together, how diet really does affect every part of the body. The switch to commercial raw diets only came about when attempting to figure out all of Katie’s food sensitivities, intolerances and allergies. I found that I couldn’t do it without the switch to commercial raw diets.

  • Dori

    In my very long experience dealing with a long lists of veterinarians (I’ve lived in quite a few states across the country), you will be one of the few exceptions to the rule then. All veterinarians should also specialize in nutrition if they are going to treat an animal as a whole. I prefer to have my dogs see an Integrative Veterinary but unfortunately where I’m living right now they are hard to come by.

  • Dori

    My dogs have all lost weight and are all at their optimum weights ever since I switched them to high protein, moderate to high fat, LOW carb diets about 4 or 5 years ago. They’ve been on commercial raw diets for the passed 3 1/2 years or so. If I were to say anything about weight as related to their diets it is that it is more difficult for me to keep weight on them, that’s if I wanted to. The level of their activity has skyrocketed since the switch to commercial raw diets. Including, and most importantly, my Maltese, that was 12 years old at the time of the switch. All she did back then on a kibble diet (high high quality kibbles) was sleep, didn’t play any more, didn’t go up and down stairs anymore, didn’t bark at anything going by outside (it was her favorite activity). I attributed all those behaviors to her age, not knowing any better. Also her muscles were kind of spongey (sp?). After the switch she perked up almost within the first 3 days and has been doing all her old activities again. She seemed to have regressed back into puppyhood. Her muscles are back to being as they should be. She’s still that way at the age of 15 years 8 months old. I don’t make homemade raw meals. I’m quite sure I could balance it all out properly but, truth be told, I’m too lazy. I rarely if ever cook for my hubby and I. Too busy doing fun activities to be cooking. Truthfully it’s not the cooking that bothers me. That I rather enjoy. It’s the clean up that I cannot stand. So, on commercial raw diets there’s no cooking involved and I can continue my lazy ways in the kitchen. Sorry for the very long post. I may have gone off topic not sure.

  • Leanne

    Yes, and there are also those who have studied both. I specialized in nutrition, and went back to school to become a Veterinarian. Just because one is a Veterinarian and not a nutritionist does not necessarily mean they are not educated in nutrition.

  • Dori

    Leanne, I’m certainly not trying to pick on you, I’m simply going to say that if you do not go into detail then the uninformed won’t know the details. A lot of us do know the details all too well, but not everyone and certainly not new posters that come to DFA every day. It helps them understand the issues being discussed if there are details. Just saying.

  • Dori

    Also diets high in carbohydrates will cause weight gain and obesity. We have an obesity problem in this country due to the high carb highly processed foods. Not just animals but ourselves also.

  • Dori

    I take my dogs to their vets for their medical expertise. I take my dogs to a veterinary nutritionist for her expertise in nutrition. Two different fields of intense studies.

  • Leanne

    When you said fed too much food, I assumed you were referring to weight gain.

  • Crazy4dogs

    I think you need to reread all of your comments and my comment. I didn’t say obesity. I said grow too quickly which is often what causes the joint “issues” in large breeds.

  • Leanne

    I never said a joint issue and joint problem were two separate things. They are the same thing and I worded it differently. I was referring to glucosamine supplements, not glucosamine in the foods. Large breed dogs are known to be prone to joint issues even not related to obesity. There are times where that is the cause but there can be many causes. Large breed dogs are more likely to have joint issues than small breed dogs.

  • Crazy4cats

    That’s a beagle for you! Lol! They’re so cute. She must have come from good stock, but obviously you have taken great care of her! Your advice is valuable.

  • Crazy4dogs

    I’m sorry, isn’t a joint issue and a joint problem pretty much the same thing? And isn’t a joint issue generally caused by disease or other health problem? Large dogs are prone to joint problems when fed too much food and too much calcium causing bones to grow too quickly which then causes joint issues. I believe this would be in the category of health concerns. Glucosamine in the ridiculously small amounts in kibble are not going to solve or prevent that issue.

  • Leanne

    No, I was stating two separate recalls they’ve had and you are combining the two. Yes, Diamond is the name on the facility that manufactures these brands, didn’t know I absolutely had to state that in my comments to make it correct.

  • Leanne

    It’s not to prevent joint problems caused by disease and other health concerns, it is given mostly to large dogs because they are prone to joint problems and this is to help prevent it in the long run. Again, this is only a preventative and not necessarily saying these things WILL happen, just that these are given to help to prevent it.

  • Crazy4dogs

    No, that’s not what you said. You don’t seem to understand or are not stating that DIAMOND IS THE FACILITY. You said the other brands were the reason and that Diamond was recalled because of the facility it was manufactured at.

  • Leanne

    There are many different ways to become a certified pet nutritionist. It can be a certificate from a 6 month school, or a degree from a veterinary school. As previously stated I am currently attending a veterinary school working toward my PhD.

  • Crazy4dogs

    Glucosamine is not standardly given at an early age unless there is a diagnosed problem. It will not prevent joint issues if there is already an issue in the making. And if a dog were fed a natural diet, a manufactured synthetic item would not be necessary. Joint issues are often already in the dog due to poor breeding, genetic issues, early castration. No amount of glucosamine is going to prevent those issues.

  • Leanne

    And as I said I feed my dogs a raw diet along with their kibble. I wasn’t saying to only feed dry kibble.

  • DogFoodie

    I’m just curious. You said that you are a pet nutritionist and that you are also currently in vet school. What education and credentialing does one receive to call themselves a pet nutritionist, such as yourself?

  • Crazy4dogs

    Are you again equating high protein with more calories? This is just ABSOLUTELY INCORRECT. Pure protein is very low in calories.
    Dogs drink lots of water to compensate for eating a completely DRY meal. Their body is trying to make up for the lack of moisture in a kibble diet (10% moisture max)!
    Have you every eaten a completely dehydrated meal for a day? I bet you’d be drinking a lot of water too!

  • Leanne

    That is exactly what I was saying… just without going into full detail.

  • Crazy4dogs

    If there is poor sanitation at a manufacturing facility, it would likely involve all the foods manufactured there, which is why the plant was SHUT DOWN. The food is run through the same machines, regardless of what product it is. If there is Salmonella/bacteria in a product it could affect any product being processed through those machines, which is the reason for the massive recalls.

  • Hater & Molly’s Mom

    Thank you for your reply! I will end this convo with you as of now since it appears your are just as uninformed about nutrition as is the veterinarian community. Have a nice day!

  • Leanne

    Slightly less protein won’t cause muscle loss. It’s a slight change, not a huge difference.

  • Leanne

    For the last time, I never said any type of food would cause any kidney damage. There are things put in diets to prevent certain common health issues, just like glucosamine being given at an early age to prevent joint issues.

  • Leanne

    The level of immaturity you’ve expressed is absurd. There is no need to insult someone’s education levels. I actually even stated Fromm isn’t available everywhere because it is a more private company, therefore being sold at independent pet stores rather than big chain stores. Any food can be ordered online, however, before I moved to Minnesota I had never heard of Fromm. So people in the areas where Fromm is not sold likely won’t know it’s available. You are really good at misreading my comments and insulting me because of it.
    Vets do not know very little about nutrition, and the fact people assume this yet trust them to treat their pets makes no sense to me.

  • Leanne

    Higher protein – more calories. As I’ve said in previous statements, I am I’m vet school and information I’ve stated is what I’ve learned in school. Also, dogs drink water, and lots of it.

  • Hater & Molly’s Mom

    Fromm is sold at independent pet stores and easily ordered online. Please get your facts straight about the Diamond recalls. For someone that is studying pet nutrition you seem to not be very well educated. Thats why most of us here do not ask our vets about nutrition as they know very little. Just as you appear to!

  • Leanne

    There has also been a recall because Diamond was recalled and all other foods from that facility were recalled to be safe. But yes there has been recalls for both reasons.

  • Guest

    Her hearing is just about gone but boy does she still have a big mouth! Lol!

  • Crazy4dogs

    Can you please cite where you got this information?
    A higher caloric intake than output causes weight gain. Isn’t that basic nutrition knowlege? Feeding a low protein diet causes muscle atrophy. Feeding an entirely kibble based dry food makes the kidneys work harder because there isn’t adequate water to flush toxins.

  • Crazy4dogs

    That is awesome H&M! The best we’ve done is 15.5 years, but we do have large breed dogs. Love the big ones, hate the shorter life span.

  • Crazy4dogs

    Older dogs do not require lower protein. Lower fat does not prevent kidney damage. A diet that is too high in fat does not cause kidney damage but MAY casuse pancreatitis, not kidney failure. Phosphorus is what needs to be restricted when kidneys are compromised. Lower sodium would only be indicated in a dog with high blood pressure or a cardiac issue.

    My dog(of several) is a 10.5 year old Lab and is very active who walks(jogs) 1.5-2 miles most days of the week. She eats high a high protein diet and has stellar blood panels. You are generalizing and this is problematic.

  • Crazy4dogs

    Are you aware that both Kirkland and TOTW are made by Diamond and more than likely made in the same Diamond plant? The quality control would probably be equal.

  • Crazy4dogs

    Protein levels have nothing to do with weight gain. An excessive caloric intake will result in weight gain. Feeding a dog lower protein levels results in muscle loss. There have been many studies on this, including dogs in kidney failure.

  • Crazy4dogs

    TOTW is a brand of Diamond which is a major dog food manufacturer. The reason for the recall was due to poor sanitation at the Diamond plant which affected it’s house brands and any brand it produced at that plant.

  • Shawna

    I have no issue with Taste of the Wild (even though a Diamond food) but like Dori I feed a rotational diet and mostly raw. I change the kibble with each new bag (I buy small bags) of food and the raw gets switched about every two to three day. I never have an issue with switching cold turkey with any of mine that I’ve owned (9 total). I usually have to give probiotics and canned pumpkin for the first few weeks to my foster dogs but after that they transition right along with my dogs eating the very same foods only more kibble and less canned and raw.

    For kibbles (for all dogs of all ages) I use Orijen, Nature’s Variety, Nature’s Logic, Earthborn Primitive Naturals, Merrick once in a while, TotW once in a while and several others. One of mine can’t have poultry of any kind and another reacts to lamb but otherwise they eat all available proteins. Since I don’t feed poultry, I would use quail or pheasant or duck as a novel protein if any develops an issue.

  • Leanne

    I also have thriving dogs, and cats, according to their doctor. I do provide raw foods along with Taste of the Wild, but Taste of the Wild is their main diet. I only stated my education because I was stating that I am currently learning the facts I’ve stated so they are not outdated facts.

  • Shawna

    And that I can completely agree with too. In human nutrition — eggs are bad, now they’re not and so on. I am thankful for research but oy.

  • Leanne

    It is possible these things are not being taught because they are still being researched. I have already been taught things that conflict with previous things I’ve been taught because research has proven them to be slightly different. But of course new things are always discovered in any studies.

  • Shawna

    How does fat overwork a healthy kidney. What specifically about fat is the problem? The kidneys don’t actually work – filtration is a passive process. Once in disease the kidneys are simply not able to filter as quickly (due to death of cells) and BUN and creatinin begin to build up.

  • Dori

    Hi Leanne. I’m not quite sure what your going for your Ph.D has to do with what we’re discussing. But, okay, that’s good and am always delighted when I come across persons wishing to continue their education. That’s a very good thing. The fact that you have decided that you feed Taste of the Wild, a Diamond product and intend to do so for the entirety of your dogs life leads me to the conclusion that there is no longer any reason for you and I specifically to continue this discussion. Your feeding protocols are 180 degrees opposite from mine. I feed a rotational diet of commercial raw BALANCED foods also rotating proteins and other ingredients. I know this works for my dogs as I have actual living breathing facts right in front of me. Three thriving dogs of different ages. Because my girls are thriving, also according to their doctor, not just my say so, I also will have no reason to lower their proteins or fats. Best of luck to you and your dogs. I forgot to mention that I keep all three girls on the lean side and muscular, not an overweight one in the group.

  • Leanne

    Thank you.

  • Shawna

    I guess I’m unintentionally disrespectful then because I really am a bit shocked. I am really really concerned that these ideas are still being taught when so much more is now known. That is certainly no reflection on you as a person and was never intended to be disrespectful to you individually.

  • Leanne

    Once the kidneys are declining, they have no option other than to work harder. If the fats have been consumed, the kidney is continuing to process them, thus rebuilding the strength of the damaged kidney. A kidney that has not been damaged can be overworked if a larger amount of fat than can be processed has been consumed.

  • Leanne

    It could have been stated respectfully. Statement such as your first response to me “Wow I’m shocked by all this” are not very friendly. A more respectful approach could have been something along the lines of “I found this article stating these facts are incorrect”.
    There were many other statements that were disrespectful but I’m not going to go back and find them all.

  • Shawna

    I COMPLETELY agree with everything you say here!!! COMPLETELY

  • Leanne

    Science Diet uses corn and other fillers in all their formulas and lack nutritional value. They patent their prescription formulas, making their formula one of the only prescription diets available. If they promote health and wellness, why would they care so much about being the only ones able to provide it? Their proteins are not quality, and they do a good job ingredient splitting (having multiple types of the same ingredient on their ingredient list to list more nutritional ingredients first).

  • Shawna

    I think you may have missed my question? Could you please explain how fat prevents initial kidney damage but is not problematic once the kidneys are already declining?

  • Shawna

    I’m sorry, where did I insult your education other than to say that there is newer research than what you have been provided. How is truth an insult?

  • Shawna

    Yes, a dog used to lower protein is going to have to be transitioned onto higher but the higher protein is not the issue, it is the conditioning on lower protein that created the problem. I’ve had over 40 dogs in my home (my own and fosters) all eating a minimum of 38 to 40% protein and not even one had diarrhea from higher protein after transition. I had everything from puppies to geriatrics and most of the older ones were puppy mill retired breeding dogs.

  • Leanne

    And again, every dog is different.

  • Leanne

    I will continue to educate myself in the veterinary program I am attending rather than reading something provided by someone who has continuously insulted my education. Thank you.

  • Shawna

    Please read the Journal of Nutrition articles I’ve linked.

  • Shawna

    My Chihuahua was blind (due to an accident not age related) the last yearish of her life. She had very little exercise and ate MORE food than she did when younger. Same protein levels, just more food in general.

  • Hater & Molly’s Mom

    That usually happens from over feeding. A higher quality kibble requires that you feed less. Also always remember to do a slow transistion if your dog isnt used to switching.

  • Leanne

    Again, every dog is different. And again, higher energy levels need more protein while lower energy levels need less.

    A highly active dog will lose weight on high protein, while a much less active dog MAY gain weight on high protein.

  • Shawna

    “Senior canine diets should provide a minimum of 27% ME from protein” Purdue again. http://www.ansc.purdue.edu/swineclass/PDF/Companion%20Animal%20Nutrition_2.pdf

  • Shawna

    My Chihuahua lived to age 19 eating a HIGH protein raw diet (45 to over 54% protein) and was not even remotely fat. I foster and I use high protein, moderate fat foods to take weight off of the dogs that come in. I had one go from 34 pounds to 12 pounds on that high protein, moderate fat and LOW carb diet. We ended up adopting her. Her name is Mimi and I have told her story here on DFA many times (including pictures).

  • Leanne

    As previously stated, lower protein is recommended after a senior dog has decreased energy levels.

    And AGAIN, every dog is different. Some live to be in their 20s, some live to 10. Smaller breeds typically live longer than large breeds. Some dogs have more energy at an older age than other dogs. That doesn’t make any information I’ve given false, just simply means it is not ideal for that specific dog.

  • Shawna

    They just recently discovered that geriatric dogs are not well equipped to utilize glucose for brain food. They are now increasing the fat content, medium chain triglycerides that is, allowing ketones to provide brain food.

  • Hater & Molly’s Mom

    We feel we are blessed every day she is with us! Her hearing is just about gone, but other than that she gets along good.

  • Leanne

    Everything I’ve stated is appropriate for a senior dog. Maybe not every single senior dog in the world, because every dog is different, but senior diets are specially formulated to fit most geriatric needs.

  • Shawna

    Please explain further.

    For the record, I’m not a fan of Science Diet myself.

  • Shawna

    “Traditionally, high-fiber low-energy diets have been promoted for weight management. The content of TDF in those diets typically range from 20 to 40% on a DM basis, as in the two diets used in this study. Dietary fibers are used to dilute energy density of the food and to provide a feeling of satiety by causing gastric distension. This latter effect remains controversial in dogs. A concern with feeding weight-reduction diets is that reduced energy intake is associated with suboptimal intake of
    essential nutrients, especially protein (12). Feeding a high-protein diet in obese dogs resulted in a better conservation of lean body mass (4).

    As expected, dogs of both groups lost their excess body weight and reached their predetermined target body weight over a period ranging from wk 12 to wk 26. Although the weight loss was more rapid in the control group than in the high-protein group, the differences were not significant between the diets for the duration (P = 0.11) nor for the rate of weight loss (P = 0.22).” http://jn.nutrition.org/content/132/6/1685S.full

    Not everything you are being told is true.

  • Leanne

    I’m not going to get into why I disagree with Science Diet, because of course I’m going to be bashed for all of that, too. Like I said, what I am taught daily is the information I’ve used to form my opinions and back up the infomation I’ve given.

    To answer your question, though, the way to treat kidney damage vs. the way to prevent kidney damage are two entirely different things, so a diet to treat kidney disease is obviously going to be different.

  • Hater & Molly’s Mom

    Low protein does not prevent weight gain in a senior dog. Since my girl has been eating a high protein diet she has much more energy than she ever had before.

  • Shawna

    Please not they say a decrease in not only fat but also in serum triglycerides.

    Journal of Nutriton (already linked above)
    “Several studies showed the potential benefits of a high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet on reducing body weight in humans (6,7).
    These diets are also associated with decreases in serum TG as compared
    to diets high in carbohydrates. The results of the
    study reported here suggest that these same
    benefits can also be obtained in dogs fed high-protein, low-carbohydrate
    diets

    This study evaluated the benefits of high-protein, low-carbohydrate
    diets as well as CLA addition on reducing body weight
    in dogs. Changing the macronutrient profile of a
    canine weight-loss diet from a high-carbohydrate level to one primarily
    based
    on protein can promote greater weight loss without
    further reductions in caloric intake. This weight loss is driven
    primarily
    from an increased loss of fat mass while
    maintaining lean muscle mass.” http://jn.nutrition.org/content/134/8/2087S.full

  • Hater & Molly’s Mom

    None of those things you mentioned are appropriate for a senior dog! If I fed my senior girl that way she may not be here at 18.

  • Shawna

    Anything can be put on the Internet — please note my references were the Journal of Nutrition and Purdue University.

    Science Diet Canine KD canned
    Fat content 22.6%
    Protein content 14.6%
    http://www.hillspet.com/products/pd-canine-kd-canine-renal-health-dry.html

    If a low fat diet “prevents” kidney disease, why on earth would they make the prescription food high fat?

  • Hater & Molly’s Mom

    Amen Dori!

  • Leanne

    Again, I did NOT connect protein with kidney damage. I said low protein prevents weight gain in a geriatric dog as they become less active.

  • Leanne

    First, how is it thay everyone thinks I said protein is related to kidney damage? I said low FAT prevents kidney damage, not protein. I also did not say that high fat or protein causes kidney damage. Anything can be put on the internet, it doesn’t make it right. I am still currently attending classes and working toward my PhD so I am learning current information daily. The information I’m taught is the information I use.
    Secondly, not ALL senior dogs require lower protein, but the majority do as their metabolism slows and they become less active. If a dog is on a high protein diet but has low activity levels, the higher protein may cause weight gain. “May” is the key word here.

    Again, every dog is different. Not every dog is going to need the same thing.

  • Shawna

    “Kenneth C. Bovée, DVM, MMedSc
    Department of Clinical Studies
    School of Veterinary Medicine
    University of Pennsylvania
    Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

    Mythology of Protein Restriction for Dogs with Reduced Renal Function
    Evidence that high protein diets enhance renal function in normal dogs has led to confusion among veterinarians who have been told for decades that low protein diets may be beneficial for kidney function.

    Results of the 10 experimental studies on dogs have failed to provide evidence of the benefit of reduced dietary protein to influence the course of renal failure.

    In conclusion, the continued existence of this false myth about dietary protein is an uncomfortable reminder of the lack of sophistication, lack of critical thought, and reliance on oversimplified and attractive dogma that persists in our profession. This is only one example of many false myths, misinformation, and partial truths that are repeated from decade to decade. Until a more critical approach with standards and oversight are brought to bear in our profession, we will likely continue to be ensnared in false myths de-spite the presence of sound science. http://www.dogaware.com/files/bovee.pdf

  • Leanne

    It is not “outdated” information. I also am not saying every single senior dog needs a special diet. The majority of dogs, just like humans, have a slowed metabolism as they age, which is why lower protein is recommended to prevent weight gain. Low fat is recommended because it reduces the risk of kidney damage. Again, this does NOT mean high fat diets cause kidney damage! But the less the kidney needs to process, the lower the risk of damage. I have done my research and am still working toward my PhD, therefore learning new and CURRENT information daily. I would appreciate it if my education and research weren’t consistently insulted because someone disagrees.

  • Shawna

    WOW, I’m a bit shocked at all this.

    1. “low protein diets prevent weight gain.”

    Low protein has to be either higher fat (more calories) or higher carbs. Journal of Nutrition “High-Protein Low-Carbohydrate Diets Enhance Weight Loss in Dogs” http://jn.nutrition.org/content/134/8/2087S.full

    Second Journal of Nutrition paper “Weight Loss in Obese Dogs: Evaluation of a High-Protein, Low-Carbohydrate Diet” http://jn.nutrition.org/content/132/6/1685S.full

    2. “kidneys are not working hard to process the amino acids”

    Purdue University PowerPoint presentation titled “Geriatric Nutrition of Companion Animals” On page 2 “High dietary protein does
    not overwork the kidneys because the excretion of excess urea is a
    passive process” http://www.ansc.purdue.edu/swineclass/PDF/Companion%20Animal%20Nutrition_2.pdf

    3. “Older dogs require lower protein”

    Page 3 “Senior canine research – 40 years, Older dogs need more protein than young adults (50% more!)” Same link as above.

    That is only a small sampling of the current research out on these topics. We are not a group that is easily swayed by someone stating they are a nutritionist if they are still believing myths that have more recently been debunked.

  • Dori

    You’re giving outdated information as advice. Senior dogs dog not need senior special diets. In actuality the opposite is quite true. Please do more research on current procedures and recommendations.

  • Leanne

    See, you are misinterpreting my statement. I didn’t say any type of food causes kidney damage, or any illnesses for that matter. I was simply stating as dogs age it is recommended to lower protein and fat intake to help prevent these things. You are right in that age does not mean they are automatically prone to illnesses, however, even in a healthy pet, as they age, they are more susceptible to these illnesses. That is why these recommendations are put out there. Raw diets are great, as long as they are balanced. I will say though, just because you are feeding them high quality meats, does no necessarily mean the percentage of protein they are given is higher. Strictly meat diets are not ideal because it lacks the balance dogs need. Feeding a senior dog high protein and high fat does not mean they are more likely to become ill and that is something I never stated. I gave my opinon, and facts to back it up. Also, I wouldn’t change a dog’s diet just because they get older. I only stated I wouldn’t feed these brands because they are making a switch at a later age. My dogs both eat Taste of the Wild and will their entire lives, unless they begin having issues that can be helped with a change of diet. Because I have no intention of switching, I don’t need to lower the protein and fat intake. However, if I do need to change their diet when they are older, I would go for a diet with lower protein and fat content. I think a lot of you are misreading the information I put out there because a lot of the replies are stating things I never said.

  • Dori

    I have three dogs. One of which is 15 years and 8 months old. The other 2 are 5 1/2 years old. They are all on commercial raw foods on rotational feeding. All are fed high quality protein, high quality fats, Los carb diets. None have any kidney issues. I’ve been feeding this way for a little over 3 1/2 years or more. I can afford to do this because all three are toy breeds. I’ve had all three of them all their lives. No, I do not advocate high fat diets to all, not because I feel that quality high fats will cause kidney problems, I also don’t feel that high protein diets will cause issues, but a low quality fat diet has the propensity to cause pancreatitis. Believe me I have done my homework on these issues. I’ve been given schooling on these issues by the best qualified posters on this site and others as well as the top of the line holistic, homeopathic and integrative vets as well as my dogs own traditional vets for traditional medical issues. It is my opinion as well as others that healthy seniors are not prone to health issues if the are healthy seniors. Unhealthy seniors, just as unhealthy adults and unhealthy puppies are prone to health issues. It is an out moded and out dated fallacy to think that with age automatically comes unhealth. Not so. Dogs that have been fed diets that have been species inappropriate for the duration of their lives will, no doubt, have varying issues as they age. It is why many of us here have been advocating for species appropriate rotational diets for so long. It’s not enough to feed a food and think ones dog likes it and is doing well. At that point it is surviving not thriving and the results are seen as the dog ages. Anyway, I kindly and respectfully disagree with you. This is a great site for differing opinions and experiences.

  • Leanne

    Nothing wrong with that! Both are high quality and I would recommend both as long as they fit the dog’s needs. There are also foods that have never been recalled that are very poor quality, though, so I don’t like to base my decisions off recalls alone.

  • Linda Connolly

    They’ve had too many recalls for salmonella in the past for me to take any chances. A hundred year old company with NO recalls or a company with a reputation for recalls? I’ll stick with Fromm. AND my poor 13 year old Shepherd had been having poop accidents in the house for months while on TOW…Over a month now with NO accidents since being on Fromm.

  • Leanne

    Nobody said you need a degree to tell you that. Nobody said you are doing anything wrong. However, just because there haven’t been any problems, doesn’t mean there won’t be. I also never said there would be. Senior diets are made to help aid in aging and prevent typical signs of aging from occuring. Many senior dogs develop illnesses and there are diets to help prevent them from developing, just as there are diets designed for dogs that are already ill. Every dog is different, and nobody is saying your dogs are going to have kidney damage, gain weight, or develop a heart condition. I am simply stating that it is recommended to lower these things in a dog’s diet as they age to help prevent these things from developing. I don’t believe you need to change your dogs diet if you don’t feel it is necessary, I was just suggesting what is appropriate for an aging dog and responding to an inquiry with the information I have learned over the years. I do, however, believe you should reconsider the way you respond to people when they give accurate and helpful information. I did not come into this post for conflict.

  • Crazy4cats

    Wow! That is awesome. I’m not sure I’ve ever known anyone with a dog that old. Thank you for sharing.

  • Leanne

    Both are equally important, which is why there are sites like this for pet owners to find ratings on the quality of their pets’ food. Senior dogs are prone to kidney damage as it comes with age. A low fat diet will help keep the kidneys from working as hard, thus aiding in the prevention of kidney damage. Again, I am not saying proteins or fats cause kidney damage; however, as dogs age, they tend to have health problems which is why there are diets designed specifically for geriatric dogs. This is only to reduce the risk of these situations occuring, not a guarantee that it won’t happen. It is a similar situation to a young human adult eating healthy to prevent heart, kidney, and liver damage as they age. It is better to prevent the situation than treat it as it occurs.

  • Hater & Molly’s Mom

    I know whats best for my girls. I dont need a degree to tell me that!

  • Dori

    It’s the quality of the proteins, fats and carbohydrates that mean anything not solely the % of any of it. Low fat diets do not prevent kidney damage unless the fats that you are feeding your dogs is of low quality.

  • Dori

    I have a 15 year 8 month old senior that continues to eat quality high protein, high fat, low carb diet. No one would know, including her doctors and her that she has bladder and lung lobe cancer. She also is hypothyroid and geriatric arthritis, night blindness and loosing tons of her hearing., She’s the loudest, noises and spunkiest of my three dogs. The other two are 5 1/2 years old. Go figure? Species appropriate high quality ingredients is what they need. They do not need or thrive on what dog food companies would like us to think they need. My girls all eat commercial raw diets in rotation with fruits and veggies. No commercial treats ever.

  • Leanne

    I never said high protein diets cause kidney damage. I said low fat diets PREVENT kidney damage. I stated low protein diets prevent weight gain. High protein on a slower metabolism (which happens as dogs get older) can cause weight gain. If you’re feeding a low protein, low fat diet, the kidneys are not working as hard to process the amino acids, therefore less chance of kidney damage. I study Veterinary Medicine and am a pet nutritionist, I have done more research than needed. Please fully read a statement before calling it false.

  • Hater & Molly’s Mom

    I have an 18 year old lab beagle mix who eats a high protein diet every single day. She has not gained any weight nor does she have any problems with her kidneys and has a healthy heart. For 18 years old she has a lot of energy and goes on daily walks! Senior food is just a gimmick! High protein diets do not cause kidney damage. Please do your research before you post info like that.

  • Leanne

    These are only considered controversial because of a difference in opinions. Neither are bad for the dogs, but they are not in the natural state. Canola oil has been put into an oil form, tomato pomace is not a whole tomato, and pea protein contains only the protein extracted from the pea itself. These are not cause for concern.

  • Leanne

    I would not recommend either for your dog, since he/she is a bit higher in age. Not necessarily geriatric just yet, but getting up there in age. Older dogs require lower protein (to prevent weight gain), lower fat (to prevent kidney damage), and lower sodium (to promote heart health). Try a food such specially formulated for Senior dogs. Many dog owners believe they should only start feeding senior diets when their dogs are 10+, however, feeding it a bit sooner can help prevent anything from coming up by surprise. Around 7 or 8 years, most dogs have less energy and this is the time frame in which you should start feeding a senior diet. Try a food such as Wellness for seniors.

  • Leanne

    TOTW has had recalls in the past, though, they have not had any recalls in a while. The reason for their past recalls were simply because they were manufactured in a facility that also manufactured other brands which were recalled. Fromm is good as well. Same quality as TOTW, however, they are a more private company. Fromm is only sold in certain areas.

  • Leanne

    High protein may cause diarrhea in a dog that has gotten used to a lower protein diet. Also, depending on the activity levels and organ function, a higher protein may promote runny stools.

  • Leanne

    Added salt actually isn’t strange. Salt is an essential part of many enzyme systems. The only dogs that need a lower sodium content are geriatric (aka senior) dogs. They still need the sodium, but they need less of it. This food is high quality, and being a nutritionist, I am surprised this is only rated 4 stars. Though, I feel this way about many 4 star foods on this site.

  • Storm’s Mom

    TOTW Wetlands has only 22% of the kcal/cup that Victor Ultra Pro GF has, so Victor actually be cheaper to feed since the bag would last longer because you’re feeding less at each meal. Wetlands has the highest kcal/cup of any TOTW variety, so if you’re feeding another TOTW variety the Victor Ultra Pro GF would be an eve better buy. It’s not always about how cheap the bag is, you have to factor in how much you are feeding per serving (kcal/cup).

  • DogFoodie

    Purchased locally, Victor grain free formulas usually cost around $40 for a 30 pound bag. Grain inclusive is around $40 for a 40 pound bag.

  • Melissa

    It looks like a good food, but it is almost $20 more a bag than TOTW.

    Thanks for your response though! I’ll keep an eye open for more solutions locally as well.

  • Crazy4cats

    Hi Melissa-
    How about Victor grain free kibble? Here is their site: http://www.victordogfood.com/dogfood.html

  • Melissa

    I’ve been reading all these terrible things about TOTW, but really, can anyone suggest a better grain free dry food at a similar price point?

    I am on a budget and TOTW locally is $40 for a 30 lb bag.

    I wouldn’t mind switching, but I have two huskies who eat bunches and have never had any bad reactions.

  • Akash PatilI

    Thanks :)

  • Akash PatilI

    No I didn’t start yet … Just want to conform before starting … Thanks :)

  • Amanda Bates

    I noticed sometimes there were fewer options when I was there, though I didn’t look for dog food, have you found farmina n&d near you? The brand looks very good. Grain free is nice on the dogs system and the ingredient list looks very good. They have a large breed puppy food as well. If you’ve already started him on this food great, if not remember to introduce it to his currant food little by little until he is only eating the new food. I start 75% old brand 25 % new brand and work up every couple days for puppies till 100% new brand.

  • neezerfan

    Farmina is an EXCELLENT food!

  • Akash PatilI

    Thanks .. But here pet store only suggesting me royal canin & pedigree ..& I don’t believe this two products … Here in Mumbai I’m not getting other brands food .. One of my friend suggest me Famina N&D grain free food. Is that good ?

  • Amanda Bates

    Hello, I have always had large breed dogs and dispite brand arguments or loyalty I suggest you go to the store you’ll get the food and look at the ingredients of a few brands. My Great Dane and now my cane corso have taste of the wild, we switch the type every other bag or so, lamb, duck, fish, so they have different proteins. The first ingredients of a good food should not be “fillers” like corn, and a meet by products, these foods are crap. You should give your puppy a puppy food (most brands have one) 1/2 cup three times a day works well for their stomachs until they are a bit older and can handle larger servings twice a day. As he grows you can measure his amount of food by his weight. There will be a feeding chart in the back of the food bag. Hope this helps a bit!

  • Akash PatilI
  • Andrea Nosia

    Beside RAW this is the only dry food my GSD can eat with out getting sick. I am still in shock that he can actually eat a dry food. After 3 years of our Vet & I trying to find a grain free food for him I ended up putting him on a raw diet but my foster dogs eat kibble so I had this in my house and ran out of food and was to sick to get him his raw stuff so fed him this and no reaction. I was so happy that he can finally eat a dry food but still can’t eat wet foods.

  • mjfromga

    My Nigredo tried this… found it on sale online. No issues with it. He’s not picky though. Diamond products can be scary (Kirkland made him sick) but I think TOTW has better quality control. The Bison etc. is just gimmick IMO, I doubt there’s any noticeable levels of it in there. And as another person pointed out to me, it has added salt, which is strange. In any case, he did fine on it.

  • trish aguiar

    I have a 2 year old mastiff that we rescued a few months ago. He is allergic to grains so needs a grain free kibble. since i got him, his stool has always been very soft then recently turned into diarrhea. I changed his food about 4 times trying to find one that works for him and finally since putting him on the TOTW Pacific (Salmon) he is finally doing much better. Within 3 days, his stool is perfectly normal. So happy i tried this brand. My poor baby suffered with constant diarrhea for almost a month. The other grain free brands i tried had high levels of protein (37 %) i was told to go for a grain free kibble with less protein and was recommended i try this brand which has 25% protein. apparently a high protein diet causes diareeha. My boy and I are very grateful. :)

  • Linda Connolly

    Just heard that Canine Caviar is having problems. this from a friend who knows a distributor. .I just took our 13 year old German Shepherd off Taste of the Wild bison because she didn’t want to eat it…then vomited…that was it for me. I switched her to Fromm. Over a hundred year old company and never have they had a recall. Our dog loves the food and has more energy…Definitely looks healthier…My research showed that TOW has had MANY recalls…

  • Jo

    Thanks, i have been getting a lot of advice (including in the forums) to steer clear of TOTW :)
    i have also been considering Timberwolf’s Lamb Grain Free. what do you guys think about that?
    i know Rosemary is a controversial ingredient but i do not know whether i should pay any mind to it.

  • theBCnut

    I really like CC and use it often. I really don’t like TOTW and would never use it.

  • GSDsForever

    I would for sure go with Canine Caviar over TOTW any day, on better quality/more selective ingredients & grade, avoidance of Diamond products, and CC’s flash cooking process at low temperature (preserving more nutrients) + higher digestibility cited.

  • DogFoodie

    I really like and use myself, Canine Caviar as part of a rotation. I definitely prefer it over TOTW because I’m not a fan of Diamond made products.

  • Jo

    Anyone has any comments on whether Taste of the Wild or Canine Caviar is better for a 8.5year old dog with no known allergies?

  • Jo

    Anyone has any comments on whether Taste of the Wild or Canine Caviar is better for a 8.5year old dog with no known allergies?

  • Dori

    You could vacuum seal the food in 1 gallon increments and just keep out what you think you will use in two or three weeks. I would still urge you to keep the original bag somewhere just in case there is a recall you’ll need the info on the bag itself. We all urge people to do that. Not that we’re expecting a recall or know any knowledge of a recall coming but it’s always best to be prepared. You can keep the 1 gallon bags either in it’s original bag rolled up and stored in an air tight non see through container. Tupperware containers are not advised for storing dog food. Even light coming through a plastic container can prove to be harmful to the food. Try to find a metal container for a tight fitting air tight lid. If you have room in your freezer, what a lot of people do is vacuum seal food in separate bags and store all the extras in the freezer, then just pull one bag out at a time. That’s a lot of freezer space unless you have a dedicated freezer in the house. A lot of people purchase larger bags of kibble when they have multiple dogs because, as you said, it is more economical than buying the smaller bags. The rule of thumb typically is to purchase the amount that your dog will go through in a month, that would vary with the number of dogs in the household and the sizes of the dogs and how much they eat. There are a lot of places on line and in stores that you can purchase a metal air tight container for dog food.

  • myOWNcompass

    My dog’s coat went all thick, glossy, and beautiful with the Salmon flavor. Perhaps it’s an allergy?

  • myOWNcompass

    Thank you Dori for your detailed answer. Yes, the idea was/is to save money. Otherwise I am left buying it 5lbs at a time for $14.99 plus tax each, a total of $97.36. My thirty pound bag costs me a total of $53.03.

    The container I am using seals tightly, and like I mentioned above, IS stored in a cool, dark pantry. It has never smelled rancid. When you say airtight, do you mean vacuum sealed? I have a vacuum sealer, I suppose I could do it in 1 gallon increments.

    I do have to say that I have not seen any symptoms of illness in Turbo, other than the times when the new dog on the property has overturned the trashcans and the dogs have all partaken. ugh.

  • Beth

    We used to use Natural Balance but switched to TOTW after noticing the glossy coat of our friend’s Doberman (who uses TOTW), doing some research, and talking to our pet supply shop owner. Our Mastiff/Doberman’s coat is now so glossy, we get constant comments at the dog park. She radiates health and I am thrilled with TOTW.

  • Connie Finck

    I use Taste of the Wild for my shiz shu as well. I have also used Origin which is also a grain free diet. he has been on grain free food since a puppy and he is very healthy. I think dogs do better on grain free diets and Noah has steamed vegetables with his dry food to which he loves. The Origin comes from Canada I like all the positive in put on this food.
    Thank you Connie Finck

  • Roberta Liford

    Taste of the Wild High Prairie (adult) recipe appears to have 5 start rating, even though it contains a few controversial ingredients (canola oil, tomato pomace and pea protein). So — how controversial can these ingredients be if they don’t seem to affect the rating?

  • chase

    my dogs love it

  • Dori

    If it’s taking you 2.5 months to go through a bag then you need to start buying smaller bags. If you do buy a larger bag for financial reasons then you should buy an air tight container and store the food, in it’s original bag and it should all be stored in a cool darker area. Pantry, closet, something like that. The problem with buying large bags for economical reasons is that the oils in the foods go rancid (oxidize) sooner than you will go through the bag of food so in the long run you’ve got to throw the remainder of the food away and buy more. Economically it makes more sense to figure out how much your dogs are going to eat and calculate, more or less, how long it will take your dogs to go through the food and buy that size bag. It is more waste full on your end to attempt to purchase a large size bag to save money. (We’ve all tried it). It just doesn’t work because at some point the remainder of the food at the end of the food is going to go bad and do more harm than good.

  • theBCnut

    After about 2 weeks, the fats start to go rancid. Store in the original bag with the top rolled down tight for least damage.

  • myOWNcompass

    How long does it take for a dog kibble to go bad? I buy a large bag and keep it in a large tupperware type of container stored in a cool, dry, dark cabinet. The bag lasts us approximately 2.5 months.

  • karen bright

    My dogs only eat Nutri Source (grain free) kibble and Iam’s lamb biscuits. I used to feed them Canadae and TOTW (grain free) kibble ’til the “incident” at the Blue Diamond factory. Occasionally I give them a can of grain free dog food, about once a week, and they get two soft boiled eggs once a week. Their vet (DR. Kragness) says they’re healthy and pleasantly plump. They see the vet every 4 months. I love my boys and yes they’re spoiled. I have a 131 pound Rottweiler and a 65 pound Black Lab mix.

  • Dori

    Hi Kerry. I’m wondering when you put him back on the TOTW was it the same bag that you had or was it a new bag you purchased?
    There are plenty of better foods on the market than TOTW as aquariangt mentioned and again BB has been having a lot of issues lately. Hopefully you can find a food without peas or at least less of them so that he doesn’t have to be so itchy.

  • Carrie

    I switched to the Salmon to help my English Springer Spaniel overcome chronic ear infections and she is completely free of them now. Both my dogs have better stools and no incidence of vomiting. My American Eskimo has completely lost his tear stains as well. Love this food.

  • aquariangt

    Taste of the Wild is manufactured by Diamond, so I wouldn’t be surprised if there was some quality control issues there. Not that BB doesn’t have those issues as well. I’d look for a non pea food though, no reason to put your dog through allergies, there are lot’s of options. I myself have a pea allergic dog. Where do you usually shop and I can give you some ideas? Paying TotW and BB prices gives you a lot of better options from better companies

  • Kerry Lee Haas

    Something is amiss. I was feeding my Boxer TOTW Pacific Stream for about a year but started noticing he would get diarrhea towards the end of the bag. So I switched him To Blue Buffalo which sorted out his stomach issues. Then I attempted to transition him back to TOTW and he developed bloody diarrhea and vomiting. I took him off of it right away. Something has changed with their formula. I wanted to put him back on it because he is allergic to peas and I feel badly for him scratching at his ears after eating BB. But I would rather him have itchy ears than bloody diarrhea.

  • Melissa

    This food was recommended to me by a family friend who owns a pet shop. Supposedly TOTW is the highest quality food Pet Value carries. My dogs have been on this diet for about 3 years now and thriving. I only have good things to say.

  • Joni

    I am feeding the lg breed puppy chicken and rice……and I eased my guy into it by feeding him cooked ground turkey and white rice for a few meals……my vet said treat him like he has diarrhea and then mixed a little dog food with it….after a fee days he was all dog food. I have also been buying canned Proplan puppy food to mix in with the dry food, cuz I believe his teeth are hurting (teething, Silver is almost 4 months) so that with warm water mixed with his food, he seems to get it down easier! I hear ya about scared to feed them anything ….so much scary stuff out there! Good luck – keep me posted!

  • Joseph Cadieux

    No problems, i rotational feed my dog but I want to say i give her the salmon flavor more than anything. It has actually made her coat amazing, but i do give her salmon oil as well. Your dog could just be allergic to something in it.

  • Bryan Bailey

    Joni, may I ask which Proplan Puppy variety you’re using? I see Large Breed Puppy Chicken & Rice and I see Puppy Lamb & Rice.

  • Bryan Bailey

    Wish I could take credit but when he first lost his appetite he seemed depressed and I started hand feeding him cat food to “cheer him up”. He loves stealing Kitty’s food. That evening I realized how really sick he was when we went potty.
    I should note, I had also just gotten Kitty a bag of TOTW cat food which after two meals he would not eat (possibly bad?) so I returned him to his usual cat food which is what I hand fed puppy after he got sick. Cats are very sensitive, like a canary in a coal mine. Kitty may have helped save puppy’s life.

    Puppy is still quieter than usual. I’m watching him very closely.

  • Bryan Bailey

    Joni, I mis-spoke, it was when I switched him to TOTW Pacific Stream that he got so sick (not Bison). I think those can be Salmonella symptoms, not sure about the green urine. My puppy is only 3 1/2 mos old but weighs 37 pounds, mix breed stray with blue eyes. He’s gonna be large if/when he’s all grown. I may try the Proplan too. I’m scared to feed the little guy anything.

  • Dori

    I’m so glad you thought to change his food and that he has returned to normal. Unfortunately, not all dog owners act quick enough and don’t realize that the first thing to think about is what he’s eating. Glad you did! Lucky puppy.

  • Joni

    Wow! What kind of dog? A vet had told a friend of mine, who had similar problems with TOTW, and that it was too high protein for the big breeds – but that can’t be it because my puppy is now doing fine now on Proplan Puppy food and it has the same amount of protein. It’s something else. Scary!

  • Bryan Bailey

    PLEASE don’t overlook this and know that there are similar accounts popping up all over the web including several on Dog Food Guru.
    My puppy had been eating TOTW High Prairie and was thriving. Got a bag of TOTW Pacific Stream and he immediately developed symptoms of extreme thirst, dark mucous diarrhea, greenish urine and extreme lethargy, and he stopped eating. Glad he stopped. With the ice/snow storm I couldn’t get him to the vet hospital till Monday at which point his symptoms had subsided somewhat and at that point the vet couldn’t pinpoint a cause other than it being something puppy had ingested. Because of the numerous accounts of the same, I am convinced there is something amiss in this bag of dog food that almost killed my puppy.

  • Bryan Bailey

    Yes, my 4 month old puppy on TOTW Bison developed intense thirst, lethargy, mucousy diarrhea, and greenish urine. Thought he was dying that morning he seemed so weak and quit eating. The vet couldn’t find any cause but after a few days not eating TOTW his poop has returned to normal and his other issues have cleared up.

  • Jenna Meadows

    My girl used to lose her hair after eating chicken flavored food. Vet said she was allergic. I switched her to salmon formula and her coat has never looked better! Maybe your dog is allergic to some of the ingredients. I would try switching to the bison…

  • Cody Toler

    Has anyone else had their dogs start loosing hair after you feed the Salmon flavor? not any of the others just this one? another lady said hers lost it’s hair after eating it and 3 of mine have??

  • barbkohl

    Any Bil-Jac is pretty much the same except the grain free. All are based on the same formula and just altered slightly, for the specific needs of large breeds, older dogs, puppies, and low fat.
    So you can get any variety of Bil-Jac Dry and it will work fine.

  • Joni

    I just recently had a big problem with Taste of the Wild with my 3 month old collie pup – pooping and peeing A LOT / struggling to poop tho not diarrhea ….I thought it was just a stage or something simple he will get over, but he didn’t and after a few weeks I brought him in the vet – not parasites / no infection but his urine PH was 9 and it’s supposed to be 6 or 7. Changed food – feed cooked ground turkey and rice and changed him to Proplan….after 4 days his urine PH ws 6! I know someone else that had a similar thing happen with TOW food.

  • Crazy4cats

    Oh, just a puppy. How painful :-(

  • Dog_Obsessed

    I’m so sorry for your loss. Please keep trying to get the food tested, and do not throw any of it away. Some vet schools will test food. Also, if you haven’t already, I would recommend making a report to the FDA and having your vet make one too.

  • upset_malamute_parent

    We had a malamute who was switched to this food. Had being the operative word. He was on this food for 3 weeks before he passed away. The food being the only variable in his life that changed. Because we didn’t want to believe that this change was the reason for his death we had tests run on him which turned up e.coli. No one knows exactly how this happened and we’ve tried to get the food tested for a 100% confirmation but at this current moment all vets we’ve talked to agree that it had to have been the food since with how wide spread the e.coli was simply getting into something wouldn’t have been enough to bring him down. I am so upset because he would have turned 1 today and was a happy, healthy puppy before switching his food to something we thought we could trust.

  • http://www.abuzubaydah.com Hesham Abu Zubaydah

    We just got our first puppy, she is 1/2 Sheltie and 1/2 pit. She came with a bag of Purina, my wife spends all day with her and noticed that she doesn’t like to eat, is shedding and has itchy skin. So my wife ordered Taste of the Wild Pacific Stream puppy food and is really hoping that this food works for our puppy. We have had Lexi for a week and a half, and have never had a puppy before. We are just trying to make sure she is healthy and happy. Will post updates as the food arrives tomorrow.

  • Jessica Rivera

    I recently rescued a 2 year old foxhound mix from out of state and know very little about her history prior to the last month or so. She has been with me about a week, and her stool has become more and more soft and lighter in color each day. I am feeding her the same dog food (Nutro Natural Balance) that she was eating in her foster home for the last few weeks. I gave her a plain scrambled egg on saturday and she had the most normal stool within a few hours. so, I am wondering if she is just not processing the Nutro properly and am considering weening her on to something like Taste of the Wild. Does anyone have any feedback on this?

  • Karen Yeong

    My boy…is super fussy like yours, similar 2 days eating span…. u can actually see his hip bones quite obviously (previous owner practically shaved him left with 1cm fur), he is that underweight. He used to just pick out the boiled meat (chicken, pork, beef), n left most of the soaked kibbles behind.
    What i did to “reset” his picky eating habits (advise from his APDT trainer):
    -skip dinner for 1st nite
    -2 meals a day (per usual no change, if dont eat within 5 mins, just pick it up n he skips a meal). My boy, by 2nd day dinner onwards (not eaten for 2 meals already) gobbled-up whatever was in his bowl
    -every meal same kibbles mix n quantity (i mix 2 different brands n flavours), quantity to slowly increase every couple of days if the whole bowl is cleaned/eaten fully. To give him a quantity he will b able to finish.
    -canned food (same flavour for 1st week) to microwave slightly for aroma (so far my mini poodle gobbles nutripe ambrosia lamb, nutripe lamb n addiction herbed duck potato, are delicious smelling with gravy n worth to cleanup his bowl). I dont soak his kibbles anymore with hot water, now i just mix the hot canned food with kibbles, n feed him when less hot, the kibbles r still crunchy.
    -do not fuss over or give butler service (if he doesnt eat n walks away, he misses that meal n gets nothing till the next meal)… On hindsight, i didnt knew i was giving butler service, i was worried my boy was eating little n already so underweight, so kept trying to make him eat somethingelse if a meal didnt entice him.
    My boy doesnt eat dry kibbles, the only time he ate dry kibbles was on the 3rd day of this “reset” process, probably super hungry or just wanted to eat whatever there was.
    Today marks the last day of the 2 week “reset” process, look forward to him continuing gobbling his meals… fingers crossed.
    Good luck with your little one.

  • Dog_Obsessed

    Ugh. Dogs!

  • Daniella Rogers

    Thanks for the info. Someone suggested to boil chicken breast and mix with her food. I cut the chicken up fine with her food thinking I was being smarter than her. She would eat the chicken and not her food. This little girl has a mind of her own.

  • Daniella Rogers

    The lady at Pets Mart suggested that. I brought the trial bag and she ate both meals for 2 days straight. I was so excited, then she stopped. So I started trying other things and decided to go back to the Bil-Jac since it was the only thing that I got four meals straight. Pets Mart didn’t have the trial bag and I couldn’t remember the flavor. I thought the last bag had a red color on it and this one had a yellow label. I’m desperate for all the advices. Thanks so much.

  • Daniella Rogers

    Wow, so you know what I am talking about. So you mix the kibble, wet food, with the hot water? I just feel so sorry for her, I can feel all her little bones. Thanks so much.