Skin Issues (Severe Itching)

Dog Food Advisor Forums Diet and Health Skin Issues (Severe Itching)

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  • #94715 Report Abuse

    “….my almost 2 year old, female German Shorthair Pointer is suffering from a skin condition that causes her to scratch behind her ears with such force that she’s losing her fur in that area and now the same itch is beginning under her legs. I’ve taken her to the Vet twice, switched to a grain free food and now a limited ingredient grain free food will be started soon, the Vet asked me to try daily doses of Benadryl and while it was a temporary fix, it’s no longer working as well as when I first started dosing her. The Vet has now suggested that I try Claritin but I feel as if continuing to try over-the-counter drugs is not the answer, I feel that the answer lies in getting to the bottom of what’s actually wrong, in other words, a real diagnosis and I’m just beginning to research skin testing methods and any holistic methods that may be available. I’m wondering if any of you have had similar issues with your own dogs and if so, if it was food related, what was the solution and also if anyone has tried a holistic method of solving a skin issue. Thank you very much for your attention to my thoughts and questions!”

    #94716 Report Abuse

    Susan
    Member

    Hi, yes I have a dog with Seasonal Environment allergies & food sensitivities causing IBD & itchy, yeasty smelly skin, red paws, itchy ears & hive like lumps + IBD symptoms sloppy poos, gas/farts etc…
    It has taken me 3yrs to finally work Patch out, in the beginning my vet said to keep a diary & you’ll start to see a pattern as the years go by & yes we did….
    It’s best too see a Dermatologist they’re a but more expensive but in the long run you’ll save money, Dermatologist specialize in the skin….
    Baths, twice a week or weekly baths or as soon as dog is uncomfortable & is scratching real bad then bath to relieve their skin…..I use Malaseb medicated shampoo, baths wash off any allergens, dirt, pollens & yeast if dog has yeast problems, Malaseb kills any bacteria yeast on the skin & keeps the skin nice & moist leaving the dog feeling so soft, Malaseb can be used daily if needed…..
    I like using creams on my boy instead of medications he doesn’t do well on meds…I use “Sudocrem” sold in supermarket in baby section, I apply the Sudocrem on Patches red paws, around mouth, above his eye where he has white fur he seems to have all the problems, some nights when he’s real red around his mouth from eating I used Hydrocortisone 1% cream & on his paws & other parts of his body as well, I check patches body out as he’s sleeping at night before I go to bed & apply the creams, now I’ve removed the foods in his diet that he’s sensitive too his ear problem has all clear up, I did an elimination diet the best thing for food sensitivities & found when he eats carrots & beef he started shaking his head & scratching his ears, chicken causes his paws to go red 20mins after eating chicken, raw chicken was worse, also kibbles with grains made his poos sloppy, now he eats grain free kibbles that are Whitefish/Salmon or Lamb….if you don’t want to do the elimination diet & cook or do raw then it’s best to get a vet diet like Royal Canine PV- Potato & Venison or PS-Potato & Salmon or PR- Potato & Rabbit kibble or wet tin… then when dog isn’t scratching ears & is stable not itching you start & add 1 new ingredient with the vet diet every 6 weeks, no treats nothing else, it can take 1 day to 6 weeks for a dog to show symptoms for a food sensitivities…Once you find out what foods your dog is sensitive too you can stop the vet diet & start a diet without the foods he’s sensitive too.
    I live Australia & I saw a Naturopath cause of Patches IBD, I wanted him on a raw diet.. Vitamin C is a natural antihistamine, we have a skin pack made by the Naturopath called Natural Animal Solutions, Skin Pack & it has DigestaVite Plus which balances the diet & fixes the gut, then it has Omega 3,6 & 9 Oil you add high dose for the first 2 months to diet & Vitamin C to work as a natural antihistamine…..
    Here’s Jacquelines site there’s a lot of good reading & what natural products to use…on your left scroll down a bit & click on “Skin System” then click on “Skin Allergies” & she explains all about the skin & what causes what. She also has a F/B site & will answer any questions.. called “Natural Animal Solutions” NAS
    http://www.naturalanimalsolutions.com.au/education.php

    #94717 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Per the search engine here:

    What you describe sounds like environmental allergies, food would have little impact, if any, on this condition.
    I would continue to work with your veterinarian, however, for best results, I would go to a specialist, a veterinary dermatologist.

    Have you tried the search engine here? This subject comes up frequently.
    Example: https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/topic/irritated-skin-food-allergy/
    https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/topic/dog-chewing-nails-till-they-bleed/

    “Food allergies are rare. Food sensitivities tend to result in GI disturbances such as vomiting and diarrhea. Environmental allergies tend to show up as pruritus, ear infections and such”.

    “You could try a limited ingredient grain free food. My dog does well on Nutrisca Salmon and Chickpea. Wipe down her feet with water and gently dry when she comes in from outdoors”.

    “Bathe her using a gentle shampoo, I use Malaseb (see chewy dot com).
    I tried all kinds of things times 1 year (including going back and forth to the veterinarian), but, did not get results till I took her to a dermatologist for testing. Allergen specific immunotherapy worked in her case”.

    Unfortunately, steroids and such are often necessary (for brief periods) to stop the suffering and prevent infection.
    Allergen specific immunotherapy is the most natural treatment.
    Also, I have heard that some dogs do well on apoquel, you may want to consider staying with that, talk to your vet.

    #94718 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    And:

    I would encourage you to make an appointment with a veterinary dermatologist. It may be seasonal, it may be mild, or not. Only testing by a specialist can give you answers and a treatment plan. Saliva and hair mail-in tests are not allergy tests.
    Per the search engine here: https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/search/allergies/

    “Atopic dermatitis is a hypersensitivity or over-reaction to a variety of commonplace and otherwise harmless substances in the environment such as plant pollens, house dust mites or mold spores. Most pets with atopic dermatitis either inhale or absorb their allergens through their skin. Allergy tests are used to identify what a pet is allergic to in their environment”.

    “There are two types of allergy tests, the intradermal allergy test and blood testing for allergies (serologic allergy testing). In an intradermal allergy test, the fur is clipped on one side of the chest and very small amounts of common allergens are injected into the skin. This test is very precise and is only performed by Veterinary Dermatology services. Because most pets with environmental allergies become exposed to their allergens through their skin, the intradermal allergy test may also best simulate a pet’s natural allergies. In a blood allergy test, a blood sample is obtained and submitted to a laboratory for testing”.

    “If a pet is diagnosed with atopic dermatitis, there are three methods of therapy. The first method of therapy involves removing the allergen from the pet’s environment”. “Unfortunately, this is not possible in most cases. The second method of therapy involves the use of anti-itch drugs such as anti-histamines or steroids (cortisone). Some of these anti-itch medications do not work in every pet. Other pets develop side-effects from taking certain anti-itch medications”.

    “The third method of therapy for atopic dermatitis (environmental allergies) is allergy injections. Other names for allergy injections include desensitization, hyposensitization, allergy vaccine, or allergen-specific immunotherapy. Immunotherapy involves a series of injections of diluted allergens. Over time, these injections make a pet less sensitive to their allergens and thus less allergic. Most pet owners are able to learn how to give the injections at home. When based on the results of intradermal allergy testing, immunotherapy helps manage the allergies in approximately 70-90% of pets. Most pets will respond to immunotherapy within 6-9 months, but some pets will require up to a year of immunotherapy injections before a full benefit can be noted”.

    http://www.mspca.org/vet-services/angell-boston/dermatology/boston-dematology-allergies.html

    #94719 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Mail-in hair and saliva tests are not diagnostic tools (just read the fine print).
    Please read the blog below, nothing is being sold at that site, no t-shirts, no supplements, no kits, no books….nothing.
    http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2016/11/glacier-peak-holistics-pet-wellness-life-scan-stress-test-or-how-much-bs-can-fit-on-one-web-page/
    Excerpt from the link above:
    Bottom Line
    “The Glacier Peak Holistics Pet Wellness Life Stress Scan (formerly “Healthy Dog and Cat Alternative Sensitivity Assessment”) is a completely implausible test based on vague, mystical nonsense and pseudoscientific theories that contradict the legitimate scientific evidence regarding the cause and management of allergies. The general concept that hair and saliva testing can identify the causes of allergies is false. The marketing of this test is misleading and contains many of the hallmarks of quack advertising. Dog owners struggling with allergies would be far better spending their time and money consulting a veterinary dermatologist for a science-based approach to helping their canine”.
    Also, per the search engine here: https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/topic/desperate-food-recomendations-for-lab/

    #94720 Report Abuse

    Susan
    Member

    I forgot to add if you want to test for Skin Allergies then the ” Intradermal Skin Test ” is gold standard to find out what in the Environment your dog is allergic too….Dermatologist do this test..
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TM3zb0q7pc4&feature=share
    Normally when a dog has Environment allergies he’ll also have food sensitivities as well…
    I also use Huggies Baby Wipes Aloe & Cucumber wipes or the Coconut Oil Wipes & wipe Patches body down using a new baby wipe for different parts of his body to wipe off the allergens or pollens on his skin that’s making him nuts with itch, when I don’t want to bath him but he has his bath every Thursday in the Spring & Summer months in Winter we get a break from the Environment Allergies….When Patch starts rubbing bum & back on carpet I use the “Sudocrem” it takes away the itch as soon as I apply the Sudocrem, same when I apply the Hydrocortisone 1 % cream, I rotate between both creams….

    #94722 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Please do not apply anything to the skin or give over the counter meds intended for humans or give supplements unless instructed to do so by a veterinarian that has examined the dog.
    You could make things much worse and increase the risk of infection.

    Hope this helps:
    By Klaus Loft, DVM
    Angell Dermatology Service
    Anyone who suffers debilitating environmental allergies tied to changing seasons, pet dander or household dust mites knows first-hand the misery of a scratchy throat, itchy eyes or painful rashes.
    Not everyone knows, however, that our pets can experience similar allergic reactions — and other very bothersome dermatological issues. But our pets need not suffer in silence. Modern veterinary science has evolved such that advanced, comprehensive treatments are now available to treat a range of skin conditions.
    Top pet dermatological issues
    Our four-legged friends suffer from some of the same skin issues as we do — and several that we do not. The most common conditions we see at Angell include:
    •Parasites, such as mites, fleas and mange (scabies)
    •Infectious diseases, such as Staphylococcal pyoderma (“Staph”) skin infections, yeast and fungal infections and skin fold infections
    •Systemic diseases, such as autoimmune diseases
    •Skin cancer, such as Squamous cell carcinoma, cutaneous lymphoma, Mast cell tumors
    •Allergies, such as flea allergy dermatitis, adverse food reactions, environmental allergies, etc.
    All of these conditions can become serious and, if untreated, dramatically reduce quality of life. But the tremendous strides made in veterinary innovation, however, is very good news for our pets. Specifically, the testing and treatments for allergies now rivals human healthcare in its sophistication, quality of care and long-term health outcomes.
    Unlike humans, dogs and cats cannot tell us about their dermatological health issues. So we as pet owners must look for the signs. The most common indicators that a pet is suffering from some kind of allergy involve frequent episodes of ear infections, red raised or open sores on the skin, constant licking or biting of paws or groin — sometimes causing wounds that will not go away.
    Allergies present a particular challenge because there can be hundreds (even thousands) of potential allergens that impact pet health, from foods to pollen from grasses, weeds, trees, dust mites and more. Today’s specialty veterinary hospitals have access to the very latest diagnostic tests to get to the bottom of what’s ailing our pet. Among these tests is the Intra Dermal Test (IDT).
    IDT is generally considered the gold standard of testing for identifying allergens that cause pets to suffer from chronic skin and/or ear diseases. IDT involves injections of a series of concentrated allergens into the skin to determine which of them generate allergic reactions in a given animal. The use of fluorescein — a chemical that illuminates the inflammation caused by the injected allergens in order to visualize the strength of individual reactions — is key to accurately diagnosing pet allergies, and is just one of the many ways veterinarians use new technologies to improve care and diagnostics.
    The results of IDT (as well as a review of the pet’s medical history) can then inform comprehensive immunotherapy treatments to relieve suffering. Veterinary dermatologists rely on IDT to build customized treatment plans for patients called Allergen Specific Immuno Therapy or “ASIT” for short.
    ASIT involves a series of injections specifically created for the allergic animal’s skin. These injections, of diluted allergens, are designed to make a pet less sensitive to their allergens over time. In most cases these injections must be continued for life to reduce symptoms, but they are highly effective. Seventy to 90 percent of pets experience a reduction in symptoms as a result of ASIT treatment. These treatments can be delivered even more easily via droplets under the tongue, perfect for pet owners who are squeamish about giving injections to their pet.
    This treatment is very new to the North American field of medicine (both human and veterinary) and underscores just how far innovation in veterinary medicine has come.
    When it’s time to see the vet
    Many pet owners are understandably concerned about taking their animals to the veterinarian because the cost (to say nothing of the fear some animals experience when going do the doctor) may outweigh any perceived reduction in suffering. To help pet owners know when it’s time to bring Fido to the doctor I’ve compiled my “Top Ten” list of dermatological symptoms that should never be ignored:
    •Intense itching of the skin (head shaking, running the face into the carpet, furniture, etc.)
    •Biting at the skin that creates red, raw crusting areas of the skin
    •Multiple ear infections (head shaking, odor from ears, scratching at the ears with hind legs)
    •Paw licking or chewing and frequent infections of the skin in the webbed skin of the paws
    •Staining of the fur of the paws and nails on multiple feet
    •Reoccurring skin infections in the groin, under the shoulders, perianal areas (on or under the tail)
    •Greasy scaling skin and/or fur with odorous skin
    •Hair loss, or thinning of the fur
    •Dark pigmentation of the skin that is chronically infected
    •Sudden depigmentation of skin
    Allergies and other dermatological issues can be as frustrating for pet owners and their veterinarians as they can be for pets. I encourage any pet owner whose animal is experiencing any of these symptoms to consult with their veterinarian.
    https://www.mspca.org/angell_services/dermatology-allergies/

    #94723 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    What you describe sounds like environmental allergies, food would have little impact, if any, on this condition.
    I would continue to work with your veterinarian, however, for best results, I would go to a specialist, a veterinary dermatologist.
    Have you tried the search engine here? This subject comes up frequently.
    Example: https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/topic/irritated-skin-food-allergy/
    https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/forums/topic/dog-chewing-nails-till-they-bleed/
    “Food allergies are rare. Food sensitivities tend to result in GI disturbances such as vomiting and diarrhea. Environmental allergies tend to show up as pruritus, ear infections and such”.
    “You could try a limited ingredient grain free food. My dog does well on Nutrisca Salmon and Chickpea. Wipe down her feet with water and gently dry when she comes in from outdoors”.
    “Bathe her using a gentle shampoo, I use Malaseb (see chewy dot com).
    I tried all kinds of things times 1 year (including going back and forth to the veterinarian), but, did not get results till I took her to a dermatologist for testing. Allergen specific immunotherapy worked in her case”.
    Unfortunately, steroids and such are often necessary (for brief periods) to stop the suffering and prevent infection.
    Allergen specific immunotherapy is the most natural treatment.
    Also, I have heard that some dogs do well on apoquel, you may want to consider staying with that, talk to your vet.

    #94724 Report Abuse

    Natasha C
    Member

    Hi. I have a 2 1/2 year old lab who itches constantly in the face, behind his “elbows” and between paws. He would scratch his face so badly, it would bleed. I had him allergy tested a year ago and he tested extremely allergic to storage mites. I had never heard of them before but they are little bugs that live and breed in dry dog food. There is nothing you can do to get rid of them, even the limited ingredient foods have them, so I started cooking homemade food for him. It made HUGE difference. Then, when, due to a busy lifestyle, I couldn’t cook for awhile and started him back on kibble – his itching started up again. So maybe give a try to homemade food. I used potato, sweet potato, frozen veggies (carrots, peas, kale, spinach), ground turkey. And add a supplement for vitamins. You could also try raw or freeze dried food, but I couldn’t afford that so I got busy in the kitchen! Good luck!

    • This reply was modified 2 years, 6 months ago by  Natasha C.
    • This reply was modified 2 years, 6 months ago by  Natasha C.
    #94728 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Environmental allergies tend to wax and wane, so, you may think a diet change is working….
    Also the storage mite is in the same family as the common household dust mite that exists on the skin of all living things and is constantly being shed (airborne) including you.
    Often the dog has allergies to both, not just one.

    Below is an excerpt from an article that you may find helpful http://veterinarynews.dvm360.com/faqs-about-house-dust-mite-and-storage-mite-allergies?id=&pageID=1&sk=&date=

    Where are storage mites commonly found?
    These particular mites (Tyrophagus putrescentiae, Lepidoglyphus destructor, Acarus siro) are present in dry foods, cereals, grains, straw and cheese—i.e., substances that can get moldy. Like dust mites, storage mites can cause nonseasonal signs, including pruritus, erythema and recurrent otitis in dogs and cats. They’re well-known in humans for causing asthma and allergic rhinitis (“baker’s lung”).
    Data have shown that storage mites live in conjunction with house dust mites and can be found in bedding, mattresses, upholstered furniture and fabrics. One study in humans found storage mites to have overtaken dust mites as a leading source of allergy.

    A popular misconception is that storage mites are present in bags of food or cereals from the manufacturer. In one study, out of 10 bags of dry dog food, one was found to have storage

    #94729 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Where are storage mites commonly found?
    These particular mites (Tyrophagus putrescentiae, Lepidoglyphus destructor, Acarus siro) are present in dry foods, cereals, grains, straw and cheese—i.e., substances that can get moldy. Like dust mites, storage mites can cause nonseasonal signs, including pruritus, erythema and recurrent otitis in dogs and cats. They’re well-known in humans for causing asthma and allergic rhinitis (“baker’s lung”).
    Data have shown that storage mites live in conjunction with house dust mites and can be found in bedding, mattresses, upholstered furniture and fabrics. One study in humans found storage mites to have overtaken dust mites as a leading source of allergy.

    A popular misconception is that storage mites are present in bags of food or cereals from the manufacturer. In one study, out of 10 bags of dry dog food, one was found to have storage mites, but the rest developed the mites after being in the owners’ homes.
    Above is an excerpt from: http://veterinarynews.dvm360.com/faqs-about-house-dust-mite-and-storage-mite-allergies?id=&pageID=1&sk=&date=

    #94730 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    Where are storage mites commonly found?
    These particular mites (Tyrophagus putrescentiae, Lepidoglyphus destructor, Acarus siro) are present in dry foods, cereals, grains, straw and cheese—i.e., substances that can get moldy. Like dust mites, storage mites can cause nonseasonal signs, including pruritus, erythema and recurrent otitis in dogs and cats. They’re well-known in humans for causing asthma and allergic rhinitis (“baker’s lung”).
    Data have shown that storage mites live in conjunction with house dust mites and can be found in bedding, mattresses, upholstered furniture and fabrics. One study in humans found storage mites to have overtaken dust mites as a leading source of allergy.

    A popular misconception is that storage mites are present in bags of food or cereals from the manufacturer. In one study, out of 10 bags of dry dog food, one was found to have storage mites, but the rest developed the mites after being in the owners’ homes.

    Excerpt from http://veterinarynews.dvm360.com/faqs-about-house-dust-mite-and-storage-mite-allergies?id=&pageID=1&sk=&date=

    #94731 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member
    #94734 Report Abuse

    anon101
    Member

    FAQs about house dust mite and storage mite allergies
    By bringing pets into our homes, we’ve increased their exposure to these common skin irritants.

    Mar 01, 2013
    By Alice M. Jeromin, RPh, DVM, DACVD
    DVM360 MAGAZINE
    Excerpt from above article below, unable to provide direct link, if you google DMV360 MAGAZINE and then search “dust mites” at the search engine at that site it will take you to the full article.

    Where are storage mites commonly found?
    These particular mites (Tyrophagus putrescentiae, Lepidoglyphus destructor, Acarus siro) are present in dry foods, cereals, grains, straw and cheese—i.e., substances that can get moldy. Like dust mites, storage mites can cause nonseasonal signs, including pruritus, erythema and recurrent otitis in dogs and cats. They’re well-known in humans for causing asthma and allergic rhinitis (“baker’s lung”).
    Data have shown that storage mites live in conjunction with house dust mites and can be found in bedding, mattresses, upholstered furniture and fabrics. One study in humans found storage mites to have overtaken dust mites as a leading source of allergy.

    A popular misconception is that storage mites are present in bags of food or cereals from the manufacturer. In one study, out of 10 bags of dry dog food, one was found to have storage mites, but the rest developed the mites after being in the owners’ homes.2

    #94740 Report Abuse

    elaine c
    Member

    most of the time it is the food you are feeding. If you want the best for your dog look up answers pet food. It is miraculous.

    #94741 Report Abuse

    Susan
    Member

    To Anon101,
    Patches vet write’s a script for the Hydrocortisone 1% cream for Patch…..I know in America a lower strength Hydrocortisone cream can be bought over the counter from chemist same as in Australia….I don’t know what you can buy in Wales….
    LadyUplandHunter asked if anyone has a dog with similar issues, not a lecture like you always give to posters, learn to scroll past my post PLEASE stop following my post & get a life PLEASE, you’re very annoying & can confuse the poster….Just post your own post & there’s no need to always knock other peoples post just cause you don’t agree with their post, I don’t agree with a lot of things you post but I don’t re post & re post after you post all the time……In the end the poster does what they want with their pets, our post are just stepping stone to steer the poster the right way….

    #94742 Report Abuse

    Acroyali
    Member

    Just my experiences, but after fighting allergies in one of our dogs for years we contacted a homeopathic vet who was able to shape him up in a month’s time. It may not work for every person or every dog, and like medications the correct remedy MUST be chose, but it sure gave us all relief. My concern was yours; the medications work and work well but eventually you need something stronger, and eventually that doesn’t work so you need something even stronger, and it’s a vicious cycle.

    I’ve heard some people swear by Solid Gold Seameal powder as an allergy killer, but others say it does nothing so I would assume it depends on what the dog is allergic to.

    #94743 Report Abuse

    Acroyali
    Member

    http://ottawavalleydogwhisperer.ca/?s=allergies

    Keep in mind I’m not the owner of this site, nor do I have anything to do with it. But her website has helped me out a lot over the years. If all else fails, give it a look.

    #95162 Report Abuse

    Bill K
    Member

    We use a item called Dinovite, Google it and you will learn about it.

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